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Your Community, Your News

MARCH 13, 2014

Vol. 7 No. 35

local

Going Bald for a cause BY LAURA KATAUSKAS staff reporter

Valley View Superintendent James Mitchem makes no apologies for striving to have the school district be child-centered rather than adult-centered. But he does take responsibility for the continued change in leadership at Bolingbrook High School. At a three-hour town hall meeting held at BHS March 6, Mitchem answered questions from the community stemming from last month’s resignation of BHS Principal Michael White and an incident in which a student brought a BB gun to school. Reportedly to keep the forum moving along, audience members were asked to submit their questions on an index card that were then collected and categorized. The majority of questions regarded the safety and the climate of the school, as well as teacher morale and curriculum.

>> see Bhs | page 6

Remembering those lost; fighting for survivors By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

A cherished little girl, Macy Bella Ganz, was a total ray of sunshine with a smile that lit up any room.A “little rock star,” she took on cancer with all the strength her body could muster. A story her mom, Michelle Ganz, would like to share as she calls on the community to come out and support the annual Bolingbrook4Kids St. Baldrick’s Foundation event to help raise funds for cancer research this weekend. “St. Baldrick’s is an important event that helps keep her spirit alive, taking this horrible tragedy and have something good come out of it,” said Ganz. “If I can do this in my spare time to help someone else, I am going to do it.” At age 3, Macy passed away in September 2010 from a rare form of kidney cancer, >> see cause | page 2


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THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

>> cause, from page 1 Stage IV Clear Cell Sarcoma of the kidney. First diagnosed in 2008, she underwent aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy. After removal of a 2.5-pound tumor, kidney, and a later brain surgery, she spent the summer of 2009 cancerfree until devastation hit again that September as a dental appointment revealed she developed leukemia. Macy continued to fight, undergoing a successful cell transplant, only to find her original cancer had never disappeared, ultimately taking her life shortly after it was rediscovered. The cancer that took Macy’s life affects only approximately 20 children a year in the United States. It is funding for these rare diseases, which may not get the attention of researchers that Ganz is fighting for. “While there may be those tremendous success stories, there are so many that do not have a happy ending,” said Ganz. “We went through a lot of struggles and a complete

roller coaster ride. We became involved because there are not enough funds for rare cases, and we wanted to build awareness and do our part to further the much-needed research to help families that may be in the same situation.” Bringing the need for funding to the forefront remains critical to the Ganz family, so much so that their 8-year-old son Ethan, shares the same passion. He speaks of his sister often, sharing her story with friends and classmates. It was during a parent-teacher conference Ganz learned of her son’s outreach, though already knowing the amount of compassion he holds. Hung on the classroom wall display for all to see his project, titled “If You Could Have Anything,”—his answer— A Cure for Cancer, so I can have my sister back.” “It is amazing to see how everyone is touched by Ethan’s stories of his sister, and I am so glad we kept him part of everything during her treatment,” said Ganz. “…We talk about it so that we can help others and somehow get a

News

Submitted photos

Macy Bella Ganz and her brother Ethan. Macy lost her battle to cancer in 2010.

positive out of this.” The St. Baldrick’s Foundation is a volunteer-driven charity that funds more in childhood cancer research grants than any organization except the U.S. government. Bolingbrook has been topping out as the 12th largest community drive in the world to collect funds for childhood cancer research and Ganz wants to continue the

trend with a goal of $200,000 for this year’s event. Split into two events this year to accommodate more potential shavees, the 2014 Bolingbrook for Kids St. Baldrick’s Events will take place Saturday, March 15, at the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 Rodeo Drive. The first event begins at 11 a.m. with registration at 10 a.m., and the second event starting at 6 p.m.

with registration at 5 p.m. Organizers ask that people throw vanity out the window and dare them to experience the “brilliance of being bald while raising funds for lifesaving research.” Being a shavee raises awareness—a bald head, a display of solidarity with children who have cancer. Teams from all over Bolingbrook came together for this event, Bolingbrook 4 Kids. Men, women, boys and girls all step up to show their support. Each year, Team Rockstar, Macy’s dad Chris and his fellow Lemont firefighters take to the barber chairs in remembering Macy and supporting so many others touched by cancer. You do not have to go bald to support the cause. Everyone is invited to the family-friendly event to cheer the shavees on and take part in various raffles and purchase food donated from local restaurants like Rosati’s, Gordon Beirsch, Go Roma, Red Mango, Bar Louie and BD Mongolian Grill. To donate online, visit www. stbaldricks.org or call 888-8992253.


News

81st District

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will county

Matune critical of Sandack’s votes on Loss of salary arbitration same-sex marriage, pension reform puts Sheriff’s Department By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

The March 18 primary is a week away, and state Rep. Ron Sandack is hoping to win the Republican nomination for the 81st House District seat and ward off challenger Keith Matune. Sandack served as a state senator prior to being elected the House of Representatives in 2012. The 81st District includes parts of Bolingbrook, Downers Grove, Darien, Lisle, Naperville,Westmont and Woodridge. Sandack also was the mayor of Downers Grove from 2007 to 2011. Matune, who teaches social studies at Waubonsie Valley High School, was elected to the District 99 Board of Education in 2011. He is currently in his third year on the board. Matune, 44, has been critical of his opponent’s legislative record, saying Sandack resembled a “Chicago Democrat” with his support of same-sex marriage and pension reform legislation, Senate Bill 1. “My motivation [to enter the race] was Mr. Sandack’s record,” Matune said. “I just didn’t think he was being responsive enough to middle class families. I thought that I could do a better job.” Sandack, 50, was one of three House Republicans to vote in favor of Senate Bill 10, the Religious Freedom and Marriage Fairness Act, in November. Defending that vote, Sandack said he polled his constituents in the 81st District and found the majority of them supported marriage equality. Sandack added that his challenger is a “one-trick pony” because Matune has been mostly critical of his support of same-sex marriage. “He wouldn’t be anywhere near as successful in getting notoriety and attention if I had taken the path of least resistance and voted against same-sex marriage,” Sandack said. On the surface, both Sandack and Matune have similar ideas about how to remedy the state’s ailing financial situation. Both see pension reform and improving the state’s business climate as necessary steps to addressing Illinois’ budget problems. Both agree the corporate income tax, which is set to drop

Keith Matune Ron Sandack state representative District 99 Board

from 9.5 percent to 7.75 percent in 2015, should be reduced even more. Matune said lowering the corporate tax rate to 5 percent would allow Illinois to compete with neighboring states and quell the outward migration of workers and employers. Sandack,too,sees over-regulation of business and more favorable business climates in states like Indiana and Wisconsin as a source of Illinois’ ongoing financial woes. “We need to go to a pro-growth, pro-jobs, pro-market environment that will grow the tax base by creating more tax payers,” Sandack said. However, Matune criticized Sandack’s support of the recent pension reform bill, saying the move has “ensured” taxes will go up. “I’m totally against, what they call, the latest pension fix because

all it does is maintain a failing pension model,” he said. Matune said he would like to see all new hires go into a 401k program, while giving people currently in the system a choice between their current state pension or a 401k. However,Sandack said S.B.1 was an important first step in reforming the state’s pension system, adding that the bill is expected to save approximately $1.3 billion in the first year and $145 billion over the next 30 years. “To not vote on that, I think, would be a dereliction of duty,” Sandack said. The next steps, Sandack said, would be to turn the General Assembly Retirement System into a 401k program and expand 401k options to other state workers. Additionally, Sandack would like to introduce legislation that prevents retirees from receiving pension benefits if they were to take another state job. “Under my bill, if you are taking a subsequent job, your pension benefits would stop until you are again retired,” he said. There are currently no Democratic challengers declared for the November general election.

deeper in the hole Sheriff’s department already is down some 27 positions By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

