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DN WEDNESDAY, JAN. 8, 2014

THE DAILY NEWS

BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

Muncie begins to warm up After 2-day closure, campus is open again, city returns to normal |

ALAN HOVORKA CHIEF REPORTER afhovorka@bsu.edu

Businesses lost customers, the hospital saw an increase in patients and police handled stranded vehicles through a snowstorm that shutdown Mun-

cie on Monday and campus for two days. The community was hit with temperatures as low as negative 13 degrees without windchill and more than a foot of snow. Here is a look at what has happened the past two days.

CAMPUS

The storm caused one cold related incident on campus in DeHority Complex, said George Edwards, associate director facilities.

A radiator in the entryway broke Monday night, and staff repaired it Tuesday morning. Across campus, the university extended the closure due to frozen locks, drifting snow, high wind chill, difficult roads and other factors, said a university spokesperson. “We ultimately felt it would be better to delay opening offices a bit longer,” Tony Proudfoot said.

DAILY HIGHS AND LOWS Average temperature

40°F 30 20 10 0 -10 -20

See STORM, page 3

AND COLD NEARLY NAKED

DEC. 31 JAN. 1 JAN. 2 JAN. 3 JAN. 4 JAN. 5 JAN. 6

NOTE: Jan. 7 values not available at publication SOURCE: National Weather Service DN GRAPHIC

PHOTO PROVIDED BY MARK McCOY

Brittany Roe, left, Candace King, Talia Traub, Chelsy Jones and Casey Clement pose in front of snowmen built by a group yesterday with Mark McCoy and Mike Davis. Traub’s recent tradition of taking winter photos in swimwear became popular with hundreds of shares and likes on Facebook.

Facebook post leads to Internet sensation when adults don bikinis, boxers to play in snow LAUREN CHAPMAN STAFF REPORTER

T

hree snowmen wave casually to drivers at the corner of McGalliard Road and Tillotson Avenue in front of the Ball State sign. Broken branches make up their bushy mohawks and hair while spray paint and scarves decorate their 6-foot-tall bodies. After a local radio station, 99.5 WZPL, shared a photo, these snowmen became famous — for standing next to adults wearing bikinis and boxers in the snow. It all started with a Facebook post and a group of friends from 29 to 42 years old playing in the snow.

FOOTBALL

Wide receiver leaves school for NFL Draft Snead gives up senior season for dreams of pro football career |

DAKOTA CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR @DakotaCrawford_

Willie Snead’s stock may never be this high again. After back-to-back 1,000 yard seasons, Snead announced Tuesday that he is forgoing his senior year to enter the 2014 NFL Draft. Snead’s father is a football coach, and despite the importance he places on education, supports Snead in pursuing the draft. Through his father’s connections with players and scouts at the NFL level, Snead is confident that now is his time. “If they think Willie Snead is good enough to play at the next level right now, then that’s what I’m going to do,” he said. “I’ve done a lot for Ball State, and I feel like it’s time to move on to the next phase of my life.” His father, Willie Snead III, also had his chance at an NFL future. He was drafted by the New York Jets in the 12th round of the 1989 NFL Draft. In three seasons playing with senior quarterback Keith Wenning, Snead has gained 223 receptions for 2,991 yards and 26 touchdowns.

See SNEAD, page 5

lechapman@bsu.edu

Mark McCoy and Mike Davis hatched the plan while buying some food and supplies at the store before McCoy posted on Facebook asking friends to help out. Soon, there were 100 likes. “I told him, we had to go,” McCoy said. “The people want to build some snowmen.” In a two-hour marathon of what Davis said included the group sweating under their bundles of clothing, they completed their masterpiece.

« I figured [the

photo] would get passed around between mutual friends and that’d be as far as it’d go. » CASEY CLEMENT,   a Muncie resident

See NEARLY NAKED, page 4

SNOW, COLD MAKES TRAVEL CHALLENGING Student with disability plans to skip classes due to safety concern KARA BERG STAFF REPORTER | knberg2@bsu.edu

Ball State has been working to make the campus safe for students looking to start the semester, but Alliance for Disability Awareness member Will Kuhn still did not feel safe about getting to class today. “I will probably skip class, just because of how cold it is and just walking outside ... I’d probably freeze to death right there,” he said. “I’m not going to risk my life to go outside when it’s negative 43 out.” Snow makes campus difficult to navigate, especially for those with mobility disabilities. “I looked outside [Tuesday] and saw that Ball State really needs to do a lot of work to make sure everything is square away,” Kuhn said. “[A few friends] said it would be in my best interest to probably just stay inside because it’s really difficult for me to get around.” Students in wheelchairs face potentially getting stuck or slip-

ACCESSIBILITY Almost all of the buildings on campus have been adapted to be accessible to those with physical disabilities. Most the buildings have the following features: • ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACES NEAR TO THE BUILDING • RAMPS AND AT LEAST ONE AUTOMATIC DOOR FOR EACH BUILDING • ELEVATORS WITH ACCESS TO EACH FLOOR • ACCESSIBLE RESTROOMS

ping on icy ramps if they haven’t been properly salted. Kevin Kenyon, associate vice president of facilities, said the first priority of snow crews is always to make sure ramps are cleared so that people in wheelchairs can access buildings. Still, Kuhn said the university could do a better job. “I know a couple of my friends got stuck on those a couple years ago,” he said. “Just a small, little ramp can do wonders for us to get over stuff. And sometimes, they’re very icy, and it’s very hard to move.” 1. CLOUDY To help students, Ball State offers a shuttle for students with

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

MUNCIE, INDIANA

CLASSES ARE A THING NOW. YOU SHOULD GO.

|

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on Twitter.

