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DN MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2013

THE DAILY NEWS

FAIRYTALE TOLD IN BALLET

NCAA

Cinderella will lose the glass slipper and strap on ballet flats in tonight’s premiere

See where the Indiana schools, Akron were drawn for The Dance

Tournament field selected Sunday SEE PAGE 4

SEE PAGE 6

BSUDAILY.COM

REWARDS OR WINNING? STUDENT REWARDS PRIZES

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

The student section of Scheumann Stadium fills up with students for an evening game against Southern Florida on Sept. 22, 2012. Attendance for the games went up 63 percent in the 2012 season.

Below are the amount of points a student needs to receive each prize listed on the left.

10

Ball State athletics koozie

30

Stadium cup with one free drink

50

Ball State athletics drawstring bag

80

Free large 1 topping Papa John’s pizza coupon

100

Ball State athletics commemorative glass

200

Free spray tan coupon from Sun Tan City

250

Lunch with football coach Pete Lembo with three friends

350+

MAT MIKESELL SPORTS EDITOR | @MatMikesell

Program fuels rise in student attendance, but successful teams factor for BSU fans

W

hen Ryan McBride and two classmates were assigned to a project to come up with ways to draw more students to Ball State games and create a better atmosphere, they were immediately intrigued. “I knew there was a lot of potential,” McBride said. “I was a freshman in [2008] when [the football team] went 12-0. So I got to see the atmosphere that could be generated. I knew there was more that could be done.” Throughout the course of the semester, the group put together a survey for students, brainstormed ideas how to complete their project and met with football coach Pete Lembo on a monthly basis. The group pitched moving football kickoffs to a later time, having longer tailgating times and for Lembo to be active on social media.

See REWARDS, page 5

BLAKE BEEMER

These three students have the highest amount of points and are eligible for prizes such as an iPad, a TV and a PS3.

Entry to grand prize giveaway

425 points

KEENAN PFOTENHAUER

380 points

EVAN MUDRONCIK

360 points

UPD reconsiders Twitter

Account could be used for emergency, safety notifications EMMA KATE FITTES CHIEF REPORTER | emfittes@bsu.edu

University Police Department and University Marketing and Communications are reconsidering using Twitter for public safety and emergency notifications following communication strategies used when an alleged gunman was on campus. “The situation that we had

[March 11] has led us to reconsider and reevaluate how we use Twitter, in particular for an emergency,” said Tony Proudfoot, associate vice president for Marketing and Communications. “Communicating with 20,000 people about something as serious as public safety is a very important responsibility.” Proudfoot said his department debriefs with Ball State’s Crisis Management Team every time after an emergency situation occurs. He said the alleged gunman discussion led them to consider including Twitter in the

« We have to look

at it from a student standpoint. Generations are different in what tools they use. » DAVID HUFF, UPD detective university’s emergency communication protocol, although the final decision won’t be made until the next meeting in April. Proudfoot said social media has intentionally not been a part of emergency notifications because the university

felt using it could have compromised the accuracy of the information. “If we are not communicating clear, accurate information about credible threats, then the campus will stop listening when they get emergency notifications,” Proudfoot said. “The safety of the campus is at stake.” University officials believed in the past that keeping notifications off of social media would keep students skeptical of false alarms and rumors posted by other people, Proudfoot said.

See UPD, page 3

BEAT EXPANDS ENERGY CHALLENGE

Academic buildings will now compete to use less energy SARA NAHRWOLD DAY EDITOR | news@bsudailynews.com

The Ball State Energy Action Team is expanding its energy hall challenge this semester to include an academic building energy challenge. “It will be up to professors in classes to turn off the projector when they are done using it, when they leave their office at night to turn off their computers and just little things like that,” said Abby Rondot, a senior public relations major and president of BEAT. The residence hall and academic building challenges will run at the same time but as separate challenges from today through April 15.

Each semester, BEAT hosts an energy hall challenge for those students living on campus. Last semester, Elliot Hall won the four week long competition. “The goal is to educate students,” she said. “The other huge point we try to put emphasis on is that you might be doing only one thing, but together it does make a big difference.” Prior to the competition, Facilities Planning and Management measures the average energy usage of each hall. During the challenge, energy rates are compared among the halls to determine the winning hall that gets a pizza party. Student groups such as BEAT are important for the campus, said Kevin Kenyon, adviser for BEAT and associate vice president of Facilities Planning and Management. “Their main focus is on energy conservation, looking at various ways to encourage people to

use less energy,” he said. “They don’t get directly involved with technological solutions, they look more for behavioral and educational solutions.” Other organizations such as the Residence Hall Association help to get BEAT’s cause out to students. “The easiest way for any organization to contact every hall at the same time is to come to us because every hall has a representative,” Ryan Cole, RHA president, said. For students involved in the challenge, Rondot said BEAT tries to provide helpful tips such as unplugging things not in use, hanging clothes to dry and watching a movie on one television versus multiple in the halls. The Student Government Association, like RHA, helps to promote the challenge to the student body.

COMPUTERS:

The university recommends setting your monitor to standby after 5 minutes of inactivity and the computer after 20 minutes of inactivity. When charging your laptop, unplug it when the battery is fully charged and don’t leave it plugged in. WATER BOTTLE:

Use reusable bottles (plastic or metal) instead of bottled water. This reduces waste significantly and saves money. For filtered water, buy a filter pitcher for your refrigerator.

For more, go to bsudaily. com SOURCE: Ball State Energy Action Team

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

MUNCIE, INDIANA

TIME TO CLEAN THE GREEN OFF YOUR LIFE.

See BEAT, page 3

SAVING ENERGY IN RESIDENT HALLS

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8255 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8247

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

PHOTO GALLERIES

Go online to see photography from campus, community events. Visit bsudaily.com and click on multimedia.

DN FILE PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Former coach Billy Taylor looks over his players toward the end of a game against Ohio on Feb. 6. The university announced Taylor was let go on Thursday.

