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October 2014

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Volume 15 | 5


ESTCONTENTS | 1

IN EVERY ISSUE

15

Comment 3 News 4 Events 13 Company Profiles 14 | 37 | 54 | 85 | 114 People 16 Profiles 21 | 38 Products 116 Last Words 120

IN THIS ISSUE RESILIENCE

18

Chris Felton from the Cabinet Office highlights the challenges of severe space weather and how the UK is preparing for and plans to lessen the impact of such events

43

MASS FATALITIES

23

Advice for emergency planners from Dr Lucy Easthope, Senior lecturer in Forensic Science at the University of Lincoln, on the task of preparing a ‘mass fatalities framework’

INTEROPERABILITY

25

What next for the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme (JESIP)? How the JESIP approach has been embraced by Staffordshire’s blue light services and the successful multi-agency work of Yorkshire’s emergency services in preparation for and during this year’s Tour de France

29

WATER RESCUE

93

CFOA National Resilience identifies the lessons learned from the National Flood Events of 2013/14, a special guide to the care and maintenance of search and rescue drysuits and how MREW’s national ‘Water Strategy’ hopes to guide water rescue capability within mountain rescue

ESS2014: ERZ FOCUS

5

43

61

The Emergency Response Zone (ERZ) at The Emergency Services Show 2014 features over 80 frontline response organisations, government departments and voluntary sector partners, exhibiting at the event to network with blue light colleagues and better understand each other’s capabilities – find out more from page 61.

63 ESS2014: EXHIBITOR FOCUS

87

Over 400 exhibitors will be displaying products and services at The Emergency Services Show 2014 – discover more about these suppliers, including Primetech, Serco Fire Services, Emergency Planning College, DS Medical, PageOne, PGI Training, Dräger, TenCate, Scott Safety, Bollé Safety and SP Services, to name but a select few.

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Registration for The Emergency Services Show 2014, which takes place from 24-25 September, will remain open up to and throughout the show – visit www.emergencyuk.com and click on ‘Register Now’ to sign up for free admission to the UK’s leading multi-agency emergency services event.

Emergency Services Times October 2014


2 | ESTA-Z

Companies Company Name

Page No

Alcohol Concern ..................................................................................77 Amputees in Action.............................................................................37 Armadillo Merino..............................................................................110 Association of Air Ambulances..........................................................13 Association of Ambulance Chief Executives.....................................65 Association of Chief Police Officers...........................30, 56, 61, 73, 74 Babcock International.........................................................................65 Ballyclare Limited...............................................................................93 Bob Wade Media Ltd ............................................................................5 Bollé Safety.........................................................................................113 Brake.....................................................................................................56 Bristol Uniforms..........................................................................11, 105 Bristow Helicopters Ltd .......................................................................8 British Red Cross.................................................................................73 British Transport Police..................................................................6, 26 Buckinghamshire and Milton Keynes Fire and Rescue Service ................................5, 110 BW Technologies by Honeywell.......................................................108 Cabinet Office ..............................................................18, 21, 26, 70, 73 Cambridgeshire Fire and Rescue Service............................................6 Care Quality Commission...................................................................63 CF Motoring Services Ltd..................................................................77 CFOA National Resilience .....................................................43, 64, 67 Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service......................................................56 Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser.....................................................44, 64 Chief Fire Officers' Association ...............................26, 44, 53, 56, 105 Civil Aviation Authority.....................................................................16 Civil Contingencies Secretariat....................................................18, 21 Civil Nuclear Defence Constabulary .............................................6, 26 Class Professional Publishing...........................................................102 College of Policing.......................................................3, 5, 6, 26, 30, 61 CRI Reels..............................................................................................98 Cruse Bereavement Care .....................................................................73 DEFRA.................................................................................................48 Department for Communities & Local Government.26, 43, 44, 53 64, 70 73 Department for Transport...................................................................56 Department of Health .............................................................26, 70, 74 Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service..................................................33 Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service............................26, 53 Disaster Action ....................................................................................23 Dorset Fire and Rescue Service..........................................................96 Dräger .................................................................................................102 DS Medical...........................................................................................93 DuPont Protection Technologies ...............................................38, 120 e2v .........................................................................................................15 East Anglian Air Ambulance..............................................................16

Company Name

Page No

Company Name

Page No

Company Name

Page No

East Midlands Ambulance Service ............................................33, 115 East of England Ambulance Service................................................6, 8 Emergency Planning College .............................................................90 Emergency Planning Society..........................................................5, 78 Emergency Services Training Centre.................................................55 Environment Agency ..........................................................................78 EP Barrus Ltd....................................................................................105 Espar ...................................................................................................116 ESPO.......................................................................................................8 Essex and Herts Air Ambulance ........................................................16 Fire Service College.........................................................3, 5, 13, 26, 44 FlamePro (UK) ltd ..............................................................................98 Flood Forecasting Centre ...................................................................49 Freight Transport Association..............................................................6 Glazesafe .............................................................................................118 Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service ............................................8 Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service .............................11, 54 HAIX ..................................................................................................118 Hammond Drysuits Ltd .............................................................47, 118 Hampshire Constabulary ................................................................5, 61 Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service..............................................5, 11 Hertfordshire Constabulary..............................................................116 Highways Agency ................................................................................56 HM Coastguard....................................................................................26 Home Office .........................................................................5, 26, 30, 70 Hope Digital.........................................................................................98 Independent Ambulance Association................................................63 Institute of Vehicle Recovery..............................................................77 International Fire Training Centre....................................................89 International Rescue Corps ..................................................................5 ISC Wales..............................................................................................95 ISG Infrasys........................................................................................101 JESIP.............................................................................25, 29, 30, 70, 90 Kent Fire and Rescue Service.......................................................16, 53 Kiowa Group......................................................................................110 Land Rover.........................................................................................115 Local Government Association..........................................................73 London Ambulance Service ...............................................................77 London Fire Brigade...............................................................16, 37, 95 London's Air Ambulance................................................................8, 16 Lowland Rescue...................................................................................61 MC Products UK Ltd .......................................................................107 MedTrade Products Ltd....................................................................117 Met Office.............................................................................................18 Metz ......................................................................................................14

