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SOFTBALL

MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

PITCHING BRINGS BALANCE Sophomore hurlers utilize differing styles to limit opposition’s offensive production

SEE PAGE 4

FEATURES

Drag show raises money for children

SEE PAGE 6

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

The sun sets Friday during the Late Nite Carnival in the C1 commuter lot. It was the 11th Annual Late Nite Carnival.

FAIR WEATHER Warm temperatures accompany games, rides, food at Late Nite Carnival

« Actually, [the Carnival] was

The 11th year of the Carnival was packed with AN INSIDER’S students and community members with an esti- EXPERIENCE Look inside to mated 800 students pre-registering alone, said read about what Late Nite adviser Alicia Fitzgerald. it’s like working Late Nite ordered 10,000 wrist bands for the at the carnival event. Toward the end of the event, the group had + PAGE 5 fewer than 2,000 left. When the gates opened at 7 p.m. for general admission, more than 200 people were lined up, waiting for their chance to shrug off winter. Warm, clear weather played a role in attendance — the last few years have been plagued with snow and rain. Throughout the night, it became nearly impossible to walk through the midway without squeezing between a group of friends waiting, often for up to half an hour, to ride one of the many attractions. When participants grew tired or too queasy to spin, flip and soar on the rides Late Nite offered free games with prizes including hacky sacks and suckers. Those willing to wager a little money for the chance to take home an overstuffed, plush character could play Poor Jack Amusements’ traditional games such as water gun races. This year’s event also offered a new spectacle, a fireworks show over LaFollette Complex. –

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

Laura White, a junior human resources major, and Justin Pennington watch fireworks at the Late Nite Carnival on Friday at the C1 commuter lot. Fireworks, games, food and 16 different rides were available to those who attended.

one of me and my girlfriend’s first dates. We have been together for about two years now. We may ride the ferris wheel again [like the first time we came]. » BROCK SUMNER, a senior psychology major

« It will be OK. I don’t normally

do things like this. But I kept my eyes open, I’m hyperventilating, but you’re only in college once. ... YOLO. » KASSIDY JULIAN, a freshman elementary education major, after riding 1,001 Nachts

CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Laney Ledetter, a 4-year-old community member, watches Late Nite Carnival attendees ride 1,001 Nachts on Friday at the C1 commuter lot. The 11th Annual Late Nite Carnival was also open to Muncie residents.

Sororities to join PHC RETIREMENT MEANS TIME TO SING Assistant police chief as associate members to leave 24-year post

Multicultural Greek group sees drop in membership, makes move to disband KAITLIN LANGE CHIEF REPORTER | kllange@bsu.edu

Due to a lack of multiculturalism in Greek life, the Multicultural Greek Council will disband next year and become associate members of Ball State’s Pan-Hellenic Council. Representatives from each chapter in PHC voted nine to zero Thursday, with one abstention, in favor of adopting the two remaining MGC sororities. Gamma Rho Lambda, a lesbian, bisexual, ally, transgender, question-



ending diverse career ALAN HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER | afhovorka@bsu.edu

WHAT ASSOCIATE MEMBERS MEANS • Can vote on topics that pertain to them • Pay dues •A  ttend round table, but not required to attend all •M  aintain previous recruitment practices

ing, straight or no label sorority, and Gamma Phi Omega, a sorority focused on Latina representation, will act as associate members. Casiana Warfield, president of MGC, said joining PHC was really their only option. None of the other sorority and fraternity organizations were able to take them in.

See PHC, page 3

For about a decade, Bob Fey met with his barbershop quartet, City Limits, every week. But it wasn’t until they reached senior citizen status 5. SUNNY 4. MOSTLY SUNNY 1. CLOUDY 2. MOSTLY CLOUDY 3. PARTLY CLOUDY that Fey, University Police Department’s assistant police chief, and his group took their first gold in a regional competition in 2003 and were able to compete internationally. 7. PERIODS OF RAIN 10. DRIZZLE 9. SCATTERED SHOWERS 6. RAIN Two members have since moved to Florida, breaking up the group, but not their friendship. The gang plans to get back together this summer following Fey’s retirement DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY from his 24-year career in UPD. 12. SCATTERED FLURRIES 11. SNOW FLURRIES 13. SNOW SHOWERS Robert Fey, assistant police chief for the University Police Department, poses for a photo. Fey THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

See FEY, page 3

plans to retire in the summer.

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

MUNCIE, INDIANA

VOL. 93, ISSUE 112 15. HEAVY SNOW

THERE WILL BE A LUNAR ECLIPSE TONIGHT, BUT YOU MIGHT NOT SEE IT. BECAUSE OF A CHANCE OF SNOWFALL.

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter.

FORECAST

green dining challenge #2

Let that selfie earn you a free lunch!

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

20. THUNDERSTORMS

April is Earth Month, and BSU Dining wants to see how you’re being green. TWEET A SELFIE doing something related to the weekly challenge, and we’ll pick our 5 favorites each week to receive a complimentary lunch or dinner coupon.

#MugMugBSU

18. WINTRY MIX

Temperatures will fall throughout the day. We will see a transition to snow tonight into Tuesday, but with no accumulation expected. - Michael Behrens, WCRD Chief Weather Forecaster

THURSDAY  Thunderstorms High: 66 Low: 30 19. RAIN/SNOW MIX

17. FREEZING RAIN

16. SLEET

THIS WEEK’S CHALLENGE

DRINK OUT OF A REUSABLE MUG, BOTTLE, OR TUMBLER INSTEAD OF A DISPOSABLE Open to students, faculty, and staff

G GOIN EN GRE


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY TODAY’S BULLETIN BOARD NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

TODAY

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

TUESDAY Scattered flurries High: 37 Low: 26

WEDNESDAY

RUPERT BOYD

12 - SCATTERED FLURRIES

WEDNESDAY Mostly sunny High: 48 Low: 24

KELSEY TIMMERMAN

Ball State’s School of Music is offering a free and open to the public master class with Australian classical guitarist Rupert Boyd. Boyd, who was called “a player who deserves to be heard’ by Classical Guitar Magazine, will host the class at 10 a.m. in the Music Instruction Building.

