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HOWARD JONES MEMORY AND REFRACTION


HOWARD JONES: MEMORY AND REFRACTION September 4 - 27, 2008 Bruno David Gallery 3721 Washington Boulevard Saint Louis, 63108 Missouri, U.S.A. info@brunodavidgallery.com www.brunodavidgallery.com Director: Bruno L. David This catalogue was published in conjunction with the exhibition Howard Jones: Memory and Refraction Editor: Bruno L. David Catalog Designer: Yoko Kiyoi Designer Assistant: Sage A. David and Claudia R. David Printed in USA All works courtesy of Bruno David Gallery and the Estate of Howard Jones Artwork photos by Bruno David Gallery staff Cover Image: Howard Jones Solo (detail), 1965 Wood, paint, light bulbs, 68-1/2 x 31-1/2 x 3-1/2 inches (173.99 x 80.01 x 8.89 cm) Copyright Š 2008 Bruno David Gallery and Howard Jones All Right Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written permission of Bruno David Gallery, Inc.


Contents

Essay by Robert Duffy Afterword by Brandyn Jones Afterword by Bruno L. David Checklist of the Exhibition Biography

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HOWARD JONES: MEMORY AND REFRACTION Essay by Robert Duffy 2


The three white Washington University buildings at the corner of Forsyth and Skinker on Washington University’s campus exerted a special magnetism for all of us on campus infected with a fascination for the visual arts in the turbulence of the magnificent 1960s. Gaining access to these buildings and this atmosphere didn’t require actually making things or designing things. What mattered was being interested in art and architecture and their histories, and being fascinated by the changes that were braiding together heightened sensitivities toward new art and politics and human behavior. The real estate is now sewn up as the Sam Fox School of the Visual Arts and Design. But back then – in what seems like a twinkling but now almost a half a century past – the various schools housed in those buildings offered extraordinary excitement. This is not to say that such energy has diminished over the years. Far from it. As a teacher, I go back there every semester to have my batteries recharged and to be schooled by those I am supposed to be teaching. But for those of us who were studying at Washington University back then the institutions, and the men and women who worked there, offered the opportunity to shape ideas, to refocus, to grow and to work for changes in worlds of one sort or another. All sorts of artists, architects, intellectuals, hippies, poseurs, conservatives, liberals and radicals hung around, along with people who were bewildered or bemused, people who were searching desperately or smugly believed they had found all the answers. In general, however, those who were there were dedicated to looking, learning and producing The was certain aura of aesthetic gravitas, perhaps because in the previous two decades Washington University moved into the international arena by having had Philip Guston and Max Beckmann on the faculty; by having had H.W. Janson not only teaching in the department of art and archaeology and publishing his monumental textbook but also collecting with astonishing perspicacity for the Gallery of Art; and by having had Joe Passonneau in the school of architecture as its dean. Taken all together, that assembly of thinkers, creators and philosophers congregated something of a work of art itself – fractious, brilliant in many cases, extraordinarily curious and productive. Some were rigorous traditionalists and defenders of pre-modernist doctrines. Others were authentically radical in their promotion of modernism’s inclinations toward experimentation and rulebreaking.

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One influential representative of the latter was Howard Jones, whose work is the subject of this luminous exhibition at the Bruno David Gallery in St. Louis. Jones was the sort of fellow who broke rules all the time. He was a member of a respected academy but decreed that art was not something that could be taught, and who, it is said, turned his back toward his colleagues at faculty meetings. He was gregarious and friendly but on the other hand did not suffer fools at all. For these reasons, he attracted detractors and disciples, and his disciples, I thought, were the smartest kids in the room in those days. Without falling into the trap of the cliché, Jones was a model 1960s personage but did not look the part of the artist necessarily. He was a big, vigorous man, fine featured, tough, and although his interests were all over the place he channeled them into discreet directions. His intelligence was sunk deep into the history of his chosen vocation, and that, perhaps, is a reason why he was able to break the rules so successfully. He also did a good job of living the vie bohème, without being at all prissy about it. He and his wife, the late artist Helen Jones, whom everyone called Wiz, and his daughter, Brandyn, who has contributed so much to this show, lived upstairs in a building that was originally a mounted police station on Newstead Avenue between Laclede and West Pine. Legend had it that the ransom money from the Greenlease kidnapping made it into the building and never made it out. And on top of that, so the story goes, the building was – is I guess – haunted. Jones found it much to his liking, one guesses, because its generous spaces were so accommodating of living and working at the same time. Another part of the legend was the parties, which were fantastic. Howard William Jones was born in Ilion, New York in 1922, and came into his own as an artist in the 1950s. His work in the ‘50s displayed the sort of ecstatic freedom characteristic of abstract expressionism, both in its non-representational characteristics and its vigor. By the time I knew him, however, he had made a turn toward technology. But as his colleague and friend, the art historian Udo Kultermann noted, “Technology was never a goal for Howard Jones – it was a vehicle he used to express changing perceptions of reality in a continuously poetic and artistic manner.” Sound was an important part of this exploratory process. As was light.