Midlands Air Ambulance .....................................................................8 Mountain Rescue England and Wales .........................................48, 61 National Academy of Crime Scene Cleaners...................................114 National Ambulance Resilience Unit......................................3, 26, 74 National Association of Community First Responders ...................81 National Audit Office..........................................................................53 National Ballistics Intelligence Service.............................................73 National Fire Protection Association ..............................................105 National Grid .......................................................................................18 NHS England.......................................................................................74 Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service........................................................50 North East Ambulance Service ..........................................................33 North West Ambulance Service .........................................................33 North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service .........................................33 Northern Ireland Ambulance Service ...............................................77 Northumberland Fire and Rescue Service........................................98 Northumbria University.......................................................................5 Nottinghamshire Police ......................................................................74 Office for Security and Counter Terrorism .......................................30 Ordnance Survey .................................................................................21 Outreach Rescue ..................................................................................95 Oxfordshire Fire and Rescue Service.................................................85 PageOne................................................................................................96 Panasonic............................................................................................116 Parkland Engineering .......................................................................110 PGI Training ......................................................................................101 Police National CBRN Centre............................................................30 Police National Search Centre............................................................61 Police Scotland.......................................................................................6 Primetech (UK) Ltd............................................................................87 Proflight..............................................................................................107 Promove UK Ltd...............................................................................118 R3 Safety & Rescue Ltd ....................................................................105 Radio Amateurs' Emergency Network ..............................................73 RAE Systems Inc ...............................................................................108 RAF Fire and Rescue Service.............................................................85 RAF Mountain Rescue Service ..........................................................70 Rail Industry Fire Association ...........................................................81 Rennicks UK........................................................................................16 RNLI.....................................................................................................50 Road Haulage Association ..................................................................77 Road Safety Great Britain ...................................................................56 RoadSafe ...............................................................................................56 Rosenbauer UK plc .......................................................................14, 15 Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service....................................11, 13

Royal Life Saving Society UK............................................................74 Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents .................................56 Royal Voluntary Service......................................................................73 Salvation Army ....................................................................................73 School of Resilience and Emergency Response..................................3 Scott Safety.........................................................................................107 Scottish Fire and Rescue Service .......................................................65 Serco Fire Services...............................................................................89 SlideandTilt........................................................................................113 Somerset Police....................................................................................26 South Wales Fire and Rescue Service ................................................13 South Western Ambulance Service....................................................26 South Worcester Life Saving Club.....................................................50 South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue.......................................................33 SP Services .........................................................................................113 St John Ambulance..............................................................................73 Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service...............................................29 Staffordshire Police .............................................................................29 Staffordshire's Civil Contingencies Unit...........................................29 Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service.........................................................54 Surf Life Saving GB ............................................................................50 TenCate ...............................................................................................102 Training 4 Resilience.............................................................................3 Tyresafe .................................................................................................56 UK Aeronautical Rescue Coordination Centre ................................16 UNISON...............................................................................................77 University of Lincoln..........................................................................23 Vauxhall ..............................................................................................116 VCS .....................................................................................................115 Victim Support.....................................................................................73 Voluntary Sector Civil Protection Forum .........................................73 Volvo .....................................................................................................54 VW ......................................................................................................115 West Midlands Ambulance Service .....................................5, 6, 29, 33 West Midlands Fire Service............................................................6, 78 West Midlands Police............................................................................6 West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service .....................................16, 33 West Yorkshire Police..........................................................................33 WH Bence ............................................................................................54 Wm Sugden & Sons Ltd .......................................................................6 World Rescue Challenge .....................................................................13 Yorkshire Air Ambulance ...................................................................33 Yorkshire Ambulance Service ............................................................33 Zodiac Milpro ........................................................................................5 ZOLL Medical.......................................................................................5

Company Name

Company Name

Company Name

Advertisers Company Name

Page No

Page No

Page No

Page No

Airwave Solutions.........................................................................7

The Emergency Planning College.............................................19

Ledco Ltd – LED Lenser ..........................................................92

Safequip .......................................................................................45

Amputees in Action....................................................................97

Emergency Services Driver Training......................................112

Link 51.......................................................................................109

Serco Fire Services......................................................................17

APB Mobile Installations Ltd .................................................106

Emergency Services Training College ......................................22

Lyon Equipment Limited..........................................................69

Siöen.............................................................................................94

Armadillo Merino.......................................................................39

Espar Ltd...................................................................................112

MedTrade.....................................................................................80

SP Services (UK) Ltd ............................................................OBC

Arqiva.....................................................................................34, 35

ESPO............................................................................................94

MedTree.......................................................................................82

Babcock International ................................................................40

Excelerate Technology Ltd.........................................OFC, 58-60

Mercedes-Benz............................................................................31

Ballyclare Limited ......................................................................97

EVO Distribution.......................................................................45

Mines Rescue Service ...............................................................104

EP Barrus Ltd .............................................................................51

Ferno UK.....................................................................................66

National Outdoor Centre ...........................................................51

Berendsen UK Ltd ...................................................................100

The Fire Service College......................................................24, 28

Ordnance Survey ........................................................................52

Tactical Ventilation Solutions..................................................104

Bluecher UK Ltd......................................................................106

The Fire Training Group ...........................................................92

Outreach Rescue Medical Skills................................................52

Technical Absorbents ...............................................................109

Blue Lamp Afloat .......................................................................45

FlamePro .....................................................................................72

PageOne Communications.......................................................106

Terberg DTS UK ........................................................................88

Blue Star Human Resources ......................................................63

FLOOD-IT ...............................................................................111

Parkland Engineering ................................................................71

TEXPORT ..................................................................................99

BOC Healthcare..........................................................................76

Getac UK.....................................................................................80

Peli Products (UK) Ltd..............................................................52

Transport Security Expo..........................................................IBC

Bristol Uniforms Limited..........................................................39

Goliath Footwear (YDS Boots)..................................................46

Physio Control ............................................................................63

VectorCommand .........................................................................75

British Red Cross........................................................................36

HAAGEN Fire Training Products............................................91

Premier Hazard...........................................................................91

Vimpex Limited..........................................................................66

Canland (Hotpack) Ltd..............................................................51

AW Hainsworth & Sons Ltd .....................................................32

Premier Hose Technologies .......................................................84

Communicare..............................................................................88

HAIX ...........................................................................................49

Primetech UK Ltd......................................................................20

Churchill Contract Services.....................................................103

Honeywell (RAE Systems)......................................................IFC

Proflight Bags............................................................................106

Dräger ..........................................................................................12

Hytrans ........................................................................................42

ProMove ....................................................................................111

Dropboxx.....................................................................................36

Interspiro.....................................................................................86

Ricardo AEA .............................................................................104