6. RAIN

DN PHOTO SAM HOYT

Colin McIntire, a junior computer science major, passes Bracken Library in the snow. McIntire had trouble crossing McKinley Avenue, but he doesn’t expect more problems on campus. To get to classes during the week, he plans to use the campus buses to get around.

disabilities. “Like all other students, there’s Tony Proudfoot, a university really no reason to be outside,” spokesperson, said most, if he said Monday. “The idea here not all, students with mobility is classes are canceled and folks disabilities are in residence should stay inside and stay halls that have food services warm, especially if they live in they2. MOSTLY canCLOUDY access, so getting food hall and have food 5. SUNNY 4. MOSTLY SUNNYa residence 3. PARTLY CLOUDY Monday and Tuesday wouldn’t prepared for them.” be a safety concern. See ACCESSIBILITY, page 3 THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

7. PERIODS OF RAIN

10. DRIZZLE

We finally warm up today. Expect a high of 21 with possible scattered flurries. - Michael Behrens, chief weather forecaster

FORECAST TODAY  Scattered snow High: 21 Low: 7 11. SNOW FLURRIES

9. SCATTERED SHOWERS

12. SCATTERED FLURRIES

13. SNOW SHOWERS

VOL. 93, ISSUE 63

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY SOURCE BEHIND THE COLD NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

POLAR VORTEX FACTS

What is a polar vortex?

MOVEMENT OF THE POLAR VORTEX

THE FORECAST POWERED BY WCRD.NET/WEATHER

THURSDAY Snow showers High: 29 Low: 7 13 - SNOW SHOWERS

FRIDAY Rain/snow mix High: 39 Low: 28

The polar vortex normally hovers around the North Pole, however certain disturbances cause it to move further south. Here’s a look at what caused this week’s frigid temperatures.

The polar vortex is a circulation of wind in the upper levels of the atmosphere that surrounds the north pole in a low-pressure system. This low-pressure cold front is usually contained to the pole, although sometimes it can become distorted, dipping well below the Arctic zone.

NORMAL POLAR VORTEX

19 - RAIN/SNOW MIX

SATURDAY Rain showers High: 42 Low: 37 08 - RAIN SHOWERS

SUNDAY Scattered showers High: 43 Low: 27

Why does it gets distorted?

09 - SCATTERED SHOWERS

The intensity of the wind can often change. When they decrease in speed significantly, they change shape. This causes a jet stream of intensely cold air that can reach far into the southern territories. This is called an Arctic oscillation, which tends to lead to major outbreaks of cold weather.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

NORMAL JET STREAM

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus.

Is it dangerous?

POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind.

This depends. Considering the size of the storm, certain regions may experience differing levels of extreme cold. Don’t be confused because although it is called a vortex, it does not cause tornadoes. The storms can, as most Indiana residents are already aware, cause extremely low temperatures.

TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

CURRENT POLAR VORTEX

TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306.

Have we seen this before?

Changes in the polar vortex happen every year. This storm happens to combine already cold weather with an especially bad disruption of the vortex. In cinema, the plot of the 2004 film “The Day After Tomorrow” is based on a major disruption of the polar vortex. Sources: heavy.com, cnn.com

CURRENT JET STREAM

BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

SOURCE: independent.co.uk DN GRAPHIC STEPHANIE REDDING

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Sam Hoyt

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Ryan Howe

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

72HRS EDITOR Kourtney Cooper MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Taylor Irby

ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

COPY CHIEF Ashley Dye SENIOR COPY EDITOR Cooper Cox

WEDNESDAY

24/7 Crossword

ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty

50¢ 22oz MUGS

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Difficult

SOLUTION FOR TUESDAY

ACROSS 1 __-LOADING: ENDURANCE STRATEGY 5 CHANCE 9 SHOCKING WEAPON 14 WORKER PROTECTION ORG. 15 SINGER FROM COUNTY DONEGAL 16 SKY HUE 17 *MARLIN, FOR ONE 19 PREPARE TO MAKE AN ELECTRONIC PAYMENT, SAY 20 HALVES OF FIFTHS 21 BREAKING WAVE FEATURE 23 DRINK FOR A HOT DAY 24 NASTY EXPRESSION 25 *SOURCE OF ENDLESS FUNDS 27 “YOU’RE DREAMING” 29 HATE 30 *COMMON MILKY WAY STAR 34 GALLERY BADDIES 37 YOKO OF TOKYO 38 RODEO ROPE 40 __-CONE 41 MOUNT MCKINLEY’S NATIONAL PARK 44 *BILLIARDS MANEUVER 47 WHERE THE FLOOR IS ALWAYS

WET 49 BANKING REGULATORY AGCY. 50 *PART OF A UNIFORM 53 LATISH WAKE-UP TIME 57 CURVE 58 “WOE __!” 59 “GRACIAS” REPLY 60 SPANISH AMERICAN GRASSLAND 62 FAMILY RELATIONS, AND WHAT THE FIRST WORDS OF THE ANSWERS TO STARRED CLUES CAN HAVE 64 FREQUENT MASTROIANNI CO-STAR 65 EDGER’S TARGET 66 SPACEWALKS, FOR SHORT 67 RANGE WITH CHINCHILLAS 68 FORMER PARTNERS 69 TAKE OUT DOWN 1 PROFIT FACTORS 2 ROCKIES SKIING DESTINATION 3 AVIGNON’S RIVER 4 WORK AT A SALOON 5 THEY MAY CRY FOUL 6 PASTA ENDING

