Page 1

‘RUN THE JEWELS’ REVIEW

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL

Killer Mike and El-P’s brand new project succeeds in setting bar higher for future

Assistant coach, recruits boost Cards’ confidence

DN MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

Building on a 21-6 season

SEE PAGE 6

THE DAILY NEWS

SEE PAGE 4

BSUDAILY.COM

PUPPY LOVE

Pet-A-Palooza helps about 100 cats and dogs find homes for $5 KRYSTAL BYERS STAFF REPORTER

|

kmbyers@bsu.edu

Groups question new BSU professor

Intelligent design scholar was denied tenure at Iowa State SAM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER | sthoyt@bsu.edu

COST FOR CATS AND DOGS

Ball State has made a con- GUILLERMO troversial move in hiring a prominent intelligent de- GONZALEZ: sign scholar to teach in the • Gonzalez obtained a department of physics and Ph.D. in astronomy astronomy. in 1993 at the Individuals on both sides of University of the intelligent design debate Washington. He did are commenting on the addipost-doctoral work tion of Guillermo Gonzalez, at the University of who is slated to teach “The Texas, Austin and Sun and Stars” and “The Sothe University of lar System” as an associate Washington. professor in the fall. • He co-wrote Gonzalez was the center “Observational of a debate at Iowa State Astronomy,” a University when he was 2006 textbook, denied tenure in 2008. The and “Privileged Discovery Institute, a maPlanet: How Our jor intelligent design orgaPlace in the Cosmos nization, fought the deciis Designed for sion to deny tenure, saying Discovery” in 2004. it was based on religious SOURCE: iscid.org, discovery.org grounds. ISU responded by saying he was hired due to academic reasons. Gonzalez’s 2004 book “The Privileged Planet: How Our Place in the Cosmos is Designed for Discovery,” which explores evidence supporting intelligent design, received criticism from his fellow professors at ISU, including a petition that was signed by more than 100 of his fellow professors there asking to publish a statement against the legitimacy of intelligent design as a science.

Search available pets petfinder.com

ATHLETICS

DN PHOTOS KRYSTAL BYERS

TOP: Elijah Fowler pets a dog at the Muncie Animal Shelter on Friday. Fowler and his parents were among the many families who came to the shelter in the hopes of adopting an animal for $5. BOTTOM: An adoptable cat peers out the bars of its cage Friday. Over 100 cats and dogs were adopted during the 2-day Pet-aPalooza.

M

ore than 100 happy cats and dogs found homes this weekend after being adopted for $5 at the Muncie Animal Shelter’s first annual Pet-A-Palooza. Phil Peckinpaugh, superintendent of the shelter, said the shelter hosted the event to get more animals into good homes. “We get so full with animals here and it’s really hard to find homes,” Peckinpaugh said. “The alternative is euthanasia so a lot of shelters across the country had events similar to this that have been really successful.”

ADOPT TODAY WHAT 

Muncie Animal Shelter WHERE 

2401 S. Gharkey St. WHEN 

Monday – Friday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday Noon to 3 p.m. Males, $65 Females, $75

See GONZALEZ, page 3

SCHOLL FACES 2 COACHING Plane crash kills 2, injures more than 100 VACANCIES See ADOPT, page 6

San Francisco flight hit runway during landing, caught fire | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO — An Asiana Airlines flight packed with more than 300 people slammed onto the runway while landing at San Francisco airport Saturday and caught fire, forcing many to escape by sliding down the emergency inflatable slides and into a trail of metal debris as flames tore through the plane. At least two people who were found outside the wreckage died in the crash, while another 182 people were taken to hospitals, many with minor injuries, authorities said. Forty-nine people were reported to be in critical condition, San Francisco International Airport spokesman Doug Yakel said. As the plane approached the

MUNCIE, INDIANA

Athletic director patient in search for new replacements DAKOTA CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR | @DakotaCrawford_

« Everybody was

screaming. I was trying to usher them out. I said, ‘Stay calm, stop screaming, help each other out, don’t push. » BENJAMIN LEVY, a passenger runway from the waters of San Francisco Bay around noon, travelers in the terminals and others eyewitnesses could see that the aircraft was swaying unusually from side to side and that at one point the tail seemed to hit the ground before breaking off. Kate Belding, who was jogging a few miles away, said she thought: “Oh my God. That plane is crashing.” By the time the flames were out, much of the top of the Boeing 777’s fuselage had burned away. The tail section was gone, with pieces of it

ONLY TWO MORE WEEKS OF CLASSES, YOU CAN MAKE IT

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

MCT PHOTO

Onlookers view the Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 that crashed on landing at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday. There were more than 300 people on board, two of which died as a result of the crash.

scattered across the beginning of the runway. One engine appeared to have broken away. Emergency responders could be seen walking inside the burned-out wreckage. News of the crash spread quickly on Twitter and the Internet in this

wired city, with eyewitnesses tweeting their stories, posting images of the plumes of smoke rising above the bay and uploading video of passengers fleeing the burning plane.

See BOEING, page 2

In searching for the ideal replacements of former coaches Craig Nicholson and Nadalie Walsh, athletic director Bill Scholl has two very different roles to fill. On one hand, it’s finding a coach to take over Ball State’s softball program — a perennial contender in the Mid-American Conference for the last five seasons. On the other lies a gymnastics program that has yet to reach the peak of a long rebuilding process. The process for finding those replacements is quite similar though. “My tendency has been to explore the marketplace,” Scholl said. “Not to just decide ahead of that if our coach leaves, this is who I want. You can have a list in advance, but you can’t be talking to people. “I think it’s generally going to be a one to three week period of time to get through the paper work and the proper notifications and actually sitting down to do the due diligence with the candidate. I would say you could see an announcement anywhere from the end of this week, to two to three weeks down the road.”

See SCHOLL, page 4

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Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

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Go online to see photography from campus, community events. Visit bsudaily.com and click on multimedia.

