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Golden Globes celebrate 71st year

MONDAY, JAN. 13, 2014

Series ‘Breaking Bad,’ movie ‘American Hustle’ receive multiple awards.

THE DAILY NEWS

SEE PAGE 4

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Trustees add $365 to living expenses Room, board rates increase, still lower than national average RACHEL PODNAR AND CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS | news@bsudailynews.com Students returning to university housing next year will pay about $365 more for regular accommodations. Ball State Board of Trustees voted HOUSING COSTS to raise room and Here is a side-by-side comparison board costs 3.8 of average room and board costs percent at a meet- at Ball State University, Indiana ing Friday. Rates University and Purdue University. have increased 2.8 Ball State University percent on average each year over the Indiana University past five years. Students already Purdue University on the premium plan will continue In thousands to pay the 2013 12 price. 2013: $9,078 Randy Howard, 10 vice president of 8 business affairs, said Ball State does 6 all it can do to con4 trol cost. “[Our rates are] 2 still at or below Indiana average 2010 2011 2012 2013 room and board rates,” he said. “We SOURCE: bsu.edu, indiana.edu, purdue.edu are offering a prod- DN GRAPHIC STEPHANIE REDDING uct of still much higher quality than our competitors.” Between 2010 and 2013, Purdue University raised room and board rates by 7.8 percent total. The university’s rates were reduced by 2.5 percent for the upcoming 2014-15 school year. While Indiana University has yet to release their 2014-15 prices, the Board of Trustees has raised rates on the most requested room option by 16.5 percent in the past four years. In the same time Ball State has risen its rates 10.6 percent. The meeting also acted as the end to what Board of Trustees president Hollis Hughes called the “opportunity of a lifetime.” Hughes stepped down after three years as president. He has served on the board for 25 years: a member in 1989, secretary in 2006 and president in 2011. Hughes graduated from Ball State in 1965 with a bachelor’s degree and later with a master’s degree in 1972.

Screenshots from the The Armed Citizen Project’s video show the Training 50 Women in One Day event put on by the Armed Citizens Project. Kyle Coplen, founder of the organization, intends to bring the initiative to Indianapolis. The project offers free pump-action shotguns to people who live in high-crime areas and are willing to pass a background check and participate in a gun safety program.

GIVING OUT GUNS Ball State alumnus runs program aiming to put shot guns in high-crime areas TYLER JURANOVICH STAFF REPORTER

A

Ball State alumnus plans to bring free guns and a safety program to Indianapolis in February, in an attempt to prove an armed and trained community reduces crime. The Armed Citizens Project chooses neighborhoods in cities with average to high crime rates and then offers a free pumpaction shotgun to any willing citizen in the neighborhood who also passes a background check and takes part in a gun safety program. “We’re giving shotguns because they’re perfect

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tjjuranovich@bsu.edu

for house safety,” said ACP’s founder Kyle Coplen. “They’re also much cheaper than handguns, and the pump action sound is a perfect deterrent. It sends chills up people’s spins.” Training includes education about gun safety and practice at a gun range so participants are comfortable holding their weapons. So far, the project has trained 240 citizens and armed 90, according to Coplen. “We’re not just throwing shotguns into random yards,” he said.

See GUNS, page 5

QUAD TALK

WOULD ARMING CITIZENS AND POSTING SIGNS DETER CRIME?

« I think it would deter some crime by intimidation.»

« I think it would deter crime because it would make criminals more hesitant.»

CHAUNCEY BAKER, a sophomore telecommunications major

DAKODAH CARLIN, a freshman undecided major

«At first I thought it was terrifying. But if they’re going through the proper channels, it’s fine. » JORDAN MEYER, a senior sociology major

See HOUSING, page 5

Lopsided score helps team reach .500 Defensive performance gives opponent trouble, coach applauds effort DAKOTA CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR | @DakotaCrawford_

BREW YOUR OWN BEER Students in homebrewing club create craft drinks at home, talk about process SEE PAGE 4

It’s a bit of déjà vu for the Ball State women’s basketball team. The Cardinals have won four of five, and now sit on a .500 record. Though head coach Brady Sallee doesn’t put too much stock into the team’s overall record, he knows players appreciate the mark. “I don’t really care a whole lot about it,” Sallee said. “For them, it’s easier to say ‘yeah, we’re 7-7.’ It rolls off the tongue a little better.” The team’s record isn’t the only thing rolling. Much like last year’s team, Ball State is finding its rhythm as it enters Mid-American Conference play. A 55-31 win over Kent State on Sunday improved Ball State’s MAC record to 2-1. “There’s a little bit of a feel [similar]

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE

DN PHOTO MARCEY BURTON

Ball State sophomore Nathalie Fontaine draws a foul against Kent State Jan. 12

See BASKETBALL, page 3 at Worthern Arena. The Cardinal’s win places them at 2-1 in the MAC.