Wm Sugdens ...............................................................................39

DS Medical..................................................................................76

ISC Wales...................................................................................103

Rosenbauer UK...........................................................................79

YPO..............................................................................................71

DuPont.........................................................................................71

ISG Infrasys...................................................................................4

RSG Engineering Limited.......................................................104

Zodiac Milpro .............................................................................46

Emergency Medical Services (UK) Ltd..................................119

Laerdal Medical ............................................................................9

Ruth Lee Limited.......................................................................42

Emergency Services Times October 2014

Strongs Plastic Products Ltd...................................................111 Stryker .......................................................................................109 Supacat.........................................................................................86

Vodafone ......................................................................................27 Volvo Cars....................................................................................57 WH Bence (Coachworks) Ltd....................................................10

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ESTCOMMENT | 3

ISSN 1472-1090 Date:

Resilience for all October 2014

Editor: David J. Holden MEng(Hons) Twitter: @999editor davidholden@brodenmedia.com Advertisement Manager: David Brown davidbrown@brodenmedia.com Advertisement Sales: Carol Fox carolfox@brodenmedia.com Office & Events Manager: Lesley Stevenson lesleystevenson@brodenmedia.com Marketing Manager: Emma Nicholls emmanicholls@brodenmedia.com Circulation: Christine Knoll admin@hpcpublishing.com

Joint Managing Directors: David Brown David Holden Published by

Robert Denholm House, Bletchingley Road Nutfield, Surrey RH1 4HW Tel: 01737 824010 Fax: 01737 824011 e-mail: davidbrown@brodenmedia.com www: brodenmedia.com Distribution: EMERGENCY SERVICES TIMES is free of charge to officers and managers who are buyers or specifiers actively involved in the procurement of equipment or services within the emergency response industry and based in the UK and Irish Republic. All other categories of reader are invited to subscribe at £130.00 to UK addresses and £165.00 overseas. Single copy price £25.00 including post and packing. The articles within Emergency Services Times are copyright and are the property of the publisher Broden Media Limited and cannot be reproduced in any media form without permission of the publisher. Application should be made in writing. Reprints of articles and advertisements are available, allow 28 days for delivery. PDF pages are available by email at £20.00 (+VAT) per page (€32.50, $33). Prices on application to the publisher.

Words: Jon Hall, Director of Training, The Fire Service College. Most of us will have noticed that it finally stopped raining. The floods have receded; there is no immediate prospect of fuel shortages. Pandemic flu stays on the horizon and the Olympics came and went. It would be nice to think that we could all relax about our statutory and organisational planning for resilient operational arrangements and business continuity because, well, things are pretty stable! However, we’re increasingly becoming aware that there is a tangible and real link between business continuity and operational sustainability and effectiveness, largely hinging on communications and multi-agency operations – in other words how well we work together when crisis hits. Capability for joint operations among blue light services has improved dramatically in recent years, with the introduction of the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme (JESIP) and the large-scale training programme that has supported it. A similarly energised programme of training and exercising for local authorities and statutory responders has yet to build impetus. More so, there is a real need for a programme that pulls all responders together to exercise on realistic scenarios relevant to local risk on a frequent and ongoing basis. Wide spectrum multi-agency exercising

The School of Resilience and Emergency Response has been created to address just this problem and to create support for individual organisations to learn and train, leading to wide spectrum multi-agency exercising. Vertical training within individual agencies and organisations will improve the overall skills base and civil contingencies arrangements and, most importantly, ensure that you have resilience in depth and a ‘B’ team ready to help. This training is then confirmed through an exercise programme, designed to validate plans and procedures and reinforce staff competences.

Printed by Manor Creative Tel: 01323 514400 Studio work by Friskywhiska Design Tel: 01947 811333 Mobile: 07976 917411 charlotte@friskywhiska.co.uk

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Being launched from the Fire Service College, the school already has a well-established portfolio of courses delivering across blue light services, infrastructure providers and government agencies. Recent training for the Highways, Environment and Military agencies, in particular when delivered in partnership with other established providers such as the College of Policing and National Ambulance Resilience Unit, is already showing benefits in the efficiency and performance of those organisations. In partnership with Training 4 Resilience, a wellestablished deliverer of training and exercising into local authorities and local resilience forums, the portfolio has grown substantially over recent times and now includes outreach and fully-managed training opportunities, designed to ensure that both key and supportive players are both comfortable and competent operating in the modern multi-agency environment. Training 4 Resilience has designed and delivered over 80 different exercises for Category 1 and Category 2 Responders across the UK, plus many more for the private sector. As a partnership, we now offer a full range of exercise opportunities – from focused sessions for small strategic teams; through desktop events that span both single and multi-agency operations, delivered across multiple locations; to live exercises either at your location or at the world leading incident simulation facilities at Moreton in Marsh, where we have access to road, rail, aviation and infrastructure scenarios that can be configured for your event.

Partnership across the resilience world

Combining existing capability, well established skills and partnerships across the resilience world, the School of Resilience and Emergency Response now offers everything from an introduction to the Civil Contingencies Act through an assisted competence programme to build confidence with LRF and strategic coordinating group operations to an established level 7 award in Executive Emergency Management. This is supplemented by a full exercising capability at all levels, including tabletop exercises and live exercises. Please come and visit the School of Resilience and Emergency Response on Stand P22 at The Emergency Services Show 2014 to discuss your needs and how it might help you improve your emergency response and ongoing business continuity. www.fireservicecollege.ac.uk www.training4resilience.co.uk

Emergency Services Times October 2014


ESTNEWS | 5

Specialist Hampshire fire and police look to command share strategic headquarters course is MAGIC Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service The Multi Agency Gold Incident Command (MAGIC) course for emergency services is the only fully integrated, strategic level, multi-agency command course available. It develops confidence, understanding and ability to perform the role of Gold Commander, alongside key multi-agency partners to resolve major incidents or civil emergencies. This intensive course is aimed at Category 1 and Category 2 Responders from the blue light services, local authorities and key partner agencies. The course includes individuals from key government departments as well as key military personnel who usually command at the strategic level for their organisations during a major incident or civil emergency. Next dates The next MAGIC courses will be run at the College of Policing from 27-30 October, 24-27 November and 9-12 March. The course will also be run at the Fire Service College from 2-5 February. The cost of the course will be £1499 and requires candidates to complete a pre-course research document and an e-learning package. This will be followed by two-and-a-half day classroom session and one day of exercise. The course will provide continuous professional development for trained Gold Commanders or multi-agency Gold training for those developing in the role as a Gold Commander. www.college.police.uk