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Light is, of course, fundamental to all creation. Always, forever, it has captivated and energized us. All of art is dependent upon it, as are all biological functions. Jones was drawn to it like a great genius of a moth, and his fascination revealed itself in various ways here at the gallery. This show, mounted in his memory, provides a sense of the durability of Jones’s work with light by connecting it to more recent work being shown in installations and exhibitions in the Grand Center performing arts district now. Across the street from the gallery, at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, is a mesmerizing, tour de force tribute to the work of the late Dan Flavin. And all around the Pulitzer building and the Bruno David Gallery are installations that form “The Light Project.” This includes work by the Danish artist Ann Lislegaard; by Sebastian Hungerer and Rainer Kehres, from Karlsruhe, Germany; and by Spencer Finch and by Jason Peters, both from New York City. “Memory and Refraction” at Bruno David represents only a flash of Jones’s total body of work and his work with light in particular. A fine retrospective was at the Washington University Gallery of Art in 1993, and, fittingly, the show was a collaboration of artists, curators, art historians and engineers. As a testament to Jones’s vitality and energy, it took something of a village to put together what he assembled largely on his own in that magical, haunted series of spaces on Newstead Avenue. In the years immediately before his death in 1991, he and Wiz Jones lived and worked together at a beautiful place in Missouri’s Arcadia Valley south of St. Louis. There, his attention was tuned to the natural landscape, and he portrayed it and its denizens with a focus as sharp, crisp and inventive as that used for these electrified manifestations of his talent. But for me – perhaps because I first saw these works in the 1960s when the lights were coming on for me in regard to the art of our time – the light paintings continue to affect me most directly, and hang in my memory and my imagination. When their switches are thrown and they go dark, their ghosts remind me most indelibly of Howard Jones and his sorcery and the pleasure they have provided me all these years. Robert W. Duffy Robert W. Duffy is the associate editor of the St. Louis Beacon and former cultural news editor of the St. Louis Post Dispatch. This essay is one in a series of the gallery’s exhibitions written by fellow gallery artists and friends.

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Afterword by Brandyn Jones 6


Howard Jones was my father. Growing up with him, as well as with my equally interesting artist mother, Wiz Jones, was a wild ride – never static, never dull. Our home (an old mounted police station) was filled with strange sounds, blinking lights, artworks in process, neon, new music, curious objects, books, esoteric food, and always the most interesting mix of people. Howard’s mind constantly sought discovery: New sounds, new methods, new philosophies, new music, new poetry, new people, new ways to consider things. His and my mother’s natural tendency toward new considerations led our family to all sorts of interesting places, explorations, adventures, as well as discussions, interactions and involvements. My dad was brilliant. He taught himself to do whatever was necessary to execute his art or to make things function. With no background in electronics, he did the circuitry in his electronic work. Figured it out. Made it work. Made it beautiful. He could conceive and build absolutely anything, constantly coming up with interesting and beautifully crafted solutions to logistical problems in his work, in my mother’s work, and around the house. He could survive and thrive in the wilderness. We spent every summer camping throughout the U.S. and Canada. He and my mother made three months in a tent in very remote settings comfortable, fun, educational, mind-expanding, and endlessly adventure-filled. His brain was never at rest, and he expected a similar level of mental activity from everyone around him - and I do mean everyone. Whenever he had to drive the carpool, he insisted on mortifying 13 year old me and irritating the other kids by playing Philip Glass, The Kronos Quartet or Laurie Anderson in the car. He truly felt that any time people were not exposing themselves to the unfamiliar was wasted time. I have run into some of those kids in adulthood, and I have to hand it to my dad – they never ever forgot about the experience of carpool with Howard. He often told me it caused him physical pain to see me watching television. I tried valiantly throughout my childhood to convince him of the value of resting the mind occasionally – a little Love Boat or Speed Racer every now and again never killed anybody, right? I further asserted that exposure to popular culture was critical to a more complete comprehension of our world. Though I feel my logic was solid, I always lost the debate. He was resolute in his insistence that anyone in his environment not waste time on vacant pursuits - and as an adult I have to finally admit I appreciate having had parents with that perspective. I knew it then, but now I am finally willing to admit it. This constant mental motion was exhausting at times for his friends and family, but it was also what made him so magnetic, and such a sought after Professor of Art. Time spent with my dad was active, dynamic, sometimes provoking and exasperating, but always worth it. To put it simply, Howard was unlike anyone else. For an art student, interested in non-traditional media and expansion of thought about art, my dad was a real find. For his daughter, he was a larger-than-life presence who made every day a day of discovery.