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THE FIRST PUBLIC RADIO BROADCAST WAS TODAY IN 1910.

to how we got better last season... and here we go again,” Sallee said. “As the season has progressed you see us getting better.” Last season, Ball State entered conference play with a 3-10 record. An immediate turnaround led to a 12-4 record in league play and a spot in the Women’s National Invitational Tournament. Sallee said early January is the time when teams should be learning their roles, hitting shots and playing good team basketball. Now, for a second year in a row, that looks to be the case for the Cardinals. On Saturday, Ball Sate’s defensive efforts led to a physical, scrappy win over Kent State. The Cardinals shot 13-of-46 from the floor, hitting just one more field goal than the Golden Eagles. Though shooting has improved in recent games, a poor performance forced the team to rely on its defensive discipline against Kent State. Sallee was glad to see the team maintain its focus through adversity.

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VOL. 93, ISSUE 65 FORECAST TODAY Mostly cloudy High: 43 Low: 28 1. CLOUDY

2. MOSTLY CLOUDY

It will be a cloudy Monday with a slight chance of showers in the early afternoon that will clear out by the evening. - Michael Behrens, chief weather forecaster 5. SUNNY 4. MOSTLY SUNNY 3. PARTLY CLOUDY

THE PULSE OF BALL STATE


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

THE SKINNY TODAY’S BULLETIN BOARD NEWS AND EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, IN BRIEF NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM | TWITTER.COM/DN_CAMPUS

TUESDAY

TODAY

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TUESDAY Rain/snow mix High: 38 Low: 20 19 - RAIN/SNOW MIX

WEDNESDAY Snow flurries High: 22 Low: 18

INTERNATIONAL CONVERSATION HOUR

TAKE BACK COLLEGE

Ball State’s International Conversation Hour will begin again at 6 p.m. in the L.A. Pittenger Student Center room 310. The program is designed to help international students learn English and culture, while making American friends, according to a press release. The program also looks to educate American students about other cultures without studying abroad. Students will also learn study skills to help them succeed at Ball State, according to the press release.

Ryan Penneau, award winning public speaker and founder of Take Back College, will present a guide for first-year students at 6:30 p.m. in Pruis Hall. His presentation will focus on students and is designed to “provide the tools and tips to help WHERE you be a Pruis Hall success.” Penneau is WHEN 6:30 p.m. currently a professor of experimental education at Minnesota State University. “During his talk he will encourage you to develop goals and strategies that will inspire you to a new level of greatness, while keeping you interested and entertained,” according to a press release. Although the program will focus on new students, all are welcome to the free event.

STREAMLINE YOUR RESEARCH

Ball State University Libraries will open up their spring workshop schedule with a program informing students how to set up search and citation alerts. The program will begin at 1 p.m. in Bracken Library room 225. The workshop series will continue throughout the year.

WEDNESDAY STUDENT VOLUNTARY SERVICES

The Spring Volunteer Recruitment Fair sponsored by Student Voluntary Services will take place between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. in the L.A. Pittenger Student Center Ballroom. More than 30 nonprofit agencies will have booths and be present at the event. “Volunteering is a great way to build new skills while also making friendships and connections in the Muncie community,” according to a press release. PRESIDENTIAL SEARCH COMMITTEE PHOTO COURTESY OF TAKEBACKCOLLEGE .COM

RESIDENCE ASSISTANT APPLICATIONS

WHERE

Applications are due for Resident Assistant, Multicultural Advisor or Community Assistant positions beginning next year. Applications are available online at bsu.edu/housing/ student staff.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT ON THIS PAGE?

bsu.edu/housing/student staff APPLICATION DUE DATE

Today

Ball State faculty, staff, alumni and students will have a chance to tell the presidential search committee what they want in a new university president. Public forums will take place throughout the day with times beginning at: 1 p.m. for faculty, 2 p.m. for students, 3 p.m. for staff and 5:30 p.m. for alumni and community.

THURSDAY GRACE KELLY QUINTET

Email us at news@bsudailynews.com.

Musician Grace Kelly will perform at 7:30 p.m. in Pruis Hall. The saxophonist, composer, vocalist and arranger has won numerous awards, including being the youngest person voted to “Down Beat,” at 16. She graduated from Berklee College of Music at the age of 19.