(HFRS) and Hampshire Constabulary aim to co-locate their strategic headquarters, a move which is leading the way nationally. Over the past couple of years the two organisations have successfully co-located police officers and staff into shared facilities within HFRS buildings. This latest announcement, which is the first of its kind in the country, highlights the organisations’ commitment to build on the successful strategic police-fire partnership. The move will see around 100 senior police officers and support staff based at the new strategic headquarters at HFRS’s Leigh Road base. Hampshire Constabulary’s operational headquarters will remain in the centre of Winchester. The joint location offers the potential for a shared gold command facility, which could be utilised by either, and critically by both partners during a major incident. This will massively strengthen the already well established ties between fire and police through joint blue light agency working and through the Local Resilience Forum, as was well evidenced in the emergency response to the unprecedented flooding that affected Hampshire and the rest of the country earlier this year. The ambitious plans are part of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Hampshire and the Isle of Wight’s commitment to greater integration and sharing of facilities with Hampshire Constabulary’s key partners and has backing from the Hampshire Fire

Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service (HFRS) and Hampshire Constabulary are committed to build on the successful strategic police-fire partnership.

and Rescue Authority. Police and Crime Commissioner Simon Hayes said, “Co-locating senior police officers and support staff from Hampshire Constabulary with Hampshire Fire and Rescue is key to the successful delivery of my policing estate strategy. It is only by investing in joint-working initiatives such as this that I will be able to protect people and places locally while ensuring that the police’s estate is cost-effective and fit for purpose despite significant economic challenges. I look forward to continuing the close working relationship with Hampshire Fire and Rescue into the future.” Further efficiencies Both services anticipate further efficiencies in effective command of multi-operational strategic incidents in due course once the new arrangements are operational and bedded in. Timeframes are currently under discussion but it is anticipated that senior police officers can start moving into Eastleigh in the autumn of next year, although precise timeframes are to be agreed. www.hantsfire.gov.uk

Boats upgrade for Buckinghamshire and Milton Keynes The recent delivery of two new high specification Zodiac Milpro boats has brought a significant upgrade to the capabilities of the Water Rescue Units operated by Buckinghamshire and Milton Keynes Fire and Rescue Service in the UK. The new Zodiac Milpro FC 470 inflatables are now based at the Newport Pagnell and Beaconsfield Fire Stations from where they and their crews are available to provide a water rescue capability across the county. At 4.7m long and equipped with 40hp Mariner outboard engines, the new Zodiac Milpro boats are more stable and provide more power and deck space than their predecessors. The new boats use the unique new

Zodiac Futura hull design that features two removable inflatable tubes fixed to the hull below the water line. These make it more stable in fast turns and increase its payload by enhancing its buoyancy. They also enable the boat to plane more quickly, which adds to its overall speed and economy. The boat crews are made up of firefighters from Buckinghamshire and

The Beaconsfield and Newport Pagnell water rescue teams with their new boats.

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Milton Keynes Fire and Rescue Service who have been additionally trained to a high standard in powerboat operation and water rescue techniques in line with the latest DEFRA (Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs) requirements. The boats are mounted on trailers supplied by SBS Ltd and towed by specialised support vehicles. Buckinghamshire and Milton Keynes Fire and Rescue Service selected its new boats from a range of over 60 models available from Zodiac Milpro. The company is headquartered in Paris and supplies its UK customers through Zodiac Milpro UK Ltd, which is based in South Wales. www.zodiacmilpro.com

A deal to supply pre-hospital defibrillators to West Midlands Ambulance Service will see the ambulance service replace all of its existing monitors with the latest technology from ZOLL® Medical UK Ltd. Weighing less than 6kg, the X Series is half the size and half the weight of most full-featured defibrillators, yet powerful and built to the most rigorous standards for ruggedness. The X Series has every advanced monitoring and communication capability required by a leading ambulance service. www.zoll.com

Bob Wade Media Ltd has won the tender to provide a full media and communications service for the Emergency Planning Society (EPS). Bob brings with him a team of professionals who have years of experience of resilience communications, all having worked for the BBC or the former Central Office of Information. The team will be providing media relations, editing Resilience magazine, monitoring and engaging with social media, and identifying marketing opportunities for the EPS. www.the-eps.org

Northumbria University recently hosted a trauma training day for the International Rescue Corps, in collaboration with the specialist rescue organisation. The event at Northumbria’s Clinical Skills Centre gave IRC members the opportunity to undergo intensive training with a variety of dramatic scenarios and simulations. The day was developed by the university to help members of the charity to gain an insight into the injuries they may see and have to treat while in disaster situations. www.intrescue.org

Communications organisations who were formally invited to tender for the new Emergency Services Network (ESN) have attended a ‘supplier conference’ hosted by the Home Office. Minister of State for Policing, Criminal Justice and Victims, Mike Penning, said, “The emergency services need a modernised communications network to help them protect the public and save lives; we are on track to deliver this critical part of our national infrastructure by 2017. Interest in providing the new emergency services network and its supporting elements is strong; we expect those organisations selected to tender to produce proposals to create a communications network that is the best in the world.” www.homeoffice.gov.uk

Emergency Services Times October 2014


6 | ESTNEWS

The East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST) is one of the first in the country to roll out the latest equipment for moving patients. A new carry chair will virtually eliminate the need to lift patients after being fitted with tracks to roll up and down stairs. The carry chairs are on all new ambulances and will be rolled out across the region as more replacement vehicles are introduced. Staff, including the latest student paramedics, are currently receiving training on how to use them. www.eastamb.nhs.uk

In addition to holding the current framework contract for the supply of police uniform poly/cotton shirts, Wm Sugden & Sons Ltd was delighted to be awarded ‘the Framework Contract for the Supply of All Climate Shirts’ to the UK police forces. The new garments are now available to all forces including the British Transport Police, Civil Nuclear Defence Constabulary, Police Scotland and police forces of the Ministry of Defence. Over 100,000 garments have already been supplied and it is anticipated that over 400,000 will be provided by the end of 2015. www.wmsugden.co.uk

West Midlands Ambulance Service has become the first emergency service in the region to receive accreditation to one of the toughest ‘excellence’ programmes in the country. The Freight Transport Association (FTA) has awarded the trust ‘Van Excellence’, which means for patients in the region who need an ambulance, the vehicle they are conveyed in is operated at the highest level.