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TODAY High: 85, Low: 71 Scattered t-storms

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The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306-0481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Steven Williams NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford PHOTO EDITOR Jordan Huffer DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein COPY CHIEF Daniel Brount

EGYPT LEADERSHIP STARTS RALLIES

MULTIMEDIA BSUDAILY.COM

TOP FIGURES IN EGYPT

Conservatives reject liberal’s candidate for prime minister

ZIAD BAHAA-ELDIN,

Egyptian Social Democratic Party • Widely tipped as the consensus candidate to become prime minister for the transitional government. • Western-educated lawyer with a degree from the London School of Economics who set up the government’s financial regulatory body overseeing capital markets after heading the business-friendly investment agency. • Won a seat in the first parliament •Called for building a new system based on inclusiveness and respect for law and “does not use the weapons of our rivals in treating them.”

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Fireworks, zipline part of July 4 celebration

Check out our photo gallery from a Fourth of July party in Yorktown including fireworks, a zipline and food.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVES BSUDAILY.COM

Oil train derails in Quebec, kills 5

The crash caused by the runaway tankers destroyed the downtown area of Lac-Megantic and dozens are still reported missing.

BP repayment claims some gulf businesses unfairly taking money

CAIRO — Feuding erupted within Egypt’s new leadership on Sunday as secular and liberal factions wrangled with ultraconservative Islamists who rejected their choice for prime minister, stalling the formation of a new government after the military’s ouster of President Mohammed Morsi. At the same time, the shows of strength over the removal of Egypt’s first freely elected president were far from ending, with tens of thousands in the streets Sunday from each side. The military deployed troops at key locations in Cairo and other cities amid fears of renewed violence. The Muslim Brotherhood pushed ahead with its campaign of protests aimed at forcing Morsi’s reinstatement, bringing out large crowds in new rallies. Its officials vowed the group would not be “terrorized” by arrests of their leaders and the shutdown of their media outlets. The Brotherhood’s oppo-

Giffords tours nation on anti-gun campaign

Gabrielle Giffords has met with George H.W. Bush and parents of school shootings to fight the NRA for stricter control on firearms.

nents, in turn, called out large rallies in Tahrir Square and other squares in Cairo and several cities to defend against an Islamist counter-push. Military warplanes swooped over the crowd filling Tahrir, drawing a heart shape and an Egyptian flag in the sky with colored smoke. Two days ago, clashes between the rival camps left at least 36 dead and more than

1,000 injured nationwide. Senior Brotherhood member Saad Emara said there was no possibility for any negotiations with the new leadership after “all betrayed us,” and following the military’s clampdown on the group. “We are not regressing to a Mubarak era but to ... a totalitarian regime,” he told The Associated Press. “Anything other than protest is suicide.”

investigators were heading to the scene. Asiana, Boeing and the engine manufacturer, Pratt & Whitney, pledged to work with them. Vedpal Singh, who was sitting in the middle of the aircraft and survived the crash with his family, said there was no forewarning from the pilot or any crew members before the plane touched down hard and he heard a loud sound.

“We knew something was horrible wrong,” said Singh, who suffered a fractured collarbone and had his arm was in a sling. “It’s miraculous we survived,” he said. A visibly shaken Singh said the plane went silent before people tried to get out any way they could. His 15-year-old son said luggage tumbled from the overhead bins. The entire incident

MOHAMED ELBARADEI,

former director of the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency • Originally pegged to be prime minister • Was opposed by conservatives and may become vice president in the interim government. • Served as an Egyptian diplomat to the United Nations and later as an aide to Egypt’s foreign minister. •Was the director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency for nearly 12 years. He and the IAEA shared the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. SOURCE: The Associated Press

BOEING: Tail, landing gear may have caught on wall | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

The company’s case against payments to businesses it says were unaffected by the oil spill will be heard.

MCT PHOTO

Walid el Halali, a Ministry of Investment employee, was among those injured in clashes with Republican Guards in Cairo on Friday. The conflict erupted over groups being unsatisfied with the country’s new leadership.

“It just looked really bad,” Belding said. “I’ve seen the pictures of it since then, and it’s amazing anyone walked out of that plane.” The investigation has been turned over to the FBI and terrorism has been ruled out, San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said. Federal aviation and transportation

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WEDNESDAY: T-storms, High: 83, Low: 64 THURSDAY: Partly cloudy, High: 78, Low: 60

lasted about 10 seconds. Levy, who was sitting in an emergency exit row, said he felt the pilot try to lift the jet up before it crashed, and thinks the maneuver might have saved some lives. “Everybody was screaming. I was trying to usher them out,” he recalled of the first seconds after the landing. “I said, ‘Stay calm, stop screaming, help each other out, don’t push.’”

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Still updating 24/7. Sudoku Crossword

By Michael Mepham

Level: Easy Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY. ACROSS 1 __ ACID: ANTISEPTIC CLEANER 6 RAINDROP SOUND 10 HUNTER’S QUARRY 14 TEXAS SHRINE 15 CIVIL RIGHTS ICON PARKS 16 MORTGAGE ADJUSTMENT, BRIEFLY 17 FIGURE OF SPEECH 18 WAIKIKI’S WHEREABOUTS 19 AUNT BEE’S GRANDNEPHEW 20 COUNTDOWN KICKOFF 21 WILD WEST SHOWMAN 24 MAKES SMALL TALK 26 DID SOME PRESSING WORK? 27 SOUTH PACIFIC ISLAND 29 SPOTLESS 31 SENT PACKING 32 EGYPTIAN PORTRAYED BY LIZ 34 PRIZE WITH SIX CATEGORIES 38 DWARF WEARING SPECS 39 SACK ON A RED-WHITE-