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THURSDAY Snow flurries High: 36 Low: 18 11 - SNOW FLURRIES

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SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Baumgartner MANAGING EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

NEWS EDITOR Christopher Stephens ASST. NEWS EDITOR Sam Hoyt

FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz ASST. FEATURES EDITOR Ryan Howe

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford ASST. SPORTS EDITOR David Polaski

ASST. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Breanna Daugherty ART DIRECTOR Amy Cavenaile

DESIGN EDITORS Daniel Brount Ellen Collier GRAPHICS EDITOR Stephanie Redding

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46 HURRICANE RESCUE OP 49 OMNIVOROUS LOONEY TUNES DEVIL, FAMILIARLY 50 FOLGERS COMPETITOR 53 GREEK LETTER BETWEEN PHI AND PSI 55 AIRLINE APPROX. 56 TEE OR BLOUSE 57 SANDWICH MEAT 58 RANDOMLY DETERMINED NBA DRAFT CHOICE 64 “ME, TOO” 66 USE A PIGGY BANK 67 OVERFLOW WITH, AS CHARM 68 PRELUDE, FOR SHORT 69 HAWAIIAN STRINGS 70 THIEF’S HAUL 71 EXPLOSIVE EXPERIMENT 72 FELT TIPS AND BALLPOINTS 73 DUMBO’S WINGS DOWN 1 LOG CUTTERS 2 CONDO DIVISION 3 “INSIDE” FACTS, BRIEFLY 4 MEDITATIVE EXERCISE REGIMEN

5 TEARDROP-SHAPED NUTLIKE SNACKS 6 ANSWERING MACHINE CUE 7 PART OF MIT: ABBR. 8 SOUTH SEAS GETAWAY 9 SUBSTITUTE (FOR) 10 “TO THINE __ SELF BE TRUE” 11 OHIO CITY 12 WORK ON DOUGH 13 TITILLATING CELLPHONE MESSAGES 21 GREEN HORNET’S SIDEKICK 22 EXTREMELY 27 MALE DEER 28 GAME ON HORSEBACK 29 VALID 30 CHRISTMAS TOYMAKER 31 GADGET USED ON AN APPLE 32 “__ THE FIELDS WE GO” 36 PC ALTERNATIVE 37 RELAX IN A HAMMOCK 39 CALIFORNIA’S SANTA __ 41 ICU DRIPS 44 POET WHOSE WORK INSPIRED “CATS” 45 DIRECTOR PREMINGER 47 WOMAN ON STAGE

48 BOK __: CHINESE CABBAGE 51 CONSUMES AVIDLY 52 TAKE A STAND AGAINST 53 SERIES OF LINKS 54 LACKS 59 WORD BEFORE FIVE OR TEN 60 __-STEVEN 61 STATE KNOWN FOR ITS CAUCUSES 62 BUSINESS BIGWIG 63 GUNPOWDER HOLDERS 65 “__ DOUBTFIRE”

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MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

SPORTS

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Free throws play key factor during win Foul shot points provide offense, make large impact ANDI TOLENTINO STAFF REPORTER | altolentino@bsu.edu After not shooting well from the free-throw line and only hitting 18 out of 33 shots when playing against Eastern Michigan last week, the women’s basketball team had a stronger showing from the line in this week’s game against Kent State. Free throws were a large part of the game, having contributed

25 points to the 31-55 win over Kent State. Without those free throws, the Cardinals would have had a tighter game with a score of 30-26. Throughout the game, the Cardinals were sent to the line 16 times with a total of 32 shots, making 25 of them, to give the team a 78 percent on the free-throw line. “When getting to the freethrow line that many times, we got to make those free throws so those aren’t empty possessions,” Head coach Brady Sallee said. “Those are big for us, we play to get to the free-throw line.”

Players that were sent to the line made nearly, all of their shots, only missing a few. Senior guard Brandy Woody and junior Brittany Carter were both sent to the line four times during the game, each capitalizing on their shots.. Woody went 7-8 and Carter went 6-8 on the free-throw line. When asked if free throws were something the girls have been working on more in practice, Sallee said it was not something he was worried about since the girls have been shooting well throughout the season. “I know the team I’ve got. They didn’t like the way they

shot [against Eastern Michigan], so they got in the gym and worked on it,” Sallee said. “They’re a group who wants to make them.” Ball State’s sole loss in its last four games came against Akron where the team attempted 25 free throws. The second-lowest total attempts over that stretch was 28 against IPFW. All throughout the first half, the girls were 8-8 on the line and could have sealed up the game by a larger lead in the second half, but shots were being missed at the line. Despite the late misses, Sallee couldn’t be more pleased

with going to the free-throw line 32 times. “Usually the tougher, more aggressive team is going to be the one who shoots the [most] free throws.” Sallee said. Though Ball State had a

successful day at the free-throw line against Kent State, which helped them secure the victory, Sallee still looks forward to seeing improvement. “I’m the guy who focuses on the seven we miss,” he said.

