Page 1


Carmon Colangelo EYEDEAS

bruno david gallery


Carmon Colangelo eyedeas

March 25 - May 7, 2011 Bruno David Gallery 3721 Washington Boulevard Saint Louis, Missouri 63108. U.S.A. info@brunodavidgallery.com www.brunodavidgallery.com Director: Bruno L. David This catalogue was published in conjunction with the exhibition Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas Editor: Bruno L. David Catalog Designer: Yoko Kiyoi Design Assistant: Claudia R. David Printed in USA All works courtesy of Carmon Colangelo and Bruno David Gallery. Cover image: Why, 2011 (detail) Watercolor and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches. Copyright Š 2011 Bruno David Gallery, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written permission of Bruno David Gallery, Inc.


CONTENTS

Carmon Colangelo: IN MEDIAS RES by Buzz Spector

Carmon Colangelo and His Big ‘Eyedeas’ by Ruth Weisberg

Afterword by Bruno L. David

Checklist of the Exhibition Biography

1


Carmon Colangelo: IN MEDIAS RES BY Buzz Spector In medias res. We’re indebted to the Roman poet, Horace, for this Latin phrase, which means “in the midst of things,” but is mainly used to describe artistic narratives beginning in the middle of the action. Carmon Colangelo works this way, mixing collage, drawing, and painting with a repertoire of digital effects in producing the complex, multivalent works on paper that comprise his art. In this exhibition at Bruno David Gallery, we find an artist who stretches the parameters of his history of practice in an installation of twenty-four works, large and small, that attract the eyes while provoking the minds of viewers. Carmon is nominally a printmaker. Indeed, his more than thirty years of studio practice begins with a rigorous, but conventional, education in traditional printmaking techniques. In “Eyedeas,” however, we see images whose procedural origins are hard to decipher. All of the work on view here employs ink jet printing, but it is not clear that all are made starting with this image-making tool. Many of these works also incorporate material supplements—in watercolor, pencil, or ink—but do these physical elements follow after or precede the virtual effects of Carmon’s digital printing? We are confronted by an accumulation of embellishments , but what is it that is being concealed? One key to Carmon’s method is in the ongoing assortment of sketchbooks, memo pads, meeting notes, and scraps of paper in his studio. This loose record of reveries and inspirations is available for the artist’s scrutiny as he works at one or another of the several tables in the space. The floor is another site of opportunity to move images and artifacts around, and at any given moment the walls of the studio are covered with (mostly) unfinished works, often pinned closely together or even partially overlapping in order to draw out unexpected representational dynamics. A list of words on one studio table offers another aspect of Carmon’s art: “| FEAR | HELL | HELP | FIGURED | HUMOR ME POLLOCK | GOING NOWHERE | WINDOW | THINKING OUT LOUD | TOUCHING NATURE | SLEEPWALKER | SLIDE SHOW | ZERO | PRANKSTER | L.O.L. | LOVE | SECURITY”

2


Large concepts and witty turns of phrase alternate here. This list, and others like it, record Carmon’s play with language, another medium of interest for an artist deeply concerned with mediating between language and image. “Eyedeas,” the punning title of this exhibition, is an exemplary conjoining of seeing with reading. In works such as Conversions, Carmon has used watercolor and graphite to add words and accompanying random letters to the digital reproduction of an interior page taken from an old (1956) issue of Art News. Word fragments, including “LIB,” “ST,” “ALEMA” and “T.WIT” float across the scanned and appropriated page. These letters are not the only supplement here; digitally rendered graphic forms in vivid orange, red, and black emanate from the work’s center, with the uppermost rays apparently disturbing a digital grid so that it seems to flutter like a veil in the wind. This “explosion” of color appears to emerge from a circular blotch of tan liquid—not more watercolor but in fact a digitally reproduced coffee stain—left there by a previous reader of the magazine. Barely visible at the top and bottom edges of Conversion is a portion of the art magazine’s cover. The fragmented letterforms at the top can still be read: “ART,” but their inverted typographic remainders at the bottom are digitally distorted, with the descenders of the “T” and “R” apparently being sucked into that central coffee stain. Through all of these effects, the four reproductions on the original magazine page can be seen; images of the dead Christ, painted by Mantegna (twice), Manet, and Roualt, with lines of partially readable text speaking of creation, death, and transfiguration. Other meanings can now be surmised in Carmon’s hand-applied letters; “ST,” for example, as abbreviation of saint, perhaps, or else attached to a neighboring word fragment to make “STALEMA(te).” Sense making here may be stymied, but all the while we seek to read, we are in the midst of visual energies of push and pull. The same distorted title fragment from Art News appears in another work on view, New, but this time “ART” is right-side up, and its attenuated descenders are apparently being sucked into a vortex at the work’s center. Barely readable above this vortex is a distorted and miniaturized “NEWS.” Abstracted elements in marigold yellow, scarlet, and green have been digitally distorted so that the original cover art, a Matisse papier-collé, is no longer recognizable, and here and there Carmon has added touches of watercolor over a delicately rendered graphite grid to draw our attention away from the work’s infinitely receding center. The graphic energy of the appropriated Matisse may no longer be visible, but Carmon’s digital transfiguration offers another, a “new” energy, instead.