Freshman Connections is hosting a free event with Kelsey Timmerman, author of the 2012-13 freshman common reader. The event will look to get students to consider the sources of their coffee, chocolate, bananas and apple juice. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in Pruis Hall.

TUESDAY

04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

THURSDAY Mostly sunny High: 61 Low: 34 04 - MOSTLY SUNNY

FRIDAY Rain showers High: 59 Low: 44

REVERSE CULTURE SHOCK

WHEN The Rinker Center for International Programs is hosting a “Reverse Culture 2 p.m. WHERE Shock” event, looking to help those traveling abroad to deal with the shock L.A. Pittenger of returning home. The event will focus Student Center Room on the stress felt by international 102 travelers returning to “normal” life after extended periods of time in another country. The event will take place at 2 p.m. in the L.A. Pittenger Student Center Room 102.

THE OUTER DIMENSION

AUDITION MODE HORN SEMINAR

Karl Pituch and Denis Tryon, founders of the Audition Mode Horn Seminar, will host a presentation teaching aspiring music students how to audition through master classes, sectionals, mock auditions and lessons. The free event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in Pruis Hall. “FLAME ON!”: NUCLEAR FAMILIES, UNSTABLE MOLECULES, AND THE QUEER HISTORY OF THE FANTASTIC FOUR

Ramzi Fawaz, an assistant Ramzi Fawaz professor of English at the WHAT University of Wisconsin, will present as part of the Marilyn Presentation on LGBT issues in comic books K. Cory lecture series. He and literature specializes in Queer Theory WHEN and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual 7:30 p.m. and Transgender literature WHERE and culture evident in his Burkhardt Building project, “The New Mutants: Room 109 Comic Book Superheroes and Popular Fantasy in Postwar America.” The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in Burkhardt Building Room 109. WHO

08 - RAIN SHOWERS

A workshop hosted by MOSAIC tilted “The Outer Dimension: How Other People Create Your Identity “ aims to teach students to be aware of the concept of double-consciousness. According to a press release, the event will give students the tools to look at themselves through the eyes of others. The event will take place at 7 p.m. in the L.A. Pittenger Student Center Room 303.

DN FILE PHOTO EMMA FLYNN

SERVICE DIRECTORY

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ALPHA PHI ALPHA WEEK OF EVENTS: TODAY

TUESDAY

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THURDAY

ALPHA THEATER

BRAIN FREEZE

GO TO HIGH SCHOOL GO TO COLLEGE

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

PHIGHT NIGHT

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ALTER EGO BOWLING PARTY

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EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Ashley Dye

FEATURES EDITOR Bethannie Huffman 72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier

Trivia Night @ Cleo’s!

24/7 Crossword

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

$100 in prizes!

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

Monday is Pitcher Night! Coors $2 Coors Lt $3 Blue Moon $4

$2 Double Wells $2 Off pulled pork sandwiches from 6-8PM

Trivia @7PM

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Sudoku

By Michael Mepham

Level: EASY

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY

ACROSS 1 Steady look 5 Uneducated guess 9 Knife and fork separator, in a place setting 14 Black cat, to some 15 Like a guru 16 Long-eared hoppers 17 Hand Vac maker 19 Haloed messenger 20 Nocturnal annoyance 21 Once in a while 23 Until now 25 Road groove 26 Bermuda hrs. 29 Special “Jeopardy!” square 36 Stir-fried hodgepodge 38 Ad-lib comedy style 39 Hailed vehicle 40 Cavity filler’s letters, or, said another way, a hint to 17-, 29-, 49- and 65-Across 42 Comedian Cook

43 “The Real Slim Shady” rapper 46 Big name in gloves 49 A&E reality series featuring the Robertson family 51 Arid 52 Past-tense verb that sounds like a number 53 EMT technique 55 Squirrel’s discard 60 Continental bank notes 64 Hauled to the hoosegow 65 Computer component 67 Speak one’s mind 68 Good earth 69 Peak 70 Moisten, as a lawn 71 Tolkien tree creatures 72 Ash Wednesday-toEaster time

DOWN 1 Zeus and Apollo 2 Idi of Uganda 3 None 4 Way in 5 Nor. neighbor 6 DVR pioneer 7 “Not a chance!” 8 Steeple section with a ringer 9 “The __ of the Opera” 10 Touch down 11 Jason’s ship 12 New driver, often 13 Immigrant’s subj. 18 Closing documents 22 German automaker 24 Cross-shaped Greek letter 26 Played a part (in)

27 SeaWorld orca 28 Poisonous, as waste 30 Mil. roadside hazard 31 Winona’s “Beetlejuice” role 32 Prom hairstyle 33 Mark with an iron 34 Introvert 35 “__ Breath You Take”: Police hit 37 Internal color of a medium steak 41 Puncture sound 44 1970s Mary Tyler Moore co-star 45 Folk story 47 Non-prescription: Abbr. 48 Used a keyboard 50 Tattoo tool 54 Not urban 55 California wine valley 56 Textbook chapter 57 Fork prong 58 Big cat 59 Test for a future atty.

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY

Trivia Night @ Cleo’s!

ballstatedaily.com $100 in prizes!