BASKETBALL: Early victories bring team to fast start heading into tough game

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Sophomore guard Nathalie Fontaine jumps to shoot the ball while Kent State players Larissa Lurken and Krista White try to block her Jan. 12 at Worthen Arena. Fontaine scored 11 points.

The first half was low scoring. Ball State went into the locker room holding a 21-10 lead, a point where Sallee said it could have been easy to lose focus. “It would have been easy to go in and pout because you only have 21 points,” Sallee said. “When you look at the scoreboard and you lead by double digits because of your defensive effort, I think these kids understand how hard we work at that end of it.” Sophomore guard Nathalie Fontaine, though not the team’s best defender, said playing physical basketball is important. She said players don’t want to see themselves make mistakes on film the next day. But apart from dreading the mistakes that might come up during film sessions, looking ahead isn’t an issue. “Like [Sallee] says, we’re 1-0 today. It’s always winning the next game that matters,” she said. Sallee is pleased with the team’s current level of play.

TEAM COMPARISON

Kent State Ball State 12-50 Field goals 13-46 5-16 Free throws 25-32 13 Steals 4 8 Blocks 3 8 Assists 12 32 Turnovers 23 The growth and progress he alluded to will be tested again Wednesday night as Ball State hosts Bowling Green. The Falcons, another team Sallee expects to be very physical, are 13-2 on the season, with a 3-0 mark in MAC play. Tonight’s game will serve as good preparation for the Falcons, who Sallee said won’t give up an easy possession. But if the team’s early MAC play is of any indicator, the Cardinals will be ready. “We’re starting to look like the team I thought we could,” Sallee said. “The ball is rolling.”

The Presidential Search Committee is seeking your input. Public forums are scheduled for Wednesday, January 15, 2014. Faculty: 1–2 p.m. Student Center, Cardinal Hall A Students: 2–3 p.m. Student Center, Cardinal Hall A Professional, Staff, and Service Personnel: 3–4 p.m., Student Center, Cardinal Hall A Alumni and Community: 5:30–6:30 p.m. Alumni Center, Assembly Hall

You can also send your thoughts about what the committee should look for in Ball State’s next leader to PrezSearch@bsu.edu.


PAGE 4 | MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

FEATURES

ONLINE Visit our website to look at our entertainment reporter’s review of the Golden Globes’ big red carpet winners.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

TUESDAY Exercise science professors discuss how to make good on ‘get fit’ resolutions for real this time.

WEDNESDAY It’s not always just the winter blues. There is more to seasonal affective disorder than meets the eye.

A BREWING TREND Newly active student club brings hop hobbyists together

HOME BREWING Tyler Varnau, a senior journalism graphics major, started brewing beer in his house last May. Since then he has upgraded his operation to a six-step process.

1. THE STRIKE WATER Water is heated to 163 degrees and prepared to be used for the mash (see step 3). Varnau recently upgraded his pot and is able to heat his water outside.

2. THE GRAINS

64/55 Fourteen pounds of wheat, barley and other various grains are combined to create the mash.

than the main headline

3. THE MASH

GRAPHY

The grains are added to a container and then the strike water is poured in. The water drains through the grains to separate the sugars from the grains. Varnau stirs the mixture periodically and allows it to sit for an hour.

Road names

INDIANA

ILLINOIS

Muncie

Natural Formations

LA NDM ARKS

Single callouts CALLOUTS here and here4. THE WORT The liquid from the mash is

CALLOUTS then transferred back into here and herethe pot and boiled. At this

PRIL

point, Varnau adds hops and any other special ingrediants. For this batch, Varnau added honey, peppers, and hopps.

PIE CHART First: 40%

Fifth: 3%

Fourth: 12% 5. FERMENTATION After the wort is boiled, the last step in Third: the creation of beer is 20% Yeast is added to fermentation. the grain sugars, and ferments alcohol. Varnau first uses a Second: 25% plastic bucket for fermentation and then transfers it to a glass container until it is ready for DN GRAPHICbottling. FIRST LASTNAME Fermentation can last as little as one week and as much as one year. Varnau’s beer will sit for four weeks.