7 BIG NAME IN FOOD DISTRIBUTION 8 ALOHA STATE BIG SHOT 9 “THERE’S THE FOX!” 10 NITROGENOUS DYE 11 *CHOCOLATE OVERDOSE CONSEQUENCE 12 UNDERMINE 13 ACTRESS ZELLWEGER 18 LOSE ON PURPOSE 22 GIVE A NEW COMMERCIAL NAME TO 25 MADEMOISELLE’S MATRIARCH 26 DRESS TO THE NINES, WITH “UP” 28 SHUNNED ONES 30 “MAGGIE MAY” SINGER STEWART 31 CINCINNATI-TO-NYC DIRECTION 32 *WHAT A DRIVER’S LICENSE MAY SERVE AS 33 “SWELL!” 35 ECLECTIC MUSICIAN BRIAN 36 LUSH 39 FIRST PRESIDENT TO THROW A CEREMONIAL OPENING DAY PITCH 42 CRY FROM CATHY OF COMICS 43 SKIN WOUNDS 45 PASSED, AS RUBBER CHECKS

46 LIKE AROMATHERAPY PRODUCTS 48 QUICK AND LIGHT 50 HALF A NORTHWEST CITY 51 SOCK SYNTHETIC 52 TAKE A LOAD OFF 54 CREDULOUS 55 WORDS AFTER CUT OR CLOSE 56 POOL STROKE 59 MAFIA BIGWIGS 61 MAIDEN NAME INTRO 63 HAVE TO THANK (FOR)

ballstatedaily.com

SOLUTION FOR TUESDAY

50¢ 22oz MUGS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Colleges open as K-12 schools stay closed True cost of closing includes loss of class, pay for hourly wages KAITLIN LANGE CHIEF REPORTER | kllange@bsu.edu

While Ball State students returned to class today, K-12 schools throughout the area remain closed. Tony Proudfoot, a university spokesperson, said people often try to make the comparison between the two systems, giving Ball State its reputation for not canceling classes often. “Sometimes, people get confused and say, ‘Gosh, Muncie Community Schools is closed, why isn’t Ball State closed?’” he said. “Well, we are a very different situation.” He said K-12 schools have to consider children waiting for long periods of time at bus stops, whereas college students can drive to campus and have relatively short walks between buildings or can use buses.

Although the university doesn’t have to consider small children, there are still potential dangers associated with winter weather. On Feb. 2, 2011, classes were delayed. Student Melissa Klemeyer fell and injured her wrist in Scheidler Apartments when heading to class that day. During the same week, public records show that 33 employees fell due to the weather conditions. In case of dangerous weather, Proudfoot said each student shouldn’t put themselves in harm’s way for class, however, the campus does try to stay open if at all possible. “The most important thing is we understand students make a significant investment in their education,” he said. “We have a responsibility to continue our educational mission, if at all possible to do so, and we take that responsibility very seriously.” Unlike primary and secondary schools, Ball State doesn’t make up lost school days, meaning missed class days cut

«and Sometimes, people get confused say, ‘Gosh, Muncie Community Schools is closed, why isn’t Ball State closed?’ Well, we are a very different situation.

»

TONY PROUDFOOT, a university spokesperson

into already tight schedules. Campuses around the country follow a similar procedure to Ball State and remain open despite adverse weather. The most recent all-day closure for Ball State was in 2009 and in 2011 for Purdue University. Indiana University’s most recent closure was on Jan. 28, 2009. Randy Howard, Ball State’s vice president of business affairs and treasurer, makes the decision to close campus in coordination with President Jo Ann Gora and other members of the cabinet. Howard maintains contact with the

ground crew and uses the forecast to make the final decision. Each situation is handled on a case-by-case basis. However, there are certain criteria the university looks at when making the decision each time. “The decision again largely had to do with whether we can provide our services, whether we have power in our buildings and whether people can reasonably get on campus and get about in reasonable fashion,” Proudfoot said. There is a monetary cost

when classes are canceled, but it is difficult to calculate. “There certainly is a cost, and we do everything we can to keep classes open, to keep the university operating and delivering its educational mission,” Proudfoot said. “But I don’t know if we have ever totaled all of that up. It really depends on a case-by-case basis. There are certainly costs to closure; we’re a very large organization.” While every faculty and employee is still paid during the closure, essential personnel who must continue to work receive additional “snow pay” and overtime based on law and their contract, he said. During the two days campus was closed, only essential personnel reported for work. This includes dining and residence hall staff, university police and certain maintenance workers. While dining remained open Monday, Micro Café, Tom John Food Shop, Bookmark Café and Jamba Juice were closed all day Tuesday.

THAW: Police spend time rescuing stranded motorists from snow | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 CITY Anytime a city experiences a weather emergency and it paralyzes a city, Muncie Mayor Dennis Tyler said the weather will impact businesses. “By us being proactive in the way that we were, we were able to immediately have plows out on the streets dealing with [the weather, and] we got the streets open a lot sooner for our businesses,” Tyler said. “Overall, businesses probably lost about a day of retail opportunities.” In the beginning of 2013, an agreement was created with the sanitary district that allowed the city to pool resources and use their vehicles to get more plows to clear the streets. Scotty’s Brewhouse manager Justin Mayes said the first couple days of classes generally brings in a lot more people to the restaurant than on normal days, an opportunity he missed out on this semester by closing early Sunday evening and all day Monday. The severe weather not only created a dent in customer numbers, but lengthened de-

livery times for businesses that offer delivery, such as Greek’s Pizzeria, creating some angry customers. “The fact of the matter is that delivery takes time,” Clay Carter, a Greek’s Pizzeria employee, said. CRIME Crime during the snowstorm in 1978 included burglaries, the Daily News reported at the time, however this storm failed to bring the same influx in crime. “[We’ve had] a bunch of standard motorists and a few domestic [disputes], people getting cabin fever evidently,” Muncie Sgt. Jason Webber said. Potential crimes like burglaries were probably deterred by the bitter cold, Webber said. The most common issue faced by officers was helping stranded motorists. “Crime wise, it hasn’t been too eventful,” Webber said. HOSPITAL IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital saw an influx of patients, however, it was not immediate, said the senior administrative director of critical patient services. Lynne Bunch said most patients come in after the storm