AD wants new coach with vision

After Taylor’s firing, Scholl searches for variety of candidates for open position CONOR HOCKETT CHIEF REPORTER he isn’t looking for a more ag| @ConorHockett gressive figure on the sideline, For the past six seasons, Billy Taylor calmly patrolled the sidelines, hardly ever losing his cool with players or officials during the game. While Taylor’s personality and demeanor drew respect from nearly every opposing coach in the Mid-American Conference, critics wondered if Ball State’s former coach had the intensity to push players enough for consistent success. “I wouldn’t say Billy didn’t have fire, I just think every coach manifests it differently,” athletic director Bill Scholl said. “Everyone’s personality is just different and they get it done in different ways.” With that in mind, Scholl said TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on twitter.com.

just someone who can consistently lead the university toward MAC Championships. That person doesn’t necessarily need to play a certain style or have existing head coaching experience either. Scholl said he’s pursuing both assistants and former or current head coaches for Ball State’s men’s basketball position since the university fired Taylor on Thursday. “It’s a longer-term decision than fitting what we have on roster,” Scholl said. “What I really want is a coach with vision and a style of play that he commits, recruits and coaches to.”

FORECAST

TODAY High: 43, Low: 25 Rain showers

See TAYLOR, page 4

VOL. 92, ISSUE 95 TOMORROW High: 37, Low: 24 Scattered flurries


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

ONLINE NEWS

ONLINE

DN TOP CLICKS | WEEKEND

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Here’s a sneak peek at the Daily News you can only see online. Connect with Web-exclusive content, such as interactives, videos and audio slideshows.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

MULTIMEDIA

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BACK ISSUES Stop by AJ 278 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

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1. Billy Taylor fired as Ball State men’s basketball coach 2. Gora tells Senate Appropriations Committee that Ball State can’t recover from continued cuts 3. Swing-dancing subculture cuts loose in Fountain Square 4. St. Paddy’s Day weekend drink specials and shows 5. In the wake of recent school shootings, Ball State begins to debate whether guns should be allowed on campus

ROLLIN’ IN THE DEEP See the Derby Dames roll against Confluence Crush at Sunday’s Slamrock Scuffle.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE Community members celebrated St. Patrick’s Day the right way. Take a look at this gallery from the weekend’s parade.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Andrew Mishler

PHOTO EDITOR Bobby Ellis

MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp

NEWS EDITOR Devan Filchak ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR Evie Lichtenwalter DAY EDITOR Sara Nahrwold SPORTS EDITOR Mat Mikesell ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney FEATURES EDITOR Lindsey Gelwicks

ONLINE EXCLUSIVES BSUDAILY.COM

NUMBER OF LATINOS RISES

PLANE CRASHES IN INDIANA

The fast growth of Latinos blurs black-white color lines, reshaping alliances as “whiteness” begins to lose its numerical dominance.

A private jet experiencing mechanical trouble crashed Sunday in a South Bend, leaving multiple people dead after it hit three homes.

VIGILANTES BEAT 2 MEN

BILLS SEEK TO END ABUSE

Egyptian men attacked two others accused of stealing a motorized rickshaw, then hung them by their feet, eventually killing them.

Following graphic videos released of cow and veal abuse, lawmakers are making it harder for animal welfare advocates to investigate.

Check us out online today! Crossword

EDITORIAL BOARD

ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz 72HRS EDITOR Michelle Johnson

DESIGN EDITOR Stephanie Meredith ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITOR Emily Theis GRAPHICS EDITOR/ SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Adam Baumgartner VIDEO EDITOR Kellan Deam FORUM EDITOR/ COPY CHIEF Kelly Dickey SENIOR COPY EDITORS Marisa Hendrickson Daniel Brount

LET US KNOW

Have any meetings or events coming up? Email us at editor@bsudailynews.com.

Community Connections

Sudoku

By Michael Mepham

Level: Easy

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY.

ACROSS 1 DISCOVERERS’ SHOUTS 5 DICTATION TAKERS 11 “EVERY KISS BEGINS WITH __”: JEWELER’S SLOGAN 14 RED SALAD VEGGIE 15 CLEAR THE FUSTINESS FROM 16 GRAND __ OPRY 17 2012 BASEBALL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEE 19 NOT TOO BRIGHT 20 VOLUME OF MAPS 21 VERSAILLES RULER 22 PLUCKY MOVIE PIG 23 MICHELLE, TO BARACK 24 BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR NOMINEE FOR “ARGO” 27 PATIO FURNITURE REPAIRMAN 28 EXPRESSIVE MUSIC SUBGENRE 29 REPORT CARD FIGS. 30 HOPI HOME 34 KIND 37 MODERN, IN MUNICH 38 RELATIVES, AND AN APT

TITLE FOR THIS PUZZLE 39 “__ DO NOT!” 40 HEE-HAWING CRITTER 41 WATCHDOGS FROM JAPAN 42 GET SNIPPY WITH 43 UNREFINED FIND 44 SUPERHERO DUDS 45 IOWA SENATOR SINCE 1985 51 ELEVATOR INNOVATOR 52 “CAN I GET A WORD IN?” 53 D-BACKS, ON SCOREBOARDS 54 FORMAL DECREES 56 PARTY COFFEEMAKER 57 AL PACINO’S “SEA OF LOVE” CO-STAR 60 STATISTICAL DATA: ABBR. 61 CITY KNOWN FOR ITS BOYS’ CHOIR 62 GIGGLY MUPPET 63 “SCHEDULE UNCERTAIN AT PRESS TIME” ABBR. 64 PASSAGES BETWEEN BUILDINGS 65 GETS THE POINT DOWN

