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5 MINUTES WITH THE MAYOR

THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013

The Daily News met with Dennis Tyler to ask your Twitter questions

THE DAILY NEWS

SEE PAGE 3

BSUDAILY.COM

Southern Baptists oppose position

HEAT, SPURS SET FOR GAME 4 Tony Parker still unsure of status for tonight’s pivotal game against the Miami Heat

SEE PAGE 4

‘LIKE A BOMB WENT OFF - FOR MILES.’ Ball State Gymnast recounts witnessing Oklahoma tornadoes DAKOTA CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR | @DakotaCrawford_

B

Boy Scouts of America’s new policy to be challenged by group

rooklyn Schumacher only had three minutes to collect her favorite jewelry, a raincoat and her laptop before finding safety in her neighbor’s storm shelter. All the time in the world couldn’t have prepared the junior Ball State gymnast for the 20 minutes she spent in the shelter, wondering what would be left above. “The tornado itself was so loud you couldn’t even hear the hail,” Schumacher said. “You couldn’t hear anything else; it was like a train riding right over it.” She said it wasn’t the sound of debris, or sheets of rain falling on the shelter’s roof that caused the most discomfort. It was the tornado’s roar as it took residence above Moore, Okla., a city of 56,000 people.

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS HOUSTON — The Southern Baptist Convention approved a resolution Wednesday expressing its opposition to and disappointment in the Boy Scouts of America’s new policy allowing gay Scouts. The resolution was voted on by members RESOLUTION at the denomination’s The Southern Baptist annual meeting in Convention’s position on sexuality is: Houston. It also calls on the Boy Scouts to “We affirm God’s plan remove executive and for marriage and sexual board leaders who intimacy – one man, tried to allow gays and one woman, for life. as both members Homosexuality is not a and leaders without ‘valid alternative lifestyle.’ The Bible condemns it consulting the many as sin. It is not, however, religious groups that unforgivable sin. The sponsor Scout troops. same redemption While the resolu- available to all sinners is tion does not recom- available to homosexuals. mend that Southern They, too, may become Baptists drop ties new creations in Christ.” with the Scouts, it Source: sbc.net expresses support for those churches and families that decide to do so. It also encourages churches and families who choose to remain with the Scouts to work toward reversing the new membership policy. Because all Southern Baptist churches are independent, the denomination cannot force a church to drop ties with the Scouts. However, churches occasionally are kicked out of the convention for practices considered incompatible with Southern Baptist beliefs. The resolution takes a softer tone than the denomination has many times in the past.

“I’ve never had to go into the shelter and fully expect that everything would be completely gone when we came back out,” she said. The view through a vent in the shelter’s door kept Schumacher hopeful as she waited anxiously alongside her family. A garage door was the only part of her home she could still see from inside the shelter. It never went away. The sight of her garage door, still attached to a standing home was certainly welcome, but the reprieve was short-lived as she climbed out of the shelter to find that mother nature had left its mark.

“I haven’t been exposed to as much damage, at all,” she said. “Driving, or walking down the street, it’s just kind of like a bomb went off — for miles. I’ve never seen anything like it, it’s astronomical — the damage. You can’t really believe that it’s nature that took it all out.” Just two blocks from Schumacher’s home, the EF5 tornado touched down. With winds over 200 miles per hour, the storm caused in excess of $2 billion of damage and killed 24 people as it tore through 17 miles of Oklahoma countryside.

See MOORE, page 4

PHOTO PROVIDED BY BROOKLYN SCHUMACHER

See SCOUTS, page 2

Asst. provost for diversity to retire PAGEANT FEATURES Original developer STUDENTS, ALUMNA of cultural program reflects on career

|

SAFARALI SAYDSHOEV STAFF REPORTER email@bsu.edu

After 41 years Charles Payne, the assistant provost for diversity, director of office of institutional diversity and professor of secondary education, is soon to be retired, but the multicultural program he helped develop will continue at Ball State. The multicultural program was designed to prepare teachers from multicultural secondary schools. “I was particularly hired to develop this program, because back in 1970s BSU was one of the first institutions that offered a minor in multicultural education for secondary teachers in the U.S.,”

MUNCIE, INDIANA

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Charles Payne, assistant provost for diversity, is retiring after 41 years of working at Ball State. Payne came to live in Muncie in 1972 and can recall what life was like in the city and on campus back then.

he said. “It’s unique, and students who major in history, math or any other subjects can get a minor in multicultural education.” Payne recently celebrated his achievements at his

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CONTACT US

retirement reception Thursday in the E.B. and Bertha C. Ball Center. During his time at the university, Payne also served as the diversity coordinator for the Teachers College.

News desk: 285-8255 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8247

“When BSU had around 16,000 students, there were 800 or 900 African Americans, a few Hispanics and a few Asians,” he said. “The majority of professors and staff were white. In the department that I started, I was the only African American.” Payne said he experienced some discrimination at first. “Even though I was hired, there still was a misunderstanding between people on campus,” he said. “Some people were questioning of my teaching, of my job and my knowledge. Some of them would stay outside of the door and listen to what I would say and asked students how I was. Students told me all about this.” Early in his career as an educator he taught chemistry in segregated schools, but he always wanted to help shift this thinking.

See RETIREMENT page 6

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

PHOTO GALLERIES

Go online to see photography from campus, community events. Visit bsudaily.com and click on multimedia.

Miss Indiana title qualifier for Miss America Pageant

THE PAGEANT •C  ourtney Jurick, a 2012 graduate with a bachelor’s degree in public relations

|

Hometown: Valparaiso Title: Miss South Central Indiana Talent: Vocal performance Platform: March of Dimes

EVIE LICHTENWALTER STAFF REPORTER emlichtenwal@bsu.edu

Competing against more than 30 women across the state, three participants with Ball State ties will have the chance to take home the title of Miss Indiana and have a shot at the Miss America crown. Courtney Jurick, Gabrielle Bunn and Megan Thwaites will participate in the Miss Indiana Pageant beginning Wednesday at the Zionsville High School Performing Arts Center. The four-day competition includes a mixture of public and private events, ending with the Miss Indiana finals on June 22 at 7 p.m. Jurick graduated from Ball TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on twitter.com.