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Snow plows work to cover the roads Sunday on West University Avenue in front of the L.A. Pittenger Student Center.

clears moves on. “There have been a lot of flulike symptoms coming in, but I think they have just been home the last couple of days and now, they think they can get out,” Bunch said. She said she expects to handle

the extra patients without too much trouble. “If we start seeing injuries, it’s going to get worse,” she said. OTHER UNIVERSITIES All Indiana University campuses were closed from 9

p.m. Sunday until 9 p.m. Monday, The Indiana Daily Student reported. Purdue University suspended normal operations for two days because of the severe weather, The Purdue Exponent reported.

fending her Olympic downhill gold medal. Along the way to the next Winter Games, though, Vonn began facing setbacks. As she’d move past one, another would

surface. In the end, it was too much, even for Vonn, the most accomplished U.S. ski racer in history. Expected to be one of the biggest stars at these Olympics, Vonn announced Tuesday — exactly one month before the opening ceremony — she won’t be able to race in Russia. In a Facebook posting, Vonn said she is “devastated” to miss the Olympics, “but the reality has sunk in that my knee is just too unstable to compete at this level.” Her personal publicist, Lewis

Kay, said in a statement the 29-year-old from Vail, Colo., will have knee surgery again “shortly.” Like many in her risk-filled sport, Vonn has dealt with injuries often, particularly at major events. She withdrew midway through the 2011 world championships because of a concussion. She raced with a severely bruised shin at the last Olympics. She skipped a race at the 2009 worlds after slicing her thumb open on a champagne bottle. She

hurt her knee in training and missed a pair of races at the 2007 worlds. She took a scary fall during training at the 2006 Olympics, then left the hospital to compete. “She’s come back — she’ll be back,” Vonn’s father, Alan Kildow, said in a telephone interview. “You’ll see a lot of Lindsey Vonn in the future.” Vonn left the 2010 Vancouver Games with two medals: the first Olympic downhill gold for an American woman and a bronze in the super-G.

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Less than two weeks after reconstructive surgery on her right knee in February 2013, Lindsey Vonn already was sounding a positive note, saying she was “really looking forward to Sochi” and de-

riage in Indiana. A legal status identical or substantially similar to that of marriage for unmarried individuals shall not be valid or recognized.” Same-sex marriage is already against the law in Indiana, but HJR-6 supporters want the constitutional amendment to prevent a future court ruling that could strike down the law. Micah Clark of the American Family Association of Indiana has helped lead the amendment supporters. “I would much rather have the people of Indiana decide this issue than one unelected judge forcing a new view of marriage on every church, school and business in the state,” he said. AFAI sends weekly newsletters to donors and sends emails to thousands of people who register on its website. The organization encourages people to contact lawmakers and share their opinions. Leading the opposition is Freedom Indiana, which began a massive campaign in August and believes the amendment “defies our reputation for Hoosier hospitality,” said campaign leader Megan Robertson.

“[Indiana relies] on our legislators to make good decisions for the future of our state, and there’s no reason why something as divisive as this should even be talked about as part of our state’s founding document.” Freedom Indiana hosted a young professionals meeting in November at Bourbon Street Distillery, a downtown Indianapolis bar two blocks from the Statehouse. The meeting featured appearances by Rep. Sean Eberhart, R-Shelbyville, and Rep. Justin Moed, D-Indianapolis. Eberhart voted to support the bill in 2011, but has since changed his stance. “Public opinion on the issue no longer supports it,” he said. “The language takes rights away from a specific group, and that language doesn’t belong in the constitution.” After Eberhart switched sides, the AFAI’s political action committee and others paid for a full-page attack ad in The Shelbyville News. The ad’s headline read: “Rep. Sean Eberhart says it’s ‘very troubling’ for Hoosiers to be able to vote on marriage.” Eberhart said he’s been in pub-

lic life too long to be bothered by the ad. “It was paid for by groups that have no connection to my district,” he said. “In my mind, that doesn’t carry nearly as much weight as the people I represent. “I’ve had a greater number of calls of support on my position than against my position, a majority from the people I represent.” Clark said the ad was prompted by more than just a change in Eberhart’s position. “He didn’t simply say, ‘I’m going to change my vote now; I’ve changed my opinion,’” Clark said. “He went on to say that anybody who supports the union of a man and a woman and believes that men and women are different and that children need a mom and a dad are bigots. And he called them hateful.” Clark’s comments baffled Eberhart, who said he never made such remarks. “That’s not even close to what I said,” Eberhart said. “It’s too bad he can’t use the facts to support his side of the argument.” In any case, the campaigns and politics surrounding the bill

Lindsey Vonn,

an Olympic downhill gold medalist who is facing setbacks after injuring her knee during practice

ACCESSIBILITY: Buses help students attend class | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

INJURED SKIER DECIDES TO DROP FROM OLYMPICS Despite setback, Vonn is optimisic involving recovery

Jon Lewis, director of dining, said the weather affected food shipments Monday, so they only received a produce delivery and a milk delivery. As a result, the menus had to be altered to ensure there was enough food to feed students. He said the university received most of the food shipments Tuesday despite continued closure. The snow day Monday also impacted buses, and they did not run. Proudfoot said this should not have been an inconvenience to students since classes were canceled and all residence halls have dining within walking distance. Proudfoot said when there is a possible danger to students, they should reach out to faculty for solutions. “When we have weather like this, what we do is ask for students and faculty to work together to resolve any kind of issue,” he said. “Certainly, the expectation is that nobody would put themselves in harm’s way to get to class.”