1 “FERNANDO” BAND 2 STRETCHES IN THE HIGH 90S, SAY 3 FLIER WITH A SHAMROCK LOGO 4 FIRES ON FROM ABOVE 5 “MY GAL” OF SONG 6 SPARKLING TOPPER 7 FLAMBOYANT FLYNN 8 CELLPHONE GIANT 9 “I’D LOVE TO, YVETTE!” 10 MTA STOP 11 CAMERA NAME SINCE 1888 12 SUSPECT’S EXCUSE 13 ADEN’S COUNTRY 18 BELGIAN RIVER 22 DUDE 25 ACTRESS CARTER AND “LITTLE” DICKENS CHARACTER TRENT 26 HOG-WILD 27 WATER-TO-WINE VILLAGE 30 PENNY PINCHER 31 PREFIX WITH CYCLE 32 WEE NEWT 33 SHOWY WRAP 34 UP THE CREEK

35 RUNS TOO SLOWLY, AS A WATCH 36 X, IN VALENTINES 38 FORMER “IDOL” JUDGE DIOGUARDI 42 IRONIC SKETCHES 43 RESISTANCE MEASURE 44 MUSICAL WRAP-UP 45 TALK TRASH TO 46 “THE DICK VAN DYKE SHOW” CATCHPHRASE 47 BRAINY BUNCH 48 SUPERMAN, ON KRYPTON 49 DANCER CASTLE 50 SIMPLETON 55 YEARS IN ESPAÑA 57 ONE OF THE GABORS 58 SMALL, IN DOGPATCH 59 HISTORY MAJORS’ DEGS.

bsudaily.com

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY.

Wheelchair Ballroom Dancing

with Frank Epperson Tonight, 8PM, Student Center Ballroom Co-sponsored by DSIA & the Ballroom Dance League


MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Students stand for Resident 27 hours for slavery pushes for

green Muncie Group leader wants to make gardens in vacant locations |

CHRIS JONES STAFF REPORTER cbjones@bsu.edu

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Freshman telecommunications major Jordan Larson and junior social work major Holly Van Duzer speak to passersby during Ball State’s chapter of International Justice Mission’s protest at the Scramble Light on Thursday. The protest was to gain awareness about human trafficking.

Group participates in worldwide effort for sex trafficking ARIC CHOKEY STAFF REPORTER | aachokey@bsu.edu

For 27 consecutive hours, students literally stood up for their beliefs in awareness. Members of the International Justice Mission of Ball State stood for more than a day at the Scramble Light to bring awareness to the human trafficking that plagues societies globally as part of the organization’s campaign

BEAT: Event to create permanent changes

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

« A lot of students

think it’s something that’s far away in other countries. » CHRIS KOZAK, president of International Justice Mission Ball State chapter for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation. It involves the trade of sex for profit. “A lot of students think it’s something that’s far away in other countries,” Kozak said. It happens in cities around the United States, including Indianapolis, he said.

The International Justice Mission’s website said the organization raised a little more than $50,000 and had 593 different groups demonstrating around the world as of Friday evening. It also showed that Ball State had 16 students registered as participating in the campaign. “It worked out really well,” Kozak said. “I’m assuming it’s going to happen again next year with how successful this year was.” This is the first year Ball State’s chapter participated. Kozak said he would be more than happy to take part in it again next year.

2 OHIO FOOTBALL PLAYERS FOUND GUILTY IN RAPE CASE

Crime came to light through messages, social media posts | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOOTBALL PLAYERS GUILTY WHAT

Two football students from Steubenville High School found guilty of raping a 16-year-old girl. SO WHAT

The case has divided the town and has exposed a possible cover up of the athletes’ behavior. WHAT’S NEXT

Both boys are sentenced to a year in juvenile and afterwards juvenile authorities will decide if they should be kept until they are 21.

URBAN GARDEN LOCATIONS

Ave nue

Walnut Street

eling

participant that night, and defense attorneys soliciting testimony from witnesses that would indicate that the girl, though drunk, knew what she was doing. The teenage girl testified Saturday that she could not recall what happened the night of the attack but remembered waking up naked in a strange house after drinking at a party. The girl said she recalled drinking, leaving the party holding hands with Mays and throwing up later. When she woke up, she said she discovered her phone, earrings, shoes, and underwear were missing, she testified. “It was really scary,” she said. “I honestly did not know what to think because I could not remember anything.”

Whe

STEUBENVILLE, Ohio — Two members of a high school football team were found guilty Sunday of raping a drunken 16-year-old girl in a case that bitterly divided an Ohio city and led to accusations of a cover-up to protect the community’s athletes. Steubenville High School students Trent Mays and Ma’Lik Richmond were sentenced to at least a year in juvenile jail, capping a case that came to light via a barrage of morningafter text messages, social media posts and online photos and video that drew global attention. Mays was sentenced to an additional year in jail on a charge of illegal use of a minor in nudity-oriented material, to be served after his rape sentence is completed. The two teens broke down in tears after the verdict was read and later apologized to the victim. Both were emotional as they spoke, and Richmond began sobbing so heavily that he bent over and had to be helped back to his seat. Richmond’s father, Nathaniel, also asked that the

victim’s family “forgive Malik and Trent for the pain they put you through.” Mays, 17, and Richmond, 16, were charged with digitally penetrating the West Virginia girl, first in the back seat of a moving car after an alcohol-fueled party on Aug. 11, and then in the basement of a house. The case roiled the community a mid allegations that more students should have been charged — accusations that Ohio’s attorney general pledged to look into — and led to questions from a much wider audience online about the influence of the local football team, a source of a pride in a community of 18,000 that suffered massive job losses with the collapse of the steel industry. Protesters who sought guilty verdicts stood outside the courthouse Sunday morning, their arms linked, some wearing masks. Prosecutor Marianne Hemmeter criticized the efforts by the hacker collective Anonymous to publicize the case, saying the extra attention led to a chilling effect on those willing to testify. The trial opened last week as a contest between prosecutors determined to show the girl was so drunk she couldn’t have been a willing

Tillotson Avenue

“Our big thing is to make sure students know about it,” Chris Wilkey, SGA president, said. “Since we represent the entire student body, we tell senators to make sure they tell people they interact with on a daily basis that this is going on.” Rondot said it is important for students to participate because of the effect on campus. “These are lessons you can learn when you move off campus, move out in your own house and save money on your energy bill,” she said. “I hope the message goes through and spreads to students.” Wilkey said it’s important to learn through the challenge what students can do to save campus energy and, ultimately, money. “You can realize maybe I am the one affecting that — leaving my door open all day or leaving the air on or the heat up and causing the university to pay a little more money and harming the environment,” he said. Although the energy challenge itself is important, Kenyon encourages students to take what they learn from the competition and apply it after college.