•G  abrielle Bunn, a junior marketing major

Hometown: Kokomo Title: Miss White River Talent: Jazz dance Platform: Breast cancer awareness

• Megan Thwaites, a junior public relations and journalism major Hometown: Garrett Title: Miss Ball State University Talent: Jazz dance Platform: Relay for life

State in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and currently works as an administrative assistant for the March of Dimes.

FORECAST

TODAY High: 74, Low: 56 morning t-storms

See PAGEANT, page 3

VOL. 92, ISSUE 127 TOMORROW High: 78, Low: 58 Sunny

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PAGE 2 | THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

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EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Steven Williams NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford PHOTO EDITOR Jordan Huffer DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein COPY CHIEF Daniel Brount

| STORM HITS INDIANA

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE BSUDAILY.COM

Colorado wildfires displace thousands

More than 7,000 residents, including prison inmates, have been evacuated as workers try to contain multiple fires in the forests.

New Jersey city outlaws saggy pants

Wildwood passed a law banning sagging pants on the local boardwalk. The ban could be overturned in court if opposition is strong enough.

TOP CLICKS | MON. - WED.

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305 273 79

270 229 97

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50

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1. B  all State drops eminent domain case with Hiatt Printing 2. Village plans hope to spark massive redevelopment 3. UPDATE: Hiatt Printing responds to BSU dropping eminent domain 4. Ball State graduate state sells hula hoops beyond state lines 5. Cleveland kidnapper pleads not guilty

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

LEFT: A summer storm blows through campus late Wednesday night. The storm was expected to reach winds up to 100 miles per hour with a severe storm warning being issued for Delaware county. The storm produced heavy rain. RIGHT: Lightning strikes during a storm in Hammond, Ind., on Wednesday. The storm caused power outages across Northwest Indiana. The National Weather Service in Chicago issued a severe thunderstorm warning for parts of Northwest Indiana, as well as flood warnings for local rivers.

SCOUT: Denomination sees membership decline | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

In 1997, the Southern Baptist Convention asked its members to boycott The Walt Disney Company, in part because it provided benefits for same-sex partners of employees and hosted gay theme nights at its amusement parks. The SBC dropped the boycott in 2005. Although the Nashvillebased denomination claims 16 million members, it has

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THE FORECAST

seen membership decline for six years in a row. Recently, the convention has sought to expand its appeal beyond its traditional white, Southern base. Last year, the convention elected an African-American president for the first time in its history. The Rev. Fred Luter was re-elected without opposition Tuesday. In other resolutions introduced Wednesday, the membership passed a resolution

lution to urge denominational leaders to use caution affiliating with groups or individuals with questionable practices for protecting children. It is unclear whether the amendment was aimed at any specific person or practice, but it comes after some Southern Baptist leaders expressed support for Sovereign Grace Ministries. That group faces accusations that church officials covered up child sexual abuse.

Make sure to follow us on our various social media accounts. @bsudailynews @dn_campus @dn_sports @dn_editor

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SATURDAY Cloudy, High: 78, Low: 66 SUNDAY Scattered t-storms, High: 77, Low: 67

calling on all Southern Baptists to report allegations of child abuse to authorities. The nation’s largest Protestant denomination has resisted implementing some type of database of ministers accused of abuse, saying that all churches are independent and the denomination does not have the authority to order local churches to submit that information. Members amended the reso-

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By Michael Mepham

Level: Diabolical Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY. ACROSS 1 UNCIVILIZED 7 SHORT “AND SO ON” 10 MARINE LAYER PHENOMENA, AT TIMES 15 KING ARTHUR’S RESTING PLACE 16 ITINERARY WORD 17 GIVE OUT 18 DOUBLE 20 HOTELIER HELMSLEY 21 DOUBLE 23 “RIGHTS OF MAN” AUTHOR 26 TIJUANA TOTS 27 PLAYED THE FIRST CARD 28 WHAT PUTTING ONE’S PEN DOWN IN FINAL JEOPARDY! USUALLY MEANS 30 WHITE-COLLAR WORKER? 33 KEY ECON. INDICATOR 34 WORKED UNDERCOVER 39 SISTER OF CALLIOPE 40 DOUBLE 44 JAMS 46 PLANET EARTH 47 REST OF THE AFTERNOON 50 PROMOTING A NEW ALBUM,

POSSIBLY 52 FORMER SANDINISTA LEADER 55 ONE LACKING GRACE 56 FOOD WRITER JAMES 61 BOBBLED GROUNDER, E.G. 62 DOUBLE 66 PLEDGE FROM THE FAITHFUL 67 DOUBLE 71 __ SPORTS BUREAU, BASEBALL’S OFFICIAL STATISTICIAN 72 LIKE MIL. VOLUNTEERS 73 SUFFER 74 MANHATTAN HAS MANY HIGH ONES 75 TOPER’S TROUBLE 76 ASSENT DOWN 1 ANIMAL POUCH 2 CHARLTON’S “EARTHQUAKE” CO-STAR 3 ALT. SPELLING 4 SANS MELANIN 5 METS PITCHER WHO WAS

1984 N.L. ROOKIE OF THE YEAR 6 -ESS KIN 7 ELECTRONIC BALLOT 8 SHORT BASKET 9 PSYCHIC EDGAR 10 RETAIL HAVEN 11 “WOULD __ YOU DOWN?” 12 ONE IN NEED OF A TUTOR 13 MOST STYLISH 14 GET READY, IN MILITARY LINGO 19 “AC360˚” CHANNEL 22 INDIANA JONES TERRORIZER 23 FLICK 24 BAND AID? 25 “THAT WASN’T THE GROUP FOR ME” 29 FORWARD-LOOKING CLAIM 31 FILL-UP CHOICE: ABBR. 32 ANGER 35 “__ O’ MY HEART”: 1913 SONG 36 BUGGED BY A BUG 37 MEDIATOR’S CHALLENGE 38 DELICATELY APPLY

41 “STAR TREK: DSN” CHANGELING 42 SCH. IN OREGON’S MOST POPULOUS CITY 43 PREFIX WITH NATAL 44 RAH-RAH FAN 45 LIKE DIRTY LAUNDRY 48 PREVIOUSLY 49 3, 4 OR 5, USUALLY 51 BOX SCORE STAT 53 SASKATCHEWAN’S CAPITAL 54 NOW 57 DREW TO A CLOSE 58 GO-BETWEEN 59 TEHRAN BREAD 60 DRILLER’S LETTERS 63 YONDER ITEM 64 HARDY LASS 65 MARS, TO THE GREEKS 68 DUDE 69 BEFORE, BEFORE 70 SECOND NOTES