Since there were no classes Monday and Tuesday, Colin McIntire didn’t need the shuttle service to get to classes. But on other snowy days this semester, he plans to use it to get around campus safely. The junior computer science major said he felt like Ball State was doing as much as the university could to get the snow cleared. Kuhn said salting and making sure all the pathways are clear and the handicap buttons aren’t frozen would help students with disabilities greatly. “I know some of [the buttons] a couple of years ago were frozen,” he said. “Just [check] around the campus for handicap things that not a lot of people use except for us ... so we’re not sitting out there in the freezing cold.” Kuhn said even with all that Ball State does to keep campus accessible, sometimes it was a simple, kind act of a student that kept him warm. “Last year, I got stuck and I was sitting out in the snow and cold for 10 minutes,” he said. “It’s got its ups and downs, but there’s always a helpful hand of a student coming and saying, ‘Hey, do you need help?’ There are some really cool, awesome students that you’ll never meet again, but they help you out in a situation that they know you need help in.”

HJR-6 supporters have hope for passage of resolution

General Assembly to address marriage in upcoming session

|

DRAKE D’AMBRA AND JESSICA KNOX news@bsudailynews.com

Supporters of a state constitutional amendment to block same-sex marriage and civil unions say they can still win, despite public opinion against them and a growing lineup of major companies and others opposed. The Indiana General Assembly is expected to address proposed House Joint Resolution 6 this session, which began Tuesday. Amendments must pass two consecutive legislatures with identical language before going to the public for a statewide vote. The measure passed in 2011 and if passed this year, it would appear on November ballots. If it doesn’t pass, the process would have to start over. The amendment states: “Only a marriage between one man and one woman shall be valid or recognized as a mar-

should not detract from the bill’s real issue, he said. “We really need to make sure that we’re focused on the true issue, which is whether or not the language belongs in the constitution,” Eberhart said. “In my mind, it’s an overstep for the government to get involved.” Regardless of their stances, Eberhart, Clark, Moed and Robertson encourage Hoosiers to call or write their representatives to make their voices heard. The bill’s future is unknown, even with an increase in HJR-6 opponents. An indication of what will happen should occur this month, said Ed Feigenbaum, an attorney and longtime Statehouse observer who runs INGroup, publisher of several newsletters on public policy. Clark said he hopes that voters will get the final say. “Our bottom line is that this issue has been debated in the Indiana General Assembly for nearly 12 years off and on,” he said. “It’s time for the people to decide this issue.”

OPPOSITION TO HJR-6 THE NEWS HAS BEEN BAD FOR HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 6 SINCE THE SUMMER:

• Fifty-eight percent of state residents oppose the amendment, according to the 2013 Hoosier Survey conducted by Ball State in October. • Indiana University, Ball State, Butler, Wabash, DePauw, IUPUI, University of Evansville, University of Indianapolis and Indiana State have all expressed opposition. Purdue, led by former GOP Gov. Mitch Daniels, took no official action, though the school’s Faculty Senate voted against the proposal. • Eli Lilly, Cummins, WellPoint and other major companies have all expressed opposition, joined by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce. •Also against HJR-6 are more than a dozen mayors, including those from Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, South Bend and Hammond.


PAGE 4 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FEATURES

THURSDAY This year, be more adventurous. Check out some neat places less than an hour away from campus.

Looking for big acts that will hit campus? One reporter has the scoop on musicians like REO Speedwagon and more.

It’s awful to drive in it or walk to classes, but snow can be fun. Check out things you may have not have thought of doing.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

NEW YEAR, NEW GADGETS

Technology of 2014

Bendable smartphones, cheaper priced 3-D printers are among new technology that will take over the stage JEREMY ERVIN NO SLEEP TILL MUNCIE

LG G FLEX

W

JEREMY ERVIN IS A SOPHOMORE JOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘NO SLEEP TILL MUNCIE’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO JEREMY AT JRERVIN@BSU.EDU.

ith the Consumer Electronics Show in full swing on the Las Vegas strip, the pace and development of technology presses on. The year 2013 gave

us new video game consoles, iPhone software and a Google Glass limited release. A new year is here, and soon, there will be many cool gadgets to mess with. Here is some 2014 technology to look forward to.

NEW LINES OF 4K TVS

Modern smartphones may be thin, but they didn’t bend until the LG G Flex showed up. The company’s website, lg.com, promotes the Android-running device as “the world’s first curved, flexible smartphone.” While pricing is still unknown, The Washington Post reported Monday that the phone will be available on AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile. It is expected to be commercially available in early to mid-2014. Developers maintain that the curved shape is not just a gimmick. The slight bend in its 6-inch screen is intended to improve sound quality when talking on the phone, better visual quality by reducing glare and more comfort when stored in pockets. Both stress testing professionals and amateurs have taken the flexibility claims as a challenge, and their experiments are welldocumented on the Internet.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LG.COM

THE ‘ELDER SCROLLS’ ONLINE

The reign of 1080p as the default high quality video format may come to a close. Resolution at 4,000p — also known as “Ultra HD” — has been in development for a some time, and CNET, The Verge and Engadget reported that brands like Sony, Vizio and Toshiba are launching lines that use the format in 2014. It also should be noted that 4,000p is a blanket term that covers a range of resolutions that fit within a certain framework. In 2012, CNET cited the Consumer Electronics Association in defining the format as “at least 3,840x2, 160 pixels.” While the new resolution is making its way to consumers, PHOTO COURTESY OF TOSHIBA.COM it may be out of reach for many. Pricing has not yet been released for many of the upcoming sets, but Sony’s smallest compatible screen comes in at 49 inches while the largest at 85 inches.