Vast majority pass police fitness tests Police officers across England and Wales will now undergo annual fitness tests with initial figures showing the overwhelming majority are fit. Police in all 43 forces who undertake personal safety training, which is given to officers who make arrests, will complete the test after it became mandatory on 1 September 2013. The test, based on scientific evidence, involves a 15m shuttle run, to be completed to an endurance level of 5:4. There is no obstacle course or upper strength testing as part of the test, which lasts just under four minutes. The standard is the same as that used when recruiting officers. As the professional body for police, the College of Policing sets the standards for the service and worked with the Fitness Testing Working Group to issue guidance on how police forces should carry out officer fitness tests. There are different standards of fitness required for officers in more physically demanding roles, such as firearms officers. Other roles that require a higher standard of fitness

www.wmfs.net www.west-midlands.police.uk

research to ensure officers are fit to carry out their particular role. Working in any of the blue light services is a demanding job and it is important that fitness tests are role related. “We have a duty of care to officers to ensure they are fit to do their job and protect the public. The new guidance issued to forces has been designed to provide supportive measures to help officers to pass.” Fitness tests have been introduced into police following a recommendation in the Winsor Review, an independent review of police officer and staff remuneration and conditions, published in 2011. www.college.police.uk

Towering exercise for Cambridgeshire’s emergency services provides unique joint training opportunity The event was held at the site in Cambridge where Morgan Sindall is building the new Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology Building for the University of Cambridge. Crews had to utilise their working at height procedures, rescue expertise and command and control skills to safely and effectively rescue the crane operator and other maintenance workers on the tower crane. HART paramedics treated the simulated casualties for head and neck injuries wearing all their safety equipment, including harnesses, while seven floors above ground. In an

www.wmas.nhs.uk

Officers from West Midlands Fire Service and West Midlands Police services have joined together to create a new team to promote fuel station safety. Operation Bleve will see officers making uniformed visits to filling stations across the West Midlands, conducting safety checks and providing advice and guidance to assist in the safe and effective sales and maintenance of fuel and associated equipment. Real-time information and intelligence will be shared with other local and national authorities as the need arises.

are police divers, marine police and dog handlers. The college released snapshot figures in August, which showed that of the 42,197 tests carried out between September last year and May 2014, a total of 41,038 passed, giving an overall pass rate of 97 percent. If an officer is not able to pass the fitness test at the first attempt, the college advises forces to provide support and allow a series of at least two retakes. If all appropriate support measures and alternatives have been delivered and the officer is still unable to achieve the required standard, the college advises forces to use the unsatisfactory performance procedures as set out in the Police (Performance) Regulations 2012 procedure. The snapshot figures also revealed that women and older officers had a slightly lower pass rate (94 percent) than men (99 percent). Rose Bartlett, from the College of Policing, said, “The results show that the vast majority of officers tested are fit. The fitness level of the test was developed using academic

Cambridge Fire Station’s Red Watch planned the exercise.

Emergency services have teamed up with construction and infrastructure company Morgan Sindall to develop a unique training exercise utilising life saving skills. Dozens of firefighters from Cambridgeshire Fire and Rescue Service joined paramedics from the East of England Ambulance Service Trust’s Hazardous Area Response Team (HART) on the evening of 23 July for the scenario, which simulated a collision between two tower cranes.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

(From L to R): Watch Commander Paul Oliver, Red Watch Cambridge; Toby Lucas, Senior Site Manager from Morgan Sindall; Dan Symonds, Emergency Medical Technician with the Hazardous Area Response Team; Firefighters Ben Sams and Richard Gethin, from Linton’s on-call crew.

exercise that lasted around three hours, they then helped fire crews to safely move them down to the floor. Cambridge Fire Station’s Red Watch planned the training drill with the Morgan Sindall project team, to give firefighters and staff the opportunity to test their emergency procedures during an incident. Watch Commander Paul Oliver, from Cambridge Red Watch, said, “Although there were no real casualties, trappings or flames, firefighters still benefited hugely from being able to use an unfamiliar site. We really appreciate local firms like this allowing us to use their facilities as it adds a greater training challenge for the firefighters who continually strive to expand their knowledge and develop their skill sets.” Gary Perkiss, HART Training Manager, said, “We were working from height alongside fire crews to treat and safely move the simulated casualties that were included. We try to make these exercises as real as possible; it went really well and the challenges we faced really made us think.” www.cambsfire.gov.uk

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8 | ESTNEWS

A new banking framework available from public sector purchasing organisation ESPO will make the procurement of banking services easier for customers in the public sector. Barclays Bank, Lloyds TSB and Royal Bank of Scotland have been carefully selected by ESPO and will offer a range of banking solutions as part of the framework, especially designed to help local authorities, central government, schools, social housing providers, police, NHS, and all other public sector organisations with their banking requirements. www.espo.org

Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service has deployed Peplink routers and access points to integrate satellite and bonded 3G/4G cellular networks within a range of emergency response vehicles, trailers and portable units to ensure reliable network access during incident response. www.peplink.com

A traditional topping out ceremony has taken place to mark the construction of the new search and rescue helicopter base at Humberside Airport reaching its full height. The base will house two SAR helicopters, operated by Bristow Helicopters Ltd, their crews and support team. It is due to become fully operational in April 2015, when Bristow Helicopters Ltd takes over delivery of helicopter Search and Rescue services throughout the UK on behalf of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA). The programme of new build and refurbishment work across all 10 bases under the SAR contract will continue until early 2017.