With more than 600 employees and a potential budget shortfall of $6.3 million for 2014, the Will County Sheriff’s Office would seem like a good place to start some cuts. That’s especially true, given that the county recently lost an arbitration that will mean $1.5 million in back pay for 2012 and 2013 for current and former sheriff’s department employees, and some $3 million toward that $6.3 million deficit this year. But outgoing Sheriff Paul Kaupas, who is not running for re-election this year, brought staffers with him to a joint meeting of the County Board’s Finance and Insurance and Personnel committees March 4 to show, once again, the reasons

not only for the large number of employees and corresponding salaries, but why they could use even more. Undersheriff Jerry Nudera told members of the committees the sheriff’s department already is down some 27 positions. And Kaupas noted the County Board has funded under the department request for the past several years, including the $6.3 million this year. All county officials in the room said they had no choice but to honor the arbitrator’s ruling to give sheriff’s employees 2.5 cost of living raises on top of their 5.27 percent step increases annually. Some have estimated the increase in salaries could mean some 70 cut from the sheriff’s department. But Nudera went through the various divisions, showing members of the committees that each division barely has enough personnel to squeak by on a given day. A contract to provide police service to the village of Homer >> see hole | page 12


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News will county

county sheriff’s vacancy lures crowded field There are two candidates in the Republican primary and three in the Democratic primary By Stewart Warren For the Bugle

It’s a crowded race this year for Will County Sheriff. There are two candidates in the Republican primary and three in the Democratic primary,all of them law enforcement professionals with extensive experience in Will County. They’re trying to win the seat that will be vacated by Sheriff Paul Kaupas, a Republican who decided not to seek a fourth term. The winner of each race will go head-to-head in the November election.

Ken Kaupas, republican Hometown: Shorewood Family: Married, two children Age: 54 Professional Experience: Police officer for 30 years. Retired as a Deputy Chief of the Special Operations Bureau ken kaupas from District 5 repuBlican State Police. Currently serves

as the Deputy Chief of the Special Operations Bureau at the Will County Sheriff’s Department. Community Involvement: Chairman of the Shorewood Police and Fire Commission. Coached in the Troy Baseball Organization. Why did you decide to run for sheriff?

I have been with the sheriff’s department for more than three years, and in my capacity as deputy chief, I have seen how the department operates. There are challenges there, and I have the skill set and background to move it forward from where we are today. The first goal has to do with stabilizingthedepartment’sbudget. The budget must be managed properly or the department won’t be able to continue to provide the appropriate services to the public sector. My other goals have to do with crime, the better use of manpower and the use of analytics, something that I learned and relied on heavily in my prior experience with the state police. Crime is down, but we can continue to do better. Heroin

deaths are down, and I hope the trend will continue; we have done a lot of programming in that area. The sheriff has partnered with other county agencies and social service programs to fight the drug problem.

nick Ficarello, republican Hometown: Manhattan Township Family: Married, two children Age: 57 Professional Experience: Retired deputy chief from the Will County Sheriff’s Department. Worked in special operations, investigations and at the Will County nick ficaRello jail. Also worked repuBlican as a part-time officer for the Posen police, and am a licensed private detective. Graduate of the FBI National Academy; member of the FBI National Academy Graduate Association and of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. Community Involvement: I am a member of the Joliet Moose lodge and the Illinois State Rifle Association. Why did you decide to run for sheriff?

The citizens of Will County deserve new leadership at the sheriff’s office, someone with integrity and good moral character who is qualified and experienced in every aspect of the sheriff’s office. The sheriff should be able to lead and make Will County a safer place. I am very interested in zerobased budgeting to address the problem of the budget. I would also like to create a special victims unit to address serious crimes such as domestic violence, sex crimes, crimes involving children and the elderly and people who have special needs. Some of the existing detectives could be specially trained to handle these crimes. I also would like to create a >> see sheRiff | page 5


News

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local

ComEd raises $138,000 for Special Olympics By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Having nothing to do with seeing Jimmy Fallon take a dip into the frigid Lake Michigan and everything to do with supporting an organization that has supported her brother for years, Bolingbrook resident Lin Tabil took the Polar Plunge. As the top fundraiser for her team, Tabil, 47, a senior work planner/supervisor at ComEd, raised $8,740 for the event, her first time entering. Hosted by Special Olympics Chicago at Chicago’s North Avenue Beach, the Polar Plunge fundraiser

>> sheriff, from page 4 countywide radio emergency system such as the one used in Chicago. It would include a frequency that would be received by every police squad in the county area.When a serious crime happens, the police officer who is the nearest to the site of the crime might be a university police officer, for example. That would reduce response time during emergencies.

Mike Kelley, Democrat

Mike Kelley Democrat

Hometown: Lockport Family: Married, three children Age: 47 Professional Experience: Will County Sheriff’s Police Sergeant. Former executive board member of ASFCME 2961, former executive board member of the FOP Labor Council and a former executive board member of MAP 123. Community Involvement: Former Lockport City alderman; and currently Lockport Township Board trustee. Former AYSO Soccer Coach, a former coach for the Homer Stallions Baseball and a former Lockport Boys Baseball coach. Member of St. Joseph’s Church in Lockport. Why did you decide to run for sheriff?

Quite a few coworkers in the sheriff’s department asked me to consider running.The department

encourages participants to run into Lake Michigan and benefits approximately 5,000 athletes from Special Olympics Chicago. “Since my brother was part of the first Olympics in 1971, when this opportunity came up, it definitely pulled at my heartstrings,” said Tabil. “I remember being so overwhelmed at the whole process and wanted to support the cause. I remember watching him and it gave him and us so much joy.” Not expecting to raise as much as she did, Tabil began an email campaign to friends

and then senior management at ComEd and, then she said the momentum just began to snowball with so many willing to give their support, for which she is thankful. The fundraiser is ComEd’s largest volunteer event. More than 500 ComEd employees, joined by their family members and friends, jumped into Lake Michigan in support of the 14th annual Polar Plunge March 2. “When we first joined Special Olympics Chicago two years ago and decided to dip our toes into Lake Michigan for the Polar Plunge, we had an initial goal of 30 volunteers

and we were thrilled to have a group of 75 on the beach that day,” said Anne Pramaggiore, president and CEO, ComEd. “Two years later, I’m proud to say the ComEd Coolers had 500 members. We were the biggest team at the Polar Plunge and this event has now become the company’s largest volunteer event during the year.” The “ComEd Coolers” team raised nearly $138,000 for this year’s Polar Plunge, including ComEd’s corporate sponsorship of $15,000. This year’s Polar Plunge gained national attention when Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel

challenged Jimmy Fallon, host of “The Tonight Show” on NBC to join. Tabil said with ComEd being such a large group, their tent was set up next to the Fallon camp as well as the other celebrities, which was nice to see, she says, but not the main attraction. More than 3,200 plungers participated this year and raised nearly $1 million. The Polar Plunge funds are used by Special Olympics Chicago to support year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-style sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities.

in the last four to six years has not progressed forward in any way. As far as personnel are concerned, we can’t catch up. We do not have the manpower we need.The morale in the department is one of the lowest I have seen my 25 years there, and it is based on the lack of progression throughout the department, the lack of manpower on the street and in the Will County jail. I want people to want to come to work. With my experience on the city council and the township board, I can see both sides – the worker’s side and the administration’s side. I believe that will allow me to get things done.

charge of the sheriff’s department’s internal affairs division. Also undercover narcotics agent with the Metropolitan Area Narcotics Squad. Community Involvement: Former president of the Joliet Lions Club, member of the Will County Chapter of ABATE and parishioner at the Cathedral of St. Raymond.

from home, the department is forced to borrow a dog from another agency to search the cornfields. These programs need to be reinstated. I would like to restructure the department to make it more efficient. There are police officers doing desk jobs that could be out on the street. I would like to expand services the services for the citizens. In Joliet, a resident can walk into the police department at any time of day to make a traffic accident report. But the county’s services are offered Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. We are antiquated. We are a 9-5 police department instead of a 24-7 department. I also would introduce a heroin interdiction team that would be called HIT. Its officers would stop the flow of the drug through Will County while on its way to Chicago.