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Afterword by Bruno L. David 8


Bruno David Gallery is pleased to exhibit several sculptures by Howard Jones. This exhibition and others to follow will show how innovative and in the forefront Jones was with his work. Howard Jones was an intensely brilliant artist and even in the rambunctious 1950s, ‘60s and ‘70s was a maverick and an innovator. He was part of the Art and Technology Movement along with Nam June Paik, Le Parc, Takis, Uecker and others. He worked through various artistic phases, including abstract expressionism, op and pop, but settled finally on creating work that harnessed technology for genuinely authentic artistic ambitions. Jones’s use of light and sound, separately and simultaneously, was far in advance of his time. Many works survive and they are endowed with a special aura of prophesy. The exhibition at the Bruno David Gallery brings a group of Jones’s paintings and constructions that employ lights as media and metaphor. As art historian, Udo Kulterman said of his work, “Technology was never a goal for Howard Jones – it was a vehicle he used to express changing perceptions of reality in a continuously poetic and artistic manner.” The work in the show is from the estate of the artist and on loan from private collections. “Memory and Refraction” runs concurrently with the concluding weeks of “Dan Flavin: Constructed Light” at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, which is located directly across the street from the Bruno David Gallery. Howard Jones was born in Ilion, New York in 1922 and attended Syracuse University and Columbia University. He served in the U.S. Army Corps as a fighter pilot during World War II. His work was represented in the 1960s and ‘70s by the famous Howard Wise Gallery in New York, and is included in major public and private collections. The Bruno David Gallery represents the Estate of Howard Jones.

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Checklist of the exhibition and Images

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Recalling Edward Hopper, 1985-6 Wood, light bulb, recording, fan, curtain, curtain rod, 58-1/2 x 38-3/4 x 11-5/8 inches (148.59 x 98.42 x 29.53cm) Private collection

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Skylight Twelve, 1970 Brushed aluminum, programmed light bulbs, 60 x 60 x 4-1/2 inches (152.4 x 152.4 x 11.43 cm) Private collection

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Solo, 1965 Wood, paint, light bulbs, 68-1/2 x 31-1/2 x 3-1/2 inches (173.99 x 80.01 x 8.89 cm) Private collection

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Solo (detail), 1965 Wood, paint, light bulbs, 68-1/2 x 31-1/2 x 3-1/2 inches (173.99 x 80.01 x 8.89 cm) Private collection

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Untitled, 1969 Wood, metal, paint, light bulbs, 10-1/2 x 8 x 2 inches (26.67 x 20.32 x 5.08 cm) Private collection

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Sixth Time, 1970 Brushed aluminum, programmed light bulbs, 11 x 11 x 4 inches (27.94 x 27.94 x 10.16 cm) Private collection

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E.V.A. #1, 1965 Wood, mirror, programmed light bulbs, 11-5/8 x 11-5/8 x 14 inches (34 x 11-5/8 x 14 inches, with antenna) (29.53 x 29.53 x 35.56 cm) Private Collection

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E.V.A. #1, 1965 Wood, mirror, programmed light bulbs, 11-5/8 x 11-5/8 x 14 inches (34 x 11-5/8 x 14 inches, with antenna) (29.53 x 29.53 x 35.56 cm) Private Collection

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Untitled, 1966 Lacquered wood, programmed light bulbs, 48 x 48 x 3 inches (121.92 x 121.92 x 7.62cm) Private collection

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Untitled, 1966 Lacquered wood, programmed light bulbs, 48 x 48 x 3 inches (121.92 cm x 121.92 cm x 7.62 cm) Private collection

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Memory and Refraction (Installation view, 2008)