called “Stand for Freedom.” The event started at 9 a.m. Thursday and lasted until noon Friday. Students stood in the cold weather when temperatures got down into the upper 20s Thursday night, according to weather.com. “It was cold and it was long, but it was lots of fun,” said Chris Kozak, president of Ball State’s chapter. “I got to talk to a lot of people.” Kozak said the people he talked to expressed interest in the cause and he thinks they learned about human trafficking. According to the organization’s website, traffickers transport or detain their victims

Jason Donati has dreams and aspirations for a green, more communal city and he’s throwing his efforts behind the Urban Gardening Initiative to plant community gardens where vacant land resides. Donati is the president of Muncie Delaware Clean and Beautiful, and he has wanted to build community gardens since he returned from his stint with AmeriCorps. “When we see these vacant green spaces scattered throughout Muncie, we think it’s a great opportunity and potential to rebuild our community through growing food and getting people to come out of the house,” Donati said. Along with Donati is a team of volunteers and Ball State students led by Scott Truex, an associate professor of urban planning. They are all committed to a green Muncie realized through the community garden project. A community garden is a place where a member from a community can rent a plot of land and garden, Donati said. Truex said Muncie is capable of leading the country in community gardening. “Both the production and preservation of food is an integral part of Muncie’s story and both of those are huge economic development catalysts that could be used in economic leverage to have a big impact here,” he said. “I think there’s a huge opportunity here.” Truex believes the connection with food changed when TV dinners and two wage earners became common in households. “It’s much easier to open a can and throw it in the microwave,” he said. Bryan Preston and Lindsey Helms, a couple who has managed the Muncie community garden behind the Maring-Hunt Public Library for years, enjoy sharing the gardening experience and hope to spread their passion with the community. “I think it’s just something fun to do, it doesn’t cost money and it brings people together,” Helms said. “It’s a great way to learn.”

Preston and Helms lived in Chicago, where they cultivated their gardening spirit. Preston said gardening was something they kept in mind when they moved down the street from the library. “We moved to the neighborhood partly because there was a garden,” he said. “In a sense, the garden kind of moved us there.” Currently, UGI has 11 gardens that are part of its organization spanning across 1.75 acres of land. Donati said the process is still in an informal stage, having no paid staff and a low budget. UGI plans on hosting an urban agriculture symposium in the spring but doesn’t have an official date. The symposium would consist of Ball State professors coming to speak and organize activities, student help, a keynote speaker and an all day workshop centered on helping educate the general public about urban agriculture. Truex said he wants the community to attend the event and talk to students to see the different strategies used, have discussions and find some connections with people in certain districts. “This is not a Ball State effort. This is an UGI effort,” he said. “We’re just going to have support and play a role because we can. I’ve got young people who are passionate and are interested.” While the biggest setback UGI faces is funding, more involvement and interest can generate grant money, Truex said. “I like to think that the symposium will be a big stepping stone in getting support,” he said. “Getting that first grant is usually the toughest. Grant agencies fund success.” Until grant money does become available, places like the Muncie community garden will set the example of what UGI’s vision could be. “I think here, it still hasn’t caught on. People haven’t realized the importance of it yet,” Donati said. “They don’t think that it’s a real thing yet.” The next step for UGI is overcoming obstacles and getting the community involved. “There’s no reason we can’t be a stellar example of a small Rust Belt city learning how to survive within its boundaries and its realm and making it a true local economy and local food system where we all support each other,” Donati said.

McGalliard Road

BALL STATE UNIVERSITY

Riverside Avenue

Memorial Drive DN GRAPHIC

UPD: Department hopes to create 2-way communication with community | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Under current protocols, Marketing and Communications is required to send the message out via email and text message within 10 minutes of being notified by Director of Public Safety Gene Burton. But Proudfoot said the university normally sends it within five minutes. UPD decides if an alert is needed after they gather enough information. UPD’s Twitter account @BSUPolice has had two tweets and one retweet since it was started Jan. 13, 2012. The last tweet was March 23, 2012.

Detectives Kent Kurtz and David Huff would like to put the account back in use to communicate with students. “We have to look at it from a student standpoint,” Huff said. “Generations are different in what tools they use.” While UPD currently has multiple outlets for students to contact them on Ball State’s website, through email and anonymous tips, Kurtz said they don’t have a way to send out information. “It is one sided,” Huff said. “It’s them giving us information.” Kurtz and Huff said they would want to post safety reminders

for students and photos of people they are actively looking for. Huff said he thinks putting someone’s picture on Twitter would help UPD make an arrest faster because more people would see it and potentially recognize the suspect. “We don’t necessarily want to use it as an investigative tool,” Huff said. “It’s just a good way to communicate. It doesn’t necessarily need to be crime related.” Proudfoot said his department helped make a plan for how UPD should use their Twitter, but UPD is ultimately in charge. “We worked with UPD and

provided some guidance on some best practices when the account first started,” Proudfoot said. “That’s kind of the nature of the guidance that we provide. After that we’re not really the yes or no people in terms of how it’s used once it’s established.” He said there are two kinds of public safety communications: emergency notifications, which is a situation where immediate action needs to be taken from imminent danger, and public safety notices, which is a situation where something needs to be brought to attention.

Proudfoot said it’s possible that UPD’s Twitter could be used for public safety notices. Kurtz said some of the concerns behind using Twitter would be accidentally sending out information that should have been an emergency alert. According to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, UPD has to follow strict guidelines to release emergency alerts through the emergency alert system only. “When you start talking about Clery violations and things of that nature, you start

talking about very large fines.” Kurtz said. He said that is something the department would have to consider, as well as who would be in charge of the account. To Huff and Kurtz, it would be worth being careful to keep students safe. “I don’t think any of us have figured out yet why it would be a bad thing,” Huff said. Proudfoot said the best way to stay safe is to be familiar with current emergency protocols. “The best thing the campus community can do is look at that site and sign up for emergency text messaging,” Proudfoot said.