Age: 60 Professional Experience: Currently University Park’s Police Chief. Retired Will County Sheriff’s Police Lieutenant. Community Involvement: Member of the League of Women Voters and NOBLE; board member of the Ed Bradley Unity CDC.

Why did you decide to run for sheriff?

In my 25 years at the sheriff’s department, it has gone downhill. The department has cut important programs such as DARE that should not have been cut. I believe we would bring the DARE program back to the schools to prevent drug problems later. Steve Egan, Democrat There also have been Hometown: Joliet cuts to the TRIAD program Family: Three children throughout the county. Age: 61 TRIAD protects senior Professional Experience: citizens by educating Former Joliet police officer. them about scam artists. Current lieutenant for the The department’s canine Will County Sheriff’s Police program also was cut. If Steve Egan and shift commander in an elderly person with Democrat charge of patrol. Formerly in dementia wanders away

Ed Bradley, Democrat Hometown: University Park Family: Two children

Democrat

Why did you decide to run for sheriff?

I still have a desire to be a public servant. I still have a passion for righteousness, justice and positive change. I would bring fiscal accountability to the sheriff’s department. I would put together a financial team that would be responsible and held accountable for the spending. >> to see the full version of this story, check out buglenewspapers.com


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>> BHS, from page 1

On safety, race and perception Some parents wrote that their children were afraid to go to school, that fights are up while discipline is down at BHS, and question how the new interim principal Yolanda Jordan is handling it all. “What I find disconcerting is the way the picture is being painted—that BHS was in control with Mr.White and is now coming out of control. I encourage anyone to come to BHS during passing periods or before or after school. I guarantee that perception would change significantly. Bolingbrook High School is not a dangerous place.” Mitchem continued that while an incident can clearly happen at any time, the district’s schools are being kept safe, mentioning the district has won awards for its safety protocols. In addition, the district is reviewing any new measures it can undertake after recent events in both Bolingbrook and Romeoville and has since changed a few lockdown procedures, adding a tone alarm to announce hard lockdowns and strobe lights on the outside of BHS to warn outsiders that a school is

on lockdown. Mitchem brought out the issue of culture and race, noting the district is 67 percent minority with 11,000 out of its 18,000 students receiving free or reduced lunch. “When you think about schools that are predominately minority, there always is some type of stigma,” said Mitchem. “While I think that is unfair, it is ingrained in our culture … I am here to fight against and dispel that myth that is out there where terms like ‘gangsters’and‘ghetto’are floating. That is not who we are—that is not who our children are.” Mitchem spoke to the issue of the student and the BB gun, where parents questioned why the student was allowed back into the district after an incident at middle school. Citing laws that regulate the number of years a student can be expelled, he assured the community that such matters are dealt with on a caseby-case basis and in a manner that is best for all students involved. He reported the student is not in school.

On BHS principal, then and now He asked the community to move forward now that White has departed and accept Jordan as the

News interim principal. He believes she is proven to be effective at the job and brings what is a “fresh set of eyes” to a school that has been shaken by recent events. “We’ve had three principals in four years—I’ve apologized for that,”said Mitchem.“Never thought in a million years this would happen. It was never my intention for Principal Fabby Williams (who left after six months on the job in 2011), or Principal White to leave. We have a process for vetting that is rigorous, but it is not infallible.” Mitchem said they simply to have to do better at finding a replacement. Jordan then addressed the crowd as well, speaking of her commitment to the students. “I am not Mr. White, that is not who I am,” said Jordan. “But I care about these kids, though my method may be different. My goal is to work with you, not against you … Mr. White is gone, and we have dealt with the good, the bad and the ugly. I see the hurt in this family, and I talk to the students. We have to move forward, and we cannot dwell on the negative.” Comments surfaced that Jordan has not introduced herself to the students. She said she would continue to have class meetings to address the students and will stick to the schedule White had

established.

Retakes and systematic change Questions regarding test retakes led to discussion on the core beliefs of the district and how Mitchem is moving to take the district to being child-centered, focusing on what works best for the student, rather than adultcentered, focusing less on making a teacher’s job easier. Quickly stating he fully supports teachers, he though admits the move is unpopular, but one that is the basis for sorely needed change designed to close an achievement gap (lower scores for at-risk students) that has always existed not only in Valley View but the entire educational system. He explained that retakes are meant to give all students an equal opportunity at success; that the mastery of content is more important then the route the student took to get there. “I don’t expect (to have) all A students, but 97 percent of all students can meet minimum requirements for efficiency, which means our students can get it. If we deliver a test and a student fails, we do it again until the kid gets it,” said Mitchem.“We are not giving up on any kid.” When he became

superintendent, students in high school were taking 7th grade math—that was a problem for him. That is no longer the case at the district, he said, with students being taught at their grade level. “It all becomes a matter of beliefs,” said Mitchem. “ The intent for retakes is to ensure mastery, not to elevate a grade.” He spoke of an educational system that set at-risks students up to fail. “The old system said to students that we didn’t believe in them—our intent is to break that mold,” said Mitchem. In addition, he pointed to a system that allows teachers with seniority to pick and choose their classroom (“that’s adultcentered,”) with the highestachieving students. Due to mandates on school districts and changes in teacher evaluations across the state, morale is lower than ever before, even national surveys indicate, said Mitchem. “But the fact is our teachers are exposed to far more at-risk students and are performing well. If you compare apples to apples, with districts that have the same demographics you will find that we are outperforming most,” said Mitchem.


News District 11

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3 vie for two spots in county Board district 11 Winner will face Democrat Randall Olsen By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

Two Will County Board incumbents who have found themselves at the bottom of a quarry issue are being challenged in the March 18 Primary by a political newcomer. Michael “Big Mike” Strick is running against Will County Board Members Suzanne Hart and Charles “Chuck” Maher. All are from Naperville in the district that covers the Will

of the Naperville Junior Woman’s Club, Grow Republican Women County portion of Organization, Holy Spirit that city, as well as Catholic Church, and Wheatland Township serves as a Wheatland and a portion of Township precinct DuPage Township. committeeman. She is A 15-year Michael “Big Mike” chaRles “chuck” suZanne haRt also a past member of Naperville resident, stRick MaheR naperville the Wheatland Township Hart has served on naperville naperville Plan Commission. She the Will County the Illinois Association of Park currently works as an account Board since 2010. Previously, District’s “Rising Star” award. representative for Payflex. she served on the Naperville Hart is actively involved in She has been married to her Park District Board, including the community as a member husband Leo for 22 years. They a term as president. in 2007, reelected in 2009, and served a term as president. During her tenure, she was the recipient of

have three children. Maher moved to Naperville in 1975 with his mother, father and six brothers and sisters. He moved to the Will County portion of Naperville in 1992. His wife Sarah works at Neuqua Valley High School as the vocational coordinator for students with special needs. They have four daughters. He used an undergraduate degree from Western Illinois >> see county | page 22


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Police Blotter

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1 BHS

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The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

1

A white 1999 Trailmobile Trailer was reported stolen sometime after midnight Feb. 19 from the 100 block of south Joliet Road, taken by unknown subject.

2

A retail theft was reported on the 600 block of East Boughton Road Feb. 20. An unknown female fled the store with numerous items of clothing valued at more than $400.

3

Denise Yarbrough, 44 of 1932 S. Central Ave #6, Cicero, was arrested Feb. 22 and 10:41 p.m. and charged with driving while license revoked, driving while license suspended, possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug equipment. Ronald Cusic, 51 of 1432 E 66th Place, Chicago,

was charged with possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug using equipment, following a traffic stop on South Bolingbrook Drive and North Frontage Road.

4

Nathaniel Boatright, 27 of 536 Redwood Road, was arrested at 12:58 a.m. Feb. 23 and charged with aggravated assault, resisting arrest and domestic battery on the 500 block of South Bolingbrook Drive.

5

Michael Valerio, 18 of 1013 S Addison St., Bensenville,

was arrested at 4:41 a.m. Feb. 24 and charged with possession of cannabis, possession of drug equipment and illegal possession of alcohol by a minor at Springbrook and Wheatland Lane.