AND-BLUE TRUCK, WHICH CAN HOLD THE ENDS OF 21- AND 54-ACROSS AND 3AND 35-DOWN 41 SAVINGS OPTION, BRIEFLY 42 A PAROLEE MAY WEAR A MONITOR ON IT 44 VEHICLE ON RUNNERS 45 DOOR OPENER 46 MUSE WHO INSPIRES POETS 48 BARCELONA BUDDIES 50 PHASE 53 NFL REPLAY AID 54 CHARACTER WRITTEN IN KINDERGARTEN 57 FOLDABLE SLEEPER 60 CRITICIZE SEVERELY 61 GOOD-SIZED HOME SITE 62 ARCADE PIONEER 64 DUST BOWL REFUGEE 65 SEND, AS PACKAGES 66 ENTICED 67 ASIAN HOLIDAYS 68 DOES BETTER THAN 69 GRASSLIKE MARSH PLANT

DOWN 1 ANGLER’S BUCKETFUL 2 SHOPPE ADJECTIVE 3 TICKET FROM A POSTPONED BALL GAME 4 “IF YOU ASK ME,” IN TEXTS 5 BATTLE 6 UNIV. EMPLOYEES 7 WASTE TIME 8 DEPT. OF LABOR PROTECTION ARM 9 TALKING PARROT OF FILM 10 FREE, AS LEGAL WORK 11 FASTEN ANEW 12 USE TURBOTAX, SAY 13 TRIANGULAR TRAFFIC SIGN 22 NEW YORK CITY 23 MALAYSIAN APE 25 STAYED OUT OF SIGHT 27 “I DID IT!” 28 NEURAL TRANSMITTER 29 YO-YO MA’S INSTRUMENT 30 EAR PART 33 MARKETGOER’S MEMO 35 GAME ACCESSORY WITH 24 NUMBERED SQUARES 36 SUFFIX WITH SWITCH

37 “CSI” FACILITIES 39 PHARMACEUTICAL GIANT 40 ALLAN-__: ROBIN HOOD COHORT 43 BLOODSUCKERS 45 ACTRESS BASINGER 47 “IT’S ABOUT TIME!” 49 FABLE CONCLUSIONS 50 MONK’S SUPERIOR 51 QUENCH 52 ASSUME TO BE TRUE 53 STAIRCASE UNITS 55 CANYON FEEDBACK 56 LOSE ONE’S FOOTING 58 CALIF. NEIGHBOR 59 OCEAN MOTION 63 WED. PRECEDER

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MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Demolition to begin on University Square Removing asbestos, BY THE NUMBERS preparations ready, 24,000 sq. ft. the size of the University to take 11 months roughly Square space SAM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER 11 months | sthoyt@bsu.edu Fences have gone up around the University Square block as plans for demolition move forward. The city-funded $60 million project will destroy the University Square space, roughly 19,000 to 24,000 square feet, and replace it with a six-story garage, retail space and more than 200 apartments. Todd Donati, the director of the Muncie Redevelopment Board, said internal work, such as removing asbestos from the property, was the focus of the past few weeks, but taking down the entire structure will begin this week. “We’re looking to have everything demolished and the ground pretty well flat dirt by the second week of July,” Donati said. “You’ll start to see some construction sometime around the first of August.” He said the overall project should take 10 to 11 months to complete. The garage will be built first, and the apartments and retail space will follow in September. “It’ll hopefully be totally framed in by the end of the year,” Donati said.

to complete the six-story garage, retail space and apartments

$60 million

amount the city is giving for the project

200 apartments will be included in the new structure

There have been no reported accidents and Donati said there have been no major setbacks to the schedule. There were concerns that Ball State could disturb the project, but a meeting between Muncie mayor Dennis Tyler and Ball State officials in mid-June united the two entities in support of the plans, according to the Star Press. The project, announced at the beginning of June, aims to respark activity in the Village. Investment Property Advisors have been working with Tyler and other leaders of the redevelopment board for more than a year, and Whittenberg Construction from Louisville and Garmong Construction from Terre Haute have been chosen as the developers. Some businesses had expressed interest in the new

DN FILE PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

The former location of University Square will soon be demolished to make room for a new complex. The new complex will feature a six-story parking garage, retail space and more than 200 apartments.

retail space when the plans were revealed, but none have yet made a commitment. Leaders on the redevelopment team said a grocery area similar to a Trader Joe’s would be ideal for part of the space, giving students and locals a closer place to shop. Marta Moody, executive director of the Delaware-Muncie Metropolitan Plan Commission, said the plans to bring new things to the area and the size of the area being redeveloped will be an asset to the Village. “I will serve the same kind of function that an anchor serves,” Moody said. “I think that it will provide a very good base. I think the potential

positive impact is huge.” She said while it is still early on, the benefits of the plan can be seen. “They appear to have been developed with an eye toward serving the needs of the students as well as providing a lot of attention to the aesthetics so that will improve the streetscape and the appearance of the Village and make it more of a desired destination,” Moody said. While there was some dissent among the Muncie City Council when two members, Republican Brad Polk and Democrat Linda Gregory, voted against the plans, the project has been widely accepted and supported.

Board of Trustees student member prepares for job Decisions of board position to ‘impact entire university’ SAM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER | sthoyt@bsu.edu Kyle Pierce, a sophomore political science and pre-law major, started on July 1 as the student member of the Board of Trustees. After a being nominated by the university, he was formally appointed to the position by Gov. Mike Pence on June 28. “The students named... to our state universities’ board of trustees represent some Indiana’s best and brightest,” Pence said. KYLE PIERCE “Their insights, sophomore political science experience and guidance, couand pre-law pled with those major of their fellow trustees, will further enrich higher education in Indiana and will benefit each state university accordingly throughout the duration of their terms.” Pierce talked to the Daily News about his appointment:

Q: What was your first day like? A: We’re waiting until next week to start all the meetings with the heads of the university. However, over the next few weeks I’ll be meeting with the university leaders and President [Jo Ann] Gora.

Q: What was the process that you had to go through to be chosen for this position?

A: It started in February. I turned in an application and it had an interview with a committee of six students, juniors and seniors. From there, they recommend I think three or four students to move on. I met with Dr. [Kay] Bales, vice president of student affairs. After I met with her, I met with Dr. Gora, and after I met with President Gora, I met with Ben Evans who works in the Governor Pence’s office.