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Memory and Refraction (Installation view, 2008)

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Memory and Refraction (Installation view, 2008)

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Memory and Refraction (Installation view, 2008)

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HOWARD JONES EDUCATION 1953

B.F.A., Magna cum laude, Syracuse University, NY Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, MI

SOLO EXHIBITION 1949 1952 1959 1960 1960 1961 1963 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1976 1986 2008

Mitchell Gallery, Woodstock, NY Tulane University, New Orleans, LA Martin Schweig Gallery, St. Louis, MO America House Gallery, New York City, NY Fairmont Hotel Gallery, St. Louis, MO St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO H. Balaban Carp, St. Louis, MO Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, “Howard Jones: Light Works,” Kansas City, MO Royal Marks Gallery, New York City, NY Howard Wise Gallery, New York City, NY Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Howard Wise Gallery, “Howard Jones: Three Sounds,” New York City, NY Electric Gallery, Toronto, Canada St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, MO Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO Wadsworth Atheneum, “The Shape of Sound: Howard Jones,” Hartford, CT Forbes Foundation Museum, New York City, New York Brentwood Gallery, St. Louis, MO Bruno David Gallery, “Memory and Refraction,” St. Louis, MO

GROUP EXHIBITION 1953 1954

Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., “Contemporary American Oil Painting” Boston Museum of Fine Arts, MA, “20th Annual Traveling Art Exhibit” Louisiana State Museum, Baton Rouge, LA, “Louisiana Artists with National Recognition” Delgado Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA, “52nd Annual Exhibition” Creative Gallery, New York, NY Korman Gallery, New York, NY Akron Art Institute, OH, “Young Designers” Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, TX, “Young Collections”

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1954 1955 1956 1958 1959 1960 1961 1963 1965 1966 1967

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Norfolk Museum of Art, VA, “The New South” University of Florida, Miami, FL, “Fifteen Young Southeastern Painters” Brooklyn Museum, NY, “Designer-Craftsman” Delgado Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA, “53rd Annual Exhibition” Chicago Art Institute, IL, “Designer-Craftsman” San Francisco Museum of Art, CA, “Designer-Craftsman” Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, “Three-Man Show” Forum Gallery, New York, NY, “Group Show” America House Gallery, New York, NY, “Batik Wall Hangings” Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, “Faculty Show” Forum Gallery, New York, NY, “Group Show” Cooper Union Museum, New York, NY, “Design” New Canaan Art Gallery, CT, “New Techniques” Steinberg Gallery, St. Louis, MO, “Faculty Show” University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, “American Craftsman” St. Louis Art Museum, MO, “17th Midwestern Show” St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, MO, “Collector’s Choice IV” St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, MO, “Treasures from St. Louis Collections” Steinberg Gallery, St. Louis, MO, “Faculty Show” Steinberg Gallery, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, “Faculty Show” Byron Gallery, New York, NY, “The Box Show” Royal Marks Gallery, New York, NY, “Sculpture Show” Royal Marks Gallery, New York, NY, “Sculptor’s Toys” Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO, “Sound, Light, Silence” Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT, “Highlights 65/66” Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA, “Art Turned On” Royal Marks Gallery, New York, NY, “Directions 66/67” Ohio State University, Columbus, OH “Phase III” St. Louis Art Museum, MO, “Drawings from the Collection” Albright Knox Museum, Buffalo, NY, “Drawings” Steinberg Gallery, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, “Faculty Show” Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, “Light, Motion, Space” Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, GA “Visual Assaults” University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, “Contemporary American Painting and Sculpture” Flint Institute of Art, Flint, MI, “Light and Movement” Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, “Decade 7: Contemporary Art” Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA, “Light and Motion” Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT, “Art of 1964, 65, 66” Howard Wise Gallery, New York, NY, “Lights in Orbit” Yale University Art Gallery, “Helen and Robert Benjamin Collection” Herron Museum of Art, Indianapolis, IN, “Painting and Sculpture Today” Kent State University, Kent, OH, “First Kent Invitational”