Monday is Pitcher Night! Coors $2 Coors Lt $3 Blue Moon $4

$2 Double Wells $2 Off pulled pork sandwiches from 6-8PM

Trivia @7PM


MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

STUDENTS UNITE TO HONOR TROOPS Walking Wounded 5k brings awareness to veterans, PTSD BERG STAFF REPORTER | KARA knberg2@bsu.edu

PHOTO PROVIDED BY ROBERT FEY

Robert Fey, third from left, is a member of the quartet City Limits. Fey plans to perform more after his retirement.

FEY:

Retiree remembers moving bags of gold | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Fey came to Muncie with his family in 1990. “It’s been home ever since,” he said. He began his time at Ball State as a captain and then moved through the ranks to assistant police chief, but he hasn’t always carried a badge. Fey began his work career as an English teacher outside his 280 person hometown of Adams, Neb. He taught speech, drama, debate and theater. He called the role of educator rewarding because he watched some students make it big in show business. One of them ended up having a part in the film “Full Metal Jacket,” though the character is only in the background. “He was one of my students and you go and watch a movie and there he is, in such an incredible movie,” Fey said. After years of teaching, Fey left teaching to work at an ambulance company where he met his wife. This October will mark their 35-year anniversary. Shelley Fey, his wife, described her husband as a fair man with integrity and compassion.

Fey entered law enforcement at the University of Nebraska after working at the ambulance company. For a particular assignment, one he will never forget, his police chief told him he needed to be secretive. He wouldn’t tell Fey where he was going and said he couldn’t tell his wife he was leaving. An hour later, Fey found himself on a jet headed to Arizona to pick up a gold donation from a University of Nebraska alumnus. “There was approximately $2 million in gold,” Fey said. “So we brought it back, all very secretive.” Fey spent 10 years at the university before switching between two other jobs in law enforcement in Nebraska. Eventually he came to Ball State, a move he said was reaching back to his country roots. At the time, the department used horses. “I was born and raised on a horse,” he said. “I got to get out of the office with the other officers and feel OK in the saddle. I enjoyed that.” During one of his first summers on the force at the university, the party life had taken

over one Muncie street. Fey said hundreds of people were partying in two neighboring houses. The horse patrols went in for crowd control. “One of our officers rode his horse right up on the porch,” Fey said. “I’ll never forget that picture of the horse walking up the porch.” Riot control on horseback may be a fond moment for Fey, but his proudest moment is when the Ball State department was accredited. “That first year [of accreditation] was just grand because we were the only agency in the state of Indiana to be accredited,” he said. “That was a major undertaking that took three years.“ Gene Burton, UPD police chief, said Fey was instrumental in the process. “Being able to share that with him and have that over with was great,” Burton said. “He brought everything to the table for accreditation.” Burton said Fey’s departure will leave hard shoes to fill. He called Fey professional and eager to work. Through all the careers and

BOB FEY’S CAREER

• English teacher in Lincoln, Neb. • Manager for an ambulance company • Officer for the University of Nebraska police • Polygraph interpreter for a drug task force in Nebraska • State Revenue Agent for Nebraska • Iowa State Police department • Ball State University Police Department

years Fey still remembers his first job correcting papers. “Much to the dismay of some of the officers here, we see the grammar, spelling, and punctuations,” Fey said. “[They are] likely to get red pen mark-ups.” Following his retirement he hopes to continue working as a consultant, working with the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement. He got the job helping institutions across the country and in Canada get accreditation after UPD received its. He will leave the department April 30, but that doesn’t mean rest for Fey. Right away, he will travel and go on a wild boar hunt — a Christmas gift from his son.

PHC: Some multicultural members fear discrimination | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

If PHC had voted against the inclusion, Warfield said their national representatives would have had to get involved and find out the reason for the vote, because it could be an issue of discrimination. She said she doesn’t think they would have disbanded. Although Warfield has a positive attitude about the transition, she said it draws attention to the lack of diversity on campus. “It’s a wake-up call to the fact that it isn’t as diverse as Ball State says it is,” Warfield said. “We have a lot of international students, but a lot of international students aren’t interested in getting involved with Greek Life.” She said some members are worried about potential discrimination from the other PHC

organizations and possibly the loss of their voice. “They’re used to experiencing a lot of prejudice from similar demographics,” Warfield said. “It’s going to be a shift from having our own council to be our voice box, to taking a back seat to some things. But I think we’re going to try to make the most out of it.” Overall, Warfield is excited for the opportunity and said there are a lot of positives to being involved with PHC. President of PHC Danica Craig said as associate members, the MGC sororities will function similarly to PHC members. Craig said they will vote on any topic that pertains to them and will pay dues. She also said they will attend round tables, though they won’t be required to attend every meeting like member sororities are, due to

their smaller size. She said the biggest difference is MGC sororities will maintain their own recruiting traditions instead of participating in formal recruitment. PHC decided to take a vote on allowing MGC sororities into their council after the Phi Iota Alpha fraternity decided not to continue their colony on Ball State’s campus. The fraternity currently only has one member. Craig said only having two organizations on one council wouldn’t be beneficial to either sorority. Greek life advisers approached both organizations with the option of disbanding MGC sororities and including them in PHC. Across the nation, PHC has allowed similar groups to become associate members.

NATIONAL STUDENT EMPLOYMENT WEEK A CELEBRATION OF

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT April 13 – 19, 2014 A week of honoring student employees, both on- and off-campus, for their hard work, dedication, skill, and pursuit of excellence. The nearly 5,000 on-campus student employees, along with many more off-campus, are integral parts of the campus and local community. Benefits of student employment include: • Experience • Recommendations • Transferable skills • Money

Ball State Career Center Lucina Hall 220 765-285-1522 www.bsu.edu/careers

Thank you for your contributions to Ball State University.