Q: What was your motivation for wanting this position?

A: Both of my parents went to Ball State and I’ve been active in the Ball State community ever since I was 6 or 7 years old. I remember coming up here for football games and basketball games, and I’ve always felt a connection to [the] university. When the opportunity came up to support the university on a larger scale I decided I wanted to go after it and see if I could help.

Q: What kind of qualifications were required for this position?

A: The written rules were you had to have, I believe, a 2.7 GPA, be a full-time student and be able to be a student for the next two years, a two-year term. Those are the written rules. Besides that, there’s a lot of emphasis on being well-thought on the whole process of the university and understanding how the university works. That wasn’t an actual rule, it was just basically whoever they thought was most

prepared to tackle big issues.

Q: What was your first reaction when you heard that you had been appointed?

A: I was extremely excited. I don’t know how to put it, but very excited that I’m going to take the next two years to help shape the Ball State atmosphere and the whole university.

Q: What will your duties entail?

A: Mainly there’s meetings every other month and with them, any issues that come up to the board. Those can be issues from the smoking ban to the admission requirements. Any large issue goes through the Board of Trustees and with that, we do a lot of research on every single topic.

Q: How much have you worked with the administration before?

A: Last year I was very involved in student government as a university senator. I got to work with issues with dining and student affairs and transportation. They were interactive with those.

Q: Have you met the student that was your predecessor?

A: Michael Miller, yes. I talked with him briefly over the first few months of the process. Not in great depth, but we were able to have short conversations about the duties and what it takes to be a trustee.

Q: What kind of advice did he give you?

A: Basically he made me make sure that I’m not acting as a representative for the students, but a member of the board who

happens to be a student. I can’t just get focused on issues that only impact students, because in my position I’ll be making decisions that will impact the entire university.

Q: What are you most looking forward to with this position?

A: Just the opportunity to help the university the next few years. I think we’re in a good spot at the university and being able to pay my small part and just helping the university stay on top.

Q: Are there any issues you’re looking forward to working on?

A: Academic rigor is an issue that is very important to me. We have a university that strives for excellence in all its courses. We’re a university that when people hear ‘Ball State,’ there’s a recognition of ‘Oh, the students that go to that university are taking classes that demand great thought and great understanding.’ That will help every student from here on out when you have a university that is known for being so rigorous.

Q: What would you like to say to students about your role and what you do for them?

A: I’m always open to having conversations with students. It may be about certain issues or their view on certain issues. Having open communication of why I vote one way or why I have this view on this issue, while at the same time hearing why they have their view on certain issues. Basically just having an open conversation and having an open environment.

Congress to discuss student loans

Decisions to be made about immigration, farm bill in House | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — Republicans and Democrats will put good will to the test when Congress returns this week to potentially incendiary fights over nominations, unresolved disputes over student loans and the farm bill, and the uncertainty of whether lawmakers have the political will to rewrite the nation’s immigration laws. The cooperation evident in the Senate last month with passage of a bipartisan immigration bill could be wiped out immediately

if Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., frustrated with GOP delaying tactics on judges and nominations, tries to change the Senate rules by scrapping the current three-fifths majority for a simple majority. Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has indicated it’s a decision Reid could regret if the GOP seizes Senate control in next year’s elections. “Once the Senate definitively breaks the rules to change the rules, the pressure to respond in kind will be irresistible to future majorities,” McConnell said last month, looking ahead to 2014 when Democrats have to defend 21 seats to the GOP’s 14. McConnell envisioned a long list of reversals from the Democratic agenda, from repeal-

ing President Barack Obama’s health care law to shipping radioactive nuclear waste to Yucca Mountain in Reid’s home state of Nevada. Recently elected Democrats have clamored for changes in Senate rules as Obama has faced Republican resistance to his nominations. Two Cabinet-rank choices — Tom Perez as labor secretary and Gina McCarthy to head the Environmental Protection Agency — could be approved by the Senate this month after a loud debate over administration policies. The GOP also has challenged Obama’s three judicial nominees to the powerful U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit as they’ve tried to eliminate the vacancies.

UPCOMING DECISIONS STUDENT LOANS

• Interest rates on college student loans doubled to 6.8 percent last Monday. • Lawmakers promised to restore lower rates when they return this week, both retroactively and before students start signing loan documents. FARM BILL

• House conservatives wanted to cut more than $2 billion annually to the almost $80 billion-a-year food stamp program. • Democrats were furious with a lastminute amendment that would have added additional work requirements to food stamps. IMMIGRATION

• The Senate immigration bill would promise of citizenship for those living here unlawfully with increased border security. • Republicans have said the bill is a “nonstarter” in the House. SOURCE: The Associated Press

GONZALEZ: Gora received petition of 7,000 names for academic freedom | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “Privileged Planet” was on the syllabus for astronomy professor’s Eric Hedin’s “Boundaries of Science” course, for which he is under review by the university for accusations of teaching creationism. A petition with more than 7,000 signatures from the Discovery Institute has been sent to Ball State president Jo Ann Gora asking her to guarantee the academic freedom of Hedin. Gora has not yet responded to the petition. Jerry Coyne, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago, voiced his disapproval of the hire of Gonzalez to the Muncie Star Press and on his blog. “This [hiring] is a very unwise move for Ball State, particularly when one of its other astronomy professors, Eric Hedin, is under investigation for teaching [intelligent design] in an astronomy class,” Coyne said. “If the university wants to retain any scientific credibility, they should start hiring scientists who will teach real science and not religious apologetics.” He said he is pointing out what he believes to be a violation of the First Amendment, not trying to destroy careers. “I’ve repeatedly said that I don’t think Hedin should be fired, but only that his course be deep-sixed. And I’ve said that BSU should keep an eye on Gonzalez to make sure he doesn’t teach ID in his science classes,” Coyne said. “The

DN|BRIEF

MEET GONZALEZ • He has written around 70 articles for numerous astronomy and astrophysical journals. • He has taught at Iowa State University and Grove City College, and will join Ball State in the fall, teaching “The Stars and Sun” and “The Solar System.” Discovery Institute is being a drama llama here, trying to set up these guys as martyrs.” John West, the vice president of the Discovery Institute and a colleague of Gonzalez, told the Star Press he doesn’t think Ball State has any intelligent design leanings. “My understanding from Guillermo is that he had been seeking a university more supportive of scientific research, and so Ball State was simply one of the places he had applied,” West said. “The fact that a department of physics and astronomy doesn’t immediately blacklist someone who has argued for cosmic design does not supply evidence that the department is a hotbed of intelligent design. It simply means the department doesn’t believe in the kind of knee-jerk censorship engaged in by some Darwinian biologists.” Ball State spokesperson Joan Todd has said Gonzalez’s qualifications can be viewed in his curriculum vitae and has declined to answer other questions.