1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973

Royal Marks Gallery, New York, NY, “Group Show” Waddell Gallery, New York, NY, “Artists for SEDF” Royal Marks Gallery, New York, NY, “Sculptor’s Toys” Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO, “Magic Theater” St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, MO, “Magic Theater” Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL, “Options ‘68” Milwaukee Art Center, Milwaukee, WI, “Options ‘68” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY, “Light, Object and Image” Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL, “Light, Motion, Space” University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, “Light, Object and Image” Howard Wise Gallery, New York, NY, “Fun on 57th Street” Howard Wise Gallery, New York, NY, “Festival of Lights” Albright Knox Museum, Buffalo, NY, “Group Exhibition” La Jolla Museum of Art, La Jolla, CA, “Affect/Effect” Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT, “A Review of the Contemporary Art Scene, 64-68” Princeton University, NJ, “Art of the 60’s” Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA., “Moon Show” Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New York, NY, “Sound” Museum of Fine Arts, Montreal, Canada, “Magic Theater” Toledo Museum of Fine Arts, OH, “Magic Theater” Finch College Museum of Art, New York, NY, “Contemporary Posters” Jewish Museum of Art, New York, NY, “Superlimited: Books, Boxes and Things” Cleveland Museum of Art, OH, “Cleveland Collects” Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, NY, “Light, Object and Image” Arts Council of Great Britain, Hayward Gallery, London, “Kinetic Art” Automation House, New York, NY, “Magic Theater” Princeton University, NJ, “Art of the 60’s” Finch College Museum of Art, New York, NY, “Towers” Howard Wise Gallery, New York, NY, “Propositions for Unrealized Projects” Art Council of Great Britain, London, “Multiples” Rockefeller University, New York, NY, “Kinetic Art” Howard Wise Gallery, New York, NY, “Brain Waves” Steinberg Gallery, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, “Faculty Show” Newark Museum of Fine Arts, NJ, “Moon Show” Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA, “Multiples” Electric Gallery, Toronto, Canada, “Works in Sound and Light” Steinberg Gallery, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, “Faculty Show” New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, NJ, “Responsive Environment” Steinberg Gallery, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, “Faculty Show” St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, MO, “Mid-America Invitational: Howard Jones and Arthur Osver”

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1973 1974 1975 1977 1978 1980 1981 1982 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992

Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO, “Mid-America Invitational: Howard Jones and Arthur Osver” Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT “Tenth Anniversary Exhibition, 1964-1974” James Yu Gallery, New York, NY, “Kinaesthetics” Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, TN “Recent Media: Ten Years” Forbes Foundation, New York, NY Huntsville Museum of Art, Von Braun Civic Center, AL, “Art of the Space Era” Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, “Energy into Art: Technological Art in America 1969-1978” “Missouri Artists: Works on Paper,” two year traveling exhibition in MO, KS, NE, and AR, 1980 - 1982 Independent Curators, Inc. and University of Colorado Art Galleries, “Mapped Out,” two-year traveling exhibition, May 1981 – May1983 Neuberger Museum, State University of New York, “Soundings: The Visual Artist’s Use of Sound, from 1900 to the Present” Memphis State University, Memphis, TN “Up Front” First Street Forum, St. Louis, MO “Contemporary Prints and Posters” Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO “Art in Multiples” Acclimatization Experience Institute, International Conference, Gray Summit, MO “Painting/Collage with Sound” Rimini Cultural Center, Rimini, Italy; Kulturforum, Bonn, Germany; Kultureferat, Munich, Germany; “Venice Biennale,” Venice, Italy; “Oggi Musica,” Lugano, Switzerland “Perspective Sonorities: Sound/Environment/Music,” two year traveling exhibition Brentwood Gallery in conjunction with the UN Association, St. Louis, MO “40 Years of Artful Flags” Brentwood Gallery; St. Louis Public Library, St. Louis, MO “Artists Make Books” Theatre Project Company, St. Louis, MO “Buy Buy Blues” benefit exhibition Brentwood Gallery, St. Louis, MO “Out of the Racks on to the Walls: 5 year retrospective” Brentwood Gallery, St. Louis, MO “5th Anniversary” Channel Nine, Old Post Office, St. Louis, MO “9 Bags 9” benefit exhibition Aids Benefit, Forum, St. Louis, MO “An Affair of the Arts” benefit exhibition Steinberg Museum, St. Louis, MO “Selections from the Contemporary Art Collection” Steinberg Museum, St, Louis, MO “Washington University Faculty Show” University Art Museum, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, “Pulse II” Jacksonville Art Museum, Jacksonville, FL, “Photons: Phonons: Electrons” Edwin A. Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, “Pulse”