6

A retail theft was reported on the 1100 block of West Boughton Road at 6:15 p.m. Feb. 25. A female fled a store with more than $100 in clothing.

7

A PS3, an IPAD and ten BluRay DVDs, items valued at more $2,900, were taken by

unknown subject(s) sometime after 1:30 p.m. Feb. 25 from the 300 block of Musial Circle.

8

Isaiah Guy, 25 of 131 Delaware Drive, was arrested at 10:30 p.m. Feb. 25 and charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession of cannabis, possession of a firearm and ammunition, use of a weapon, possession of a weapon by a felon, no firearm owner’s identification card, aggravated battery and resisting arrest on Wildwood Avenue.


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THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

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coluMn

Join us for a dip … it’s a Ball 6th annual ‘Men Who Cook’ competition to take place March 22 Nick Reiher Managing Editor

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Well, Jillian and I are gonna try it again. We’re going for the gold at the sixth annual “Men Who Cook” competition. We will be among some 50 amateur chefs cooking up our favorite recipes for hundreds of guests at the fundraiser to benefit the Will County Children’s Advocacy Center, a not-for-profit agency that helps children who are the victims of sexual and physical abuse. We cooks will offer bite-size samples of our wares in each of four categories: appetizer, side dish, entrée and dessert. I will once again be offering an Italian delicacy, bagna cauda, in the appetizer category. I have come to learn that it is a very popular dish to serve on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve in some of the farm community. At least that’s what Larry Walsh told me. My boss, Michael Cleary, says he makes it the other way, with

olive oil and without cream. My way, with cream, butter, garlic and, yes, anchovies, is the “wrong way,” he says. I won’t argue with the Boss, but … I’ve had people sipping it straight instead of dunking bread or veggies. All I know is I have run through 5 quarts of the stuff in a few hours as many of the 400 or so hungry munchers who come through dunk or sip as they pass we cooks will offeR Bite-siZe saMples of ouR waRes in each of fouR categoRies: appetiZeR, side dish, entRÉe and desseRt.

by. A good number come back again. Being a newspaper guy, I don’t have enough friends to vote for me, so I haven’t even placed in the event. But I have fun. Jillian? Oh, no. This former competitive figure skater gets TICKED. Last few years, we drive home from Mokena as I try to talk her down from the ledge. Not everyone likes anchovies, as I tell her, even though you can

barely taste it. “We should make THIS next year,” she’ll say. And I tell her, no, we’re gonna keep doing this one until we win. Why? It’s easy. The first time I did this, I made pizza, and making enough for 400 bite-sized offerings nearly killed me. The year after, I baked Italian Easter bread. Same thing. Bagna cauda? Easy. Cream, butter, garlic, anchovies. Warm it up. Cut up some bread, open some baby carrots for the health nuts. And off you go. The event will be held from 6-9 p.m. Saturday, March 22, at the Pipefitters Training Center Local 597, 10850 187th St., Mokena. The cost is $40 per person; $75 per couple. The price is $10 for children between 6 and 12; kids 5 and under can attend for free. It’s casual, and you guys can buy some adult beverages to wash it all down. Tickets are available online at www.menwhocook.info, or they can be purchased at the door. There might even be room for more cooks. Give a call at (815) 774-4565 to find out. Either way, I hope Jillian and I hope to see you there. You will have a ball.


10

Take 5

THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Pizza Quick sauce brand 5 Boxer’s weapon 9 Frankly declare 13 Parade instrument 14 “The Andy Griffith Show” tyke 15 Olin of “The Reader” 16 Cheers for a torero 17 Like a blue moon 18 Overcast, in London 19 Animation pioneer 22 Too scrupulous for 24 Peasant dress 27 Warren Harding’s successor 32 Jacuzzi effect 33 50+ group 34 Score after deuce 35 Line on a map 37 1999, 2000 and 2001 Best Actor nominee (he won once) 43 Japanese fish

Down dish 44 Battery post 46 “Dear” one? 47 __ qua non 51 Duds 52 Cry of pain 53 Eat too much of, briefly 54 Poems of praise 55 Company’s main activity, and a hint to a different threeletter abbreviation hidden in 19-, 27-and 37-Across 58 Coyote’s coat 59 Bridge player’s blunder 60 Work on a garden row 62 Garden pest 63 Low points on graphs 64 Benelux locale: Abbr. 65 Billboard fillers 66 Lacking a musical key 67 Souse’s woe

1 Frat letter 2 Longtime ISP 3 Got tiresome 4 Not in the know 5 Old West defense 6 High-tech release of 2010 7 Voice-activated app for 6-Down 8 Football supporters 9 African country that was a French colony 10 “Well, that’s weird” 11 With 12-Down, sign with an arrow 12 See 11-Down 20 Island ring 21 Patriots’ org. 22 Serving success 23 Horrible 25 Modern film effects, briefly 26 Understanding 28 __ the Great: boy detective 29 Rob Reiner’s dad 30 Hershiser of ESPN 31 Oil bloc 35 FICA benefit 36 La-la lead-in

37 Ruddy, as a complexion 38 Places to plug in mice 39 More reserved 40 En pointe 41 Place to store cords 42 Beats by a whisker 43 For instance 45 Slalom curve 47 “Fine” 48 Words accompanying a shrug 49 Like much metered parking 50 Head-scratcher 56 Columnist Bombeck 57 Country singer McCoy 58 SFO overseer 61 Hesitant sounds

Tribune Content Agency 2014

Horoscopes Concentrate on how much you can accomplish in the week ahead by exerting a little extra effort. Following through on a project might be the key to getting where you want to go. Don’t be too easily discouraged by setbacks.

Your partner or a steady companion could seem quite negative or become obsessed by a get-rich scheme. It might be your job in the week ahead to be a guide and mentor to those less focused on facts.

Caution and wisdom often travel hand in hand. This week might offer many instances when you must be tough-minded now so you can enjoy prosperity in the future. Remain silent in the face of criticism.

If the winds of change don’t blow you in the direction you want to travel this week, adjust your sails. Learning to adapt to changing circumstances and using all the information at your disposal is the key to unlocking your latent talents.

When you have good advice and wisdom on your side, anything is possible. In the week ahead, a positive attitude and honest discussions will quickly resolve every challenge standing between you and the financial security you envision.

Much of your success and progress during the upcoming week will depend on whether you focus on good news or bad news. Remain willing to try out different solutions to old problems, especially in the workplace.

Implement financial safeguards so family matters don’t consume your nest egg. In the week ahead, you could be called upon to lead others and protect your circle of friends or loved ones from their own misconceptions.

There’s an upside to honesty in the week ahead, even if the truth seems to place you in a bad light. If you adopt an attitude that you’ve “made your bed and must lie in it,” you might find the bed quite comfy after all.

Find solutions that won’t exploit the opportunities shared by others while handling legitimate challenges with good grace. This week, you might be tempted to squander your resources on something that’s only a mirage.

You can fool yourself or be fooled by others in the week to come. Your hopes and dreams might seem achievable and making major changes looks easy, but seek objective advice before moving forward.

You can make progress in the week to come by quietly taking the lead and offering intuitive solutions. You won’t need to steamroll over the objections of others because people will recognize your high ideals.

In the week ahead, you have the ability to escape from the rat race and no desire to participate in oneupmanship. Within the bubble of your own unique brand of happiness you can avoid the material temptations of a dog-eat-dog world.

Sudoku

Jumble

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • EJECT • FINAL • DEFAME • SNUGLY

Answer:

Given a “chance,” they are opposite but the same -- SLIM AND FAT


THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

wEllnEss

11

Is there such a thing as too healthy eating? Orthorexia is an obsession with healthy eating that can lead to individuals severely limiting the foods they will eat Can you have too much of a good thing? When it comes to healthy eating, the answer might be yes. We all know that a healthy diet is important for preventing diseases and helps us have enough energy every day, but for individuals suffering from a condition known as orthorexia, healthy eating can become unhealthy. Orthorexia is an obsession with healthy eating that can lead to individuals severely limiting the foods they will eat. Although orthorexia is not a clinical term, and it has not been officially defined as a mental disorder, left untreated the condition can cause serious health problems including malnutrition, cardiac complications and in extreme situations, death.