REPAIRS TO ICONIC BSU LANDMARK TO BE COMPLETED BY AUGUST 15

Last week Ball State began repairs to Shafer Tower, one of the university’s more prominent landmarks. Jim Lowe, director of engineering and construction operations, said the construction is nothing more than regular maintenance being done to prevent further degradation to the tower. “All of the assembly that goes into the cladding of a building expands and contracts at a different rate,” Lowe said. “As it does that, it becomes a living and breathing structure, it’s constantly moving.” Cladding is intended to protect the structure from exposure to wind and rain. After 11 years of exposure to ultraviolet rays, the cladding between Shafer Tower’s brick and limestone has started to wear down. He said they are repairing mortar joints or taking out caulking to keep the structure sound. Lowe said the university plans to complete all of the repairs in two phases, the first of which will end between Aug. 5 and 15, a week before students begin coming back to campus. Phase two will begin next summer and should be the only repairs needed for the next nine or 10 years. “Were going to do a little bit of work this summer so we can get in and get out before students return and we’re going to do the same thing next year,” Lowe said. “Every building has that need.” – ROSS MAY

NSA LEAKER GETS ASYLUM OFFERS FROM 3 COUNTRIES Snowden remains in transit area of airport in Moscow

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS MOSCOW — An influential Russian parliament member who often speaks for the Kremlin encouraged NSA leaker Edward Snowden on Sunday to accept Venezuela’s offer of asylum. Alexei Pushkov, who heads the international affairs committee in Russia’s parliament, posted a message on Twitter saying: “Venezuela is waiting for an answer from Snowden. This, perhaps, is his last chance to receive political asylum.” Venezuelan Foreign Minister Elias Jaua said Saturday that his country has not yet been in contact with Snowden, who Russian officials say has been stuck in the transit area of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport since arriving on a flight from Hong Kong two weeks ago. He has been unable to travel further because the United States annulled his passport. Jaua said he expects to consult with Russian officials Monday about Snowden’s situation. Pushkov’s comments appeared to indicate that the Kremlin is now anxious to be

rid of the former National Security Agency systems analyst, whom the U.S. wants returned to face espionage charges. There has been no response from the Kremlin or Russian Foreign Ministry to the asylum offer made by Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro in the early hours of Saturday. For Snowden to leave for South America, he would need for Venezuela to issue him travel documents and he would need to find a way to get there. The only direct commercial flight from Moscow goes to Havana, Cuba, and Snowden had booked a seat on this flight the day after arriving from Hong Kong, but failed to show up. The Moscow-Havana flight goes over Europe and the United States, which could cause complications. Some European countries refused to allow Bolivian President Evo Morales to fly through their airspace on his way home from Moscow last week because of suspicions that Snowden was onboard his plane. The presidents of Bolivia and Nicaragua said over the weekend that Snowden was welcome in their countries. Bolivia’s foreign minister, David Choquehuanca, said Sunday on state television that his country has not yet received a formal petition for asylum from Snowden.


PAGE 4 | MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

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SCHOLL: Search continues for softball, gymnastics | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Kevin Owens was named an All-American for his role in the 2013 season. Owens will be returning for the 2014 season along with seven incoming freshman, all of whom will be looking toward the goal of the NCAA Tournament.

Recruits, coach bring team more confidence Men’s volleyball to add 2nd full-time assistant next year

|

DAKOTA CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR @Dakota Crawford_

Advancing to the NCAA Tournament is not out of the question. Or at least it shouldn’t be for the Ball State men’s volleyball team. A recruitment class featuring seven players, along with the addition of a second fulltime assistant head coach will help to strengthen an already successful program. There is no guarantee of improvement though. Coach Joel Walton said despite the team’s strength on paper, there are holes to be filled. “Our challenges next year are that we graduate Jamion Hartley and Greg Herceg,” he said. “These guys were producing probably about 60 percent of our team’s offense. We’ve got to find arms whether it’s from our returning players or our recruits to replace those two players.” Recruits will play a major part in the team’s success next season. It’s a group large in numbers and ability alike. “We have a class of seven players coming to Ball State that are all big and very physical guys,” Walton said. “This is big. Seven is a big class, and the talent level that we’ve got in the players that are coming in is also very big.”

Two of the seven players, Alex Pia out of Georgia and Brendan Surane of Illinois, were named to Volleyball Magazine’s Fab 50 – a list of the countries’ top 50 high school recruits as voted on by NCAA Division I and II head coaches. Pia, a 6-foot-6-inch middle blocker, played with the U.S. National Team this summer. His competition included the best players from countries such as Russia, Brazil, Korea, Poland and Egypt. Walton said the experience will be good for Pia as a person, and even better for his future as a collegiate men’s volleyball player. “He’s truly one of the best players in this country at his age level, and playing against some of the best players in the world,” he said. “It should lessen, but I don’t think it will completely alleviate, the fact that he’s going to be a freshman this year. He’s going to be stepping on the court with our team against a very competitive conference. It’s hopefully a set of experiences that he can lean on in some of our more intense competitive situations next year.” The smallest of the seven recruits measures up at 6-foot3-inches, while the biggest is 6-foot-8-inches. Walton said the physical size of this group will be critical in keeping his team competitive. “It’s not just about being quick and explosive,” he said. “Having height with an athletic base is just a huge advantage, because we’re trying to play as