3


Carmon’s interest in architecture surfaces in another suite of five prints. There is a play of architectonic references in these works, ranging from the inclusion of inset drawings of structures to pixellations evocative of skyscrapers. A sense as of gliding above what Carmon refers to as the “urban landscape” is particularly evident in Urban Copy and Zero, each of which feature PhotoShop manipulated grids that resemble clusters of tall buildings. Here and there amid the “towers” are embellishments in watercolor and pencil. These in fact were applied before the digitally printed elements, but their seamless integration into these compositions makes it impossible to read an order of making. What is present in these works is a kind of visual “explosiveness,” of energies expanding upward and outward. In Love, L.O.L., pixellation makes a Mercator projection of a world map seem to explode, but the affect here is less apocalyptic then ecstatic, as befits the hand lettering in the work which references sublime attraction and the Twitter shorthand for joy. A comparable repertoire of effects is employed in much of “Eyedeas,” but two larger-scale works, G.R. (GR.E.EK) and E.K. (GEEK), have been printed on canvas and float framed in white enamel. These as well incorporate a reproduction of a painting by another artist, albeit in highly distorted form. Carmon has scanned images of a Gerhard Richter color chart (G.R.) and an early Ellsworth Kelly spectrum painting (E.K.) and has digitally stirred them up, collapsing the grid-structures of the originals. The distortions of these grids are dramatic; attenuations of “outer” elements are most exaggerated in color areas approaching the four corners of each canvas, with “inner” elements shrinking in scale as if retreating into a distance. Or perhaps the attenuations are indicators of force moving explosively outward. Both works invite reflection on this representational ambiguity, but their material substrates and frame types are signs of painting; cues for attentive viewers to think instead of the tensions in stretched canvases. The effect here is one of stretching the parameters of printmaking by reference to the constructing of paintings. Carmon’s appropriation of the Richter and Kelly images is broader in scope than a simple commentary on characteristics of their art; rather, he uses these reproductions to examine how the material conditions of an art form demonstrate the contingency of all pictorial judgments. The stretched, pixilated, blurred, and scrambled images in Carmon’s work point toward a more fluid understanding that we may gain by paying attention to the physical, as well as the representational, circumstances in which we encounter art. The conditions of viewing are as much a quality of Carmon’s work as the virtuosity of his manipulations of studio tools. Such contingent circumstances are central to our engagement with Carmon’s work, which we see In medias res. Buzz Spector is Dean of the College and Graduate School of Art in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis. In addition to his work as an artist, Spector frequently writes on artists and issues in contemporary art. His critical writing has been published in many journals and reviews since the 1970s. A volume of selected interviews of Spector plus new page art, Buzzwords, is scheduled for publication in 2011 by Sara Ranchouse, Chicago.

4


Carmon Colangelo and His Big “Eyedeas” by Ruth Weisberg Arts Deans who manage to do a significant amount of their own creative work are not a large category. I should know as I was until very recently a member of that very select group of artist/deans. Carmon Colangelo, who is Dean of the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St Louis has continued to exhibit internationally and in the past few years has produced an ambitious and intriguing body of work which he has entitled “Eyedeas”. This series of over two dozen works is mostly on paper with just a couple of large scale pieces on canvas. The name, “Eyedeas”, like the work, operates on many simultaneous levels. Colangelo’s ‘eye’ and his ‘ideas’ range from the diaristic to the futuristic and from the seriously playful to the semiotic. What he brings to each of these one of a kind works is a prodigious imagination, an inventive and often witty use of genres, and a great fluency in printmaking, drawing and digital techniques. This last is no mean feat. The contemporary art world is more divided then ever generationally. Younger artists often concentrate on the digital at the expense of ever learning the decisive gesture of the hand. And many older artists are tentative or in denial about new technologies. In contrast, Colangelo moves fluidly between the various processes often making his choice of technique part of the content of the piece. Colangelo reports that he begins by drawing on plain or gridded paper using watercolor to define colored patterns and shapes. The artist then sometimes scans and combines the initial drawing with his own or borrowed imagery. He also might use Photoshop filters to stylize, distort or extrude the image. For instance, in a piece such as Buddha, the result is a crystalline figure, surrounded by a linear force field. Still recognizable as a Buddha, this image has both a powerful spiritual resonance and the look of some sort of scientific scan --two points of reference that are usually thought of as polar opposites. Conceptually the combination is thought provoking and it also really rewards the eye —this is a truly stunning image. Odd juxtapositions, adventurous combinations of techniques and references present the viewer with multiple layers of meaning and interpretation. Indeed this is the hallmark of Carmon Colangelo’s work –’expect the unexpected’ --and it will surprise you with new insights and visual delight. Another example would be the work on paper, Love. L.O. L.. It is primarily drawn on the kind of gridded paper that we identify with the measured and predictable order of things. But look again, --coming through the rationality of the grid is an exploding, ominous and splintering map of the world.