“A major difference between orthorexia and anorexia is that for those suffering from orthorexia, achieving and maintaining an ideal weight is not one of the symptoms,” explains Dr. Jan RemerOsborn, a clinical neuropsychologist at Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital in Downers Grove. “Rather, orthorexia is an obsession with both defining and maintaining a ‘perfect’ dietary regimen.” Just because someone follows a healthy diet does not mean they are orthorexic. So how can you tell if you or a friend or family member is displaying signs of orthorexia? “A healthy relationship with food looks food as a source of energy, of fuel for the day,” Remer-Osborn said. “Having a wellrounded life with many interests helps put food in its appropriate perspective. We should eat to live, not live to eat.” If you or a loved one experiencing any signs of orthorexia or have questions, it is important to contact a primary care physician who can provide resources to help you get on the path to a healthier life.

featuReS

ReMeR-osBoRn says to look foR these changes in BehavioR:

• Obsessive concern regarding the effect of food choices on health • Guilt for not adhering to strict diet • Spending an inordinate amount of time thinking about food • Avoidance of daily activities and responsibilities to follow diet • Fear of eating away from home or eating food prepared by others • Increased anxiety, depression or mood swings • Feeling increased self-esteem when eating the “right foods” while criticizing others who do not follow the same diet

• It is important for everyone, regardless of whether they are suffering from orthorexia, to have a healthy relationship with food.


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News >> hole, from page 3 Glen for the past 13 years more than covers the cost of the service, sheriff’s officials said.The Warrant Division is down low enough, Kaupas said, that they mostly just pick up people arrested on warrants from other areas instead of following up on outstanding ones from Will County. One area targeted for possible cost savings has been fleet maintenance. Some board members wondered if they could save money by contracting out. But Kaupas and Nudera reminded them the department mechanics do more than oil changes. They take apart the cars and check brakes and other functions, as well as download sensitive information

from onboard computers and cameras. And as far as corrections – for the county jail and juvenile justice center – they said they cannot be short staffed on cell watch. One area that stood out was for the five deputies and a sergeant assigned as school resource officers for Lincoln-Way Central, East, North and West, as Fairmont Grammar School. Sheriff’s officials said the program started many years ago with a grant, and continued despite that grant ending. Deputy Chief Ken Kaupas said he hoped the program would remain because the presence of a deputy in those schools undoubtedly has prevented occurrences. But County Board

members want to see if officials in those schools districts are willing to pay for the services. Diane Zigrossi, chair of the Insurance and Personnel Committee, said county finance officials will have some line item recommendations for a future Executive Committee meeting. Finance officials already said if the County Board can’t find extra money or necessary cuts, the money will have to come from cash reserves. Zigrossi and other know the entire $6.3 million deficit can’t come from personnel cuts alone. Asked if it could hold up some projects such as the countycity of Joliet comprehensive infrastructure project, she said it could.

S TAY SOCIAL!

BugleNewspapers.com

@BugleNewspapers

The Bugle Newspapers


INSIDE: Local resident comes up big for Montini girls basketball run to a state title, page 15

bolingbrookbugle.com

THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

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Raiders fall in regional final By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

For much of its regional championship game Friday night at Plainfield East, Bolingbrook appeared to be in control of winning the regional title over Geneva. However,in the final 3 minutes, 33 seconds it all changed and the Raiders, the No. 3 seed in the East Aurora Sectional, were sent home early in a 66-63 heartbreaking loss to the No. 6 Vikings, who scored 34 fourth quarter points. After trailing 9-4 out of the gate, Bolingbrook responded with a 12-0 run to take a 16-9 lead early in the second quarter and led 31-22 at the half. The second half was more of the same as the Raiders extended their lead to 41-26 on a Gage Davis three-pointer. It was 43-32 after three quarters. “We were getting good looks,” Bolingbrook coach Rob Brost said. “Our pressure was really bothering them.” It was 51-40 with 4:43 left and 53-43 with 3:33 left after Devon Sams got a steal and dunk. But Geneva stormed back in a hurry, scoring eight points in 42 seconds to get within two points and then kept the run going, finishing with a 13-0 run for a 56-53 advantage with 1:57 left.

“I think the no charge call on Prentiss when they called a block was a game-changer right there,” Brost said of three-point play for the Vikings on a questionable foul call against Nixon during the run. “It is tough when that happens.” That lead was extended to 60-55 before a pair of Davis free throws got it back to one possession. Davis then got a steal and scored a basket and was fouled to make it 60-59. Four Geneva points were sandwiched around a Sams basket and the Raiders had the ball with 31 seconds left down 64-61. The Raiders struggled to get a shot off and were eventually fouled with five seconds left. Davis sunk both free throws, making it 64-63. However, miscommunication left a Viking wide open on the inbounds and he was fouled with 2.4 seconds left. Both free throws were made, giving the Raiders a last-second chance to tie. Prentiss Nixon’s heave from just inside half-court bounced off the backboard and went in and out, ending the game. “They are a really good team,” Brost said. “I hope they win on Wednesday.” >> see FALL | page 18

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Bolingbrook’s Prentiss Nixon scored 24 points in the regional final loss to Geneva.


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THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014


Sports

Bambule big in Broncos’ title run By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Romeoville resident Kaylee Bambule came into the IHSA Class 3A state semifinal game against Burlington Central having played in 33 of Montini’s 34 games and was averaging 3.5 points and 1.3 rebounds per game. She tallied a total of nine points in the two games at Illinois State’s Redbird Arena in Normal, but every one of them had a huge impact in the game. In the state final game against Joliet Catholic Academy, a game Montini won 57-44 to win the state title, Bambule hit one shot, but it was a huge one. At the 4 minute, 53 second mark of the third quarter Montini had taken an 11-point lead, its largest lead of the game at the time before JCA came storming back. A 9-0 Angel run cut the lead to two points, but then Bambule buried the first of two Bronco three pointers from the left corner at the 2:01 mark, helping Montini build the lead back to eight heading into the fourth quarter. Bambule said she doesn’t feel the pressure, partly from growing up with her dad, Jeff, the 12- year coach of the Romeoville boys varsity team before he retired prior to this season. “He pushes me hard and it has always helped me a lot and gives me great confidence,” Kaylee said. “I try and play without any nerves and just play my game how I can and I am fortunate enough that my teammates help me out.” Montini coach Jason Nichols appreciates her pedigree. “She is a coach’s daughter,” he said. “She has guts. She is a tough, hard-nosed kid and she just makes plays in big games.Her better games are against Wheaton South, Rolling Meadows, (in the semifinal) she hit some big shots and (in the final) she hit big shots. She has to work on a few things like all freshmen, but she is tough and she is going to be a really good player for us.” In the semifinal game, Bambule checked into the game at the 4:16 mark of the second quarter with the Broncos trailing 12-11. Within 30 seconds of entering the game, Bambule connected on an acrobatic drive and layup, had

a steal and another lay in to put Montini ahead 15-12. Her two quick field goals, her only two of the game,were the final points scored of the half. While she missed on her other attempts from the field, Bambule would find herself in a crucial spot later in the contest. After a comeback in the final three minutes of the game gave Montini a 27-24 lead inside the final minute, Bambule was fouled and sent to the free throw line for the one-and-one. A 46 percent foul shooter coming into the game (6-of-13), Bambule missed the front end of the bonus, but got her own offensive rebound and was subsequently fouled again. This time, Bambule knocked

down both foul shots to extend the Montini lead to 29-24 and all but secure the Bronco win. The Bambule family still resides in Romeoville, making Kaylee’s commute to Lombard every day is tough. “I have to be up at 5:30 a.m., so it is a long morning,”she said.“Montini wasn’t always the plan, but I knew they were a team that would go hard and play hard.” All the hard work and the long days paid off with the state title, although she said it hasn’t hit her yet. “It will take a while to hit me,”she said. “It is so exciting and it won’t hit me for a while.” Follow @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

15

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Romeoville resident Kaylee Bambule hit big shots for Montini in its Class 3A title run.