NCAA MEN’S BASKETBALL

high over our net as possible. Having guys who are able to jump-touch 11 feet or higher [is] kind of what’s required to be able to keep up with the best teams in the country.” All-Americans Kevin Owen and Matt Leske return to anchor the defense. Both of the middle attackers recorded more than 125 blocks in their most recent campaign. The pair led Ball State to a 21-6 overall record, with a 9-5 mark in the Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association. Owens said neither his own, nor the team’s past success will change his work ethic. It’s all about improvement. “My goal is just to get better, and practice every day,” Owens said. “Maybe that could lead to another All-American honor, but I always just push myself to be better than my competition. [Being an All-American] is not going to change how hard I work. I’m always trying to get better.” Walton believes that new resources, such as the addition of a second paid assistant coach, will help his team to move forward with a mindset similar to Owens. “We’re very excited about these opportunities and maximizing what resources we have,” he said. “We’re really just taking advantage, because we’ve been very good for a period of time at winning with less. We’re at a point now where our resources are much more similar to our opponents.” Walton said when he joined

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — Butler found its next basketball coach the same place it usually does — inside the family. The Bulldogs announced Saturday that they were promoting recently hired assistant Brandon Miller to replace Brad Stevens. The decision came three days after Stevens surprised everyone by taking the head job with the Boston Celtics. But like Stevens and his predecessors Todd Lickliter and Thad Matta, the Bulldogs didn’t have to look far to find the next coach. “I’m just thrilled that I have an opportunity to coach the guys that are here right now,” Miller said. “We hope to continue this success in our own

way and be the best that we can be moving forward.” Only two candidates’ names were seriously bandied about — Miller, a former Butler star who was just rehired by Stevens as an assistant coach in April, and Michigan assistant LaVall Jordan, another Butler alum and former Bulldogs assistant. Miller met with athletic director Barry Collier on Wednesday and Thursday before meeting with Collier and Butler President James Danko on Friday. He was officially offered the position Saturday. “We’re very confident and looking forward to our first year in the Big East with Brandon Miller as our head coach,” Collier said. “He’s a very intense, hardworking individual. Most importantly, his values are studentoriented, and he tries to lead people to even greater things. Brandon was the best choice for our coach at this time.” Collier met with the Butler

players shortly after Stevens announced his move to Boston to hear what they were looking for in the next head coach. “There wasn’t undue concern,” Collier said. “[The players] want somebody that understands Butler. I heard consistent confidence we’d get a good person because it’s a good job, and we believe in finding someone who will do things the way we do them.” Senior forward Khyle Marshall said it was important that the new coach had been with the program already. “I’m very happy to have Brandon as our head coach,” Marshall said. “We’re all just very excited and ready to get started.” For Miller, it’s a remarkable ascension after taking a one-year hiatus from college basketball just two years ago. Before returning to Butler, Miller worked under Illinois coach John Groce as an assistant for one season. He takes over a program that was the national

the team, both in person and over the phone, and I assured them that there is no intention to back down from the success level that Craig [Nicholson] established. In fact, I’d love to push it further.” The situation with gymnastics is different because the team has not reached the same level of success. It is headed in the right direction though. Scholl said Walsh’s work in turning the program around has caused some interest in that position as well. “It hasn’t yet achieved the kind of ‘wins and loss’ success that softball has, but Nadalie did a great job of getting that program back on solid footing, and the university has done a great job of providing resources for the program with a practice facility that is now as good as any in the country,” he said. “So again, I think because of Nadalie leaving it in much better shape than when she got it, it’s going to be an attractive position, and again, we’ve got people calling.”

LEADERBOARD Returning Seniors PLAYER

HEIGHT POSITION

K. Owens* M. Leske* G. McIlvaine U. Demirovski L. Wrather

6’9” 6’7” 6’6” 6’4” 5’11”

PLAYER

HEIGHT POSITION

Notable recruits

MA MA S OA OA

6’6” A. Pia** MB B. Surane** 6’6” MB 6’4” C. Gross S *All-American **Selected to U.S. Boys Youth National Team

the team in 1990-91, Ball State’s was one of the few programs that had both a full-time assistant and head coach. “We had been one of the leaders in our league, and recently have fallen somewhat behind,” he said. “So I’m looking forward to now having the additional resource of myself and two other people working full-time so our program can be the best it can possibly be.” More man-power means responsibilities such as recruiting would be shared, making the entire process run more smoothly. Not that Walton is worried about the direction of Ball State’s recruiting. He said this season’s success with recruits will allow his team to not only pursue its perennial goal of winning the MIVA Tournament, but advance deep into the NCAA Tournament as well.

Assistant coach to replace Stevens Coaching tradition continues with hire of Brandon Miller

In regard to the Ball State softball program, Scholl said players will miss former coach Craig Nicholson both as a mentor and as a person. “They’re all student athletes that he has developed and recruited, and they love him,” he said. “They really loved him as a coach and as an individual. From that standpoint, it’s certainly a very large loss. With that being said though, there’s nobody that’s irreplaceable, and I think that Craig would be the first to tell you that he’s not irreplaceable.” After winning three of the last four regular season MidAmerican Conference titles, the softball program has become very well established. Scholl called it one of the “model programs” in the country. “Because of that, it will be a very attractive position,” he said. “My phone is ringing, and there are a lot of very valid coaches who are interested in this position. I’ve met with

runner-up in 2010 and 2011, and then reached the regional semifinals last season after missing the tourney in 2012. The NCAA tournament success turned Butler into one of the most recognizable midmajor programs in the nation and allowed the school to move from the Horizon League to a much stronger Atlantic 10 last season and now on to the reformed Big East. Miller admitted that he and Stevens share similar philosophies and ways of coaching. Even off the court, the two appear very similar — family by their side, constantly using words like “humbled” and “blessed.” But Miller made it clear that he would not simply be continuing the work Stevens left behind. “I’m not Brad Stevens. I’m Brandon Miller,” Miller said. “I will tweak and adjust in my own way, be my own person. I’ll be Brandon Miller and coach accordingly.”