5


And what about the handmade? The works, Why and Horizon reveal Colangelo’s affection, deep knowledge and respect for the American quilt. Why makes use of a subtle image of skyscrapers seen from above. It takes a while to decode this image. Overlaid on this digital evocation of the city is a quilt pattern which is perhaps the quintessence of the handmade. A ‘Y’ is stitched into the very center of the composition. ‘Y’ indeed……. And in Horizon Colangelo again uses the image of the city from above but this time the artist plays an elaborate game both affirming and denying a possible horizon line. In addition, the predictability of the rectilinear quilt pattern has been warped and folded. In another work suggestively titled, See a lovely hand drawn 18th or 19th C flowered border is used to frame its own deconstruction. The inserted drawing undermines the meaning of the border and its conventional imagery with humor and inventiveness. The word ‘LOOK’ is also incorporated underlining the task of seeing freshly and anew. Twit and Tweet are a pair of images which evoke the history of the print, in this case referring back to 17th or 18th C. engravings. They even appear to have buff colored mats. However on closer inspection the image of a man in chains and an almost melodramatic maiden in distress are manipulated digitally so that the tessellated and crystallized images could only be possible in the 21st C. An enigmatic work called No Accident seems to combine many of the themes and strategies of this body of work. It consists of an almost diaristic set of notations and references; a botanical drawing, quotations from an 18th C. print, a fragment of a quilt and the letters H, E, and L set squarely in the middle of the composition. Does this mean ‘HELP’ or does it refer to ‘HELL”? With Carmon Colangelo’s work we can have it both ways. As I spend more time with this and other works in the “Eyedeas” series I know that additional associations and visual puns will emerge — I have learned to ‘expect the unexpected’......

Ruth Weisberg, artist, Professor of Fine Arts and former Dean at the University of Southern California, is the recipient of the Art Leadership Award, National Council of Art Administrators and the Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award, 2009, Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, Hebrew Union College, 2001, College Art Association Distinguished Teaching of Art Award 1999, Visiting Artist at the American Academy in Rome 2011, 1995, 1994, and 1992. Weisberg has had over 80 solo exhibitions, including a recent major exhibition at the Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena and a retrospective, at the Skirball Museum, Los Angeles. Her work is included in sixty major Museum collections including The Art Institute of Chicago; The Biblioteque Nationale of France, Paris; Istituto Nationale per la Grafica, Rome; The Norwegian National Museum, Oslo; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; National Gallery, Washington, D.C. and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

6


Afterwords by Bruno L. David I am pleased to present Carmon Colangelo’ s fourth solo exhibition entitled “Eyedeas” with the gallery. Support for the creation of significant new works of art has been the core to the mission and program of the Bruno David Gallery since its founding. Carmon Colangelo’s remarkable and complex drawings make him one the most impressive artists of the gallery. I would like to express my sincere thanks to Buzz Spector and Ruth Weisberg for their thoughtful essays. I am deeply grateful to Yoko Kiyoi, who lent much time, talent, and expertise to the production of this catalogue. Carmon Colangelo’s new works on paper and canvas from 2009-2011 explore the conflation of human history, current events and personal reveries through time, space and media. Taking a diaristic approach, Colangelo muses about cultural narratives, urban life, globalism, social networking, transcendence and recording everyday ideas. Using grids, reproductions, text and juxtaposing the iconography from modernism with conceptual artmaking strategies, this body of experimental drawings and paintings are composed of water based media, graphite and ink on paper or canvas. Born in Toronto, Canada, Carmon Colangelo received his MFA from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He is one of the foremost figures in the print and drawing world in America and the world. His work has been exhibited widely, from Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. to Argentina, Canada, England, Puerto Rico, and Korea. His works are in collections at the National Museum of American Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University. He is the Dean of the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis and holds the E. Desmond Lee Professorship for Collaboration in the Arts.

7


8


Checklist & Images of the Exhibition

9


Fear O.M.G., 2011

Watercolor, graphite, ink on paper 48 x 32 inches (121.92 x 81.28 cm) 10


Fear O.M.G. (detail view) 11


Bits and Pieces, 2010

Watercolor and ink on paper 48 x 32 inches (121.92 x 81.28 cm) 12


Bits and Pieces (detail view) 13


Why, 2011

Watercolor and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 14


Thumbnails 1-2, 2011 Watercolor, acrylic. graphite and ink on paper (diptych) 30 x 44 inches (76.20 x 111.76 cm) 15


Blog, 2011

Watercolor and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 16


No Accident, 2011 Watercolor and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 17


Not Here, 2011

Watercolor, prismacolor, ink on paper 32 x 48 inches (81.28 x 121.92 cm) 18


HELP, 2011 Watercolor, prismacolor, ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 19


See, 2011

Watercolor, acrylic, and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 20


Conversions, 2011 Watercolor, graphite, and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 21


Buddha, 2011

Watercolor, and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 22


New, 2011 Watercolor, graphite, and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 23


Horizon, 2011 Watercolor, and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 24


Golden Channel, 2011 Watercolor, graphite, and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 25


Sunset, 2011

Watercolor, and ink on paper 30 x 22 inches (76.20 x 55.88 cm) 26


Urban Copy, 2011 Watercolor, and ink on paper 39 x 29 inches (99.06 x 73.66 cm) 27