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THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

5 MINUTES WITH THE MAYOR

Mayor discusses roads, campus Dennis Tyler meets individually with Muncie residents

|

SAM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER sthoyt@bsu.edu

Mayor Dennis Tyler said he tells other mayors and legislators that his “Five Minutes with the Mayor” program is “so simple, it’s hard to put into words.” Tyler hosted the program on Tuesday afternoon, setting aside time for anyone to schedule an appointment or walk in to talk with him about whatever issue they want. “Usually they’re very positive, very appreciative that they get a chance to talk to the mayor,” Tyler said. “You never know what the issue’s going to be. I had a lady that was over 100 years old that had never been in this building. She had never been in the third floor, in the mayor’s office. All she wanted to do was come in and get her picture taken.” Some of the issues Tyler said he addressed varied from someone who wanted help confronting a family member housing a meth lab, to someone who had a dog lunge at them. Tyler said the program helps him become aware of problems that are important to individuals and he normally wouldn’t know about. The program began last summer, but Tyler said the idea has been with him since he served in the Indiana General Assembly. “I was part of town forums,” Tyler said. “What I’ve found in those town forums is that maybe somebody has a question and they want the opportunity to speak, but they don’t get to because there’s other people there that control the forum. “My thought was that maybe I give them an opportunity to come in here and talk to me in private. It’s just us, one on one, nobody else gets the opportunity to hear what their issue is. It’s worked.” The Daily News used Twitter to gather some questions that our readers wanted us to ask

Texas fertilizer plant explosion won’t get funding to rebuild | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DN FILE PHOTO BOBBY ELLIS

Mayor Dennis Tyler looks over paper work in his office during his first year as mayor. Tyler started a program that encourages citizens to come into his office and speak with him about whatever issues they want.

Tyler during our five minutes with the mayor, so we wrote them down, took a bus and had him answer those questions.

Q: One question that came up a couple times was about the sidewalks and roads of Muncie. Everyone knows they’re in a bit of disrepair right now. What’s the process of fixing those? A: The process is one you have to find a revenue and the resources to do that, and we are. As a matter of fact, one of the things that we’re looking at in some areas in repairing sidewalks and creating new sidewalks is using asphalt. It’s much cheaper. In the Ball State area near the Village as we move forward with these projects there will be a lot of new infrastructure improvements on the streets and the sidewalks.

Q: So what are some of your future plans for the city?

A: Well again, reinvesting in the infrastructure as we can find dollars to do that. We’ve

got a bond that we’ve recently introduced for the first time at the June City Council meeting that will be finalized in the July City Council meeting that will have dollars going in for the reconstruction and renovation of City Hall and then the Prairie Creek Handicap Access Bathhouse and swimming area. There will be funds left over in that we’ll use for discretionary funding that we’re going to put into infrastructure repair.

Q: One person brought up an interesting question. Are there any plans to better physically connect campus and downtown?

A: There is. As we do some of the storm water separation and some of the issues that sanitary district will be dealing with, we’re going to be doing some connections with Ball State through bicycle lanes that will increase not only bicycle access for students but walkways too

as we begin to do some of this redevelopment with the University Village project. The interesting thing is that a study IPA did, the developer on this University Village project, is that as this moves forward, students will be less inclined to drive. They’ll be more inclined to walk or use a bicycle. Their study shows that could put as much as $8,000 in a student’s pocket and that they’re more apt to put that back into the community, which is good.

Q: Another Twitter question: what do you think the city would be without BSU?

A: I don’t really want to think about that. A successful Ball State is critical to Muncie, but I would also argue that a successful Muncie is critical to Ball State, for them to attract the proper kind of students and professors and educators that they need to be a successful university. It’s a very strong twoway partnership.

Local ice cream store’s reopening to be postponed for redecoration Grandma Betty’s changes location, next to the Cup

|

EVAN BARNUM-STEGGERDA CHIEF REPORTER @Slice_of_Evan

As Grandma Betty’s Ice Cream Shop changes locations, it is also updating its style. The not-for-profit ice cream parlor is moving next to the Cup in the Village. General manager Jeannine Lee Lake said the shop will reopen no later than July 1. The original goal was to open by June 15, but Lake said typical moving problems got in the way. “With all the transfers and things like that, it’s a lot of work,” Lake said. “It’s a little more than I expected.” Lake said she is pushing to open the shop as soon as possible to avoid losing any more revenue.

U.S. agency refuses to fund repairs

“We’re working fast to get the new store open,” said Lake. “But when everything is done, it will be done.” Despite the hurdles, Lake is still very optimistic about the move. “The move is going very well,” Lake said. “[The shop] will have a new design, new colors, and it’s going to be how I want it to be. Last time everything kind of got thrown together at the last minute, and I know I can do better.” Splashes of rainbow sherbet colors will line the walls, as one of many new additions to the décor. And while a menu has not been set in stone, Grandma Betty’s will still offer its pulled pork sandwiches everyday, as well as ribs and other barbecued foods Thursdays through Saturdays. The mint julep will be making its way from the

HOUSTON — The Federal Emergency Management Agency is refusing to provide additional money to help rebuild the small Texas town where a deadly fertilizer plant explosion leveled numerous homes and a school, and killed 15 people. According to a letter obtained by The Associated Press, FEMA said it reviewed the state’s appeal to help but decided that the explosion “is not of the severity and magnitude that warrants a major disaster declaration.” FEMA already has provided millions of dollars in aid to the town of West and its residents, but the decision prevents them from getting some of the widespread assistance typically available to victims of tornadoes, hurricanes and other natural disasters. The decision likely means less money to pay for public repairs to roads, sewer lines, pipes and a school that was destroyed. The blast killed 10 first responders and brought national attention to the agricultural community. President Barack Obama traveled to the area to attend a memorial service for the first responders and others who died trying to help. As of Wednesday, FEMA said the agency and the U.S. Small Business Administration had approved more than $7 million in aid and low-interest loans to West residents impacted by the blast. FEMA also is paying 75 percent of the costs of debris removal and will reimburse the state and the municipality for the initial emergency response.