PAGE 4 | MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

/////////// THE

HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

ONLINE Read about the softball team’s weekend in Kentucky, including an upset win over ranked North Carolina.

WEDNESDAY Find out how all 68 teams in the tournament have a relation to Ball State in the ‘March Boredom.’

THURSDAY Men’s volleyball travels an hour north to face rival IPFW in a crucial MIVA match at 7 p.m.

Walk-offs fuel weekend sweep Timely hits, wins over IPFW, Taylor builds confidence

Maloney believes the close losses may have taught his players how to handle intense pressure in the future. “I think the more you’re in those games, the better chance you’ll have a positive result,” Maloney said. “The more you play in those, the more you’re confident and relaxed, and that leads to success.” Maloney stressed the weekends walk-off wins were huge for his team’s confidence. He said for a team that hasn’t had much winning, being able to experience it is a great feeling. Having two seasons consisting of a combined 29-100 record gives players a lot more negative feelings then positive ones. “To see the team celebrating the two walk-off wins was just huge,” Maloney said. “Huge for our team building and it’s huge to win close games like that. It was excellent.” Maloney said a lot of players have stepped up on offense since he saw them for the first time last fall. Wellman stuck out to him, saying that he’s made a number of clutch plays, including his game winning RBI on Saturday. Maloney said although he loves the teamwork on the field and in the clubhouse, his players don’t play as individuals, but as a

POLASKI STAFF REPORTER | DAVID @DavidPolaski

Ball State stood tied with IPFW 2-2 in the bottom of the ninth Friday afternoon. With sophomore Jarrett James on third, senior Dominick Catanzarite stepped to the plate. Catanzarite and James ran a risky play. Catanzarite bunted, and James sprinted home, beating the throw and scoring to get the 3-2 win off the play known as the suicide squeeze. Just a day later, James stood at third base in the bottom of the ninth again. This time, junior Billy Wellman singled and brought James across home plate for the Cardinals’ second walk-off win in 24 hours. This season, Ball State coach Rich Maloney has advocated to his team that one of the keys to victory was getting the timely hit each game. Ball State swept IPFW and Taylor University in its four game series, increasing its record to 10-8 on the season. “Having contributions from a lot of different people was

DN FILE PHOTO DYLAN BUELL

Senior Billy Wellman swings at a pitch against Eastern Michigan during a game on April 22, 2012. Wellman had a walk-off hit in the game against IPFW.

pretty important,” Maloney said. “That’s what it’s going to take. A team effort and everyone executing, just like we’ve been able to do.”

Just a few weeks ago, Ball State was in a similar situation against both Ohio State and Coastal Carolina. Leading in both games, Ball State failed to tack on addi-

tional runs. They lost both games, a stark contrast to the big plays they produced this previous weekend.

INDIANA, MAC SCHOOLS IN TOURNEY

Hoosiers, Bulldogs in same region, Akron gets No. 12 seed against mid-major VCU Louisville NC A&T/Liberty Colorado St. Missouri Oklahoma St. Oregon St. Louis New Mexico St. Memphis

Midwest

Md. Tenn./St. Mary’s Michigan St. Valparaiso Notre Dame is drawn as the Creighton No. 7 seed in the West Region

Cincinnati and will go up against a tough Iowa State team. Duke The West has intriguing Albany games, which could include Gonzaga several upsets. The Irish Southern should be aware of a Cyclone Pittsburgh team capable of an upset. Wichita St. Wisconsin Ole Miss Kansas St. Boise St./La Salle Arizona Belmont New Mexico Harvard

Notre Dame

Iowa St. Ohio St. Iona

West

The MAC champion gets drawn as the No. 12 seed in the South Region against midmajor power VCU. Two years ago, VCU made a surprise run to the Final Four, and Akron will have to play a perfect game against this year’s team as well.

Kansas WKU North Carolina Villanova VCU

Akron

South

After missing out on the overall No. 1 seed, Indiana gets the top spot in the East. The region is favorable for Indiana, as the only threat is a potential Sweet 16 matchup against Syracuse. A possible Elite 8 game against Miami would be an energized game.

Butler returns to the dance as a No. 6 seed in the East. The Bulldogs will be looking to make March magic again, but a first round game against Bucknell will be difficult. It won’t get easier for Butler either as the team struggled in the late part of the season

Michigan S. Dakota St. UCLA Minnesota Florida N’western St. San Diego St. Oklahoma Georgetown Florida GC

Indiana

UU-B/James Madison

NC State Temple UNLV

East

California Syracruse Montana

Butler

Bucknell Marquette Davidson Illinois Colorado Miami Pacific

Ball State gets 4-3 win over Xavier Team recovers from doubles loss, grabs best victory of year WEISS STAFF REPORTER | BRIAN @bweiss14

A little luck and some crafty play earned Ball State a key 4-3 victory over Xavier on St. Patrick’s Day. With the win, Ball State improved to 9-6 on the season. Once again the Cardinals got behind early as they dropped the doubles point. The senior duo of Dalton Albertin and Alexandre Brym recorded the sole doubles victory at the No. 3 spot. Albertin and Brym took that victory and carried the momentum gained straight into singles action. Brym played his first match of the season at the No. 5 spot, but it didn’t seem to faze him as he cruised to a convincing 6-3, 6-3 win. Previously this season Albertin struggled at the No. 3 spot, as he came into the match with a 1-4 record there. It didn’t seem to bother him this time around. “I felt confident that the matchup was pretty good for

PHOTO PROVIDED BY ALISON MERCADO

Dalton Albertin and Alexandre Brym shake hands after the match Sunday against Xavier. Albertin took both his doubles and his singles match with the team winning the match 4-3.

me, throughout the match I felt pretty good out there,” Albertin said. He looked comfortable in the first set as he took it 6-3 before quickly falling behind 4-1 in the second. Instead of throwing the set away and focusing on winning the third, Albertin hung tough and broke his opponents serve twice to even the score at four games apiece. He then went on to break again before

serving the match out. “I kind of weathered the storm, he was a little bit of a hot-cold player too; so him getting up 4-1 that quick was just him playing really well,” Albertin said. Sophomores Ray Leonard (No. 1) and Patrick Elliot (No. 6) recorded the other two points to seal the deal. The victory is arguably the best the Cardinals have recorded all year.