No. 9, 2011

Watercolor, graphite, and ink on paper 39 x 29 inches (99.06 x 73.66 cm) 28


Love, L.O.L., 2011 Watercolor, acrylic, graphite, and ink on paper 39 x 29 inches (99.06 x 73.66 cm) 29


Terminal, 2011

Watercolor, graphite, and ink on paper 39 x 29 inches (99.06 x 73.66 cm) 30


Zero, 2011 Watercolor, graphite, gouache, acrylic and ink on paper 39 x 29 inches (99.06 x 73.66 cm) 31


Twit, 2011

Ink on paper 24 x 18 inches (60.96 x 45.72 cm) 32


Tweet, 2011

Ink on paper 24 x 18 inches (60.96 x 45.72 cm) 33


E.K. (GEEK), 2011

Ink on Canvas 60-1/2 x 43-1/2 inches (153.67 x 110.49 cm) 34


E.K. (GEEK) (detail view) 35


G.R. (GR.E.EK), 2011 Ink on Canvas 60-1/2 x 43-1/2 inches (153.67 x 110.49 cm) 36


G.R. (GR.E.EK) (detail view) 37


Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas at Bruno David Gallery, 2011 (installation view - detail) 38


Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas at Bruno David Gallery, 2011 (installation view - detail) 39


Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas at Bruno David Gallery, 2011 (installation view - detail) 40


Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas at Bruno David Gallery, 2011 (installation view - detail) 41


Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas at Bruno David Gallery, 2011 (installation view - detail) 42


Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas at Bruno David Gallery, 2011 (installation view - detail) 43


Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas at Bruno David Gallery, 2011 (installation view - detail) 44


Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas at Bruno David Gallery, 2011 (installation view - detail) 45


46


CARMON COLANGELO Born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada Lives and works in St. Louis, Missouri EDUCATION M.F.A B.F.A

1983, Printmaking, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1981, Printmaking and Painting, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada.

SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2011 Bruno David Gallery, Eyedeas, Saint Louis, Missouri. 2008 Heuser Art Gallery, Carmon Colangelo, Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois. Bruno David Gallery, Big Bang to Big Melt, Saint Louis, Missouri. 2007 Farrell Center Gallery, Carmon Colangelo: Prints, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. Flora Kirsch Beck Gallery, Carmon Colangelo, Alma College, Alma, Michigan. Bruno David Gallery, Pharmland Series, Saint Louis, Missouri. Sandler Hudson Gallery, Carmon Colangelo: Configured/Disfigured, Atlanta, Georgia. 2006 Bruno David Gallery, Configured/Disfigured, Saint Louis, Missouri. Sandler Hudson Gallery, Carmon Colangelo, Atlanta, Georgia. 2004 Laura Mesaros Gallery, Phantasmagoria, West Virginia University. Museo de Pueblos, Phantasmagoria, Guanajuato, Mexico. 2003 Scuola Internazionale di Grafica, Looking Back, Residency, Venice, Italy. 2002 Hope Street Gallery, DA,DA,DA, Liverpool John Moores University Gallery, in conjunction with the Liverpool Contemporary Art Biennial, Liverpool , England. Sandler Hudson Gallery, Fountain of Age, Atlanta, Georgia. 2001 John and Jane Allcott Gallery, Re-Tracings, University of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 2000 University of Delaware, Blasted Impulses and Beautiful Impossibilities, Newark, Delaware. 1996 Crieghton Davis Gallery, Carmon Colangelo, Washington, DC. 1995 Philadelphia Print Club, Carmon Colangelo, Philadelphia, PA. Ohio Wesleyan University, Lynn Mayhew Gallery, Carmon Colangelo, OH. 1994 Bradley University, Heuser Gallery, Carmon Colangelo, Peoria, Illinois.

47


1994 1993 1993 1993 1992

Adams State College, Carmon Colangelo, Alamosa, Colorado. Shepherd College Gallery, Carmon Colangelo, Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Rockville Arts Place, Prints and Constructions, Rockville, Maryland. Governor’s Mansion, Arts and Letters Series, Carmon Colangelo and Alison Helm. Windsor Printmaker’s Forum Gallery, Permutations, Windsor, Ontario.

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2011 Prints + Multiples, Bruno David Gallery, St. Louis, MO. 2010 MATRIX, Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Overpaper, Bruno David Gallery, St. Louis, MO. A Survey of Contemporary Prints, Wellington Gray Gallery, School of Art and Design, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, 2010. 2008 Assorted Printmakers, curated by Jeff Sippel, Gallery FAB, University of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri. Overview_08, Bruno David Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri. Four Aces: Large-Scale Prints from Four Universities, Bruno David Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri. 2007 Overview_07, Bruno David Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri. There and Here: Carmon Colangelo, Joan Hall, Peter Marcus, COCA: Millstone Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri. 2006 Overview_06, Bruno David Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri. 2005 Impressions, An Invitational Exhibition of Prints, McMaster Gallery, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina. 2004 Handmade Papermaking Exhibition, The Robert C. Williams American Museum of Papermaking, Atlanta, Georgia. 2004 Gallery Artists, College Arts Association, Sandler Hudson Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia. Works on Paper, Sandler Hudson Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia. 2003 2K3, Wesleyan College, Macon, Georgia. 2003 Culture Shock: Works by Georgia’s Foreign-Born Artists, Suntrust Plaza Gallery, Atlanta, GA. 2002 Georgia Triennial Exhibition, Traveling. Gallery City East, Atlanta, GA; Macon Museum of Art, Macon, GA; Albany Museum of Art and Telfair Museum, Savannah, GA. 2001 Prints by Georgia Artists, Swan Coach Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia. 2000 XIII San Juan Print Biennial, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Hypersalon, Prints and Multiples, Atrium Gallery,Virginia Museum of Fine Arts,Virginia. Interprint, Contemporary American Prints, Maastricht, Holland.”Contemporary _ Prints and the Print Process,” Albrecht-Kemper Museum, St. Joseph Missouri. Faculty Exhibition, Lyndon House Arts Center, Athens, Georgia. 1999 Nexus Biennial: “Celebrating Local Figures”, Nexus Contemporary Arts Center, Atlanta, Georgia. 1998 Pervasive Impressions: Contemporary Political Prints, Contemporary Research Center for the Arts, University of Texas Arlington Gallery, Texas.