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DANIELLE GRADY STAFF REPORTER dagrady@bsu.edu

Tyler Varnau doesn’t buy beer, he brews it. The senior journalism graphics major, is the president of the fledgling student organization Ball State Homebrew Club. The club achieved official approval last spring, but has not been active until this year, said Varnau. He chills, ferments and bottles a new batch every two weeks in his kitchen and has brewed a total of 25 gallons of beer in his lifetime. So far, the club consists solely of Varnau and vice president Josh Bertsch who share a passion for the art of home-brewing. Varnau dove headfirst into the hobby as soon as home-brewing was legally permitted in May 2013: the month he turned 21. His club is a part of a national trend; the number of craft breweries in the nation has increased from eight in 1980 to 1,500 planned or established breweries as of June 2013, according to the Brewers Association.

NEW CLUB ON THE BLOCK

George Gaither, faculty advisor of the Ball State Homebrew Club and an associate professor of BYOB: BREW YOUR OWN psychological sciences, has been BEER involved since the club was just a New to the craft, Varnau found small thought of former student, the information he required from Chase Lennon. websites such as Reddit. Armed Lennon and Gaither joined towith his interest in art and sci- gether to create a constitution ence, he began brewing. for the club to present to the of“I’ve always been into custom fice of student life. made things,” he said. “I just To pacify concerns of having a club thought it’d be really cool to make closely associated with the creation my own recipes.” and consumption of alcohol on a Varnau’s first venture produced campus, Lennon and Gaither’s cona batch of India Pale Ale with the stitution included strict stipulations help of a brew kit. He has since for its members: students under the expanded his repertoire, changing legal drinking age are not allowed his batches to fit the season and membership, and any student in the his personal preference. club convicted of a drinking related “I’m really into Belgian beers charge is debarred. right now, so I brewed a Belgian Although Lennon graduated berecently,” he said. fore he could see the club claim The production of a home- its first member, his efforts made brewed beerTOP is a series of these the club official. FIVE MICROBREWERIES Indiana has seen a brewery boom over recent years on

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DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

Tyler Varnau, a senior journalism graphics major, and his friend Kyle Little pour 5.5 gallons of water into a pot to heat. This is the first step for their home-brewing process.

Upon inheriting the club, Varnau contacted Bertsch, a senior biology major to help bring it to life. “Since I love brewing so much, it was easy to see the need for a club like this at Ball State,” Bertsch said. “There had to be others out there with the same interest as we do.” Gaither, who has brewed his own alcoholic concoctions since 2007, also shared his excitement of

being involved with the club. “I have faculty advised other clubs before, but this is the first one that is really strongly related to a personal interest of my own, “ he said. As an unseasoned organization, Varnau only has a rudimentary blueprint for the club. He plans to host two meetings a month and hopes to fit in discussions about home-brewing.

trend with the rest of the nation. Here are the topBarley best Island Brewing Co. 639 Conner St. Noblesville, IN 46060 | www.barleyisland.com/ TOP 5 MICROBREWERIES

in the area that produce award winning Noblesville’s Barley Island Brewing Co. has a saying: “Get Stranded with Better Beer!” DERREK TIPTONbreweries STAFF REPORTER | dmtipton@bsu.edu

They take pride in their beer by “double-brewing” most of their output and using a state-of-the-art six-head bottle filler. stouts, alesover and recent other craft Indiana has seenIPA’s, a brewery boom years,beers on premises. Barley Island Brewing Co. has won many awards, including a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival. on trend with the rest of the nation. Here are the top Some of their featured drinks include malted “80 Shilling Scotch Ale,” “Barfly IPA,” Belgian style black IPA “Barrel-aged best breweries in the area that produce award winning Mussels from Brussels” and wood-aged beer “Beastie Barrel Porter.” IPA’s, stouts, ales and other craft beers on premises. Chicago Union Brewing Co. 622 N. Rangeline Road Carmel, IN 46032 | www.unionbrewingco.com/ Carmel’s Union Brewing Co. uses “time honored traditions, natural ingredients and traditional methods,” to craft their beer. 69 Justine Fila, operations manager at Union Brewing Co., said her favorite brew is the “Apollo Space Flight,” which is an imperial IPA. To make the “Apollo Space Flight,” Fila said they mash three different caramel malts and generous amounts of two-row 57 barley. Next, they add local honey and put in three different hops: “Apollo,” “Falconer’s Flight” and “Galaxy.” 65

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Varnau recycles beer bottles with a cleaning process, spraying them with a disinfectant as well as heating the bottles to kill germs. A single batch of beer can make as many as 50 bottles for Varnau.