“It was a good win, you look at Xavier and they had only lost two matches all year,” coach Bill Richards said. “To lose the doubles point and come back and win four singles matches fairly routine was a very solid effort out of our part.” The Musketeers provided a stiff test for the Cardinals as they prepare to begin MidAmerican Conference play in two weeks.

WEEKEND PITCHING STATS FRIDAY AFTERNOON

Nestor Bautista, Win, 3.2 IP, 0 ER, 2 H, 2 K FRIDAY EVENING

Chris Marangon, Win, 6.1 IP, 1 ER, 8 H, 9 K SATURDAY

Jon Cisna, Win, 5 IP, 2 ER, 6 H, 5 K SUNDAY

Scott Baker, Win, 7 IP, 0 ER, 3 H, 8 K collective unit. “We’ve got a lot of kids who are very competitive and want to win badly for Ball State,” Maloney said. “They’re just finding ways and learning how to win, and they like it.” With just one game remaining before heading into conference play, Maloney said he hopes the confidence built up this weekend continues against Butler on Wednesday, then Akron this weekend. With the entire starting lineup contributing to the wins, it’s hard for opposing teams to find a player to focus on stopping to halt the Cardinals offense. They can’t just focus on one player, they have to focus on the entire team.

AKRON EXPOSES BSU’S WEAKNESS IN SEMIFINAL GAME Transition offense gave Cardinals fits in 70-61 in defeat

|

MATT McKINNEY ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR @Matt_D_McKinney

It was a pick-your-poison type of women’s basketball game. When Akron and Ball State met in the regular season, Akron won by utilizing forwards Rachel Tecca and Sina King close to the basket. In Friday’s Mid-American Conference semifinal, Akron prevailed 70-61, not because of Tecca, but because of guard Hanna Luburgh. It didn’t take a crack scouting department to discover Ball State’s major weakness — depth. Akron, and Luburgh in particular, exploited that weakness by running down the court in transition as often as possible. Luburgh said transition offense is something her team practices in the preseason. “That’s what we do,” she said. “We run. That’s how we score. We score a lot of points a game, and we score quickly.” “That’s what we preach to our kids,” Akron coach Jodi Kest said. “Keep pushing, keep pushing. Even if we miss shots. They’re not used to that pace. At some point, they’re going to get tired. It happened today.” In the first game between Ball State and Akron, Tecca scored 22 points. Ball State concentrated on her and held the MAC Player-of-the-Year to just six points, her lowest total all season. Sophomore Brittany Carter had one of her worst shooting performances of the season when Ball State played Akron in mid-February. She went 1-of-12 from the field and 0-4 from 3-point range. From the get-go, it was clear she was looking to make up for that on Friday. Less than two

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Katie Murphy attempts a layup to score for Ball State during the first half of the Mid-Amercican Conference semifinals Friday. Ball State briefly tied Akron toward the end of the game, but ultimately lost 70-61.

minutes into Friday’s game, Carter exceeded her previous scoring total against Akron with a 3-pointer. She finished the game with a team- and season-high 18 points. She made four 3-pointers throughout the game. When senior Shanee’ Jackson tied the game with a pair of free throws, it was a reset of the game’s previous 37 minutes. Luburgh, whose team was 0-8 from 3-point range in the second half, then pulled up for a 3-pointer in transition. She drained it, giving her a new career-high 33 points. “That’s her game, the 1-2 pullup,” Ball State junior guard Brandy Woody said. The only player from the team that is graduating is Jackson, and the team looks to add six new recruits, one transfer midway through the year and possibly return up to three players back from injuries that ended their seasons short. Although Ball State’s season ended in Cleveland without a MAC Tournament title, the team hopes the added depth will help them.

TAYLOR: Cards best season under coach was 2010-11 | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Ball State’s best season under Taylor came in 2010-11 when the team finished the regular season 18-12 and 10-6 in the MAC. In the conference tournament, Ball State defeated Ohio 76-73 in overtime but fell in the semifinals to Kent State the following night.

This past season saw the team start slow, going 8-13 after a 6942 home loss to Ohio. After the loss, however, Ball State would win seven of the last eight games to clinch the No. 5 seed in the conference tournament. Ball State suffered a 76-61 loss on the quarterfinals to Buffalo on March 13, ending its season.


MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

SPORTS

REWARDS: Football saw 63 percent rise in student attendance from 2011 to 2012 | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The idea of a student rewards program, which ultimately became the centerpiece of Ball State athletics wanting to get more students at games, wasn’t initially received well by the athletics department, McBride said. Eventually, the athletics department decided to form a program, hoping students would follow to games.