48


1998 Drawn to Stone, Kennedy Museum, University of Ohio, Athens, Ohio. Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair, The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland. American Graphic Artists: The 5th Biennial of Slovene Arts, Nova Mesto, Slovenia. El Paso Printmaking Invitational, University of Texas, Fox Fine Arts Center Gallery, El Paso, TX. Are You Looking at Me?, Acme Art Gallery, Cleveland, Ohio. Texas/Georgia Print Exchange Exhibition, University of Dallas, Texas. Multiple Touch: The Tactile Sensation in Prints, Robert Else Gallery, California State University, Sacramento, California. Faculty Exhibition, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, Georgia. A Strange Vision, Brazosport College, Lake Jackson, Texas. World Print Survey, Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri. 1997 Allographies, Contemporary Printmakers, University Museum, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania. Print Panorama: Nostalgia for the Future, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Halifax, NS, Canada. Print Panorama: Nostalgia for the Future, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. Litografia Argentina Contemporanea II, Museo Nacional del Grabado, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Litografia Argentina Contemporanea II, Belles Artes Emilio Caraffa, Cordoba City, Argentina. A Thought Intercepted, California Museum of Art, Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, Santa Rosa, California. Sliced Orbits, (Colangelo, Jaye and Hocking ) Pierce Art Gallery, West Virginia University Institute of Technology, Montgomery, West Virginia. 26th Bradley National Print Exhibitions, University Galleries, Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois. Group Exhibition, Corcoran School of Art, Printmaking Studio Gallery, Washington, DC. The West Virginia Collection: Figurative Works, Cultural Museum, Charleston, West Virginia. American Print Survey, Highland Community College, Highland, Kansas. A Strange Vision, Luther College Galleries, Decorah, Iowa. 1996 Print Invitational, (five person) Atrium Gallery, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut. The Minnesota National Print Biennial, Katherine E. Nash Gallery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 6th Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition, Rudolph E. Lee Gallery, Clemson, SC. Holler to Holler, Remote State, Monongahela Arts Center and State College Galleries, WV. West Virgina Fellowship Exhibition, Cultural Complex and Museum, Charleston, West Virginia. Summer Exhibition, Bennington College, Bennington, Vermont. Governor’s Academy Faculty Exhibition (two person), Fairmont College, Fairmont, West Virginia. West Virginia Traveling Exhibition, Tamarack Galleries, Beckley, West Virginia. Print Types, Art Institute for the Permain Basin, Odessa, Texas. 1995 17th University of Dallas Printmaking Invitational, University of Dallas, Irving, Texas. Print Invitational, Richard E. Beasley Museum and Gallery, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona. Miami Print Invitational, New Galley, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida. Hawaii Print Invitational, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, Hawaii. McNeese Print Invitational, McCrombie Gallery, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana.