App calls on Good Samaritans to deliver basic life support Neurosurgeon and London’s Air Ambulance Doctor, Mr Mark Wilson, and technical developers, Ali Ghorbangholi and Ali Haddad, have developed the GoodSAM app, which uses GPRS technology to alert trained first responders to emergencies within their immediate reach. With over 1500 first responders currently signed up as Good Samaritans across the UK (nearly 1000 in London), the creators are now appealing to members of the public to become ‘alerters’. Through the GoodSAM app, trained first responders (who may be off duty) including doctors, nurses, firefighters, paramedics, police officers and medical students can register to be alerted to incidents in their surrounding area and could be on scene within minutes. With a built-in Defibrilocator function, app users can also easily identify public access defibrillators. Mr Mark Wilson said, “If a patient has a cardiac arrest or a traumatic head injury, it is the first few minutes after the incident that determine the outcome – life, death or long-term brain injury. But in this time frame, we could never employ enough paramedics to be on scene in seconds – hence we need to alert people with the skills in the surrounding few hundred metres that can be. “GoodSAM can revolutionise our ability to get to the patient immediately and improve outcomes. Harnessing the community for the benefit of the community. Effectively what the app

does is enable someone to shout for help, really loudly – even through walls – so the anaesthetist in the bookshop knows that the man in the coffee shop next door is having a cardiac arrest. “Opening an airway and administering basic life support can save lives if done quickly enough and all around us are people who have these lifesaving skills and could be put to good use in an emergency. These Good Samaritans can provide vital assistance until such time as the emergency services arrive on scene.” In a life threatening emergency anyone who has downloaded the GoodSAM Alerter app can simply open it and press ‘Call for Help’. The app identifies their geographical location and as soon as the call is confirmed as a medical emergency the app does two things simultaneously – dials 999 to request the emergency services and sends a group alert to the nearest GoodSAM Responders. When a GoodSAM Responder receives an alert, using the app they can either accept the request for help or reject it if they are unavailable. If they reject the request, the next nearest responder is alerted. The caller is advised that a group of responders has been alerted and notifies them when a GoodSAM Responder is on their way. The app guides the GoodSAM Responder to the exact location of the caller and identifies where the

nearest defibrillator is located. A built in messaging service means the caller and the responder can communicate on route if required. Once on scene a GoodSAM responder can reassure the patient and begin performing basic first aid and life support as required before handing over the emergency services. Mark Wilson added, “The GoodSAM App is a free tool to help the public get emergency assistance from the local community. There is so much life-saving support, immediately available, if we can just tap into it. Whether a trained first aider, someone with a medical condition or just a Good Samaritan that one day might be in the right place at the right time to give the alert it’s well worth having the GoodSAM app on your phone.” All Good Samaritans are verified manually. GoodSAM has a global reach and has already started rolling out in other countries, including in Ireland and Australia. www.londonsairambulance.co.uk www.goodsamapp.org

www.bristowgroup.com

Much-needed reconstruction work to Midlands Air Ambulance’s flagship RAF Cosford airbase in Shropshire is now complete. The new building was funded entirely by a £200,000 grant from the County Air Ambulance Trust and includes a dedicated clinical training room, larger open plan kitchen and lounge area, an air operations office, pilots’ office and utility room. In addition, as the service is looking into the viability of flying during the hours of darkness, there are overnight rest facilities for the flight paramedics and doctors plus a separate bedroom for the on-duty pilot. www.midlandsairambulance.com

National award for ambulance staff communications A first-of-its-kind for ambulance staff communications has won a national award just months after it was set up. Rolling news site ‘Need to Know’ went live in the East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST) in March, following staff feedback about using a more easily accessible and regularly updated form of communication. Internal Communications Manager Tara Crabtree, Internal Communications Officer Sophie Taylor and Digital Officer Gail Huggins worked with existing website providers Sitekit on the project from inception to launch, and it was announced on 17 July that it has won an Institute of Internal Communication Award of Excellence for a new channel.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

Tara said, “It’s an incredible achievement to win a national award for Need to Know and I’m immensely proud of the team. Developing the site took a lot of hard work and creativity and it’s really satisfying to see that come to fruition; now we have a 24/7 rolling news channel that’s more interactive, engaging and accessible – and most importantly it works better for our staff.” The site works in a similar way to news websites with daily updates, a scrolling ‘Bitesize’ feature, and even a Twitter feed. Staff can also access it offsite (eg mobile devices) and it’s also printable for those who want it. Chief Executive Dr Anthony Marsh added, “I am very proud of the team for winning this award, and for coming

(From L to R): Digital Officer Gail Huggins, Internal Communications Officer Sophie Taylor and Internal Communications Manager Tara Crabtree.

up with an easy-to-use but dynamic and effective way of communicating with staff.” www.eastamb.nhs.uk

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ESTNEWS | 11

Greater Manchester becomes first UK FRS to adopt new layered multi-purpose fire fighting garments An innovative layered approach to garment design sees Greater Manchester become the first UK fire and rescue service to meet all its response duties in one garment in which the different levels and types of protection for structural, USAR and wildland are met through wearing different combinations of outer and under garments. The contract for the 3200 sets of the XFlex/RescueFlex™ layered gar-

ments was confirmed recently. In a major departure from the approach to firefighter protection developed over the last 10 years, Greater Manchester’s new garments, designed by Bristol, will substantially reduce the number of garments each firefighter will need to fulfil the European standards of protection for use in structural fire fighting, technical rescue operations and fighting heath and scrub fires. The novel layered approach marries two jackets, a RescueFlex™ Jacket and an XFlex™ outer jacket, with one XFlex™ overtrouser. The RescueFlex™ jacket has a high visibility outershell with a Crosstech® SR moisture barrier and meets the Wildland Standard EN15614:2007 and Hi-Visibility Standard EN20471:2013. When worn with the XFlex™ outer jacket it meets EN469:2005 Level 2. The XFlex™ outer jacket is manufactured using an outer fabric of Pbi Matrix with a thermal barrier. The

XFlex™ trouser combines a Pbi Matrix outershell with a Crosstech® Fireblocker moisture barrier and a thermal barrier. The profile of the garments is based on Bristol’s latest XFlex™ design, providing an enhanced level of comfort and ergonomic flexibility. Combined with its technical performance, these wearer considerations, in which there was a clear preference for Bristol’s design and visual appeal, were key to securing the contract. Philip Tasker, Bristol’s UK Sales Director, said, “Our XFlex™ design platform has already won us considerable new business both in UK and overseas markets and has enabled us to successfully deliver on Manchester’s needs for a layered garment by adopting the basic design principles of XFlex™ to create an entirely new firefighter garment solution.” www.bristoluniforms.co.uk