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Athletic director Bill Scholl speaks with women’s basketball coach Brady Sallee after a game. Scholl is currently searching for the next coaches for the gymnastics and softball teams.

BALL STATE LOOKS TO CAPITALIZE ON NEW NCAA RULES Coach Brady Sallee looking forward to new offensive look

|

DAKOTA CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR @Dakota Crawford_

In late June, the NCAA implemented a 10-second backcourt rule for women’s basketball. Previously, teams could spend any amount of the 30-second shot clock behind the mid-court line. Now, if the ball does not cross half court in 10 seconds, the offensive team will turn the ball over. Ball State women’s basketball coach Brady Sallee was not thrilled with the rule change. “I wasn’t necessarily a proponent of changing the rules,” he said. “I think our game has been appreciated for what it is and I would like to see this build on that instead of trying to change.” NCAA women’s basketball was the only level of the sport throughout the world that did not have some form of the backcourt rule. Sallee said a positive impact from the change will be a heightened experience for the casual fan. “It helps with just generally getting the rules of basketball closer together,” he said. “You hear so many people come watch a women’s game and start yelling about the 10 seconds and they don’t know the rules. This will get the casual fan a little bit more in tune.” Rule committees believe that the change will speed up the tempo of the game and create more offensive scoring opportunities. Sallee said the rule will also encourage teams to use a fullcourt press on defense in an attempt to force turnovers. “I think everybody is go-

ing to have it in their arsenal now, to try and use it to turn teams over,” he said. “It will be something that we’ll bring a little bit this year. We have in the past, but I think our depth, our athleticism and length will allow us to press a little bit more.” Offensively, Ball State looks to have all the tools necessary to break a full-court press. Ball handlers in Brandy Woody and Nathalie Fontaine, as well as incoming freshmen, will allow the team to aggressively push the ball. “I don’t see it really affecting us a whole lot,” Sallee said. “I’ve always had the philosophy that if you press against us we’re going to try and score off of it. We’re not just going to set it up at the end. We’ll have to make the right decisions to do it, but we’ve certainly got the skill-set to do it.” With the addition of two recruits over 6-foot-3-inches in height, Ball State will be able to play through the post as well. Sallee said an increased focus on the post game will be important to his team next season. Outside scorers will contrast the inside players, making for what he believes will be a strong offensive combination. It could also help to keep the opposing team from utilizing the full-court press on defense. “It makes teams expend energy to keep you out of the post, and opens up the perimeter where we have plenty of scorers,” he said. “That’s my bread and butter, pushing it into the post. I’ve had some really good, all-conference type of post players for the nine years I’ve been a head coach.” The potential for a new offensive look is exciting for Sallee. “If you don’t change a little bit from year to year, then you can get a little bit stale and we definitely don’t want that to happen,” he said.


MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM OPINION@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

DNSWITCHBOARD IF YOU WERE A DOG, WHICH DOG WOULD YOU BE? WHY? STEVEN WILLIAMS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

JORDAN HUFFER, PHOTO EDITOR

because of its undeniable cuteness. However, the bigger reason is because it is naturally aggressive and one of my duties as a dog would be to attack any pugs I see. No uglier pet ever created..

are big, fluffy, loving, clever, strong and quite lazy. However if they are in a bad mood and are not left alone they will take your face off. Already sounds like me. Also good for cuddling up with in the winter, much like myself.

ÂŤ I would easily choose a Husky

ÂŤ I would be a Great Pyreneese. They

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FORUM POLICY

DAKOTA CRAWFORD, SPORTS EDITOR

 I’d want to be a police-trained

German Shepherd. I’ve always liked the idea of joining a police force, but like don’t want to get shot. I think the risk of that would be smaller as a large, intelligent and athletic police dog.

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EMMA KATE FITTES, NEWS EDITOR

MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN, DESIGN EDITOR

DANIEL BROUNT, COPY CHIEF

a shitzu, poodle mix, because then I would live a life of luxury, being overfed, sleeping all day and having my belly scratched. That sounds like something I could handle.

be a pug and play around all day with other pugs but I would also like to be able to breathe and sadly, the little guys have a hard time doing this. So I’d be the next best thing, a beagle, and I’d run around all day, everyday.

the Queen of England’s corgis. Between basically being famous, being adorable, and being well taken care of, I think it’d be a pretty awesome life.

ÂŤ I would want to be my own dog,

ÂŤ I would love nothing more than to

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ÂŤ I would probably be one of Âť

| THE DAILY NEWS COMIC Josh Shaffer is an art major and draws “Strange Gods� for the Daily News. His views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Josh at jashaffer @bsu.edu.

The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor, guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed. The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community: REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842 SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467 U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623 U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

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Cancer (June 22-July 22)Today is a 9 -- It’s easier to collect debts for a year. You understand things newly. The rules of the game may have changed.You’re especially powerful and confident. Outrageous suggestions abound.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 -- Advance in your career.Your team is hot. Let someone else take the lead, and support them. New information gets discovered. Review details in private. Onward and upward.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 9 -- The kitchen is the heart of the home. For the next year, financial planning saves money and time. Try not to get impatient, impetuous or angry. Get terms down in writing.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7 -- A practical work matter moves forward now. Test your idea for a blinding insight. Household difficulties ease, with Saturn direct for a year. Completion and fresh beginnings develop romantically. Begin your relationship anew.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 7 -Consider consequences before taking action. Love is all that matters. Plan a writing project. Clean up your stuff. Your experience pays. It’s getting easier to get agreement.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 9 -- Someone’s extra persuasive now. Finalize communications. Progress eases for the next year, so help set the rules. Provide facts, and acknowledge the team. Make long-term goals and long-distance connections. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 -- Career responsibilities become clear. Expand your territory over the next year.Venture farther out. Listen for opportunities. Review resources, with the Cancer New Moon. Opposites attract even more so now.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 -It gets easier to work efficiently for the next year. Discover a new point of view. Listen carefully, and gather data. Do it for love, not money. The competition is increasing, too.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8 -Listen to a creative associate, and finish up a project. Advance to a new level. It’s getting easier to make progress at home for a year. Talk things over, and follow through on tasks.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8 -- Respectfully advance your agenda. Obtain bids or advice. Amazing developments occur. Adjust your attitude as needed. Let others know what you need. Move forward with personal planning. It’s easier to stick to the rules and finish old business.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is an 8 -- Focus your intention. Imagination works wonders. It gets easier to understand your sweetheart’s rules later. Keep track of the money, and stay in communication. For the next year, streamline your routine and simplify.