49


1995 Works on Paper, Elzay Gallery of Art, Wilson Art Center, Ohio Northern University, Ada, Ohio. Elvis “ X “ Suite, The Candy Factory, 23rd Southern Graphics Conference, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee. 1994 Colorprint USA, Lubbock Fine Arts Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock ,Texas. Curated by Lynwood Kreneck. Alternative Prints, University Art Galleries, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota. Dakotas International, University Art Galleries, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota. Southern Printmakers, Atrium Gallery, University of North Texas, Fort Worth, Texas. Printypes, Tareton State University, Stephenville, TX and Chadron State College, Chadron, Nebraska. 1993 Paradise Endangered: New World of Contemporary Prints, The American Print Alliance, Baltimore City Hall Courtyard Galleries, Baltimore, Maryland. Naked Pittsburgh ,Views from Zenith Gallery, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Curated by David Goldstein. 6th Annual Florida Printmaking Society Exhibition, New World School of the Arts Gallery, Miami, Florida. 6th Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition, Rudolph E. Lee Gallery, Clemson, SC. Society of American Graphic Artists 65th National Print Exhibition, Federal Plaza, New York, New York. Pulling Prints/ Talking Together, 21st Southern Graphics Conference, Thesis Gallery Fox Bldg., Maryland Institute, College of Art, Baltimore, MD. Southern Graphics Traveling Exhibition, University of North Alabama, Montgomery College, MD and Morehead State College, KY. Charlotte International Art Exhibition, Spirit Square Center for the Arts, Charlotte, NC. Juror Amada Cruz, Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC. 1992 Earth Views: Landscape Imagery by Mid-Atlantic Printmakers, Rockville Arts Place,Rockville, Maryland. Group Exhibition, Silvermine Prints International, Silvermine Guild Galleries, New Caanan, CT. Exhibition 280: Works on Walls, Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, West Virginia. 20th Southern Graphics National Exhibition, (traveling) 1992-94. Printworks, Carmon Colangelo and Sergio Soave, Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts, New Castle, PA. 1991 5th Clemson National Print And Drawing Exhibition, Rudolph E. Lee Gallery, Lee Hall, College of Architecture, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. Florida Printmakers Society 5th Annual Exhibition, Thomas Center Gallery, Gainesville, Florida. West Virgina Impressions: Printmaking in the Mountain State, Sunrise Museum Downtown, Charleston, West Virginia. 1990 11th Los Angeles Printmaking Society National Printmaking Exhibition, Laband Art Gallery, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, California. 1989 The Boston Printmakers 42nd North American Print Exhibition, Fitchburg Art Museum, Fitchburg, Massachusetts. U.S. - Korea Traveling Exhibition, (Los Angeles, Seoul, Paris), Los Angeles Printmaking Society and The Korean Contemporary Printmaking Association,Korean Cultural Galleries in Los Angeles and Seoul and the Embassy Cultural Center in Paris, France. 1988 Korean International Print Biennial, International Exchange of Prints 1989, Korean Printmakers Association, Seoul, Korea. International Prints II, Silvermine Guild Galleries, New Canaan, Connecticut and John Szoke Gallery, New York City, New York. 10th University of Dallas Printmaking Invitational, Haggerty Art Center, University of Dallas,Irving, Texas. Solo Exhibition, Recent Prints and Paintings, Benedum Gallery, Monongahela Art Center, Morgantown, West Virginia. The Great White North, Recent Canadian Art, Invitational Exhibition, Staten Island Institute of the Arts, New York.

50


1987 Prints, Invitational Exhibition, Four Printmakers, Merwin Gallery, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Illinois. 21st Bradley National Print and Drawing Exhibition, Hartman Center Gallery, Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois. 3rd Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition, Rudolf E. Lee Gallery, College of Architecture, Clemson University, South Carolina. 7th Annual National Print Exhibition, Artlink Contemporary Artspace, Fort Wayne, Indiana. 1986 Philadelphia Print Club 62nd International Print and Photography Exhibition, Print Club Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Post-Rustic, Artists Liaison Gallery Exhibition, Theater Art Gallery, Design Center, Los Angeles, California. Society of American Graphic Artists Juried Exhibition, Lumen Winter Gallery of the New Rochelle Public Library, New York, New York. 6th Annual National Print Exhibition, Artlink Contemporary Artspace, Fort Wayne, IN. Scotland tour Exhibition, Works from LSU Print Workshop, Aberdeen Art Museum, Glascow School of Art, Edinboro College of Art, Dundee College of Art, Greys School of Art, Scotland. 9th National Juried Exhibition of the Los Angeles Printmaking Society, (33 Printmakers), Wright Art Gallery, UCLA, Los Angeles, California. Pratt-Silvermine International Print Exhibition, Silvermine Guild Center for the Arts, New Cannaan, Connecticut and Pratt Manhattan Center Gallery, New York, New York. The 38th North American Print Exhibition, Boston Printmakers, DeCordova Museum, Boston, Massachusetts. 1985 The Boston Printmakers 37th National Print Exhibition, Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts. 9th Annual Eastern United States Print and Drawing Exhibition, North Carolina Print and Drawing Society, Spirit Square Art Center and St. Johns Museum, North Carolina. GRANTS & AWARDS 2010 Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, (ACSA) Service Award for hosting and the annual ACSA and NCAA (National Council of Art Administrators) conference, Economies: Art + Architecture. 2006 E. Desmond Lee Professorship for Collaboration in the Arts and Medal, Endowed Professorship with Scholarly Support 2004 Alison and Patrick Deem Distinguished Lecturer, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. 2003 Distinguished Research Professor, Award, University of Georgia. 2001 Melon Foundation Grant, UGA Libraries and School of Art (Digitize the Carnegie Study of the Art of the United States.) 2000 State of the Art Conference Grant, Cortona International Art Symposium; A Print Odyssey 2001. President’s Venture Fund Grant for Scholarships, Print and Book Arts Maymester Program and Cortona International Art Symposium. 1998 Senior Research Grant in the Fine Arts, Mixed Media Paintings and Layered Impressions, The University of Georgia. 1996 West Virginia Artist Fellowship: Art and Humanities Grant, Cultural Center and Museum, Charleston, West Virginia. Gary Applebaum Purchase Award and the Charbonnel Inks Award, Minnesota National Print Biennial, Katherine E. Nash Gallery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. Jurors Elizabeth Armstrong and Frances Myers. Juror’s Commendation, Sixth Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition, Clemson University. Juror, Ruth Wiesberg. 1996 International Visiting Artist Grant, Shanghai University, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute and the Nanjing Arts College, People’s Republic of China.