Six months of success for fleet maintenance partnership Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service (HFRS) and Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service (RBFRS) entered into a unique partnership in January 2014. RBFRS had, for many years, outsourced its vehicle maintenance to a number of providers in the private sector and wanted to bring service provision back in house. Meanwhile, HFRS had dedicated specialist workshop facilities with capacity to undertake additional workshop based maintenance. An initial scoping project showed that a mutually beneficial partnership would also be financially viable based on a cost recovery model. From the start of the year, RBFRS vehicles began arriving at HFRS’s Fleet Maintenance Centre (FMC). HFRS operates the main workshop with RBFRS contributing a member of staff to the team. ‘On station’ repairs and maintenance are undertaken by mobile workshops, staffed in the south by HFRS technicians and by RBFRS technicians in the north of the combined region. In terms of the volume of vehicles that can pass through the FMC in Eastleigh, HFRS has around 330 vehicles and approximately 970 pieces of associated equipment, while RBFRS has around 150 vehicles and 230 pieces of associated equipment. Has it been a success? Data analysis from the fleet management system, which is shared by HFRS and RBFRS, shows that the first six months of the project since the first Berkshire vehicles started arriving in January have met projected timescales and the financial benefits for both HFRS and RBFRS are in line with forecasts. CFOA Best Practice Standards are applied to both fleets. Sam Davis, Project Manager, Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service, said, “This is producing benefits for both fire services. The partnership has produced a combined public sector benefit of around £142,000 in the initial six months from a joint investment of just £90,000. The partnership is forecast to recurrently deliver an annual public sector benefit of £185,000.

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(From L to R) John Bonney, Chief Officer Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service and Andy Fry, Chief Officer Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service at the Fleet Maintenance Centre in Hampshire.

“It’s helping us both meet our financial challenges. As far as I’m aware there’s nothing else like this in the UK fire service where two authorities are sharing the running costs at one single facility.” HFRS Fleet Manager Tim Mansbridge said, “Getting the IT right from the start is important. Finding a solution which allows easy access for both services may lead to an IT hosting re-provision, such as taking the service to the cloud. Vehicle movement logistics are likely to be challenging initially, especially if not adequately resourced. You need to make contingency arrangements and put a robust plan in place, which will help mitigate any foreseeable problems.” Andy Haste, Head of Transport and Engineering at RBFRS, said, “Getting the respective legal teams

together early in the development phase is essential to establish a robust governance framework in line with implementation timescales. Sharing project management resource is an effective way to keep costs down and ensures a joined up approach from the separate services.” He added, “Fire and rescue services are only as effective as the vehicles that can get them to incidents in a timely and reliable manner, and sharing the same high standards of service and maintenance with a fellow FRS, gives us the security in our fleet that we need.” www.hantsfire.gov.uk www.rbfrs.co.uk

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ESTEVENTS | 13

Fire Service College to host Dates for World Rescue Challenge your diary The Fire Service College is proud to be hosting the World Rescue Challenge (WRC) 2014, on behalf of the World Rescue Organisation (WRO) from 9-12 October. The Fire Service College is one of the world’s largest operational fire and rescue training facilities and is the perfect venue to host the most prestigious international competition for fire and rescue services from across the world. This event will provide an opportunity for international firefighter teams to showcase their rescue skills and techniques, while competing against other teams from across the globe.

The aim of the WRO is to provide a platform for rescue and medical personnel to share and advance rescue science and technology, as teams compete in intense, realistic scenarios for the world title and trophy. Winners last year included Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service, who won the Technical Award and Extrication Overall Team Award. South Wales Fire and Rescue Service also had a great 2013 and won Best Incident Command, Best Medic and Complex Pit Awards. London Fire Brigade won the Trauma and Limited Pit awards and Catalunya Terressa, Spain, won the Rapid Pit Award. The four-day event is expected to attract over 300 operational delegates, together with support teams and guests from up to 20 countries from around the world.

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24-25 September 2014 The Emergency Services Show 2014 The NEC, Birmingham www.emergencyuk.com 7-8 October 2014 Trauma Innovation Olympia Conference Centre, London www.ame-event.co.uk/ti 9-12 October 2014 World Rescue Challenge (WRC) 2014 www.wrescue.org 11 November 2014 Blue Light Innovation Conference and Exhibition QEII Conference Centre, London http://bluelightinnovation.co.uk

www.wrescue.org

Operational speakers announced to complete air ambulance conference The prestigious line up of expert speakers has been confirmed for this year’s National Air Ambulance Conference run by the Association of Air Ambulances, which takes place on 17 November at the Millennium Gloucester Hotel, London. The event, which is a firm fixture for aero medical experts, aims to inform, incite debate and provide the platform for the air ambulance sector to come together, share ideas and build partnerships. Air ambulance leaders and operational staff, including clinicians and pilots, attend the event to network with each other and hear from leading sector speakers on issues pertinent to helicopter emergency medical services. In June it was announced that clinical experts Professor Keith Willett, Dr Gareth Davies and David Griffiths of the Care Quality Commission (CQC) will take to the stage. The association has now announced some of the operational experts who will deliver presentations on the day: Brian Baldwin, from the Civil Aviation Authority, has confirmed his attendance and will give a European Aviation Safety Agency update; Lt Col Chris Wright (Royal Army Medical Corps) will present ‘Lessons from the Theatre of War for the Future’. Chris served 12 tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan and spent years treating injured soldiers and civilians. He believes that lessons learnt in the field can be applied in a civilian setting; Mike Shanahan, Head of Special Operations for Yorkshire Ambulance Service, will provide a review of the service’s preparation and deployment for the

22-28 September 2014 National Air Ambulance Week www.associationofairambulances.co.uk/naaw

12-15 November 2014 Medica 2014 Dusseldorf, Germany www.medica-tradefair.com

17 November 2014 National Air Ambulance Conference Millennium Gloucester Hotel, London www.associationofairambulances.co.uk 25 November 2014 Lone Worker Safety 2014 London Olympia www.loneworkersafetyexpo.com 26-27 November 2014 CATO Final Conference and Exercise Brussels, Belgium www.cato-project.eu 3 March 2015 Professional Clothing Show – Meet the Buyer London Marriott Hotel, Regent’s Park www.professionalclothingshow.com

Tour de France; and John Power, Senor Fire Officer, will deliver a speech on ‘Helipad Heroes’. The key colleges of clinical, charity and air operations are all present in an agenda that is comprehensive and packed with experts within their fields. Additionally, group debates and further presentations will be found in many of the workshops taking place throughout the day. Last year’s conference saw a total of 22 speakers and 25+ sponsors with over 330 delegates attending. Clive Dicken, National Director of the AAA, said, “This year’s event has even more for our delegates, from high profile cutting edge speakers, new ideas, more opportunities to network and workshops that will challenge and inspire. As a member, delegate rates are exceptional value and as a non-member extremely competitive for the level of specialist information you will receive. Don’t forget CPD points will be available.” www.aoaa.org.uk