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Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 9 -Ask probing questions.You’ll especially love learning this year. A sense of discomfort leads you to errors. It’s a good time for brainstorming. A new door opens regarding career.


PAGE 6 | MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

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DUO’S ‘RUN THE JEWELS’ AMONG BEST OF 2013

| ROCKET’S RED GLARE

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

A bright flash from fireworks illuminates a field full of onlookers Saturday night in Morrow’s Meadow in Yorktown. The festival and firework display was part of the town’s annual celebration of the Fourth of July. Along with the festival, there was a 4K run earlier in the day, also an annual event.

ADOPT: Adoption includes microchipping, vaccinations, in-home trainer consultation | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The Muncie Animal Shelter took in approximately 3,800 animals last year and had about 742 adoptions. In the two days of the event, 103 animals were adopted. Anyone over 18 could adopt an animal Friday and Saturday. Every adoption was $5 and included microchipping, current vaccinations, a pre-wellness exam at participating vets,

spay/neuter voucher at participating vet and an in-home consultation with animal trainer Jim Turner. This is the first time the Muncie Animal Shelter has hosted the annual Pet-a-Palooza adoption. For cats and dogs, males usually cost $65 and females cost $75. “I would really like to come in Monday morning and most of these guys be in good homes,” Peckinpaugh said.

Muncie residents Gabby Clark and Danyeal Fullhart adopted a pit bull named Roxie on Friday. Clark said she has found many people are hesitant to adopt pit bulls. “I have been wanting a pit bull, I think it’s the owners I don’t think it’s the dog,” Clark said. “That boy said earlier that he was scared of them because one attacked him. That dog was probably a stray and mad and probably wanted food. I hate

that people do that.” Clark and Fullhart spent the day playing with the shelter dogs in the kennel and instantly fell in love with their golden-haired pit bull. “I think it’s good that they are doing [the event], I think that they are just trying to get everybody to a good home,” Clark said. “I am glad we got here, they are having puppies [Saturday] but we didn’t want to wait for her [Roxie].”

Two of last year’s most successful rappers have joined together for a project in 2013, and no — it’s not Kanye West and Jay-Z. Killer Mike and El-P have recently released a free album called “Run The Jewels,” that follows both of their successful 2012 albums. Particularly Killer Mike’s outstanding “R.A.P. Music” with the help of production from El-P made its way into my top 10 albums of last year. Now they are back working together, and it’s one hell of a ride. While this project is a bit short, it packs a heavy punch when it is hitting. The differing styles of Killer Mike and El-P are evident, but the production by El-P and the chemistry between the two makes it work superbly. Starting with the first track, it feels like each verse between the two is the progression of a friendly competition — but friendly isn’t exactly the word because both Killer Mike and El-P come out hungry on most of these tracks. El-P keeps up verse for verse with Killer Mike being particularly vicious in the album’s opener rapping, “You wanna hang, bring your throat. I got stools and a rope. I’m a slang poet, haranguing the land with a man’s flow.” Killer Mike steals the show on “Sea Legs” with a long verse that features some hilarious lines and some imPHOTO COURTESY OF STEREOGUM.COM pressive internal rhyming. He raps, “I’m the reason the season for treason starts this evening. And this evening the odds ain’t even. People praying to the gods but the gods ain’t even listening. Don’t matter if you’re Muslim, Hebrew, Christian.” This is the type of bite both El-P and Killer Mike carry throughout the album. And it goes along with some solid production from El-P. The album is sort of a combination of “R.A.P. Music” and El-P’s 2012 album “Cancer 4 Cure.” He retains some of the southern sounds he implemented when producing for El-P while bringing some of his traditional experimental side to the new collaboration. It doesn’t sound poor at all, but it’s not as interesting as his last two efforts. It’s not as conceptually deep as either of El-P’s or Killer Mike’s last albums, but it wasn’t intended to either. It’s essentially a victory lap for the two after last year’s success, but it’s one victory lap that’s worth experiencing. And when the content does get a little deeper, it hits extremely well, especially on the track “DDFH.” Sure, it’s riffing in a lot of the same ways “Watch the Throne” did, but it’s a better effort for a couple of reasons. First, the chemistry between Killer Mike and El-P is far more substantial than that of Kanye West and Jay-Z. Killer Mike even raps about a producer giving him a beat, claiming it was the beat of the year while he retorts if it’s not El-P’s then he doesn’t care. Secondly, it’s how hungry these two sound that make it such a special project. It’s a free album that the group put its best stuff toward and that says something about the two MCs. One thing’s for sure, I’m already anticipating the next El-P and Killer Mike collaboration. Rating: HHHHI

STEVEN WILLIAMS SUMMER REVIEW STEVEN WILLIAMS IS A SENIOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS NEWS MAJOR AND WRITES “SUMMER REVIEW” FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. TWEET STEVEN AT @SBWILLIAMS15

Village Branch Moving to Campus L.A. PITTENGER Student Center - main floor.

You’re Invited!

open house,

July 15, 2013

Come see our new facility and new technology,

to better serve you! The Village Branch is closing! The last day open is:

July 12, 2013

New Facility Student Center Branch:

Great Service

2001 W University Ave. Ste 115 / 47306

On Campus

Combined 07 08 13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on Monday, July 8, 2013.

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