Warfield said the move could help multicultural organizations recruit more people and get more involved with other greek chapters. Warfield also said she is appreciative of PHC for allowing them to maintain traditions like recruitment. Craig said the transition is also a positive one for current PHC members because it will help members learn about about other greek organizations. “We are learning about things that are a little bit different than what we might think of when we hear, ‘I want to join a sorority,’” Craig said. She said the biggest issue will be adjusting and figuring out what is going to work. “I think it will be fun and I think it will bring good changes to our community,” Craig said.

For students and veterans bringing attention to posttraumatic stress disorder Saturday, their small support walk was nothing compared to a soldier’s sacrifice. “Sometimes, the deepest wounds of war show no scars,” was the rallying cry for the Student Veteran Organization, which hosted an awareness walk for PTSD from Scheumann Stadium to Riverside Avenue and back. Nearly half of the walkers were veterans. Jessica Robinson, SVO vice president, said the main purpose of the walk was to raise awareness for veterans. In the opening ceremony, Robinson spoke about her experience returning from a 2009 term in Iraq. She said she thought there would be great support for returning veterans, but she was wrong. “Sometimes, it seems like we don’t have a lot of support,” Robinson said. “I wanted to show them someone cared.” This is the first year of the Walking Wounded 5k, and Robinson said the turnout was better than expected. She said she expected about 15-20 people to come, but approximately 40 marchers attended the event.

One of the walkers, Janette Dalton, said there are three veterans in her life: her father, her brother and a friend. She said her dad and brother both have PTSD. “To me, [PTSD] is supporting something that people can’t see,” Dalton said. “[People] don’t understand it unless they suffer from it or someone they know suffers from it.” Jill Fernelius, another walker, said her husband is a student in the counseling psychology program and is currently doing an internship at the Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System. Her son joined the walk to support him. “I think that the attention of what PTSD is very important,” Fernelius said. “It’s so hard for people who experience it.” Fernelius said participating in the walk was a simple way to show support for veterans. “We want to try to support these people who have supported us for the past decade,” she said. “They develop [PTSD] serving us.” Mark Fischer was at the walk supporting his son, a veteran of Afghanistan. He said he also was there to support and thank the veterans for their sacrifices for the United States. “This is something I can do, a simple effort I can make, compared to the sacrifices they’ve made,” Fischer said. “It’s something I can do to show I appreciate their efforts — it’s the least I can do.”

BALL STATE HOSTS IRON CHEF EVENT

Ball State’s Residence Hall Association hosted a ONLINE competition today to see which residence hall had the See the teams skill to be Ball State’s next “Iron Chef.” race the clock The teams had to create two dishes that included in this video: at least one of the secret ingredients from limes, bit.ly/1gstgFt plantains and sweet potatoes. Noyer Complex’s team members decided to use all three of the ingredients in their dishes. The team made lime chicken with rice and a sweet potato with a honey, butter, brown sugar and cinnamon glaze for the first dish. For dessert, the team made ice cream with fried plantains and fudge sauce. As an added challenge, contestants had to buy all of their ingredients at the university dining halls. Kaytianna Porter, the leader of Team Peaches, said her team chose to get the majority of ingredients from Woodworth because of the variety. The teams had an hour to create the two dishes. Then RHA President Marie Prevost, Student Government Association president pro tempore Jack Hesser and Dehority Hall Director Bart Upah judged the dishes. The winning team this year was #TeamTurn-Ip from Brayton and Clevenger halls. – JACOB BURBRINK


PAGE 4 | MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FEATURES

Miss out on watching the MTV Movie Awards last night? Check out the winners online at ballstatedaily.com.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Avery Leigh makes her entrance onto the stage to start her first performance of the night Saturday at the Bad to the Bone drag show in Ball Gymnasium. Leigh has participated in the drag show eight times.

DOLLARS FOR

DRAG Spectrum members, performances provide flair, attitude, charisma ANA OLVERA STAFF REPORTER | aolvera@bsu.edu

High-kicks, splits, cartwheels and twerking were signature moves throughout Saturday’s performances at Spectrum’s annual spring drag show. Performers worked the stage at Ball Gymnasium as audience members waved their dollar bills in the air. Admission was free, but the audience was encouraged to make donations by

tipping the performers. Proceeds were donated to the local chapter of Bikers Against Child Abuse International. The organization hopes to partner with Spectrum’s drag show again. The show raised a total of $1,429.80, about $580 more than the total at the end of last semester’s show. The show was split into two acts and featured 12 performers. Guest performers included the king trio Vicious and Delicious from Franklin College, queen Amaya Sexton, from Dayton, Ohio and “Mr. Gay Indianapolis” Tailor Made. The show began with Clint Taurus’ performance to Pharrell Williams’ “Happy.” Within seconds,

Taurus had the crowd clapping to the beat and dollar bills waving in the air. Queen Robyn Simore gave a nod to the selfie movement by performing to the electronic dance music hit “#SELFIE.” Courtney O’s performance showed Miley Cyrus’ transformation from Hannah Montana to the twerking teddy bear from the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards. Avery Leigh performed to Beyoncé’s Superbowl mix. Jacob Walker, a sophomore mathematics major, attended the event for the first time. “For a gay male, it’s just amazing to come out and support the [LGBT] community and see every-

one have so much fun,” Walker said. The show ended with a powerful performance from Jaime Whitaker, a senior theatre design major, performing as Avery Leigh for the eighth and final time as a Ball State student. The final performance will show “something you haven’t seen from me,” Whitaker said. “Vulnerability.” Whitaker removed his makeup and changed from drag attire into a t-shirt and shorts as Christina Aguilera’s “Beautiful” played in the background. Maddy Vaughn, a sophomore elementary education major, accompanied Walker to the drag show. At the end of the night, Vaugh couldn’t decide which performance was her favorite.