51


1995 College of Creative Arts Outstanding Research Award, West Virginia University, West Virginia. 17th University of Dallas Printmaking Invitational Purchase Award, University of Dallas, Texas. Governor’s Award, West Virginia Juried Exhibition, The Cultural Museum, Charleston, WV. 1994 International Visiting Artist Grant, Academy of Fine Arts, Bratislava, Slovakia. 1993 Judith Lieber Purchase Award, Society of American Graphic Artists, 65th National Print Exhibition, Federal Plaza, New York, New York. Juror’s Award, Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition, Clemson, South Carolina. Juror, Elizabeth Armstrong, Curator Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. 1992 Sabbatical Research Leave, Board of Trustees, WVU, Fall semester. West Virginia University Senate Research and Scholarship Grant, for “Print Assemblages”. International Visiting Artist Residency Program, Windsor Printmakers Forum, funded by the Canada Arts Council. 1991 Honorable Mention, Exhibition 280: Works on Walls, Huntington Museum of Art, West Virginia. Fifth Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition Purchase Award, Clemson University. Juror, Ned Rifkin, Chief Curator Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institute. 1990 Arjamari-Arches-Rives Purchase Award, 11th National Los Angeles Printmaking Society, Los Angeles, California Senate Research and Scholarship Grant, “Collaborative Lithography,”creation of lithographs at Winstone Press, North Carolina. 1988 10th University of Dallas Printmaking Invitational Purchase Award, University of Dallas, Irving, Texas. 1987 3rd Clemson National Jurors Purchase Award, Clemson University, South Carolina. Juror, Terence La Noue, Painter and Printmaker. 1986 6th Annual National Print Jurors Award, Artlink Contemporary Artspace, Indiana. Juror, Fred Grude, Master Printer, Four Brothers Press, Chicago. North Carolina Print and Drawing Society Purchase Award, 9th Annual Eastern United States Print and Drawing Exhibition. Juror, Robert Gordy. West Virginia University Senate Research and Scholarship Grant, Project; Mixed Media Printmaking. 1985 Award of Excellence, West Virginia Juried Exhibition, Cultural Center, Capitol Complex, Charleston, West Virginia. Juror’s Award, Three Rivers Art Festival, Juried Exhibition. Juror Patterson Sims, Assistant Curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Consolidated Natural Gas Foundation Purchase Award, Purchase for the University of Pittsburgh, Three Rivers Art Festival Juried Exhibition. Juror’s Commendation, Boston Printmakers 37th National. Juror, David W. Kiehl, Assistant Curator of Prints, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

52


CURATED EXHIBITIONS 2008 On the Margins, Mildred Lane Kemper Museum, St. Louis, Missouri. Artists: Adel Abidin, Laylah Ali, Paolo Canevari, Enrique Chagoya, Willie Cole, Luis Cruz Azaceta, Willie Doherty, Jane Hammond, Martha Rosler and Do-Ho Suh. Catalogue: On the Margins, with contributions from Eleanor Heartney and Paul Krainak, February 2008. 2001 Ponte Futuro, Co- curator with Judith Brodsky, Girifalco Fortress in Cortona, Italy. Artists: Willie Cole, Magdelena Compos Pons, Leslie Dill, Hung Liu, Igor Makarevich, Young Soon Min, Pepon Osorio, Juan Sanchez, Italo Scagna, Kiki Smith, Komar and Melamid, Mimmo Palladino, James Siena, Robert Stackhouse and William Kentridge. Installed in the town fortress the exhibition exemplified the aesthetic range of artists around the world addressing technology, craft, identity, popular media and globalism after a century of avant-gardism. 1999 Fabled Impressions, Knox Gallery of Prints and Drawings, Georgia Museum of Art. Artists: Luis Cruz Azaceta, Jose Bedia, Leslie Dill, Randy Bolton, Jane Hammond, Bill Fick, Steve Murakishi, Kurt Kemp, Laurie Sloan and Kara Walker. Exhibition focused on works by artists who use allegory and irony to comment on the political, spiritual and technological issues of the late 20th century; 1996 Remote Sensing, Paul and Laura Mesaros Galleries, West Virginia University. Artists: Nancy Spero, Frances Myers, Beauvais Lyon, Tom Nakashima, Simon Penny, Juila Kilgaard, Adele Henderson, James McEllinney, Michael Rodemer, Tanja Softic, Chris Sperandio and Kelley Walker.