FAMILY 3-D PRINTERS

Ten years after beginning the series of single-player role-playing games, Bethesda is taking its most popular series in a new direction. After the commercial success of the titles “The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion” and “The Elder PHOTO COURTESY OF ELDERSCROLLSONLINE.COM Scrolls V: Skyrim,” the company is launching its first massive multiplayer online role playing game, also known as an MMORPG. “World of Warcraft” has seen a substantial fall in subscribers since its peak in 2010 from 12 million to just 7.6 million in summer of last year, according to statements made by gaming news sites VentureBeat and G4tv. Whether this is the result of a loss of public interest in MMORPGs or a symptom of game developer Blizzard’s choices is unclear. “The Elder Scrolls” online seeks to fill that void. The game’s official website elderscrollsonline.com states that after the first 30 days, players must pay a subscription fee of $14.99 per month to play the title, which is the same originally charged by “World of Warcraft.” Bethesda has set the game for release in March for both Mac and PC. Beta testing sign up is now open at elderscrollsonline.com.

Company 3D Systems announced its new Cube 3 printer and plans to sell it for less than $1,000 this year, reported tech news publication Gizmag. In 2012, 3-D printers made headlines with the distribution of printable gun schematics by group Defense Distributed. The evolving technology has seen technical improvement in recent years, and 3D Systems is marketing the Cube 3 toward families, according to its website. The Cube 3 has a maximum print size of 6-by6 inches and uses different materials and colors on the same print job. The device also pairs PHOTO COURTESY OF 3DSYSTEMS.COM with a mobile app that allows users to send schematics and begin printing wherever they are. Preloaded ABS and PLA plastic cartridges can be purchased from 3D Systems and other retailers. In line with its family marketing plan, 3D Systems promotes the Cube 3 as safe for ages 8 and older. The Cube 3 offers higher resolution than its predecessors, with printing precision coming in at 75 microns. The company’s website claims that the printer is twice as fast as other commercially available 3-D printers. The Cube 3 also is compatible with both Macs and PCs.

NEARLY NAKED:

Muncie residents strip clothes in storm

PHOTO PROVIDED MARK McCOY

A group of Muncie residents create three giant snowmen on the corner of McGalliard Road and Tillotson Avenue. Mark McCoy and Mike Davis organized the group, whose work would become the backdrop for a viral photo, showing people posing in swimwear.

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “We were trying to make it in before the [GoDaddy] Bowl game,” Davis said. “We wanted to get out to the bowl game in Mobile, Ala., to see what Muncie is doing back at home, but that didn’t happen. So we got it up just after they lost their game, just trying to lighten things up.” McCoy said location was chosen “because people would see it and know exactly where that is at.” Casey Clement, who also worked on the project, wanted to give credit to the adults. “I was actually kind of irritated that they credited it to

the students [at Ball State],” Clement said. The photos were posted and the snowmen became an instant hit among McCoy’s Facebook friends. A city councilman messaged McCoy on Facebook and asked to get a photo with the mayor and all the city councilmen in front of the snowmen. But then they added bikinis. Talia Traub, a Ball State alumna, had been taking photos in the snow insummer clothing for the past few years. “I post every year,” Traub said. “Growing up, we had a friend of the family, that every year her and her husband

would get out into the snow in bathing suits and lawn chairs like they were in summer weather. I always loved looking at those pictures growing up.” Traub invited her friends, Clement and Candace King, to join in the summer in the snow photo with the snowmen with the condition that she would get a ride. “So she says, ‘Hey, the only people crazy enough to get out in this weather is Mike and Mark in the four-wheel drive — come get us and we’ll take a picture of us with your snowmen in our bikinis,’” McCoy said. “And that’s how that happened.”

PHOTO PROVIDED MARK McCOY

Casey Clement poses in his Superman underwear Monday afternoon in front of the snowmen on the corner of McGalliard Road and Tillotson Avenue. Clement helped build the snowmen Sunday evening with a large group and returned after shaving an “S” into his chest hair to pose for photos Monday.

The group, along with King’s high school daughter, drove out to the snowmen Monday with McCoy and Davis, keeping fully clothed and warm inside the vehicle. “We jumped out, took the pictures and then got right back in the car,” King said. “We were only out there for five seconds. It wasn’t long at all.” Clement added a little more to the mix by joining the bikinis in the snow, shaving an “S” into his chest hair and putting on Superman underwear. He said the bitter wind made his skin tingle and turn red. McCoy and Traub posted the

« It was just a bunch of cabin fever fun. » CANDICE KING, a Muncie resident photos on Facebook, which quickly spread through NASH FM and WZPL to a much larger audience around 7:30 p.m. Monday. By 10 p.m., the photo was viral. “I figured [the photo] would get passed around between mutual friends and that’d be as far as it’d go,” Clement said. “I was told it got posted on the news in Minnesota.” The response wasn’t always friendly, though. Clement said some people left comments

saying they hoped the participants would get frostbite. King called her mother, expecting her to think she “was crazy” for taking the photo. “She said, ‘I remember the blizzard of ’78 and there were all sorts of people running up hills in boots wearing American flags,’” King said. “Nobody saw that back then because there wasn’t as much technology.” McCoy said Muncie police came by and complimented the group and a shuttle bus driver sat through three lights watching the picture be taken. “It was just a bunch of cabin fever fun,” King said.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

SPORTS

CONFERENCE PLAY BEGINS AFTER POOR START TO SEASON Senior center Majok earns MAC award after strong week |