PROBLEM AND SOLUTION

The day before the football team’s home opener against Eastern Michigan on Aug. 30, 2012, Ball State announced the start of The Charlie’s Crew Student Rewards Program. Any Ball State student could use their student ID to swipe into home football, women’s volleyball, men’s basketball and women’s basketball games to earn points. The points were determined by the sport, and the more points earned meant more prizes for students. The most appealing prize to

students came for attending all five home football games in the 2012 season: a chance to kick a field goal to win free tuition. The free tuition idea wasn’t original to Ball State — Director of Marketing Promotions Molly Myers said it came from former Ball State football coach Stan Parrish after a game at Western Michigan. Just like attending any Ball State sporting event, the program was free for students. Putting the program in place took research, fitting it into the department’s budget and finding sponsors to provide prizes. The athletic department allocated $30,000 for the program, $23,765.52 was spent on the program, which included purchasing the prizes, card scanners and advertisements. “[The student rewards program] was one that we think we could realistically achieve and set in place,� Myers said. “We thought it would have good appeal from the sponsor end and that they would be

able to provide us with the different prize levels.� Myers, like McBride, arrived at Ball State in 2008 and witnessed the football team’s run to the Mid-American Conference title game. Scheumann Stadium saw a packed student section every home game during the team’s unbeaten regular season, but Myers knew it probably wouldn’t last or carry over to the other sports. She was right. In the 2009 home opener against North Texas, 16,035 fans showed up at Scheumann Stadium to watch Ball State lose 20-10. The Cardinals would go on to lose the next six games, losing fans along the way. The seventh loss of the season, a 31-17 home loss to Bowling Green, only 10,192 fans were in attendance. The students came out in less numbers as the season went on and carried over into the 2010 season. Myers knew student attendance was becoming a problem for Ball State and the athletic department needed to

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

find a solution. “I guess probably then just moving into the other seasons that year and getting a better feel for the appeal or draw that the athletics has to the student body here,� Myers said. “It wasn’t necessarily a No. 1 priority.� McBride and Myers looked at other schools similar in size to Ball State. McBride referenced similar programs that are done at Middle Tennessee State and East Carolina. Myers stayed in the MAC and looked at Ball State’s closest neighbor, Miami of Ohio.

FOOTBALL

Former linebacker Travis Freeman, who played at Ball State from 2009-12, had seen the decrease in student turnout at football games. Freeman said he remembers being disappointed at times at student turnout. One game he remembers being upset was Senior Night his freshman season against Central Michigan. With a Wednesday night game

in the pouring rain made the student section at Scheumann Stadium virtually empty, despite playing the Dan LeFevourled Chippewas. “Just for it to be a Senior Night and those seniors who had put everything they had into the program for four years, for them not to witness the fan support they worked so hard to get was a disappointment,� Freeman said. With the creation of the student rewards program, Freeman said it helped bring more students on a consistent basis to the stadium. “The student population was up and down depending on other factors besides what the football team was actually doing,� Freeman said. “I think the student rewards program did bring some consistency to that.� From the 2011 season to the 2012 season, student attendance rose 63 percent. The highest student turnout came in the season opener against Eastern Michigan when 5,154 were counted. Of those that showed

up, 2,087 swiped in for the rewards program. The lowest number of students at a football game in 2012 was against Northern Illinois on Oct. 6 when 1,888 attended. Just 658 students swiped in at the game. Senior Night against Ohio on Nov. 14 consisted of more perks for students. The athletic department rented a video board, the football team wore black uniforms for the first time and one student had the opportunity to kick a field goal for free tuition. The student missed the field goal, but Ball State blew out Ohio 52-27 in front of 2,680 students. Student attendance did rise, but the football team also had its best record since the 2008 season at 9-3. “The fans want to see you win football games and if you’re winning football games, they’re going to continue to support you,� Freeman said.

For full story, go to bsudaily.com

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Happy times at home start the year off right. A May 25 career spotlight could lead to a raise around November. Creativity percolates by summer, and travel calls after that. Immerse yourself in learning about something you love with others who share your passion.

 

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Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8 -- Get outside your normal view of things to see new opportunities. Toss the ball to a teammate and share the love. Stash away the surplus. Expand your circle. Travel beckons; take care.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 9 -- You’re a superhero right now. And you’re basking in abundance. It’s not about having more toys, but about what you’ll do with your powers.You have plenty to protect. Share your love.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)Today is an 8 -Improve your position. Big games offer big prizes. There’s an interesting development, but more study is required. You can succeed on whatever you set your heart to. Believe in yourself.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 9 -- You’re gaining confidence. Let go of old baggage so you can move more freely.You’re very popular now. Be respectful.You have access to whatever you need. Consider how best to serve.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 9 -- Your wishes are easier to achieve for the next few weeks. Keep your objective in mind. Go full speed ahead, avoiding distractions. Don’t overspend on toys. Communication flows, equipment works as planned. Finish early and go play.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 7 -- It’s a very lucky moment for scoring great household items. Luxury is a viable option.You have more than expected, and there’s this lucky break. But study’s still required. Get antiques appraised later.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 -- You’re very persuasive now, and communications flow with ease. Joy inspires you. Use your own good judgment, with confidence. Don’t make promises you won’t keep.You have more resources than you knew.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is an 8 -- You discover wisdom and compassion.You have more than you let on, anyway.Your new status leads to new friends. Another has lots of needs for you to fill. Set long-range goals. A theological insight reveals clarity.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is an 8 -- There’s a lot on your list, so you’d better get help.You’re luckier than you think.You can’t produce on optimism alone, but it sure helps. Find what you need nearby. Don’t skip over any details.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 9 -- You have what you need to do the job. There could be a temporary sense of overload. Complete negotiations. You’re surrounded by love.You have more friends than you thought. Great abundance is available now.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8 -There are so many places you’d like to visit and study. Tap into another source of funds, and you’ll get farther than expected. Discover wonderful things. Insight comes from contemplation. You’re gaining status.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8 -- You have more than enough in the realms of both money and love. Soak it up and be grateful. Together, you’ll score double. Change your mind, if you need to. There’s more work coming in.

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PAGE 6 | MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FEATURES

Check out the play “Language of Angels,” where a missing girl’s ghost haunts nine friends. The question is, which one killed her?

TUESDAY Your schedule. Your friends. Your life. The dorm room may not be the only thing in need of spring cleaning.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

WEDNESDAY National Proposal Day has college sweethearts dropping on one knee. Is it too soon for a ring?