Q+A WITH AVERY LEIGH SENIOR JAIME WHITAKER

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Robyn Simore accepts tips from an audience member during the Bad to the Bone drag show Saturday at Ball Gymnasium. Audience members donated by giving tips.

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

A representative from Bikers Against Child Abuse International speaks at the drag show Saturday at Ball Gymnasium. The show benefited the organization.

Ball State’s Spectrum hosted its annual drag show Saturday night at Ball Gymnasium. From makeup to hair and costumes, the performers went all out for the year’s final show. Senior Jaime Whitaker, a theatre design and technology major, performed at the event for the eighth and final time as a Cardinal.

Q: How did you come up with your stage name, Avery Leigh? A: So, we were talking and my first name Avery is actually

like a play on words because when [my friend] was asking me what kind of queen I wanted to be, I was like, “Well I want to be a very pretty drag queen. I want to be a very loud, outgoing drag queen. I want to be a very popular drag queen. I want to be a very dancing drag queen.” And she goes, “well everything you just said has ‘a very’ in front of it and if you put ‘a’ and ‘very’ together, your name’s Avery, and that’s the name I just got from you saying everything.” And Leigh is actually a play on my real middle name ’cause my real middle name is spelled “Lee.”

Q: How do you have the energy to perform? A: It’s an adrenaline rush. You’re a guy in high heels and a dress

or a sequin leotard or something completely flashy that you wouldn’t normally wear, and people love it. It’s one of those things where you have energy when you go on stage.

AND THE WINNER IS... QUEEN CROWD FAVORITE

Avery Leigh

KING CROWD FAVORITE

Glitter Boy Floyd

MOST MONEY RAISED IN A PERFORMANCE

Avery Leigh, $342.80

Check out #BadToTheBone to read comments from the show.

“They were all amazing,” Vaughn said. “But then again Avery Leigh’s [second performance] was very personal.”

Q: What is Avery Leigh like? A: If you would have asked me this two years ago, my an-

swer for “How is Jaime?” and “How is Avery?” would have been completely different. Jaime, right now, is the exact same as Avery. We’re both very loud and outgoing. We can be the center of attention. We can also be that super quiet person in the corner, depending on what’s going on and how the environment feels.

Q: What’s the process of coming up with your routine for a show?

A: Typically, I do a lot of upbeat dance songs that are sort of

current. I draw a lot of inspiration from Britney Spears and Jennifer Lopez and Kat Graham and just anybody who sort of is on the radio now. That’s typically the audience that I perform to. So when they love that song, it sort of builds up the energy. I am a chameleon; I adapt to anything. When I start making a mix, I have no idea what it’s gonna sound like. It’s literally like a little kid playing with Play-Doh. I’m just mashing pieces together and hoping that it works out, and after some editing, it does. I’ll go in from the song mix into whatever it is that I’m wearing. Then it comes to makeup, and if it’s something that is a one-time big performance, I will sort of custom design my makeup to what I’m wearing. I’ll add the colors.

ONLINE For the full profile on Avery Leigh, go to bit.ly/1qWemMn

| UNIVERSITY SINGERS PERFORM 50TH ANNUAL SPECTACULAR

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

The Ball State University Singers perform“Bye Bye Blackbird” for the 50th Annual Spectacular on Saturday at John R. Emens Auditorium. The Ball State University Singers performed more than 30 songs.

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

The Ball State University Singers perform at the 50th Annual Spectacular on Saturday at the John R. Emens Auditorium. Ball State University Singers alumni also performed during the event.

Special guest Eden Espinosa performs the song “Defying Gravity” from the DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY Broadway show “Wicked” on Saturday at John R. Emens Auditorium. Espinosa Jeff Zenger and Gabby Smith sing “Everything has Changed” by Taylor Swift and Ed Sheeran on Saturday at John R. Emens Auditorium. Zenger and Smith performed was one of the special guests that the first duet of the night. performed at the show.


MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

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CARNIVAL WORKER OFFERS INSIDE LOOK Over three days, the C1 parking lot transformed from barren asphalt to a whirling, flashing, spinning attraction in preparation for the 11th annual Late Nite Carnival. And I was in the middle of it. I was dead broke and willing to do almost anything, so I applied to work at the Carnival. Neither waiting until next semester or being constrained to campus over summer would solve my problem, so the onetime gig for event staff seemed like a smart move. I mean, if someone has to pick up trash or transport arm-flailing inflatable

FORUM POLICY

The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor,

JEREMY ERVIN NO SLEEP TILL MUNCIE JEREMY ERVIN IS A SOPHOMORE MAGAZINE JOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘NO SLEEP TILL MUNCIE’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO HIM AT JRERVIN@BSU.EDU.

tube-men, it might as well be me. I received an official confirmation on April 6, only five days before the event. Before the Carnival, we met at the L.A. Pittenger Student Center, loaded a rental truck with all of Late Nite’s toys and unloaded it at the grounds. My job for the night was to work one of Late Nite’s free food tents which meant I was responsible for making and distributing

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popcorn, passing out cotton candy and stocking our drink cooler. When people complained about drinks, we stocked it. When the table of cotton candy ran low, we put more out there. Our tent alone went through 21 boxes of cotton candy, more than 2,600 individual bags. After midnight, things began to noticeably slow down. Right after 1 a.m., as the Carnival came to a close, we got word

The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides

to shut everything down. After chasing a few stragglers off the grounds, the teams divided to pack up everything. The games went back in the truck and we swept the parking lot for garbage, of which there was plenty. Box by box, the entire whirling, flashing magic act returned to the bowels of the Student Center. It was all back in its place and we went home. I clocked out at 3:16 a.m. a total 12 hours of work. That’s all there was to it, pretty open and shut. My time at the Carnival is over — at least until it rolls into Muncie once again.

this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Sophomore magazine journalism major Jeremy Ervin puts cotton candy on a table for carnival attendees to take Friday at the Late Nite Carnival in the C1 commuter lot. Ervin worked 12 hours at the Late Nite Carnival.