DN PHOTO KRYSTAL BYERS

Kentucky Derby to Grandma Betty’s menu, but it will be non-alcoholic. The Black Cow, a root beer float

that uses chocolate syrup, whipped cream and maraschino cherries, will also make it onto the menu.

May 3, 2013 Severe winter storm in Minnesota May 6, 2013 Severe winter storm in Iowa May 10, 2013 Severe storms, straight-line winds and flooding in Illinois Severe winter storm and snowstorm in South Dakota May 20, 2013 Severe storms and tornadoes in Oklahoma May 29, 2012 Flooding in North Dakota May 31, 2013 Severe storms, straight-line winds and flooding in Iowa FEMA denied the “major disaster declaration” both for public assistance — which would give money to the city to help rebuild — and for further individual aid, which would provide for crisis counseling and other services. It’s not unusual for FEMA to turn down that level of assistance for emergencies not stemming from natural disasters. In 2010, for example, officials denied a request for millions in aid after a gas pipeline explosion that consumed a Northern California neighborhood. Some funds would be available in West through insurance pay outs and because it believes the state or the municipality has the resources to cover the costs, among other things, agency spokesman Dan Watson said in a statement. Individuals can still receive rental assistance and some funds for rebuilding, and the state can appeal for more public assistance but some programs for individuals will not be made available, he said.

PAGEANT: 2 former Miss Ball States to compete | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Jeannine Lee Lake, owner of Grandma Betty’s, supervises as the ice cream cooler is brought into the new location. Lake’s son Charles helped with the lifting, along with Marc Paraira Gimenez and Adam Byers.

FEMA’S FUNDED MAJOR DISASTERS

She first got involved with the Miss America organization during her freshman year at Ball State after receiving an email about competing in a pageant for scholarship money. “We all know how expensive college is, so I decided to enter and I was completely unprepared,” Jurick said. “It was a crash course into how everything works.” Jurick was crowned Miss Ball State University in 2012 and currently holds the title of Miss South Central Indiana. Since starting the pageant circuit, Jurick said her interest has grown from originally just participating for the scholarship money. “I’ve learned so much about myself and I want to use that as an opportunity to be a role model for young girls,” she said. Bunn, a junior marketing major, started competing in pageants as a child and then took

a break during her high school years. Scholarship money was a motivator for her as well. Competing in a pageant takes dedication and the preparation is a continuous process, Bunn said. “You’re always doing community service and working on your platform as much as you can,” she said. “To win Miss Indiana would mean everything to me.” Jurick, who has one more year to compete before reaching the age limit of 24, said winning Miss Indiana is something she has dreamed about her entire life. “So far 2013 has been one of the best years of my life and things have kind of just fallen into place,” Jurick said. “I think I’ve never been at a better place in my life to fully devote myself to being Miss Indiana.” Junior public relations and journalism major and current Miss Ball State Megan Thwaites was unavailable for comment on Wednesday.

MAN ACCUSED OF ABDUCTING WOMEN PLEADS NOT GUILTY

Castro’s defense hints at a plea deal to avoid execution | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS CLEVELAND — A man accused of holding three women captive in his home for about a decade pleaded not guilty Wednesday to hundreds of rape and kidnapping charges, and the defense hinted at avoiding a trial with a plea deal if the death penalty were ruled out. The death penalty is in play because among the accusations facing Ariel Castro, 52, is that he forced a miscarriage by one of the women, which is considered a killing under Ohio law.

That charge doesn’t include a possible death penalty, but a prosecutor has said that’s under review. The women disappeared separately between 2002 and 2004, when they were 14, 16 and 20 years old. Each said they had accepted a ride from Castro, who remained friends with the family of one girl and even attended vigils over the years marking her disappearance. Attorney Craig Weintraub acknowledged afterward that “certain charges in the indictment cannot be disputed” and said the defense was working to avoid an “unnecessary trial” with a possible death penalty sentence. “Mr. Castro currently faces hundreds of years in prison with the current charges,”

Weintraub said. “It is our hope that we can continue to work toward a resolution to avoid having an unnecessary trial about aggravated murder and the death penalty.” The prosecutor’s office will look at the defense remarks but had no immediate comment, said Joe Frolik, spokesman for Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty. The 329-count indictment returned Friday covered only the period from August 2002, when the first of the women disappeared, to February 2007. More charges could be filed. Castro was indicted on 139 counts of rape, 177 counts of kidnapping, seven counts of gross sexual imposition, three counts of felonious assault

and one count of possession of criminal tools. He was also charged with two counts of aggravated murder related to one act, saying he purposely caused the unlawful termination of one of the pregnancies of one of the women. Michelle Knight, now 32, has told investigators Castro punched her in the abdomen and starved her to force five miscarriages, according to police reports. Ohio enacted a fetal homicide law in 1996, making it illegal to kill or injure a viable fetus. That law and similar ones in 37 other states have been used mainly to win convictions in car crashes in which pregnant women died or in cases involving attacks on expectant mothers.

BY THE NUMBERS

139 counts counts of rape

177 counts

kidnapping

7 counts gross sexual imposition 3 counts felonious assault 2 counts aggravated murder

In 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty for child rapes in which no death occurred, spelling out that a killing is the only

crime eligible for the death penalty outside of a crime against the state. A death penalty case against Castro “would raise serious legal questions about whether a murder has occurred and whether such a death sentence complies” with the Supreme Court ruling, according to Richard Dieter, executive director of the Washington, D.C.-based Death Penalty Information Center, which opposes capital punishment. Weintraub, the defense attorney, said he expects a decision from prosecutors on the death penalty might hinge on medical and forensic evidence, such as any fetal tissue that may have been found at the home. Investigations haven’t detailed what evidence was found.


THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 4

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

/////////// THE

HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

TONIGHT Miami is set for Game 4 in San Antonio of the NBA Finals looking to even the series at 2.