BIBLIOGRAPHY 1959 1960 1961 1963 1965

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch, April 30, George McCue, “Two Exhibitions of Paintings.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 11, George McCue, “Accent on Space in One Man Show.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May ?, George McCue, “Howard Jones Art at Two Exhibits.” St. Louis Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 6, November, Elizabeth Sayad, “The Arts.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, November 17, George McCue, “Disunity as Theme and Form.” Ralph T. Coe, “Howard Jones: Light Paintings,” Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO, catalog of exhibition, Oct. 14 - Nov. 7. St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, Oct. 17, Mary King, “Howard Jones Art in Kansas City”


1965 1966 1967 1968

Kansas City Star, Oct. 17, Richard Brown, “He Paints with Electricity.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, Dec. 5, Eloise Lang, “Lumination for Evening Hours.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, Sept. 26, “Challenge and Choices” (illustration of painting). Art in America, Vol. 54 No. 4, pp. 22-3, 30-1 July-August, Larry Aldrich, “New Talent: USA: Howard Jones.” Art International, Vol. X/1, Jan. 20, Ralph Coe, “Post-Pop Possibilities: Howard Jones.” Artforum, Vol. IV No. 10, June, Robert Pincus-Witten, “New York: Group Show, Royal Marks.” Art News, Vol. 65, No. 2, April, Ted Berigan, “Reviews and Previews: Howard Jones.” Ralph Coe, “Sound, Light and Silence: Art That Performs,” catalog and essay, Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Nov. 4 - Dec. 4 Larry Aldrich, “Highlights of the 1965-66 Art Season,” The Larry Aldrich Museum, Ridgefield, CT, July 10 - Sept. 11. “Recent Acquisitions,” St. Louis City Art Museum Bulletin, Vol. I, No. 6, March - April. “Howard Jones: Light Painter,” Washington University Magazine, Vol. 36, No. 2, Winter. New York Times, Saturday, March 5, Hilton Kramer, “Art,” a review of one-man show at Royal Marks. St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, February 28, Walter Barker, Review of one-man show at Royal Marks. St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, Nov. 20, Mary King, “Art That Performs.” Art in America, Vol. 55 No.3, May-June, Nan Piene, “Light Art.” Artforum, Vol. V No.5, January, Robert Pincus-Witten, “Sound, Light and Silence in Kansas City.” “Light/Motion/Space,” Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, June 24-July 30, catalog with introduction by Willoughby Sharp. Leon Shulman, “Light and Motion,” Worcester Art Museum, MA, Nov. 9, 1967 - Jan. 2, 1968. Allen S. Weller, “Contemporary American Painting and Sculpture, 1967,” University of Illinois, Urbana, March 5 - April 9. “The Helen W. and Robert M. Benjamin Collection,” Yale University Art Gallery, May 4 - June 18, catalog “Light and Movement,” Flint Institute of Arts, Oct. 13 -Nov. 17, catalog “Decade 7: Contemporary American Art,” Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, April 16 - May 16, catalog “Painting and Sculpture Today,” Herron Museum of Art, IN, Jan. 8 - Feb. 12, catalog “First Kent Invitational,” Kent State University, OH, Feb. 12 - March 10, catalog “Lights in Orbit,” Howard Wise Gallery, New York, Feb. 4 -March 4, catalog Burnham, Jack. Beyond Modern Sculpture: The Effects of Science and Technology on the Sculpture of the Century. New York: George Brazillier. Kulterman, Udo. The New Sculpture: Environments and Assemblages, Frederick Praeger, New York. Artforum, April, Robert Pincus-Witten, “New York: Howard Jones,” review of one-man show at Howard Wise. Ralph Coe, “The Magic Theater,” Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO, May 25 - June 24, brochure. Arts, April, Review of one-man show at Howard Wise. New York Times, Saturday, March 16, John Canaday, “Art,” review of one-man show at Howard Wise. “Directions 1: OPTIONS,” Milwaukee Art Center, June 22 -Aug. 18; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL, Sept. 14 -Oct. 20. Art International, Vol. XII/7. Sept. 20, R. C. Kenedy, “The Kansas City Magic Theater.” L’Oeil, Aout-Sept., No. 164-165, Stephen Bann, “The Magic Theater.” Artforum, Vol. VII No. 3, September, Philip Leider, “Light: Object and Image,” review. Product Engineering, Vol. 39 No. 9, April 22, A. J. Parisi, “Interesting to Note.” Newsweek, June 24 “The Portals of Mystery,” a review of the Magic Theater. Artforum, Vol. VII No. 3, September, Jane Livingston, “The Magic Theater,” a review. New York Times, Monday, May 27, Grace Glueck, “Magic Unrealism in Kansas City.” New York Times, Thursday, July 25, Grace Glueck, “Artist, Citing Noise, Withdraws Whitney Exhibit.”