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SOURCE: Tyler Varnau, president of Ball State Homebrew Club DN GRAPHIC LAUREN CHAPMAN

general steps: extreme sanitization of the brew area; boiling water, adding in extracts and hops; cooling the mix; adding wort—a mixture of yeast; fermentation; bottling and finally letting the product mature and carbonate. It can take weeks to months from the start to when the brewer can actually enjoy their product. Varnau’s hobby expands past just being an idle past time. He hopes to obtain a degree in brewing and one day own his own brewery. The Ball State Homebrew Club would be a healthy addition to a resume if Varnau attempts to further his goals, but he sees the organization as more than that. “I just wanted to have people who I could actually talk to about brewing and annoy them with my beer snobbishness,” he said. The idea of the club however has been brewing for a little over two years.

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Sun King Brewing Co. 135 N. College Ave. Indianapolis, IN 46202 | www.sunkingbrewing.com/ Sun King Brewing Co. has an impressive résumé. They are winners of 13 Great American Beer Festival medals, five World Beer Cup medals and the 2012 Indiana Brewery of the Year at the Indiana Brewers Cup. Owner Clay Robinson attributes the achievements to their beer quality, as well as their involvement in the community. They support over 200 community-based and nonprofit organizations. Robinson said this allowed him to “help our partners raise over a half million dollars” last year. Their brews include “Sunlight Cream Ale,” “Wee Mac Scottish Style Ale” and “Osiris Pale Ale.”

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Upland Brewery 350 W. 11th St. Bloomington, IN 47404 | www.uplandbeer.com/ Upland Brewery was founded in Bloomington in 1997, but now also has locations in Carmel and Indianapolis. The Bloomington facilities offer a restaurant, tours and a tasting room. The Indianapolis facility also has a tasting room and the Carmel location offers a tap house. Their featured beers include IPA “Dragonfly,” “Wheat Ale,” pale ale “Helios” and imperial red ale ‘The Ard Ri,” among many other varieties.

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Salt Creek Brewery 466 Old State Road 37 Bedford, IN 47421 | www.saltcreekbrewery.com/ Salt Creek Brewery is nestled in the countryside of Bedford and serves as the only brewery in Lawrence County. Owner Brad Hawkins said Salt Creek Brewery stands out because the brewpub is located inside an old auto-service garage, where an open pit brewery is located in a converted alignment pit. “Have you ever been to another brewery that is in a garage?” Hawkins said.

Amy Poehler, Tina Fey hosted Golden Globes success Historical drama, con-artist comedy dominate in awards | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES- Amy Poehler made out with Bono, Tina Fey mocked George Clooney’s taste in women and Matt Damon emerged, bizarrely, as the night’s theme. But at the end of a madcap Golden Globes (Fey toasted it as “the beautiful mess we hoped it would be”), the major honors soberly ended up with the favorites. David O. Russell’s conartist caper “American Hustle” led with three awards, including best film comedy. And despite missing out in the other six categories it was nominated in, the unflinching historical drama “12 Years a Slave” concluded the

night as best film drama. “A little bit in shock,” said director Steve McQueen, before shrugging the lyrics to the old gospel song sung in the slavery epic: “Roll, Jordan, roll.” Russell’s 1970s Abscam fictionalization “American Hustle” won acting awards for Amy Adams (best actress drama) and Jennifer Lawrence (best supporting actress). Best picture was the only award for “12 Years a Slave,” which came in with seven nominations, tied for the most with “American Hustle.” Leonardo DiCaprio, a ninetime Golden Globe nominee, won his second Globe for best actor in a comedy for his work in “The Wolf of Wall Street.” Alfonso Cuaron won best director for the space odyssey “Gravity,” a worldwide hit and critical favorite. The night’s biggest winners may have been hosts Tina Fey and

Amy Poehler, ONLINE whose sec- Read what our ond time reporter thought hosting the of the awards. H o l ly w o o d ballstatedaily. Foreign Press com Association’s Beverly Hills, Calif., ceremony was just as successful as last year’s show (a six-year ratings high with 19.7 million viewers). The pair came out with a spree of punch lines, dishing them around the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Four months after its final episode, AMC’s “Breaking Bad” won for best drama TV series and best actor in a drama series for Bryan Cranston. Creator Vince Gilligan said the award gave him “one more chance to thank the fans of the show,” but left the final word for star Aaron Paul. “Yeah, bitch,” declared Paul, MCT PHOTO with what essentially became The cast of “Breaking Bad” with showrunner Vince Gilligan, center, pose backstage at the 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday in Beverly Hills, Calif. his character’s catch phrase.


MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

NEWS

STEM jobs up 39 percent in Indianapolis City above average state lags behind, Muncie lost jobs | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Indianapolis Business Journal analyzed U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and found Indianapolis had 39 percent more jobs in the STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and math — in 2012 than in 2001. That’s more than double the national growth rate of 17 percent.

But the rest of the state saw an increase of just 10 percent, and at least four areas — Muncie, Terre Haute, Fort Wayne and South Bend-Mishawaka — had fewer STEM jobs in 2012 than in 2001. “Indianapolis is somewhat of a sponge city for the whole region,� said Mark Schill, vice president of research at Praxis Strategy Group, an economic development consultant in North Dakota. Schill said it’s common for high-tech workers to flock to urban areas from smaller communities or move to college

towns, such as Bloomington and Lafayette. In Indiana, Columbus also is a hub because of engine-maker Cummins Inc. But other areas aren’t faring as well. Indiana is still recovering from hits that major manufacturers suffered and put thousands of engineers out of work. The state as a whole also saw the number of computerrelated jobs stagnate in recent years, while it has grown rapidly in Indianapolis. Even with the shortage outside the Indianapolis area, STEM jobs helped offset losses during the recession. STEM

employment increased 4 percent from mid-2009 through 2012, while all other careers were still down 0.1 percent, the IBJ reported. Derek Redelman, vice president for education and workforce policy at the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, said it’s hard to develop government policies that promote STEM fields, because researchers disagree on what jobs qualify. He said government programs, such as an Indiana initiative which gives incentives to four-year state universities

nization will focus on three neighborhoods, seeking to train 40 to 50 citizens per neighborhood with classes starting in February. “People need safety for their mental health,� Coplen said. To further deter criminals, ACP offers participants signs to place in front of homes to advertise that the homeowners possess guns. Jordan Meyer, a senior Sociology major, said he disagreed with the program initially. “At first I thought it was terrifying,� Meyer said. But after he read that the program requires background checks he changed his mind. “If they’re going through the proper channels, it’s fine,� he said. Dylan Vinson, a freshman Spanish education major, said he disagrees with the program. “It’s not exactly the best way to go about things. His inten-

tions are good, but I am not sure giving out guns, even with the training and background checks, will have the effect he wants.� Coplen, though, said people who oppose the program probably don’t understand what the Armed Citizen’s Project does. Despite Coplen’s firm belief, he admits adding guns to neighborhoods isn’t the endall solution to crime. “Armed Citizen’s Project is not the full solution,� Coplen said. “Crime is an accumulation of things. Armed Citizens Project is just one of the solutions.� Brady Hertel, a freshman social studies education and history double major, said he thinks the program could work so long as people are aware of it “If I was a robber and I knew they had a gun, I’d be hesitant to break in,� Hertel said. “As

ONLINE

GUNS: ‘People need safety for their mental health’

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Coplen grew up in Rochester, Ind. and graduated from Ball State in 2008. He then moved to Houston for graduate school. Coplen said he started the Armed Citizens Project after witnessing the physical and emotional aftermath for a veteran whose house in Houston was burglarized. “It was then I decided I would help him and others in the neighborhood feel safer,� he said. The Armed Citizens Project primarily targets single mothers, people who live alone and others who may experience difficulty defending themselves. The project is offering guns to as many as 400 residences in a community near Houston that had a total of 107 home invasions in 2012. In Indianapolis, the orga-

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long as they stay true to the background checks and don’t give guns to criminals, I can see it preventing some crime.� In the future, Coplen would like to bring the Armed Citizens Project to universities through student outreach, including Ball State. “I loved my time at Ball State,� said Coplen. “Starting maybe a student group there would be great.� Coplen said after the program’s third year, he will gather information about crime in the participating neighborhoods and publish the results.

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Today’s birthday (1-13-14)

Apply your trademark discipline to health and fitness this year for energizing results. Your love life and career advance naturally, building to a peak between May and July. Indulge your curiosity for deeper meaning with someone fun and fascinating. Maintain financial organization, and your net worth grows. Refine your message to forward a cause that matters. It’s about love.