St. Paddy’s Day in review The Cetlic holiday retained the tradition of ‘drinking to good health’ in Muncie bars LINDSEY GELWICKS FEATURES EDITOR | features@bsudailynews.com A group of 13 men and one woman at Savage’s celebrated the St. Patricks’ Day with a bit of friendly competition: Guinness chugging, complete with a several rounds in a bracket format drawn out on a poster attached to the wall. “You know the rules,” Joel Savage, the bar’s owner and fellow competitor, said. “Drink on ‘3, 2, 1, Go.’ You spill it, you’re disqualified. You puke, you get ejected from the bar.” The prize? Pride and a cheap recreation of a wrestling belt that the competition’s creator, Kory Pratt, picked up. After round one, it seemed clear who had a shot at winning. Nick Teaford, 26, had downed his 16-ounce glass before the others in his heat had even gotten halfway. “Dude, that was fast,” said one of his fellow competitors in disbelief. “I came to play, man,” Teaford replied. After several more rounds and a smoke break, the competition came down to the final round between Teaford and Miles Shiveley, 39, a Savage’s regular. By that time, many in the bar were standing on chairs and craning their necks to watch. It took two tries to determine a winner. The first attempt resulted in an unexplainable tie: Teaford finished his beer first, yet Shiveley managed to get his glass down first.

| ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE

“Do over!” someone shouted from the bar, after several attempts at determining a winner through videos. This time Teaford choked halfway, beer dripping down his beard, as Shiveley finished as the clear winner. Although St. Patrick’s Day didn’t officially begin until Sunday, many began the celebration earlier. Groups of students, decked out in all shades of green from the shamrock antenna headbands atop their heads to the green socks on their feet, began streaming to house parties and bars early Saturday afternoon. Alcoholic choices for the weekend stayed true to the Irish theme from pints of Guinness to homemade “shamrock juice,” a mix of Mountain Dew, Hawaiian punch and vodka. Approximately 34.5 million people across the U.S. claim an Irish ancestry, according to CNN. But that doesn’t stop any and all from celebrating the boozy holiday. “Everyone’s Irish on St. Patrick’s Day,” said Kate McDonald, a junior fashion merchandising major who celebrated the holiday with friends at the Locker Room on Sunday morning. The tradition of drinking on St. Patrick’s Day stems from old Irish hospitality, according to Fred Suppe, an associate history professor who has a background in Celtic history. When people would host guests, especially during celebrations, they would provide food and drinks that included beer and mead. When Irish immigrants moved to America, they brought St. Patrick’s Day with them, which had become a symbol of their culture. Cities such as New York, Chicago and Boston began hosting parades in honor of the holiday.

DN PHOTO RJ RICKER

Kate McDonald and Kristin Michels chug Irish car bombs at The Locker Room on Sunday morning. To kick start St. Patrick’s Day, the girls shared a round of screw drivers, Irish car bombs and pitchers of green beer.

“Starting maybe a century ago or more, on St. Patrick’s Day people would participate in parades and then go to a pub to celebrate hospitality and drink to good health,” Suppe said. Since then, the tradition of drinking on St. Patrick’s Day has expanded to more than just the Irish. McDonald, Abbey Kollmeyer and Kristin Michels celebrated Saturday night in a crowded Village. They decided to continue the festivities Sunday morning at the Locker Room with pitchers of green beer and the

bar’s Paddy’s Day breakfast of eggs, bacon and toast. “You have to take an Irish car bomb,” McDonald said to Michels, who was visiting from Purdue. They ordered two of the drinks, dropped the shot of Bailey’s into the pint of Guinness and chugged. “We’re so Irish today,” McDonald said, continuing to laugh. “We’re on a roll. Whiskey jello shots, green beer and Irish car bombs, and it’s not even 11:45 [a.m.]”

DN PHOTOS COREY OHLENKAMP

ABOVE: Members of the Muncie Southside High School Band lead the St. Patrick’s Day parade playing tunes to rally the crowd. Community members came out despite dreary weather to watch the parade of fellow community members and organizations. LEFT: Shelly Upchurch holds onto Garby as they walk with the parade. Garby the dog has become a local sensation after Upchurch’s husband Mike rescued the dog. The puppy had been thrown away into a Muncie trash Toter.

FROM GLASS SLIPPER TO BALLET FLATS The Russian National Ballet to perform ‘Cinderella’ for the first time at Emens

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CONSTANCE HARCOURT STAFF REPORTER cmharcourt@bsu.edu

Cinderella never pointed her toes, sickled or pirouetted in the original Disney film, but for the Russian National Ballet, Cinderella is trading in her glass slipper and ball gown for pointe shoes and a leotard. Although this is not the Russian National Ballet’s first performance at Ball State, it is the first for this glass slipperwearing princess to premiere at John R. Emens Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for “Cinderella” are on sale for $5 in advance and $10 at the door for students. The ballet performance will center on the story of Cinderella’s evil stepmother forbidding her of attending the Royal Ball. Characters such as the fairy godmother and mice duo Gus and Jaq will be recognizable from the 1950s Disney film, but the ballet will present a more archaic look at the original story. “I think it is much more of a representation of the fairy tale [than the Disney movie],” Sarah Mangelsdorf, assistant professor of dance, said. “But I’m sure the story line will be very recognizable for everyone.” Theater and technology design major Jackie Londino expects to see a side of the story that is unlike the cheery cartoon version that strayed from the Brothers’ Grimm. “Disney’s version starts with a sad beginning and ends hap-

pily ever after,” Londino said. “I think this ballet performance will be different.” First known as the Soviet National Ballet, the Russian National Ballet was founded in Moscow in the late 1980’s according to the company’s biography on Columbia Artists Management, a site that globally promotes the profes-

sional arts. The dance company included graduates from different Russian choreographic schools of Moscow, St. Petersburg and Perm. Sophomore Communications major Jonnai Smith said she is attending “Cinderella” because it reminds her of her childhood when she dreamt of being a ballerina with pretty make-up and dancing on her toes. “I’m expecting it to be the same story that I remember growing up,” she said. “Adding

BALLET WHAT

“Cinderella” WHEN

7:30 p.m. WHERE

John R. Emens Auditorium COST

$5 for students, $10 at door $23 for other, $28 at door ballet to the storyline will make it even better.”

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DN 03-18-13