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

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Help Wanted

Ball State Students! Want a "Cool" Job this Summer? Apply at www.homecityice.com Home City Ice Co. in Muncie is now Hiring for Route Delivery Drivers. Weekends and Holidays in summer are a Must. Clean Driving Record a Must. 50-60 hours a week in Summer, and part time around your classes in Spring and next Fall. Pay averages between $8 and $14 per hour. This is hard work, and rewarding for those who are motivated to succeed. Apply Online Today! Construction Comp. needs Girl Friday type secretary part time flexible hours 765-747-9814 MUNCIE ELKS is currently hiring Bartenders for the summer golf season. Please apply in person at 909 N. County Road 500 W. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm Part time office work. $7.25 per hour. near BSU. 765-717-9331

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Apartments For Rent

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****** 4 bdrm, completely renovated apt. Avail August. Great location. 2 blks from campus. Util Paid. No pets. 896-8105 ******* 3 bdrm Apts. 2 blks from campus. Avail May or August. Economical. Util Paid. No Pets. W/D DW A/C. Off street parking. 896-8105 ******** 1,2,3,4 bdrm Apts. Best locations. Avail. May or August. From $250 each. Some or all Util. paid. Walk to class. A/C, DW, W/D 896-8105 ********* 1 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. 3 blks from campus. A/C, DW, W/D. Off st. parking. Util paid. No pets. Great locations. 896-8105 ********** Affordable! Walk to class. Great locations on 1,2,3,4 bdrm apts. Avail. May or August. Part or all Util. paid. A/C DW W/D. Off st. parking. No pets. walktoballstate.com 896-8105

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*Ad must be submitted to dnclassified@bsu.edu to be eligible. * The Daily News has the right to revise or reject any advertisements. * The Daily News assumes no liability for content of the advertisement.

Houses For Rent

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Houses For Rent

1 bdrm apt. Hardwd fls. Aug lse. Ashland Ave. Some utils pd. Walk to BSU. No Dogs. 317-727-5847

!! 3 & 4 bds NY & Bethel from $275 each BSU alum landlord call 317-507-1490 for info

1,2,3,4 bdrms. Lease 2014-2015. www.clunerentals.blogspot.com 765-744-1400 or 729-9321

1 or 2 br apts available May or August 2014-may or may not include utilities. Required application fee of $35.00 and security deposit for all application forms submitted. Showing appointments will be arraged. Contact Kerry @284-6313 or 744-2998 or email @ kwiggerly@prudentialindiana.com

!!! 3-6 Bdrm house close to campus, w/laundry rm.,deck, paved off st. prkng. $350 each includes heat, water & sewage. Aug lease. No pets. lori2260@comcast.net or 765212-8992

1604 W. Adams. Lg 3 bdrm. W/D $275 per person + util. No pets/ smoking. Avail Aug. 1. Call 765-284-5741

!1505 Kimberly (behind LaFollette) 4@$300; 4bds; great house/yard /loc. full bsmt W/D May 760-3002

2011 Washington behind Student CEnter. 3 bdr water & sewage paid. no pets. avail Aug. Walktoballstate.com 896-8105

1, 2 & 3bdr apts. Some utils pd. 14 blks from BSU. No Pets. Avil Aug 1st. 765-289-3971 2 Bdrm, basement apt, W/D, $450 rent, utils included. Avail Aug. 765-748-4934 3 Bd apt, util pd, 50 inch TV, 2 ba. W/D. close to BSU. $315/person. 315 South Mckinley 744-4649

3 Bdrm upstairs apt, $1000 rent/ month. includes util, close to camSummer help All American Homes, ****1, 2 & 3 BR avail. Great floor pus, avail Aug. 765-748-4934 Decatur, IN. Call 260-724-9171 for plan, central air, DW only 3 blks to more info campus! THE 400 APARTMENTS Affordable village living (765) 288-6819 University Village Apartments www.400apartments.com Apartments 1000 mo free cable 160 reserved parking 765-729-9618 For Rent ***BSU apts, close to campus, www.bsurentals.com !!! 1,2,3,4 br apts, 514 N Martin, 1,2&3 bdrm,utils includ off-st prkg, W/D, C/A, Individual/Aug leases Call765-228-8458 or 765-749-4688 FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 (765)730-2473 www.signaturet.com bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site ***Now leasing for the 2014/2015 WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806 !!!!! SPRING SPECIAL 50% off 1st school yr. 1 Bdrm apt. $460/mo + month's rent. 2, 3 & 4 Bdrm utils, Studio apt. $410/mo + util. apts/houses avail May or Aug. W/D. Bar-Tel Apartments, 1616 W. Huge 6 bdrm. 615 North Dicks. Great locations 2 blks from campus. Gilbert St. Visit www.bsrentals.com Aquatine apartments. 1 block from campus. all utilities paid. No pets. All utils pd, A/C, D/W, W/D, off st or call Doug at 765-744-3593 Avail May. 896-8105. prkg. 765-896-8105 Utilities paid. 811 W. Main. Unique mansion,1&2 br apt.765-744-0185 bsuoffcampus.com.