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1968 1969 1970 1971

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Time Magazine, June 7, “The Magic Theater,” a review. Product Engineering, December 2, Vol. 39, No. 25, “The Kinetic Movement: Technology Paces the Arts.” Machine Design, Vol. 1*0, No. 5, February 29, Stanley Klein, “Technology Invades the Arts.” New York Times, Sunday, June 9, Grace Glueck, “Art Notes.” The Financial Times, London, Wednesday, June 19, Mario Amaya, “Kansas City Letter: Magical Immersion.” The San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, Sunday, June 2, Alfred Frankenstein, “Art: Magic Theater in Kansas City.” Philadelphia Inquirer, Sunday, Aug. 11, Charlotte Lichtblau, “Art in the New York Galleries: Light-Object and Image.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, November 17, Mary King, “Fun with Lights.” Kaleidoscope, Milwaukee, Vol. I, No. 17, June 21 - July 11, Harry Titus, “At Art Center: Options.” Art in America, Vol. 57, No. 1, January - February John Russell,”Collector: Larry Aldrich,” (Illustration of “Light Column”) Weston, Neville. The Peak of Modern Art: A Concise History. New York: Harper and Row. Kulterman, Udo. The New Painting. New York: Frederick A. Praeger. (Illustration of Solo Two and Skylight 8) Art News Annual XXXV, 1969, “Light: From Aten to Laser.” New York: The MacMillan Company. Arnason, H. H. History of Modern Art: Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Harry N. Abrams, New York. “Fine Arts Festival,” Florida State University, April. “Affect/Effect,” La Jolla Museum of Art, CA, May 9 - June 8, catalog “The Magic Theater,” Toledo Museum of Art, Jan. 18 - Feb. 23, catalog “Contemporary Art: Acquisitions 1966-69,” Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Horizon, Vol. XI, No. 4, Autumn 1969, Thomas Meehan, “Fun Art,” “Kinetic Light Works,” Exhibition V, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Forbes, Dec. 1969, catalog “Superlimited: Books, Boxes and Things,” Jewish Museum, April 16 - June 29, catalog St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, May 4, Harper Barnes, “Portrait in Sound.” Syracuse Herald-American, Sunday, February 23, Eve Jackson, “Unique Art Form Sees the Light.” New York Times, Sunday, Oct. 26, Grace Glueck, “Art for Your Ear.” Time Magazine, Nov. 7, Review of Sound Show at Museum of Contemporary Crafts. The Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, November 23, Beth Fagan, “Sound Exhibition Seeks to Heighten Sensory Awareness.” New York Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 5, Dec. 14, John Gruen, “Heard Any Good Sculpture Lately?” Douglas Davis, “Art—Improbable Marriage,” Newsweek, April 20, Review of Magic Theater in New York City. Kulterman, Udo. Leben und Kunst, Ernst Wasmuth, Tubingen, Germany. (Illustration of “Sonic Games Chamber”) Ralph Coe, “The Magic Theater,” Circle Press, Kansas City, 1970. “Kinetics,” Hayward Gallery, London, Sept. 25 - Nov. 22, catalog New York Times, Saturday, Dec. 5, John Canaday, “Review of New York Show.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, Dec. 20, Hubert Crehan, “Sound Defines Space in Jones Show.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Sunday, Dec. 6, “Jones Exhibits Sonic Works.” Ralph Coe, “Breaking Through the Sound Barrier,” Art News, Vol. 70 No. 4, Summer. (Illustrated) Lambert, Robert. The Tunnel and the Light. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin. (Illustration of “Solo Two”) St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Monday, Aug. 2, Mary King, “Tuning in on Sound Sculpture” John Tancock, “Multiples—The First Decade,” Philadelphia Museum of Art, March 5 - April 4. “Artist in America,” Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts, Program for National Film Series. Toronto Daily Star, Saturday, May 1, Peter Wilson, “A Really Moving Sculpture Show.”