16

THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

er b m u N

GIRLS BBALL Points Per Game Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Aysia Bugg, Bolingbrook Emily Schramek, Benet Erin Heide, Minooka Emily Eshoo, Benet Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Jordan Heberg, Plainfield North Sarah Costello, Downers North Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Lexi Marin, Romeoville Peyton Winters, Downers North Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Kathleen Doyle, Benet Monica Barefield, Joliet West Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Elanta Slowik, Maine East Claire Hardy, Downers South Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Ryaen Johnson, Bolingbrook Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Chantell Mack, Joliet Central

sPorts

7

rs e h c n Cru

12

18.2 15.9 15.2 14.9 14.9 14.5 14.3 14.0 13.3 12.3 11.9 11.5 11.4 11.4 11.0 10.5 10.5 10.3 10.2 10.0 10.0 9.8 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.8

Destiny Hollins, Lockport Cherish Smith, Romeoville Nina Anderson, Maine South Naomi Mays, Lockport Rebounds Per Game Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Sarah Costello, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Claire Hardy, Downers South Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Cherish Smith, Romeoville Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Maria Protic, Maine East Peyton Winters, Downers North Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Ryaen Johnson, Bolingbrook Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Ty Battle, JCA Sydney Arlis, Minooka Nina Anderson, Maine South Kyla Creal, Lockport Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Ally Fink, Plainfield South Rachel Sutphin, Plainfield South Adriana Acosta, JCA

Stats based on coach submissions. Don’t see yours? Send to staylor@buglenewspapers.com 8.7 8.6 8.2 8.1 12.5 9.6 9.1 9.0 9.0 8.0 7.9 7.3 7.0 6.9 6.8 6.3 6.0 5.8 5.8 5.3 5.0 4.9 4.9 4.8 4.8 4.8 4.7

Assists Sarah Costello, Downers North Jaida Green, Downers North Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Aysia Bugg, Bolingbrook Juatece McNear, Joliet Central Kelly Kons, Maine South Monica Barefield, Joliet West Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Sydney Arlis, Minooka Erin Heide, Minooka Skyle Osborne, Romeoville Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Nina Anderson, Maine South Christina Ekhomu, JCA Lexi Marin, Romeoville Bethany Bachmann, Minooka Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Kathleen Doyle, Benet Ty Battle, JCA Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Jnaya Walker, JCA Megan Roberts, Maine South Destiny Hollins, Lockport Hailey Schoenman, Maine South

149 103 93 85 79 78 70 69 68 66 66 60 60 59 57 56 56 55 49 48 43 43 42 42 39 39 35

Steals Sarah Costello, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kianna Campbell, Lockport Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Destiny Hollins, Lockport Jaida Green, Downers North Jnaya Walker, JCA Christina Ekhomu, JCA Elanta Slowik, Maine East Shaylee Sloan, Maine East Aysia Bugg, Bolingbrook Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Ty Battle, JCA Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Kailey Foster, Joliet West Naomi Mayes, Lockport Nina Anderson, Maine South Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Skyle Osborne, Romeoville Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Monica Barefield, Joliet West Lexi Marin, Romeoville Kathleen Doyle, Benet Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Jenae Rowe, Joliet West

103 85 78 77 75 70 58 56 54 54 54 52 50 49 46 45 45 45 41 40 39 38 38 38 37 36 35

Kelly Kons, Maine South Jamari McAfee, Lockport Monica Nunez, Resurrection Treanna Perry, Joliet West Cherish Smith, Romeoville Field Goal % Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Ty Battle, JCA Peyton Winters, Downers North Emma Hlavin, Benet Kyla Creal, Lockport Sydney Arlis, Minooka Jenna Martin, Benet Kendall McDermott, Benet Free Throw % Autumn Lawson, Joliet Central Emily Eshoo, Benet Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Alexis Pease, Minooka Faith Heitman, Romeoville Emily Schramek, Benet Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA 3-pointers Emily Schramek, Benet Erin Heide, Minooka

35 34 32 32 32 .590 .577 .560 .550 .510 .500 .490 .490 .860 .780 .764 .760 .758 .740 .730 .719 .710 .698 81 58


Sports

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Flyers earn athletic honors Lewis University redshirt junior outside hitter Geoff Powell (Claremont, Calif./Claremont) was named Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association Offensive Player of the Week while junior libero Lucas Yanez (Burbank, Calif./John Burroughs) took home MIVA Defensive Player of the Week, the conference announced on March 4. “We had a great weekend as a team and Geoff and Lucas were huge pieces of our success,”Lewis head men’s volleyball coach Dan Friend said. Powell hit .706 (37 K, 1 E, 51 TA) in six sets of play last weekend. He netted a career-high .783 hitting percentage against Quincy (19 K, 1 E, 23 TA) and tallied 18 kills in 28 attempts without an error against Lindenwood. “Geoff put up some unbelievable numbers for the weekend,” Friend said. “I am excited to see him in a great groove mid-season.”

Yanez tallied 20 digs over six sets, posting a .960 reception percentage while only committing one receiving error in 25 attempts.Against Quincy, he matched a season-high 12 digs. “Lucas has been getting better and more comfortable each week,” Friend said. “It is great to see him get recognized for a really good weekend.” • The Great Lakes Valley Conference announced on March 4 that Lewis University juniors Ryan Jackson (Bolingbrook, Ill./Riverside-Brookfield), Jeff Jarosz (Lyons, Ill./Morton) and Julian Lewis (Flossmoor, Ill./ Homewood-Flossmoor) have all earned All-GLVC accolades as all three have played a crucial role in helping the Flyers to a 21-5 record this season. Lewis’ backcourt of Jackson and Jarosz were named to the All-GLVC First and Second Team respectively, while Lewis, a forward, was named to the GLVC All-Defensive Team.

“Obviously, individual recognition will happen when you have the kind of team success we’ve had this year,” Lewis head men’s basketball coach Scott Trost said. “All three of these individuals are very deserving of any accolades they receive. “Hopefully there’s a lot of basketball left this year, but it is certainly comforting to know that these three all have another year remaining.” Jackson earned first team honors for the second-straight year, as he leads the Flyers in scoring, averaging 18.0 pointsper-game - which is sixth-best in the conference. The Bolingbrook, Ill., native, who scored his 1,000th careerpoint earlier in the season, has knocked down a team-best 37 three-pointers and tops the squad with 137 free throws made. “Ryan continues to prove why he is one of the better guards in the GLVC,”Trost said.“He made a lot of big baskets for us in crucial

games.” A first-time selection to an AllGLVC team, Jarosz is chipping in 14.1 points-per-game and shooting 56.8% (109-for-192) from the field. He is second on the squad in assists (3.3 apg.) and owns a GLVC-best assist/turnover ratio of 3.08 to 1. “Jeff probably developed and matured as much as any guard in this league,” Trost said. “There were times this year where he just took over and dominated the game from the point guard spot.” For the second-straight season, Lewis has been named to the GLVC All-Defensive squad. He averaged 13.9 points and a teambest 8.7 rebounds-per-contest - good for third overall in the conference. He collected a team-best eight double-doubles on the campaign. “Julian has had a fantastic season and is very deserving of an all-conference selection as well,” Trost said. “I saw his

confidence grow and develop into a consistent threat for us (this season).” • The No. 20 Southern Indiana men’s basketball team led from start to finish and hit 11 threepointers as the Screaming Eagles earned the 92-74 victory over No. 23 Lewis University in the 2014 Deaconess Great Lakes Valley Conference Quarterfinals at the Ford Center on Friday (March 7) afternoon. The Screaming Eagles, led by a team-best 23 points and four three-pointers from senior forward Orlando Rutledge, converted 57.9% (11-for-19) of their long-range attempts. As a team, USI shot 55.6% (30-for-54) from the floor. “I’m disappointed we didn’t play better,” Trost said.“(Southern Indiana) got up early and put us on our heels. “They are a tough team to beat when they shoot the ball as well as they did, so you have to give them credit.”