53


BIBLIOGRAPHY Spector, Buzz. “Carmon Colangelo,” Catalogue Essay, Bruno David Gallery Publications, April 2011. Cooper, Ivy. “ ‘Eyedeas’ a plenty,” St. Louis Beacon, St. Louis, MO, April 13, 2011. Baran, Jessica. “Eyedeas,” Riverfront Times, St. Louis, MO, April 14, 2011. Weisberg, Ruth. “Carmon Colangelo and His Big ‘Eyedeas’, ” Catalogue Essay, Bruno David Gallery Publications, April 2011. Murphy, Patrick. “From Big Bang to Big Melt,” Bruno David Gallery, interview on PBS, Living St. Louis. Krainak, Paul. “Carmon Colangelo,” Catalogue Essay, Bruno David Gallery Publications, December 2008. Gay, Malcom. “Four Aces,” RiverFront Times, St. louis, MO, February 27, 2008. Beall, Dickson. “Medical Arts,” West End Word, St. Louis, MO, December 2008. Otten, Liam. “Art Medicine: Carmon Colangelo,” Record, St. Louis, MO, January 9, 2008. Bonetti, David. “Art Openings,” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 2006. Duffy, Robert. “Carmon Colangelo” Riverfront Times, September 20, 2006. Downen, Jill. “Carmon Colangelo,” Catalogue Essay, Bruno David Gallery Publications, Fall 2006. Teekell, Anna. “Fit for Print,” RiverFront Times, September 2006. Dana, Robin P. “Carmon Colangelo: Multiple Impressions,” Art Works, pp. 3-4, Vol. 11, Washington University Publications, Spring 2006, St. Louis, MO. (Two color illustrations, “Body Bizarre” and “Gray’s Anatomy”) Slaven, Michael. “Phantasmagoria,” Art Papers, Summer 2004. Zhiyuan, Cong. “The Window Overseas,” Contemporary American Printmaking, Chinese Printmaking, pp. 36-44, Vol. 12, 1998. (two color illustrations, “White Breast with Bunny” and “Kiss and Tell”) Eide, Joel S. “American Graphic Artist,” The 5th Biennial of Slovene Arts (book length), pp. 97-120, October, 1998. (One color illustration). Allen, Lynn and Best of Printmaking: An International Collection, Rockport Publishers, Inc., pp. 158, 1997. McGibbon Phylis “Art, Multiple Touch: The Tactile Sensations in Prints,” The Sacramento Bee, September 6, 1998. Allen, Lynn and Who’s Who in American Art, 23rd edition. McGibbon Phylis Who’s Who in the South and Southeast, 26th edition. Krainak, Paul. “Appalachian High: Resisting Mis-Representation,” Art Examiner, pp. 31- 35, October, 1997. Colangelo, Carmon. “Remote Simulations,” Contemporary Impressions, Spring 1995. Slaven, Michael. “Out of Print,” After Image, Spring 1996. Olson, Kristina. “Colangelo,” Art Papers, Rockville Arts Place, July/August, 1993. Cunningham. E.C. Printmaking: A Primary Form of Expression, Colorado Press, 1992. (One Chapter, four reproductions.) Olson, Kristina. “Colangelo/Soave,” Art Papers, Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts, 1992.

54


FACULTY POSITIONS 2006-Present Dean of the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. E. Desmond Lee Professor for Collaboration in the Arts, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. 1999-2006 Founding Director of the Institute of Creative Exploration (I.C.E.), University of Georgia. 1997-2006 Director and Distinguished Research Professor, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 1993-97 Division of Art Chairperson and Professor of Art, Division of Art, College of Creative Arts, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. 1988-94 Associate Professor of Art, Area Coordinator of Printmaking, Division of Art, College of Creative Arts, West Virginia University. 1986-94 Graduate Coordinator, Division of Art, College of Creative Arts, West Virginia University. 1984-88 Assistant Professor of Art, Area Coordinator of Printmaking, Division of Art,College of Creative Arts, West Virginia University 1984 Visiting Artist, Printmaking Instructor, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1983 Printmaking Instructor, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

55


SELECTED PUBLIC COLLECTIONS The National Museum of American Art, Washington, DC Whitney Museum of American Art Florida State Art Museum, Tallahassee New York Public Library, New York, NY Museo National del Grabado, Buenos Aires, Argentina Kennedy Museum of Art, Athens, OH Butler Museum of American Art Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University Museums Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art University of Pittsburgh Louisiana State University Clemson University West Virginia Cultural Complex and Museum University of Windsor University of Dallas Illinois Wesleyan College Arches-Rives Paper and Ink Collection Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts Huntington Museum of Art, West Virginia Bradley University Windsor Printmakers Forum Southern Illinois University at Carbondale Ewing Gallery, University of Tennessee University of Minnesota Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, France

56


ARTISTS Margaret Adams Dickson Beall Laura Beard Elaine Blatt Martin Brief Shawn Burkard Bunny Burson Carmon Colangelo Alex Couwenberg Jill Downen Yvette Drury Dubinsky Beverly Fishman Damon Freed

William Griffin Joan Hall Takashi Horisaki Kim Humphries Kelley Johnson Howard Jones (Estate) Chris Kahler Bill Kohn (Estate) Leslie Laskey Sandra Marchewa Peter Marcus Genell Miller Patricia Olynyk

Matthew Penkala Robert Pettus Daniel Raedeke Paul Henry Ramirez Chris Rubin de la Borbolla Frank Schwaiger Charles Schwall Christina Shmigel Thomas Sleet Buzz Spector Lindsey Stouffer Cindy Tower Mario Trejo Ken Worley

brunodavidgallery.com

Carmon Colangelo: Eyedeas  

60 page fully illustrated color catalogue of Carmon Colangelo’s exhibition "Eyedeas" at Bruno David Gallery. Includes essays by Buzz Spector...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you