U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

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U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814

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4 BDRM, 1 & 1/2 bths, C/A, gas heat, W/D,o ff-street parking.1608 New York, garage, close to BSU 765-748-8425 4 & 5 bdrm houses, 3 blcks to student center. W/D, plenty of parking. Really nice. Call 765-228-3883 www.ludwickrentals.com

1904 N. Maplewood. 2-3 bdrm. Garage, Full basement, New Bath. 4 bdr, Hrdw floors. W/D, off street 3-5 bedroom house. North Ball. May or Aug lease.765-744-7862 prkg, Pet friendly, Walk dist to cambsuoffcampus.com 765-744-0185 pus, $325 + util. Call Eric at 3172 bdrm very nice house + sunrm, 825-8683 www.ballurental.com !!!5 BRw/ private swimming pool, bsmt, gar, W/D, C/A, near BSU, built in fire pit, lg deck, bike racks, 2 Aug lse. 765-215-4591 4 Brm House @1220 Neely lg Ba, off st. prkg, W/D, C/A, D/W, landlord does yard & pool maint. 2 bdrm, 1 ba, D/W, W/D, A/C, @1225 Marsh st. Avail Aug 1, $1,100 a month May or Aug lease bsmt., gar., VERY CLEAN, close to 2014. $1200/mo + utils 765-6498377 765-405-1105, leave message. BSU, $700/mo. (260)444-8481

*** 2 blks to Village. 3 & 4 bdrms for Rent. A/C, W/D, No pets. Avalible August. 1. Call 286-2808

216 N Dill st. 1 bdrm 325 + electric 2bdrm 450 + gas & elec.3bdrm 600 + gas & elec. off st prkg. aug-aug ****4 bdrm 2 bath at 825 W. Ash- 765-730-3365 land W/D, C/A, all utils paid, $365/mo, No pets,Aug. lease. Call 2713 Beckett. 4 bdrm, 2 ba. 2 car 765-760-2202 gar. $295/person + utils. Aug.-Aug. Lease. Quiet area, lots of parking ***4 bdrm, 2 Ba. 1804 W Charles Call 765-254-9992 close to campus nice W/D C/A prkg. 300 each + util 765-744-5008 3 Bdrm, 2 Ba. W/D hookup, lg living or www.munciecollegerentals.com space. 524 Alameda. $675 + utils ***RATCHFORD PROPERTIES*** 765-730-3029 • Great Apts. & Houses! • Best Locations for 1,2,3,4 BR on & Near Campus • Affordable Prices! • Some Utilities Paid! • Laundry Facility / NO Pets.

3 Brdm Homes from $167/month ea. Now,May,Aug. 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com 3 or 4 bdr C/A, C/H ,W/D + Utils. Ball Ave 4 blks from Bethel Aug 1st. 765-289-3971

***CALL OR TEXT 748-6407*** www.ratchfordproperties.com 1 & 2 bd newer units. W/D, D/W, Micro, A/C, private, near BSU. $475 Village area studio apts, & 2 bdrm 3 bdrm 2 ba, W/D, D/W 1011 N 765-717-9332 Aug lease $850 apts Call Asset Management 281- 1800 West Bethel, 3-4 bdrm. avail Wheeling www.greatbsurentals.com May. 744-7862 729-0978 9000

4, 5, or 6 bdrm. $300/ea. all utils includ. lrg. ba., W/D, off st prkg, 501 N. Alameda. (765) 744-8269. 812 west North st. 2 BD, off st parking, Aug lease, $600 a month inlcuding utlities. 765-744-7574 Great location, 1312 Abbott, 5 Bedroom, 2 bath, C/A, $290/per + utilities, Aug-Aug lease. Call 765-254-9992 Newley renovated. 1-6 BR homes. Close to BSU. W/D, A/C, D/W. thecampusedge.com 765-286-2806 Nice 3 bdr. Close to BSU. 2 ba. Avail. Aug. A/C, stove, fridge, W/D. $395 /ea, utils incl. 765-348-6413 www.jahrentals.com, Nicest houses on campus. Many extras. Even a 6 bdrm. Also student parking available. Call 286-5216. Village area 4 bdrm house, newly remodeled 1413 W. University $1400 a month, Call Asset Management 281-9000

Visit us online Today’s birthday (4-14-14) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchyTribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7. Pluto turns

This year’s mantra could be retrograde (until 9/23), and power struggles decrease. It’s still not a good time to argue. Pressure eases, and “party for a good cause”. you can take time to look back. Secure the ground taken. Improved communications Be cautious with longdistance travel, and take it slow. and organization at home add Watch conditions for changes. ease and peace. Springtime Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 7. With Pluto renovations set the stage for retrograde for the next five months, political control joyful gatherings. Collaborations issues ease. Careful financial review reveals future expenses, so keep it frugal and stick to the budget. Pay and partnerships foster bills. Do the research to craft a plan that fulfills a brilliant idea. Share your dream. compromise and diplomacy. Pluto, Saturn and Mars Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is a 7. Listen, but retrograde phases (now through don’t argue. Intuitively, you know which path to take. Don’t gamble or spend on treats for the kids. Push July) encourage reflection, yourself recreationally. For the next five months, reaffirm planning and revision. Fun with and revise partnerships. Wait to see what develops. family lights up summertime. Someone’s saying nice things about you Autumn reveals new freedom and direction. Instigate love.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is a 7. Figure out how much you can afford to put away. Your intuition gets validated. With Pluto retrograde (until 9/23), authoritarian pressure eases, and you can relax and recharge. Express your emotions artistically. Settle into a pleasant routine at work. Make future plans. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 7. Don’t gamble with your reserves or buy stuff you don’t need. Check on supplies. Over the next five months, strengthen relations with your community and partnerships. Take time to knit structures together for mutual support. Work for peace, beauty and freedom. Talk is cheap. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7. Discover family secrets from the past over the next five months. Get into the research. Take time for personal discovery, and capture it in words and images. Indulge in creative chaos. Get outside and taste freedom. Schedule more time for rejuvenation and relaxation.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8. Bossy overlords get distracted while Pluto’s retrograde (until 9/23). Savor creative freedom, and push your personal agenda. Consider possibilities, and make longrange plans. Budget carefully, and play by the rules. Listen to your intuition about the road ahead. Communicate your passionate commitments. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7. Love and spirituality soothe like balm. Nostalgia can be profitable, with Pluto’s retrograde (until 9/23). Don’t bet the farm, though. Maintain frugal financial routines. Look back and gather insight on where you’ve been. Enjoy creative freedom, and invent. Look ahead and envision your desire realized. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 7. Over the next five months, reassess your resources. Include talents, affinities, and connections. You have more than you think. Keep equipment in repair. Avoid wasting time indulging gossip. Communications could unveil surprises... make statements as if everything you say were public. Keep secrets to yourself.