18

THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

>> FALL, from page 13 Nixon finished with 24 points, while Davis added 17. “He played well,” Brost said of Nixon. “I just wish we could have played well. It is tough to go into the locker room and you face your team and have nothing

planned because you have nothing prepared for a loss.” For the game Bolingbrook shot 23-of-34 from the freethrow line, while Geneva was 17-for-19. “There was a stretch there in the second half where we went 0-for-5 from the line,”

Sports Brost stated. “I told our guys they missed two free throws all night and we missed 11. It was tough.” Despite a short playoff run, it was a strong season for the Raiders, who won the SWSC Blue title. They will be losing several key seniors, but will

return Nixon, among others. “I love this group and I love coaching them,” Brost said. “We are a family and that is what makes it so hard because we are all so close to each other and we care about each other. It is tough.” •Bolingbrook advanced to the Plainfield East Regional final with a 73-56 win over Batavia Tuesday, March 4. The Raiders built a 19-3 lead in the first quarter and the Bulldogs could get no closer than seven points the rest of the way. “That gave us a lot of confidence for the rest of the game,” Davis said. “When we came out like that, we just tried to keep it going.” That happened near the end of the second quarter and it was 32-24 when Bolingbrook scored

the final seven points of the half, including a buzzer-beating layup by Nixon to take a 39-24 lead at the half. ‘We’ve been a team of runs all season,” Brost said. “We’re capable of doing that, it is just when is it going to come?” “Going into the locker room, that gave us a lot of confidence for the second half,” Davis said. “We knew if we could keep it going, the game would be ours.” The Raiders extended that lead to 59-35 in the third quarter before settling for a 6141 advantage after three. Davis led the way with 23 points, while Nixon added 17. “My team was just finding me,” Davis said. “I happened to be open and I was able to knock them down.” Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com


buglenewspapers.com/basketball

THE BUGLE MARCH 13, 2014

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Angels second to one in Class 3A By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

NORMAL - Despite the tears and heartbreak of a 57-44 loss to Montini in the IHSA Class 3A state championship game, JCA senior Jasmine Lumpkin did something high school players often fail to do after an emotional loss – she understood the importance of what the Angels accomplished instead of lamenting on what they didn’t. This year’s team was the lone Angels (28-3) basketball team to make it to the state final four. “Being down here for my senior year with this group of girls, I wouldn’t have it any other way,” Lumpkin said. “I am just happy with what we accomplished this season. We came all the way down here, yeah, we fell short and it hurts really bad, but I am really proud of this team and I can’t take away the success we have had this year. We made history just coming down here.” Lumpkin and the Angels happened to catch the Broncos on a day where they seemingly could not miss from behind the three-point arc, connecting on 11 triples in the contest. “They were hot today,” said sophomore Nicole Ekhomu. “I can’t believe that they were a better team than us, they were just hitting their shots.” “They were the hotter team. I felt like we could have played with them, but they just got hot,” Lumpkin said. “That could have went either way, When you are hot like that, there isn’t much you can do with that.” It was JCA who used the three to grab a 13-12 lead after the first quarter, as freshman Jnaya Walker beat the first-period buzzer, but from there, the shooting belonged to Montini. Even at the end of the first half, Ekhomu hit a triple to bring the Angels back from a six-point deficit and seemingly cut the lead to two at intermission, however Montini sophomore Lea Kerstein connected on a heave at the horn

to extend the lead back to five. “We played hard,” Lumpkin said. “It was just very frustrating.” At the 4 minute, 53 second mark of the third quarter Montini increased its lead to 11-points, its largest lead of the game at the time, but the Angels were not done fighting. Joliet Catholic Academy stormed back on a 9-0 run that cut the lead to two points, but then the Broncos did what they did all game – hit the three. Montini freshman Kaylee Bambule, daughter of long-time Romeoville boys basketball coach Jeff Bambule, buried the first of two Bronco three pointers from the left corner at the 2:01 mark. After a missed three attempt by JCA, Kelly Karlis hit one of her four threes, helping Montini build the lead back to eight heading into the fourth quarter. “We got back in the game and there looked like there was some hope, but they answered,” said Joliet Catholic Academy coach Ed Schodrof. “We knew they could shoot the ball, so we started out in the 1-3-1 (defense) and see if they were hot and then make the adjustment. We did switch to man, we did switch to diamond and we had some success with the full court pressure. We told the girls not to switch on the ball, we switched twice and they hit those two big threes in the corner. You can’t do that against them. They are a very good team. They moved the ball so well, they found the open shooters.” Ekhomu led the team with 14 points, while Lumpkin added eight and Walker had seven The Angels will part ways with four seniors in Lumpkin, Christina Ekhomu, Alex Legg and Brittany Abington, but return a host of young players who now have the experience of a state final under their belt. “Everything will be OK,” Schodrof said.“I am proud of this team. There are probably 150 teams in 3A and to finish second isn’t too bad. Hopefully that will sink in Monday or Tuesday. Prolly

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Nicole Ekhomu led JCA in scoring in both games in the Class 3A final four.

a little bit of tears tonight, but everything will be fine. We had a great year. You have to get here the first time to come back. We had to crack through.”

SEMIFINAL The road to the championship

game was not an easy one for JCA, as it had to get past back-to-backto-back state champion Quincy Notre Dame. The Angles played the final 5:18 without Lumpkin, who had fouled out of the game, but still managed to close the game out on a 12-2 run and win 70-59.

Nicole Ekhomu again led the way with 16 points, while Lumkin had 15. Freshmen Walker (15 points) and Ty Battle (13 points) helped pick up the slack with Lumpkin on the bench. Follow @Hear_The_Beard mark@buglenewspapers.com


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News u.s.sEnatE

oberweis, truax battle to face durbin in november Doug Truax, of Downers Grove, and state Sen. Jim Oberweis, of Sugar Grove, run for Republican nomination By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

Two Republicans are vying for the opportunity to run against Dick Durbin for his U.S. Senate seat in November’s general election. DougTruax,of Downers Grove, and state Sen. Jim Oberweis, of Sugar Grove, are hoping to earn the Republican nomination at the March 18 primary.

the 25th District in the Illinois Senate since 2013. Oberweis is the chairman of Oberweis Dairy, started by his grandfather in 1915. Labeling himself as a “common sense conservative,” Oberweis states on his campaign sen. JiM oBeRweis doug tRuax sugar grove site he is “pro-life, proDoWners grove Second Amendment, proTruax graduated from the U.S. tax cut, pro-spending cut, Military Academy at West Point and pro-growth.” before moving to Downers Truax defines himself as Grove and starting a strategic pro-life and opposed to, what risk consulting firm. Truax is he calls, “liberal gun control the co-owner of Veritas Risk measures.”Truax also is opposed Services, based in Oak Brook, to same-sex marriage, saying which consults employers on his Christian faith influenced healthcare costs and benefits that believe and that “society retirement. should resist the temptation to Oberweis has represented redefine” marriage.