DAVID K. JONES CHIEF REPORTER @dkjones_BSU

After going 3-8 in the nonconference schedule, the start of the Mid-American Conference schedule allows for Ball State to enter competition with a new slate. The men’s basketball team begins conference play against Akron tonight. “We’re excited to start with

Akron,� head coach James Whitford said. “To me, they’re the gold standard of the league. They have been the best in the league for the last seven or eight years — it’ll be a great challenge for us.� Ball State is coming off a 9458 victory in its non-conference finale against Oakland City to snap a seven-game losing streak. The Cardinals are 3-2 at home and winless on the road at 0-6. The team made a roster move as Muncie Central product and Cincinnati transfer Jeremiah Davis III joined. Davis spent two-and-a-half years with the Bearcats before moving back

to Muncie. The 6-foot-3 guard has enrolled in classes at Ball State and will practice with the Cardinals, but he’s not immediately eligible to play due to NCAA transfer rules. Davis’s family lost its Muncie home in a fire in November, which prompted Davis to move back after completion of the Fall Semester. All-MAC senior center Majok Majok rebounded after a slow start to the season. He recently was named the MAC West Division Player of the Week. Majok averaged 21.5 points and 16 rebounds in the week, where he grabbed a career-high 18 rebounds to go along with 25

points against Oakland City. Majok is one of 15 players in the nation to average a double-double with 10.8 points per game. Majok’s 10.6 rebounds per game ranks 11th in the nation. Freshman guard Zavier Turner has filled the stat sheet, being the Cardinals leading scorer with 13.4 points per game and the nation’s leading free throw shooter at 97 percent, hitting 32 of 33. One area of struggle has been turnovers, understandable due to his youth. “The biggest thing that I worry about with Zavier is that as good as he is, he is turning the

ball over a lot,� Whitford said. “He’s got to continue to get better at it and understand the value of taking care of the ball.� Turnovers seem to be the only problem the Cardinals have trouble fixing. The players turn the ball over on average 16 times a game while only forcing 12 and owns a 0.81 percent assist-to-turnover ratio. Whitford is preparing his young team for an Akron defense that exhibits physicality all around and creates pressure to force live ball turnovers. “We’ve spent a lot more time in the last few weeks on simple fundamental drills,� he said. “Against [Akron], we’re going to

have to be very fundamental.� Whitford has said this team will go as far as its seniors will take them. Ball State is predicted to win two games in the conference, according to the Ratings Percentage Index. Ball State’s strength of schedule has been ranked in the top 25 — No. 23 — by basketball statisticians Ken Pomeroy and Jeff Sagarin. “We can’t control any of that, so I don’t worry, but what I worry about our [team] getting better,� Whitford said. “That’s the thing that we can control, and that’s going to lead to the greatest results for us — we work on it every day.�

SNEAD: Junior considers decision for weeks, uses multiple factors to make up mind | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 More importantly, he built a bond with Wenning that he knows can’t be replaced in a single season. Now, he’s taking the next step with his quarterback. “I’ve been playing with him for three years,� Snead said. “That’s probably the best feeling­— to be able to go out with a quarterback that I’ve built such a bond with and been such a good combination with.� Fears that Wenning’s departure will result in a drop in his own numbers pushed Snead toward this decision. Snead deliberated for nearly a month. On one side is a chance at the big leagues and a big-time paycheck. On the other is an education and Ball State teammates he’s played with in backto-back bowl games. Snead values his education, but he’s not giving up on a degree to pursue the NFL, just prolonging it. “I’ve talked to my agent, and

ONLINE Watch our sports staff discuss Snead’s decision and see some highlights from his games. Check out a photo gallery and see a graphic about Snead’s career at Ball State. Go to ballstatedaily.com I don’t want to take this step if I can’t finish my education,� he said. “I won’t be playing football forever, and I know I’ll need that piece of paper later.� It’s all about timing. Snead said if he’s fortunate enough to make a team in his first year, then he will work through an NFL education program. Snead said his family advised that education remains a priority — and it will, but he could soon be able to support them financially. “If I make a big check, it’s a blessing,� he said. “I’ve worked hard for this, I’ve played a lot of football for this opportunity right here, and I don’t want it to pass me up.�

WILLIE SNEAD

The Ball State wide receiver was named to the watch list for the 2013 Biletnikoff Award, and he broke several records.

2013 STATS • Receptions: 106 • Yards receiving: 1,516 • Touchdowns receiving: 15 • Yards per catch: 14.3 • Yards per game: 116.6

CAREER STATS

• Games played: 37 • Receptions: 223 • Yards receiving: 2,991 • Touchdowns receiving: 26 • Yards per catch: 13.4 • Yards per game: 80.8

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Junior wide receiver Willie Snead jukes Miami’s Kent Kern after making a catch Nov. 29. Snead decided to forgo his senior year.

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It’s a big year for love. Social fun keeps you dancing into February, when career captures your focus. Health and fitness take priority, too. Balancing work, play, fitness and romance requires finesse. Your finances grow with organization and discipline. From May to July, someone who inspires you spiritually or philosophically captures your heart. Take time to play together.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is a 5 -- Streamline your operation. Maintain objectivity. Try not to lose your temper with a scatter-brain. Cut extra-curricular activities for the next week, and restore energy. Circumstances allow some latitude. Communicate about unfulfilled expectations. Try new styles and looks. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 6 -Don’t dig into savings. Costs are higher than expected. Seek mental clarity, and ask questions. Let your partner lead. This is a good move, romantically. Evaluate an expensive suggestion carefully. Avoid risks, and listen. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 6 -- Take on a challenge. Don’t offer suggestions yet.Your domestic routine gets disrupted. Plans may have to be modified. Don’t spend too much. Resist temptation. Avoid dangerous activities. Settle down on the couch with popcorn and a movie.