Parker day-to-day, hopes to make return in Game 4 Spurs look ahead BY THE NUMBERS to playing without 11-5 Spurs record without Parker point guard, leader during regular season Tony Parker, along with all of San Antonio, really, spent a restless night worrying about a gimpy right hamstring that hampered him in Game 3 of the NBA Finals and threatened the momentum the Spurs seized with a drubbing of the Miami Heat. A day later, Parker said he got some good news. Just how good the news is likely won’t be known until Game 4 begins tonight. Parker had an MRI on Wednesday that revealed a Grade 1 strain of his hamstring, the mildest level of strain. He’s listed as day to day. “I was just hoping it was not a tear,” Parker said. “The good news is it’s not a tear or a defect. So that’s the good news. Now I just have to see how I feel tomorrow.” Parker was injured early in the second half of Game 3, which the Spurs won 113-77 to take a 2-1 lead in the bestof-seven series. He was limited to six points and eight assists in 27 minutes and left the game early in the fourth quarter with the outcome al-

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Spurs points per game when Parker is out, scoring 1.79 less points than when Parker is in

98.38

opponents points per game when Parker is out, an increase of 1.78 points when he plays

6.75

margin of victory with Parker in, a 3.57 point increase compared to when Parker is out ready decided. While the Spurs’ role players have been playing incredibly well in these finals, they know they will need Parker’s leadership, guts and unparalleled mastery of the pick-and-roll to bury LeBron James and the Heat. Danny Green, Gary Neal and Kawhi Leonard have been revelations so far in this series, scoring the same number of points (130) through the first three games that the Heat’s vaunted trio of James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh have managed. As important as his scoring and distributing have been

DN|BRIEF

TWO MEN’S VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS NAMED ALL-AMERICAN THIRD TEAM Two players from the Ball State men’s volleyball team were named to the 2013 Volleyball Magazine NCAA All-American third team. Junior Kevin Owens and Senior Matt Leske each received the honor for the first time. The middle attackers led Ball State to a 3.05 blocks per set average – the best in the nation. The Cardinals were first in Division I-II with 10.74 digs per set. Owens and Leske were also honored by the MIVA this season with First Team and Second Team honors, respectively. The two helped Ball State finish the season 21-6 overall with a 9-5 mark in conference play. The Cardinals had not finished a season with 21 wins since 2007. – DAKOTA CRAWFORD

PLAYER COMPARISON

K. Owens 94 .402* 125 1.33*

School still unsure of who controls its $60 million fine

101.56

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

M. Leske

SETS PLAYED HITTING PERCENT TOTAL BLOCKS BLOCKS/SET * Top five in nation

93 .365 133 1.43*

Penn State asks officials for final court decisions

MCT PHOTO

San Antonio head coach Gregg Popovich talks with guard Tony Parker during the team’s practice session on Wednesday before tonight’s Game 4 of the NBA Finals against the Miami Heat. The Spurs hold a 2-1 advantage.

for the Spurs, the confidence he instills with his steady hand on the throttle may be even bigger. The Spurs aren’t big on swagger, but they play with a different demeanor when he’s on the court slicing and dicing opposing defenses.

“He does a lot for us,” Neal said. “If he’s not scoring, he’s drawing the defense and being a facilitator. He has a great basketball I.Q. He brings a certain amount of confidence and toughness to our team. We definitely need Tony on the floor.”

Penn State asked the NCAA and Pennsylvania government officials to settle litigation over who will control the $60 million the school must pay for child abuse prevention efforts under a consent agreement it signed nearly a year ago. University attorney Frank Guadagnino wrote to other attorneys Tuesday, saying the school had no desire to get involved in pending state and federal court battles. His fourpage letter said Penn State intends to hold onto the first $12 million installment until the NCAA asks for it. “We note that a settlement of the dispute would permit the funds to be used for their intended purpose in an expeditious manner,” Guadagnino wrote, offering to meet with the parties if they think the university can help settle the matters. The money is designed to aid child sexual abuse prevention and to help its victims. The consent agreement was signed shortly after former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was convicted last summer of sexually

abusing boys, some of them on campus. At issue, Guadagnino said, is that if Penn State pays the money to the state, it could run afoul of its deal with the NCAA. If it pays the NCAA, it could violate a state law passed in January that requires the money be paid into the state treasury, he said. McCord spokesman Gary Tuma said McCord sympathizes with Penn State’s dilemma and is opposed to the NCAA’s attempt to bring the university into the litigation. “He supports attempts to resolve it,” Tuma said. “He and Sen. Corman are considering the next steps they might take toward that end.” “As a matter of governance, the university’s professed indifference to its independence, autonomy and substantial financial obligations [if true] is surprising,” Johnson wrote. Corman’s attorney did not return a message seeking comment. The general counsel’s office for Gov. Tom Corbett, a defendant in the NCAA’s federal lawsuit, said the Guadagnino letter was being reviewed. The consent agreement calls for a four-year ban on postseason play, a temporary reduction in football scholarships and the elimination of 112 losses from the final years of longtime coach Joe Paterno.

MOORE: BSU athlete’s home survives Okla. tornadoes | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

One of the first things she saw was a large fire consuming what she believes was once a house. With little else to do, she started walking across the small field toward her home. It was littered with debris. Pictures and other small things — even supplies from the local elementary school — had made their way into her yard. David Baker, Schumacher’s stepfather, experienced losing his home after a 1999 storm. He said personal belongings that turn into debris after a destructive storm become secondary concerns. “As long as everybody stays safe, it doesn’t matter,” Baker said. “You don’t worry about what you lose. Your house can be replaced, stuff can be replaced. It’s all irrelevant as long as nobody gets hurt.” Baker spent that night in 1999 in a friend’s underground safe room. He started to drive home after the storm was over, only to find that debris kept him from getting there. Baker later discovered that, apart from the clothes on his body and the car he was driving, everything was gone. His perspective on the importance of material posses-

sions completely changed after that. That perspective is something that Schumacher shares with her stepfather. “We were lucky enough to have a place underground to go, but there are way too many people in Oklahoma that don’t have that luxury,” Schumacher said. “At least we knew we were going to make it. I’m thankful for that.” Two days after the storm, Schumacher went to the Red Cross with her mother and sister to take part in volunteer training. They were turned away. Every spot had been filled. They then went to the Salvation Army down the street, asking if they could be of any assistance. They were given a spot helping unload and organize donations. “From there me, my mom and my sister took food and put it on shelves so people could get what they needed efficiently, and that was a good job for us,” Schumacher said. “Two days after, they were still looking for bodies. Making sure all the natural gas was turned off, and water was running.” Though residents’ mindset had already shifted toward recovery and rebuilding the area, it quickly reverted to