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>> county, from page 7 University and a masters from Illinois Institute of Technology in Rehabilitation Counseling and Psychology to work for 20 years with students in K-12, many with special needs. His teaching career included serving as a high school principal. He is founder and president of Career Education and Management Consulting, which provides clinical and consulting services to a wide range of clients, including the DuPage Court system, many local school districts and businesses. Currently, he is president of C&M Consulting, an education and mental health services firm whose clients include Live Text, a company that helps universities nationwide implement Internet-based online educational tools for faculty and students. Maher began his political career assisting with authoring and lobbying for the passage of the Professional Counselor Licensure Act. Upon the passage of the bill, he was appointed by Gov. Jim Edgar to the regulatory board, later serving as 1st chairman of the board. He was elected to the County Board in 2002,serving as chairman of the county board’s ad hoc Utilities & Energy Resource Committee, where he was instrumental in securing a commitment by Commonwealth Edison to create a new executive post – vice president of new business – to ensure high level corporate attention to Will County electric service as rapid growth increases demand on existing infrastructure. Strick has lived in Will County for more than 25 years and has operated his own business since 1994 after working in the hazardous waste collection

Real Estate & Business

industry. As a small business owner, he says he has seen first-hand the challenges the government has posed to the business community. Believing in smaller government, he said he would not take a public pension and would serve only two terms. Wanting to focus on government waste, he said he was part of the vocal grassroots opposition building a new town hall. Like a good number of residents, Strick wasn’t happy about the Will County Board settling a dispute over Boughton Materials’ plan to run a concrete crushing operation on 20 acres of its 200 acre quarry located off 111th Street near Naperville and Bolingbrook. In February 2013, the County Board voted 25-0 to reject the plan. Soon after, the company sued the county, the fourth time it has done so over zoning or permitting requests. Boughton Materials previously won court rulings in all of its lawsuits, setting the stage for a possible settlement with this suit. The Board approved the settlement of the litigation and a special use permit with 11 conditions in a 22-3 vote with Maher, Hart and Judy Ogalla, R-Monee, casting the negative votes. Some residents believe the county should have fought the company in court; others also were upset they were not made aware of the recent vote to allow the quarry. In response,Maher and Hart, on behalf of the residents living near the quarry, have requested that the Will County State’s Attorney’s Office review the Board procedures followed, in the recent settlement agreement between Will County and Boughton Materials as to whether there should have been a public hearing prior to the most recent vote.

will county

Bob Rogina remembered as developer, mentor, visionary, friend Rogina, 72, died Feb. 28 after a lingering illness By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

Bob Rogina was so much a part of Joliet, it’s tough to figure out Bob Rogina where he made his most lasting mark. But those who knew him best said he left his imprint on everything he touched, mainly because he was a do-er who gave his all no matter what he did. Rogina, 72, died Feb. 28 after a lingering illness. His legacy includes five children and nine grandchildren, as well as the many friendships he fostered as owner of Rogina & Associates land planners, chairman of the Silver Cross Hospital Foundation and of the Cornerstone Services board, and vice chair of the board that oversees the Rialto Square Theatre. Oh, and he helped save Joliet from financial ruin. Some people pile up a list like this for show, said Larry Johnson, vice president of the Silver Cross Hospital Foundation. Not Bob Rogina. “If he was on your team, he was going to be a working member,” Johnson said. “I remember one year, he was United Way fund chairman. They did pretty well, but Bob thought he could do better. So he volunteered to lead it the next year, too.” Johnson said he got to know Rogina pretty well as members of Joliet Rotary. But they really bonded once Rogina was recruited to lead the Silver Cross Hospital Foundation. “He was a great listener,” Johnson said. “He would sit there for an entire meeting and not say a word. Then at the end, when we were all grappling for a solution, Bob would give us the answer. … I considered him a mentor. He would tell me what I needed to hear, not what I wanted to hear.” When Silver Cross made its move from Joliet to New Lenox several years ago, Johnson said,

the foundation was able to raise nearly $9 million, much of which could be attributed to Rogina’s efforts. Johnson said Rogina generally was pretty quiet. But he would chide Johnson about the healthy “rabbit food” served for dinner at the hospital before Foundation meetings.“He would say,‘I want a hot dog.’ So one time, we had hot dogs. He thought that was pretty good.” Russ Slinkard, executive director of the Joliet Region Chamber of Commerce, intimated there might not have been a place to get a hot dog, or anything else, if it weren’t for the efforts of Rogina and a few others during the recession of If (Rogina) was on your team, he was going to be a working member. I remember one year, he was United Way fund chairman. They did pretty well, but Bob thought he could do better. So he volunteered to lead it the next year, too.” - arry Johnson, vice president of the Silver Cross Hospital Foundation

the 1980s. “Bob Rogina was dedicated to improving the future of Joliet,” Slinkard said. “It was in the early 1980s, when things were at their worst for Joliet, that Bob Rogina teamed up with Frank Turk, Jr., Bob Thornton and Tom Feehan to form Joliet’s first economic development organization, Greater Joliet Inc. This small beginning was the forerunner of today’s Will County Center for Economic Development, to which Bob was fully committed, serving on its Board of Directors from its founding in 1986.” John Greuling, president and CEO of the Will County CED, said Rogina represented the essence of the economic development group. “He had a passion for his community

and a passion to exact change,” Greuling said. As Slinkard mentioned, Rogina, Turk and the others realized in the 1980s Joliet’s economy wasn’t diversified enough to pull itself out of double-digit unemployment. Greuling said Rogina helped form that strategy of enticing smaller businesses to come to Joliet. In 1987, Rogina, as he often did, put his money where his heart was, starting Rogina & Associates, Ltd. in the basement of a model home.The company’s website says this was the start of a civil engineering, land surveying and land planning company that has grown to be the largest firm of this type with their principal offices in Will County. Rogina’s professional stamp was on the development of Interstate 355 through Will County, as well as much of the development around Illinois 59 and Caton Farm in Joliet. But Greuling remembers one of Rogina’s passions … and prophecies. At the end of his second interview before hiring on with CED, Greuling said his final test was a two-hour ride-along with Rogina. One of the many spots they visited was a large mess of dirt and debris that took Greuling aback just a bit: the former Joliet Arsenal property. “He said, ‘Greuling, you’re going to spend the next 10 years of your life here,’” the CED leader remembered. The property is now divided among a national cemetery, a tallgrass preserve and one of the intermodal yards that helps make the area the largest inland port in North America. Greuling also said Rogina was a mentor, and, like Johnson, said he preferred to dig in and work than sit back and watch. “If you were on Bob’s team, he made sure you had what you needed to be successful,” Greuling said. “He was one of those guys who doesn’t come along very often,” Johnson said of his longtime friend.“And he will be profoundly missed.”


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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 12 Picnic Court, Bolingbrook, IL 60490 (RESIDENTIAL). On the 10th day of April, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III Plaintiff V. NADINE AND RICHARD RASPER Defendant. Case No. 13 CH 1283 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Johnson, Blumberg and Associates, LLC 230 West Monroe Street Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 312-541-9710 312-541-9711 (fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/13, 3/20, 3/27

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 260 SAINT ANDREWS DRIVE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (TWO STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A THREE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE.). On the 3rd day of April, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A. F/K/A WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Plaintiff V. JOHN POPESCU; LVNV FUNDING, LLC; ANA POPESCU Defendant. Case No. 13 CH 254 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 444,093.96 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/6, 3/13, 3/20


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LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A. F/K/A WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. JOHN POPESCU; LVNV FUNDING, LLC; ANA POPESCU Defendant. No. 13 CH 254 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 17th day of December, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 3rd day of April, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 88, IN ST. ANDREW’S WOODS, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AND ALSO PART OF LOT 7 (EXCEPT THE NORTH 165.0 FEET IN OLDWOODS FARM), IN THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 2 IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 6, 1979 AS Commonly known as: 260 SAINT ANDREWS DRIVE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: T W O STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A THREE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE. P.I.N.: 12-02-02-102-014 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 444,093.96 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/6, 3/13, 3/20

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III Plaintiff, vs. NADINE AND RICHARD RASPER Defendant. No. 13 CH 1283 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 2nd day of January, 2014, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 10th day of April, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 139 IN TOWN AND COUNTRY’S CIDER CREEK SUBDIVISION PHASE TWO, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 17, 1995 AS DOCUMENT R95-16942, IN THE VILLAGE OF BOLINGBROOK, WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 12 Picnic Court, Bolingbrook, IL 60490 Description of Improvements: RESIDENTIAL P.I.N.: (07)01-13-201-032 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Johnson, Blumberg and Associates, LLC 230 West Monroe Street Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 312-541-9710 312-541-9711 (fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/13, 3/20, 3/27


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Bolingbrook 03-13-14