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27 DEGREES

are offered by Ball State that are considered STEM degrees. COMPUTER SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

is a degree being considered by Ball State to bolster the number of STEM degrees. 6 PERCENT

is the amount of state money given to Indiana universities based on STEM degrees. average. And we have the highest percentage of manufacturing jobs in the country.�

HOUSING: Board president leaves after 3-year term, secretary takes position | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Rick Hall, previously secretary on the board, succeeded Hughes as president. Hall joined the board in 2007 and became secretary in 2011, according to the university’s website. Hall called Hughes a “humble soul� in Friday’s board meeting and thanked him for his time serving the university. “He has 40 years of engagement with the institution, a lifetime of service, and done so with class and unselfishness that is really special,� Hall said. Hall said as an alumnus he has benefited from his time at Ball State and wants to continue the university’s traditions.

HOLLIS HUGHES RICK HALL Former Ball State Board of Trustees president

Succeeded Hughes as president of the trustees

“I am honored to be entrusted with this responsibility,� Hall said. “I am so proud that Ball State provides an incredible educational experience for the citizens of Indiana with such remarkable efficiency.�

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that recruit students into STEM fields, need to be broadened to include two-year degrees and certificates. The state also needs more rank-and-file factory workers with technical certifications, even though they often don’t count as STEM, he said. Many manufacturers say they can’t find enough qualified candidates to fill openings for skilled workers. “That is the area that Indiana particularly struggles in,� Redelman said. “Not only are we not at the national average, we’re below the Midwest

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Visit us online Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)Today is a 9 -- Today has powerhouse potential. Align your efforts to serve and support health for yourself and others, and incredible results could arise.Your words and deeds travel further, and fun takes all the work out of it.

Aries (March 21-April 19)Today is an 8 -- Heavy activity provides great lessons today. Learn from your mistakes and save time ultimately. Communications go further, so talk about what you like, and spread enthusiasm. Reward yourself with rest and relaxation at home.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 7 -- Snuggling seems delightful. Ponder concepts like freedom and inner health. Let go of some old limitation. Serve others by serving yourself. Recharge while considering your next move. Share your thanks and appreciation.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)Today is a 7 -- You’re especially brilliant today, and things are starting to get fun. Time with kids and young people rejuvenates your spirit. Set aside worries for a while and play light-hearted games. Get outside and see what’s going on.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8 -- Disciplined communications get your message out in new channels. Use creativity, charm and intellect to generate profits. Keep building infrastructure. Delight in witty banter with someone interesting. Talk about passion and promise. Gemini (May 21-June 21) The moon’s in your sign and the world is listening. Sing out from your heart, and closed doors open.Your persistence and dedication accomplish more than expected. Take responsibility for a change you want. Make it happen.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 7 -- Words come easily, and you’re especially clever today. Enjoy your friends. Talk about your next adventure. Build your plans with strong foundations. Invite those you’d like to play with to come along.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7 -Home projects flourish today. Choose what results you want, talk it over and make it happen. Creative partnership comes easily, and domestic temptations and joys distract. That’s OK. Enjoy simple family pleasures.

 

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 -- Apply yourself to your work, and creativity sparks in unique directions. Maintain a respectful attitude with clients and bosses as you get lost in the job.Your talent, articulation and focus win appreciation.

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Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 -- Travel or studies, including social, cultural or philosophical inquiries, satisfy your spirit.You’re interested in liberty and justice. Craft a perfect pitch to persuade others to join the endeavor. Disciplined efforts bear fruit. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is an 8 -- Apply your smarts to solutions that benefit your partner. Handle insurance matters or financial details. File the paperwork. Communications flow with ease, so share, connect and hit “send.� Your nest egg grows. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 -- Connect with an inspiring creative partner. It seems easier to handle tasks you’d been avoiding, so complete them. This gives space for new endeavors and collaborations, and some enticing ones wait in the wings.


PAGE 6 | MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BALLSTATEDAILY.COM

NEWS

| SAYING GOODBYE TO A MAN’S BEST FRIEND

DN PHOTO BRITTANY OVERSTREET

University Police Department officers hold the flag over the casket of Tara, the police department’s canine who died Dec. 5. Services were Friday afternoon at Elm Ridge Funeral Home. Tara would have been 10 on Dec. 19.

DN PHOTOS BRITTANY OVERSTREET

ABOVE: Scott Stafford, University Police Department’s canine handler, poses in a photo with Tara, who died Dec. 5. Tara joined the force Mar 2008 with her partner Stafford. Stafford and his family were at their home when they noticed Tara acting differently. The only conclusion Stafford said they could come to was that a vehicle hit her. LEFT: The collar that UPD’s canine, Tara, wore was displayed during Friday’s memorial service at Elm Ridge Funeral Home. University Police still have one canine unit: Sargo, who joined in Jan. 2009. His handler Craig Hodson.

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DN 1-13-14  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News for Monday, Jan. 13, 2014.

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