« As long as everybody stays safe, it doesn’t matter. You don’t worry about what you lose. Your house can be replaced, stuff can be replaced. It’s all irrelevant as long as nobody gets hurt. »

DAVID BAKER, Schumacher’s stepfather just surviving. Schumacher and her family found themselves in the line of another dangerous, and this time, unpredictable storm. “It was supposed to miss Moore, and it wasn’t supposed to be anywhere near people so it wasn’t quite as scary at first, but then it did what tornadoes never do, and it turned south,” Schumacher said. Less than two weeks later, while debris still covered much of the ground, a storm that was nastier in appearance than the first was moving into the area. “It was a terrible looking storm,” Schumacher said. “The one on May 20, you wouldn’t have thought it was as deadly

as it was because it wasn’t raining, it wasn’t hailing, it wasn’t all that windy or hot and the clouds weren’t black.” Both Schumacher and Baker said people in the already ravaged city were in a panic. “We were just praying that it would, you know, miraculously go back up into the sky. At least not here where people had already lost everything,” Schumacher said. She described that second storm, saying that hail fell on her house for nearly an hour before her family had to again resort to their neighbor’s shelter. “It’s been really unbelievable since this tornado has come,” Schumacher said. “And with that second round, I can’t really tell you what it was like for a lot of people, but it was hopefully the last that we’ll have to deal with. It’s been very, very scary. Especially knowing it could all happen again, even if it’s not to us.” For the first time in her life on May 20, Schumacher went into a storm shelter not knowing what to expect when she walked out. Though she had just three minutes to rush out of her house, it’s safe to say she’ll hold a new appreciation for her garage door, and all that jewelry for a long time.

FORMER GIANTS RB SIGNS 1-YEAR CONTRACT WITH COLTS NEW CONTRACT Colts add veteran free agent Ahmad $1.1 million 1-year contract base pay Bradshaw for 1 year | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Indianapolis Colts are trying to improve their running game. Ahmad Bradshaw is just the latest piece of the puzzle. The Indianapolis Colts signed the unrestricted free agent on Tuesday, adding a veteran running back to their crowded backfield. He will join the team Wednesday under a contract whose terms were not disclosed. The 27-year-old Bradshaw spent seven seasons with the New York Giants, but left the team in February — one of a handful of high-salaried players released as part of roster purge intended to clear up salary cap room and bring in younger talent. He ran for 1,015 yards on 221 carries (4.6 yards per car-

$250,000 signing bonus

2012-13 STATISTICS

1,015

rushing yards, led the Giants

4.6

yards per carry

6

rushing touchdowns ry) and scored six touchdowns last season but missed four games with injuries. Bradshaw’s focus is rehabbing from right foot surgery in January. He visited the Colts last week and got an evaluation by the team after battling injuries to his knee and foot for much of last year. “I’m taking it slow right now,”

MCT PHOTO

Ahmad Bradshaw breaks the tackle attempt of diving Baltimore Ravens outside linebacker Paul Kruger on December 23, 2012, in Baltimore. Bradshaw signed with the Colts this week and will be part of their 2013-14 line up.

he said. “I’m definitely going to continue my rehab. My focus is just to learn the offense and to get healthy and to be prepared for training camp and the be-

ginning of the season.” Still, Colts coach Chuck Pagano likes what Bradshaw can add to the team — Super Bowl experience, toughness and put-

ting up big numbers running the ball. “Signing a player like Bradshaw, his resume obviously speaks for itself,” Pagano said. “We know he’s coming off foot surgery, he’s trending in the right direction. This guy’s just another horseshoe guy, get us one step closer to hoisting that trophy.” “He brings just a veteran presence,” Ballard said of Bradshaw. “He’s won two Super Bowls, so obviously he knows how to get it done. He can not only help the team, but he can help the running back group as a whole.” Indy now has eight running backs on the roster, including seventh-round draft pick Kerwynn Williams and fullback Stanley Havili, who was acquired in a March trade with Philadelphia. Williams is listed at 5-foot-8, 195 pounds. But the other backs have a combined total of six NFL carries, all by Havili last season.

In seven seasons with the Giants, Bradshaw played in 84 of 96 games, starting 33 and rushed for 4,232 yards and 32 touchdowns. He is best known for scoring the winning touchdown in the Super Bowl two years ago on an awkward flop. The play gave the Giants a 2117 victory over New England. Pagano has made a point to make the running game stronger and more balanced and have made moves to get there. Last year, Indy was No. 22 in the league rushing at 104.4 yards a game. Pagano said he’s wanted a solid rushing attack from day one. As a rookie last year, Ballard led the team in rushing with 50.9 yards a game and just two touchdowns. Bradshaw knows Ballard has earned a big role with the Colts, but wants a shot at the top spot, too. “I like having the load on my back,” he said. “But Vick, he’s proved himself and I don’t mind coming in and helping those guys out as much as I can.”


THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM OPINION@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

DNSWITCHBOARD IF YOU WERE COMPETING FOR MISS

| THE DAILY NEWS COMIC

INDIANA, WHAT WOULD YOUR TALENT BE? STEVEN WILLIAMS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAKOTA CRAWFORD, SPORTS EDITOR

one thing. I am usually the type of guy that is good at a lot of different things. Maybe my talent could be doing a lot of different things semi-well.

speeches. Not speeches specifically about my talents, but speeches about nothing that are so good, my talents would be evident.

ÂŤ I have never been great at

ÂŤ My talent would be giving

Âť

Âť

EMMA KATE FITTES, NEWS EDITOR

MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN, DESIGN EDITOR

ÂŤ My talent woiuld be stand

ÂŤ My talent would be

up comedy. I probably wouldn’t be able to make people laugh but I’d have fun. I’d also probably sit down while I do stand up. Get it?

effectively pulling off a positive attitude when my natural state is negative and cynical. That and stress eating, I’m good at that.

Âť

Âť

DANIEL BROUNT, COPY EDITOR

JORDAN HUFFER, PHOTO EDITOR

ÂŤ I would say making

 I can’t think of any specific

Hamburger Helper, but due to a recent violent allergic reaction after eating some I can no longer partake. I suppose I could still make it though.

talent, but I’d have to be pretty talented to qualify for Miss Indiana as a guy.