1972 1973 1973 1974 1976 1977 1978 1980 1981 1982 1993

“Responsive Environment,” New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, Sept. 30 - Nov. 26, catalog St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Sunday, Jun. 11, Shirley Althoff, “Art in a New Dimension.” New York Times, Sep. or Oct. (exact date unknown), Piri Halasz, “Art Show in Trenton . . . .” Washington University Student Life, Friday, Mar. 17, Kevin Allen, “Howard Jones: Artist in a Time-Space Dimension.” “Mid-America Invitational: Howard Jones,” St. Louis Art Museum, Jun. 10 – Sep. ?, catalog “Mid-America Invitational: Howard Jones,” Nelson-Atkins Museum, Jun. 10 – Sep. ?, catalog “The Shape of Sound,” National Sculpture Conference, Apr. 25 “Fight, Sound, Motion, Round Table,” University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, Apr. 25, catalog “Howard Jones: Three Sounds,” Forbes Foundation, catalog Gary Witt, Frances Brinkley Cowder, and Lou Thesmar, three reviews on “Recent Media,” Untitled, Dec. 26, Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, TN City of Memphis, Vol. II No. 9, Dec., Gary Witt, “But is it Art?” Bill Fitzgibbons, “Howard Jones, Multi-Media Artist,” Untitled, Apr. 12 “Recent Media,” City of Memphis, Vol. II No. 9, Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, TN “Art of the Space Era,” Huntsville Museum of Art, Jan. 16 - Jul. 30, catalog “Energy into Art: Technological Art in America 1969-1978,” Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, Sep. 1 – Oct. 15, catalog Memphis Press Scimitar, Dec. 3., Audrey West, “What is Art? For One Artist it’s This Big Room.” Encyclopedia Americana, 1970 ed., Vol. 19, “Modern Art and Architecture,” color illustration of “Skylight 13,” plus text, pp. 305-306 Art in Multiples, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO “Soundings: The Visual Artist’s Use of Sound, from 1900 to the Present,” Neuberger Museum, State University of New York, Sep. 20 – Dec 23, catalog “Perspective Sonorities: Sound/Environment/Music:” Rimini Cultural Center, Italy; Kulturforum, Bonn, Germany; Kultureferat, Munich, Germany; “Venice Biennale, ”Venice, Italy; “Oggi Musica,” Lugano, Switzerland, Feb.1982, catalog St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Thursday, Jan. 24, 1982 “Howard Jones: An Artist Explores the Unknown” Washington University Alumni Magazine, Vol. 34 No. 3, Fall “Sound Sculptor: Howard Jones” Washington University Record, Sep. 30 “An Ear for Sound: Howard Jones” “The Crossing of Borders and the Creation of Worlds: The Art of Howard Jones,” Washington University Gallery of Art, Sep. 10 – Oct. 31, catalog, Public Collections Albright-Knox Museum, Buffalo, NY Jewish Museum, New York, NY Milwaukee Art Center, Milwaukee, WI Nelson Gallery - Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO Rockefeller University, New York City Albrecht Museum, St. Joseph, Missouri National Collection of Art, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, DC Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, NJ Lannon Foundation, New York, NY Lannon Foundation, Palm Beach, FL

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1993

Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, TN Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, MN Washington University, St. Louis, MO Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN Webster College. Webster Groves, MO Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, MO Malcolm Forbes Foundation, New York, NY University of Missouri St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

AWARDS AND GRANTS 1966-1967 1966-1967 1971 1977 1984

“New Talents, USA” Selected by Art in America Magazine as a new talent Graham Foundation for the Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, Fellowship and Grant National Endowment for the Arts and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Grant for film, “Artist in America: Howard Jones” National Endowment for the Arts, Fellowship and Grant Hand Hollow Foundations and the Yaddo Corporation Fellowship

PROFESSIONAL ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE 1951-1955 1955-1956 1957-1985

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Instructor of Painting, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA Assistant Professor of Painting and Design, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Professor of Art, Washington University in St. Louis, MO


Acknowledgement The Gallery Staff Bruno L. David, Owner/Director Kellie Trivers, Associate Director Jennifer Campbell, Print Director Yoko Kiyoi, Gallery Assistant Taryn Williams, Gallery Assistant Stefanie Horowitz, Intern Alex Jacobs, Intern Richard Vagen, Intern The Gallery Wishes to Thank: Brandyn Jones Mrs. Emily Rauh Pulitzer Robert Duffy Barbara and Sumner Holtz Dr. Donald Suggs Nelson and Juliette Reed

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Howard Jones: Memory and Refraction  

50 page fully illustrated color catalogue of an exhibtion of the late Howard Jones' work at Bruno David Gallery. Essay by Robert W. Duffy an...

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