Got a Problem? Ask Concerned Charlie! at www.bsu.edu/counselingcenter

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 6 -- Expand your range. A disagreement among teammates could interrupt your concentration. If challenges before you seem impassable, try something different. Enlist help from others, or just go around. Don’t get hasty or risky. Consider steps.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 6 -- Stay productive in the coming week. Make comfort a top priority, and maintain action.You’ll pass this test. A partner helps you to work from home. Associates reveal their feelings. Compromise on priorities.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 6 -Keep your ego out of the way.Your job could interfere with playtime. Keep up the action and reschedule. Don’t pour your money down a rat hole, though. Pursue a secret romance.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 6 -Keep increasing communication. Clarify. A financial upset could distract you. Postpone chores. Choose actions carefully. Work interferes with travel. Hold out for what you want. A female brings harmony. Don’t advertise unfinished products. Consider all possibilities.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 5 -- Opposing interests conflict. Keep watching finances. Postpone travel for later. Don’t waste your money. Get lost in the research and discover new sides to the story. Consider ethics and integrity when making decisions.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 5 -- Go for peace and quiet. Productive solitude satisfies. Don’t tell everyone everything. Change your mind at least once. Shop carefully, if spending. Repay a debt. A conflict can be resolved. Document what you love. Keep an open mind.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 5 -- Keep a lid on the money. Don’t get intimidated. Anticipate a little disagreement or controversy.You’re on fire creatively. Be frugal with your time and money, and avoid misunderstandings. Save for a rainy day.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 6 -- Delegate to decrease your workload. Consider all options. Establish new accounts. The chain of command gets disrupted or challenged. Hold onto what you have. Check things off your list, and take things slow and easy.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 7 -- Let go of doubting yourself this week. An optimistic associate inspires a new view. Don’t sign the contract yet. Something doesn’t add up. Wait for more favorable conditions. Get negotiations in writing, and think it over.

www.ballstatedaily.com


PAGE 6 | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FASHION FIX THAT’S, HOPEFULLY, SO LAST YEAR KOURTNEY COOPER FASHION FIX KOURTNEY COOPER IS A JUNIOR JOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘FASHION FIX’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO KOURTNEY AT KRCOOPER2@BSU.EDU

Top fashion trends that should disappear with 2013, emerge in 2014

I

t’s true, 2013 was a good year for fashion. Pantone’s color of the year — emerald green —swept the streets, Rick Owens brought stomping to the runway, Prada cast a black model for the first time in 20 years and Kate Middleton continued to make me weep happy tears with every flawless outfit she sported. The year also brought us a few trends that, hopefully, we can all agree should be left behind.

OUT WITH THE OLD 1. HIGH-LOW DRESSES These dresses initially seemed like the perfect mix of formal and casual. Business in front, party in back, right? Nope. The mullet dress has got to go.

2. PEPLUM

Let’s add a peplum to every dress, every shirt and every skirt, said every woman’s clothing store. I’m all for a good peplum top. They can be very flattering, especially in business-casual clothing, but not everything needs a peplum.

3. PLATFORMS

No matter how many girls you see nearly brake their ankle in these tacky shoes, they still insist on wearing them out. Heels are sexy, but round-toed 6-inch “stripper heels” are not. Pointy-toed heels with ankle straps are the solution for 2014.

4. ATHLETIC SHOES AND JEANS

I don’t care how “fresh” your new Nike kicks or Air Jordans are, they do not belong paired with jeans. Athletic shoes are made for athletic clothes. No exceptions.

5. CROP TOPS

They had a good run, really. First, crop tops were very fashion forward. Girls were wearing them with skater skirts and DIY highwaisted jorts and all was right in the world. Then people began pairing them with low-rise Abercrombie jeans, Miley Cyrus wore one every day and the appeal plummeted. While cropped shirts are out the door, I am still not giving up on the cropped sweaters. They have a few more months.

6. OMBRE HAIR

I’ll admit, when the trend first started, I was all about it, but then I came to my senses. Why would someone willingly choose to look like a skunk? Hair was not meant to be half black, half white. It just wasn’t. This spring, tell your hairdresser you want a natural balayage. Look it up and thank me later.

7. UGGS

Seriously, let them rest in peace. End of story.

8. WEDGE SNEAKERS

Are they sneakers? Are the wedges? What are they? Whatever they are, they don’t belong in your closet unless you’re a basketball wife.

IN WITH THE NEW Once you cleared your closet of the unstylish remnants of last year, check out these top five 2014 trends to look out for.

1. PLAID BLAZERS

On everyone, these blazers are the perfect mix of casual and fancy. The plaid pattern turns a usually stuffy blazer into a statement piece. Mix a plaid or checkered blazer with another print for a more casual look.

2. RADIANT ORCHID

Pantone announced radiant orchid as its color of this year, and I’ve been fangirling ever since. The color is already being incorporated into spring clothing lines and more importantly, my wardrobe. The color will bombard the market not only in clothing, but also in makeup, for spring.

3. MEN’S FLORALS

Men’s fashion finally gets a chance to rock floral and no, I don’t mean a Hawaiian shirt. A floral pattern can spruce up T-shirts, collared shirts and blazer this spring in menswear.

4. JUMPERS

Jumpers have become more flashy than casual. They can easily replace a dress for a more comfortable party look. Add swanky accessories, a chunky necklace or chandelier earrings, for a fancier feel.

5. TEA-LENGTH SKIRTS

Finally, something my grandma will love to see back in style. Tea-length skirts, while modest, can be edgy. The mid-length skirt makes shoes the focal point of your outfit, so slip on a pair of strappy heels or booties.

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