Âť

Âť

Austin Russell draws “Existentia Academica� comics for the Daily News. His views and opinions don’t necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Austin at abrussell@bsu.edu or follow him on Twitter @arussthebus.

FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor,

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The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

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Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -- A surprise career twist favors you with an unusual assignment. Explore new philosophies. Take what you get. Something you learn at work provides a better answer. Miracles are to be expected. A sudden insight spurs your progress.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 -- Upgrade your workspace and equipment. Consult an expert if needed, and get necessary information.Your partner is on the same page. Provide facts. Create a peaceful space for private reflection. Count your blessings.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 -- Look for fresh ideas. Get friends involved. Complete an old project at home. Spend money for family necessities. A surprise gift is in order. Handle your homework early so you can relax. Studies get interesting.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 9 -- Plan a dream vacation to get out in nature. Whether it involves beach or mountains, trust your intuition and craft a delightful itinerary. Get inventive, and include healthy activities. Study options and fantasies, and come up with some real fun.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 9 -- Your touch is golden. Make an amazing discovery by trusting a hunch; a brilliant solution for a romantic dilemma. Use common sense and good judgment. Study the situation without making a move. Talk to the players, and listen. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Recount your winnings and find treasures. Save some, and use some to increase your family’s comfort.You could accrue great benefits, too. Pay back a debt. Gain new insights regarding resources. Keep it simple.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 7 -Science helps with the heavy lifting. Use imagination in your work. Be persistent, and gain more than expected.You have a trash container for a reason; fear no mistake. One stroke of brilliance and you pop through to success.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7 -Planning ahead helps with unforeseen details.Your team can teach you what you need to know. Communication provides insight. Abrupt decisions may need revision. If you promise to write, write. Get outdoors if weather permits.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7 -- You sense what’s wanted and needed here.You can solve a puzzle with backstage action. Listen to unspoken cues and details. Handle surprises or breakdowns with aplomb.You have just the thing, or know where to look.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 -- Intuition provides one possible road map to success. Share it with someone you trust. Ask for help, and there’s a lucky break. A loved one has a great idea. Talk about how to make it happen.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8 -- An opportunity heads your way. Conformity can now be profitable. The two of you see the light at the end of the tunnel. Pursue innovation independently or together for a pleasant surprise. Stash the cash with panache.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)Today is a 6 -Your home is your castle. Invite friends over, and stir up a fine conversation. Take pictures to share, and before you know it, you’re meeting just the person you’ve been looking for. Later, a quiet revolution includes your reforms.

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THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 6

JUNE 21 Muncie Young Professionals is hosting a lunch, “Yikes! I Work with Old People! “at 11:30 a.m. Minnetrista.

BEHIND THE BOOTH

WEEKEND MOVIES

CHECK OUT ADDITIONAL CONTENT AT BSUDAILY.COM.

Here’s a look at some of the movies to hit theaters this weekend.

|

D

KRYSTAL BYERS STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER kmbyers@bsu.edu

“MAN OF STEEL” FRIDAY (PG-13)

iana South, a Muncie resident, has been working at the Muncie Carnival in the Muncie Mall parking lot for the past four days. She works the duck pond booth to supplement her income working at a day care during the day. Q: What is it like working your booth?

A: It’s fun when we’re busy. It’s fun to let the kids come up and play. They win every time so they really don’t have to do anything. They just play in the water and splash around and they win.

Q: What is your favorite part about working with the kids?

A: It’s that they get to pick whatever they want, so if they want the smallest thing or the biggest thing they can get whatever they want. There’s no ‘Sorry you only get this prize or that prize,’ you can get whatever.

DIRECTOR Zack Snyder CAST Henry Cavill, Amy Adams Michael Shannon, Russell Crowe RUNTIME 143 minutes

The much anticipated restart of the “Superman” series begins with an impressive cast and the help of Christopher Nolan, who turned “Batman” into the biggest superhero franchise. The directorial style of Zack Snyder could bring a fresh perspective to the genre. The story follows the coming-ofage of Superman from boy to superhero.

“THE BLING RING” FRIDAY (R)

Q:How did you get started working at the carnival?

DN PHOTO KRYSTAL BYERS

TOP: A line of assorted game prizes lines the duck pond game at the Muncie Carnival. The carnival will remain in Muncie until June 15. together. MIDDLE: Eight-yearold Jayden Qualls ride the scrambler at the Muncie Carnival Monday night. Qualls and his two brothers Greyson and Logan all rode the ride together. BOTTOM: A line of assorted game prizes lines the duck pond game at the Muncie Carnival.

A: My husband [Doug] worked for a different carnival for about 13 years, and we know somebody that is actually local and is working with this show and traveling. So he knew they [the carnival] needed some help, so he talked to us and asked us if we wanted to work.

Q: What is one crazy story that stands out to you about working here so far?

A: Well like I said, the kids are going to win anyway so it’s fun to me, especially the little kids. The biggest fun of it is

RETIREMENT: 41 year career to end soon | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

DIRECTOR Sofia Coppola CAST Katie Chang, Israel Broussard Emma Watson, Taissa Farmiga RUNTIME 90 minutes

A group of teenagers obsessed with fame discover the addresses of celebrities on the Internet and rob their homes. Director Sofia Coppola, daughter of Francis Ford Coppola, has found success with “Somewhere” and “The Lost Translation.” The film features a young, talented cast.

MUSIC KANYE WEST “YEEZUS” JUNE 18

The follow-up of Kanye West’s incredibly wellreceived “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy” is taking the world by storm before its release. West has already made his mark with a story from the New York Times, boasting about his impact on hip-hop and pop culture. Expect a less radio-friendly album packed with the typical West energy.

“I believe I can make my greatest contribution to society by becoming a change agent by creating a new America,” Payne said. Maria Williams-Hawkins, an associate professor of telecommunications, has known Payne for 20 years. “He pointed out the way things were when he came and some of the challenges that being an African American faculty member on Ball State’s campus could offer,” she said. “We go to the same church and that’s where I got to know him. ” Jayne Beilke, educational studies chairperson, said she has known Dr. Payne for 20 years as well. “Dr. Payne has a long history,” she said. “What he has been through with racial and ethnic problems made him a strong person.” Diversity is still develop-

ing, but under Payne it has evolved from its beginning. “The diversity program with Dr. Payne accomplished a lot, but we still need a long way to go,” Beilke said. “It’s hard to make somebody intellectual, but Dr. Payne has done a great job.” Payne said he always wanted to write a book about how powerful education is using the story of his own family and living in Mississippi in 1942, when it was still a legally segregated state. Until then, Payne said it is satisfying to see the difference his career has made. “People now do not see differences in race and are working together,” Payne said. “I would like to make diversity a part of the curriculum and I’d like to see people include diversity within the discipline, because a good understanding of discipline is a good understanding of diversity.