www.ballstatedaily.com

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7. The intensity lets up with Pluto retrograde for the next five months. Use this break to review strategies. Write the roadmap to reach a future personal goal accomplished. Cultivate your leadership. Take it slow to avoid accidents. A new contraption isn’t reliable. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 7. With Pluto retrograde for the next five months, take time to review and reflect. Prepare a retrospective, dig into family history, or write your memories. Study and explore. Plan a peaceful retreat. Communications could seem intense today... soothe emotions with something delicious. Sign contracts later. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7. Let love spur you to make or renew a commitment. New information could change options. A decision could get reversed. Listen to your senses. Take on new responsibility for greater independence. For five months (with Pluto retrograde) review and refine plans. Learn from the past.


PAGE 6 | MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

SPORTS

Balanced pitching key over weekend Duo finds success, differing techniques contain opposition JAKE FOX STAFF REPORTER | jkfox@bsu.edu Their is no lack of offensive production for the Ball State softball team. The Cardinals currently lead the Mid-American Conference in runs with 182, hits with 285 and average a league best .325 mark at the plate. Softball is more than just connecting with pitches, however. The Ball State pitching staff has played a key role in helping the club go 23-14 thus far in the season, and 4-2 in Mid-American Conference play. Head coach Tyra Perry said strong pitching has been a factor for Ball State this season. “I think in today’s game, especially if you want to get to an elite level of play, pitching is very important,” she said. “You have to have pitchers that are confident and comfortable in the circle, and I think it’s a key part of the game.” Leaders within the pitching staff, Nicole Steinbach and Kelsey Schifferdecker, are just sophomores. The promising young pitchers have performed well in the team’s recent stretch of games. Ball State is coming off of a four-game weekend, going 3-1 against Northern Illinois and Western Michigan. Steinbach and Schifferdecker each started two games over the weekend. Neither allowed more than four runs. They were able to give their team a chance to win each game. “I think we both did a really good job of hitting our spots and mixing up our pitches really well to keep our batters off balance,” Schifferdecker said. The sophomore duo has

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Sophomore Kelsey Schifferdecker pitches during the game against Toledo on April 6 at the Ball State Softball Complex. Schifferdecker holds a 10-5 record on the season.

combined to throw 194.4 innings this year, an equal 97.2 apiece. Only two other Cardinals have thrown innings this year. There are many statistical similarities between the two, including that they each have 10 wins. Their styles differ however, and this helps Steinbach and Schifferdecker learn from one another. “Me and Kelsey are a very good complement to each other,” Steinbach said. “We are totally different pitchers and we throw batters off in different ways. ... I feel like going into games, they don’t really know what to expect because we are so different and they don’t know who to attack more or

what side to attack.” The pair hopes to continue picking up pivotal MAC wins as they play through the season’s final 12 games. Perry said pitching and defense win championships, believes her team is strong enough in both areas to be successful. “I think it will play a huge plan when it comes to the conference tournament,” she said. “When you get into that type of setting down the stretch in the MAC and getting to the conference tournament, when you get into the pressure situations you have to have quality pitching in order to win those types of games.”

BASEBALL

BALL STATE WINS 3-GAME SERIES After splitting their first two games, conference foes Ball State and Toledo squared off Sunday. The Cardinals struck first, with Ryan Spaulding and Jarrett Rindfleisch each scoring solo runs in the first inning. Brandon Estep’s two-run RBI single extended the Cardinals’ lead to 4-0 in the fourth, but the Rockets answered with two in the bottom of the inning. Ball State went on to score runs in the fifth, eighth and ninth innings to take the series with an 8-4 victory. Zach Plesac earned his teamhigh seventh victory on the season, and the team improved its record to 24-12 and 9-2 in conference play. The team’s next game is Wednesday when the team travels to Columbus, Ohio to take on the Ohio State Buckeyes. – STAFF REPORTS

!! ENTS e e D

FrSU ST

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TENTENORS

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ON BROADWAY

BROADWAYS GREATEST HITS BROUGHT TO LIFE BY AUSTRALIA’S HOTTEST TENORS! “The cluster of high voices generates pure electricity and undeniable drama.” -- Los Angeles Times

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EMENS AUDITORIUM | APRIL 22 AT 7:30PM Adults $48/$44/$38/$34 | BSU Students Free (adv.)/$11 (door)

Emens box office | (765) 285-1539 | Ticketmaster.com | bsu.edu/emens


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