OTHER RETIREES CHARLES JAGGERS

Jaggers is the director of university development. He has been at Ball State for 17 years in the division of the university advancement. His retirement celebration is from 2 to 4 p.m. on June 26 in the Assembly Hall at the Alumni Center. JOE GOODWIN

Goodwin is retiring from the Career Center after 31 years of service to the university. His retirement celebration is from 3 to 5 p.m. on June 21 at the E.B. Ball Center. ROBERT JONES

Jones was the maintenance group leader in the department of Housing and Residence Life at Ball State for 27 years. He is already retired and had his retirement celebration earlier this summer. “Name calling, physical discrimination, we cannot see it on our campus and that is a part of what makes me proud of what I do and what I have accomplished.”

PROTESTER’S HUNGER STRIKE ENDS FOR HEALTH CONCERNS Inmate #1776 to demonstrate again for Guantanamo Bay WATSON STAFF REPORTER | BRITTANY bmwatson@bsu.edu After 18 days with no food, 15 with no calories and an 11 percent body weight loss, a local activist ended his hunger strike for his safety. Going by Inmate #1776, he tried to get major Indiana newspapers to take notice of the hunger strikes in Guantanamo Bay. Inmate #1776 put on his orange and black hooded prisoner uniform and began his hunger strike May 13 after a public waterboarding, which he said was a horrifying mix of drowning and suffocating. Calling it a “Hunger Strike for Journalistic Integrity,” he said he would not eat until American media informed our nation of the hunger strikes and

treatment of prisoners. “Democracy requires informed citizens to get something done,” he said. With a blog and Twitter page tracking his journey, Inmate #1776 began his means to cause change. The first three days of his hunger strike he had juice and then it was zero calories for the next 15 days. There were occasional photo updates showing his weight loss and video “interrogations” in which he describes himself as “hungry as hell” on his Facebook, as well as support from places across state boarders. His friends showed some concern from the beginning but made sure he was ready. “I’m the kind of person who forgets meals, so they made sure I ate leading up to the fast,” Inmate #1776 said. Mary Ogle is Inmate #1776’s best friend and support system through his protests. “I was immediately very

opposed to the idea, but as he explained why he needed to I realized that he was right,” Ogle said. “It was terrifying. Mentally I didn’t know if he’d be able to know when it was time to stop. The last week was pretty nervewracking because he was being less and less active, and on the last day he could barely sit up.” The 18-day strike caused some attention, but it was not the attention he was aiming for. Not one of the 10 Indiana newspapers Inmate #1776 was targeting followed through with reporting on the hunger strikes that have been going on in Guantanamo Bay since February. With his safety in jeopardy, Inmate #1776 had to stop his strike on May 30, with one last interrogation addressed to the public. “I’m getting extremely lightheaded and cognitively, it’s definitely affected me. I can feel extreme difference in myself,” he said. “You haven’t seen the last of me. I am Inmate #1776.”

splashing around the water. So I always tell them to make the biggest splash they can make. It’s funny to me, sometimes the parents or whoever is with them doesn’t hear me say that, so when they start splashing they’re like ‘Oh no, no don’t splash the water everywhere,’ and I’m like ���It’s okay they’re allowed.’

Q: D  o you still go to the carnival in your free time?

A: Yes [laughing], actually today has been really slow and all I can think about is going to ride rides, I was like ‘I’m not making any money I want to go ride rides.’

Q: W  hat do you do when the carnival’s closed? A: Well, normally I work my regular job which is at the day care, [the] New Beginnings Daycare on South Walnut.

Q: Are you a Muncie resident?

A: I was born here, we lived here until I was 12. My dad is from Kentucky so I lived there for a while, then I came back to Muncie, then I went back to Kentucky, then I came back to Muncie, then I moved to Indy for a year, and I have been back here for about two-anda-half years. Altogether, I don’t know, about 18 years or something like that.

Diana South

Q: A  re you going to continue working at the carnival when it moves on?

A: I am going to work through the week that they’re here and then they asked me if I wanted to work at their next spot, which is in Marion, which is not too far from here, but I don’t know if I want to drive that far. I can see myself doing it when they’re here, but not traveling.

Q: D  o you have fun working here?

A: I do have fun, sometimes, and sometimes it’s boring, like yesterday it rained and there weren’t a lot of people here. Usually if it’s at least fairly busy, even if I am not making a lot of money, I just talk to the people. Since I work at a day care I’ve seen a lot of kids come through here that either were in my class formerly or are currently in day care, so that’s kind of neat, I get to see them running around riding rides. Especially the ones that are older now that go to school, I don’t get to see them. I’ve seen two today, who are in kindergarten or first grade that I hadn’t seen since they were 1. So they are all big and they talk and they play and they’re just so cute.

DN| BRIEF

UNIVERSITY SECRETARY TO RETIRE

Judy Ingle, secretary to the director of business services for the athletic department, is retiring from Ball State after working in multiple departments for the university. Most recently in her position as secretary she deals with the athletic department’s budget. Ingle has 44 years of experience with different departments. She was the secretary to the UniJUDY INGLE versity Chief of Police for 18 years and then the department secretary for elementary education for four years before moving to the athletic department. “I enjoyed working for students and for the university,” she said. “With 44 years of experience, I saw different things and saw many changes on our physical look of our campus.” One change she experienced was when everything became computerized on campus. Ingle said she went back to class. “I went back to BSU to study business and computer services to learn how to use computers,” she said. When she’s not working, Ingle said she enjoys taking fitness classes. “I don’t like to be a couch potato; I want to work out and do it every day and will continue the adult fitness class more in the future too,” she said. Ingle said she is proud of what she accomplished working in different jobs around campus. “I am very happy that I am retiring but I will always miss people that I work with,” she said. – SAFARALI SAYDSHOEV


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