4-5 March 2015 Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience Europe The Hague, Netherlands www.cipre-expo.com 10-12 March 2015 Security and Policing 2015 FIVE Farnborough, Hampshire www.securityandpolicing.co.uk 31 March - 1 April 2015 British APCO 2015 Manchester Central www.bapco.co.uk 21-22 April 2015 Counter Terror Expo 2015 Olympia, London www.counterterrorexpo.com 21-22 April 2015 Ambition 2015 Olympia, London www.ambitionexpouk.com

Emergency Services Times October 2014


14 | ESTCOMPANY PROFILE

Rosenbauer UK looks to impress with maiden ESS appearance Since Rosenbauer’s merge with Yorkshire based North Fire plc in April of this year, much attention and anticipation has been aimed towards the world’s biggest manufacturer of fire and rescue appliances and exactly how its world class fleet offerings can integrate into the British fire and rescue service fleets. It is no surprise that Rosenbauer is the world’s biggest supplier and manufacturer of fire and rescue service appliances with arguably the most technologically advanced trucks integrated with the most attractive bodywork on the global market. Added to this, the crew comfort and working space is almost unrivalled – incorporating more safety for the crew than ever before. Rosenbauer’s appliances also make impossible stowage tasks possible ensuring every cubic inch of stowage space is used effectively, meaning either more equipment can be carried or smaller, more manoeuvrable chassis can be used for the same job. UK specific vehicle range Since the aforementioned April merge, investing heavily into their UK operations, Rosenbauer has demonstrated its desire and willingness to completely concentrate on its UK specific appliance range, albeit stemming from the company’s world class ‘standard’ range technology and styling. “We’re fully aware of the requirements and pre-requisites for what a British appliance needs to achieve in terms of manual handling and truck dimensions,” said Oliver North, Managing Director, Rosenbauer UK plc. “But what we will achieve is a more efficient, refined and aesthetically stunning appliance from our current ‘standard’ here in the UK. I genuinely think we have the most professional brigades throughout Europe in terms of firefighters and their skill levels but my personal opinion is that many parts of Europe are very much ahead of us in terms of quality of front line appliances and I’m confident we can start to change that with our UK specific range.”

Rosenbauer fire appliances are no strangers to UK shores, with the already established range of Metz Aerials both on the run and in build at the present time, with forecasts showing continued growth into the near and distant future. Rosenbauer’s ‘marquee’ appliances are also an extremely common sight at the majority of major UK airports too with the excellent Panther – of which there are over 60 of throughout the UK and Ireland.

Twister lace-up fire boot.

The Otter pump from Rosenbauer.

Range of equipment As most fire and rescue service personnel are aware, Rosenbauer is almost a standard brand at a fire station in one way or another already, with the excellent range of equipment supplied to fire and rescue services, UK-wide, over many years. The Rosenbauer HEROS-xtreme fire helmet is a market leader in Britain and the Rosenbauer Otter LPP has been a ‘firefighter favourite’ for over a

decade. Now the company’s presence in the PPE market looks set to grow firmly with the excellent Twister lace-up fire boot winning various trials already throughout brigades since its launch. The Rosenbauer Fanergy-Pro turbo fan is also gaining positive momentum throughout brigades, testament that Rosenbauer really does specialise as a ‘full liner’ for brigade requirements.

“Visitors to ESS2014 will be able to demonstrate any of the market leading ranges on the Rosenbauer stand.” In conjunction with Rosenbauer’s manufactured products, the company incorporates another strong English connection into its portfolio with the superb, British-made Argus range of thermal imaging cameras. The highlight of the UK fire and rescue service thermal imaging market over the past two years has been the excellent Mi-TIC, which is now comfortably a market leader with over 25 brigades using the device operationally. The ARGUS Mi-TIC encompasses the latest thermal imaging technology and provides the firefighter with what many say is the most ergonomic design on the market, with a weight of only 740g. Simplicity of operation and impeccable robustness also add together resulting in the most loved hand held thermal imaging unit in the UK, as well as around the world.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

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ESTCOMPANY PROFILE | 15

The Emergency Services Show 2014: highlights Rosenbauer 12-tonne Compact Line pumping appliance: Rosenbauer’s Compact Line range is the natural choice for UK fire and rescue services due to its compact design; the appliance is designed for maximum manoeuvrability and operation around ever congested and narrow roads and streets. The Compact Line has proven time after time that due to sophisticated stowage technology it can, on most occasions, carry as much as if not more than a more standard 18-tonne UK B-type pumping appliance. While achieving its light weight and smaller dimensions, the Compact Line still offers more crew cab space and comfort, ensuring working conditions are improved for the front line firefighter. Metz L32A-XS turntable ladder: Buckinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service’s soonto-be commissioned Metz XS will be the aerial highlight of The Emergency Services Show 2014, displaying what is arguably the most efficient ladder set on the European market today. The XS boasts a bigger outreach, and just as importantly, the smallest in-reach over and above its nearest rival with an expertly engineered ladder set, while the ‘Metz design’ bodywork provides extremely functional yet an aesthetically stunning look, providing aerial crews with maximum ability and confidence to carry out the most demanding aerial challenges (you can watch the Metz XS video in full at www.rosenbauer.co.uk).

The HEROS-xtreme fire helmet.

Rosenbauer FANERGY-Pro: The new Rosenbauer Turbo Fan FANERGY-Pro, makes its first public appearance in the UK with a full demonstration available from any of Rosenbauer’s technical representatives on the Rosenbauer stand at The Emergency Services Show. The FANERGY-Pro raises the bar of quality and air flow with a completely unrivalled, robust, and ergonomic design, chosen time and time again by firefighters throughout the UK during recent trials as their fan of choice.

The new Rosenbauer Turbo Fan FANERGY-Pro, makes its first public appearance in the UK.

ARGUS Mi-TIC and security thermal imaging cameras: The market leading ARGUS Mi-TIC will be available for demonstration at ESS2014 with senior management staff in attendance from e2v’s thermal imaging division – ARGUS. For years, ARGUS has continued to set benchmarks and raise the bar of quality for specialist emergency services thermal imaging requirements with both fire and rescue services and police forces throughout the UK opting for

The NAUTILUS is the first submersible pump from Rosenbauer with an electric drive.

the latest technology of British manufactured TICs, distributed and serviced exclusively by Rosenbauer UK. Personal Protective Equipment: Rosenbauer’s excellent PPE range will be available to try out at this year’s Emergency Services Show, in particular the market leading HEROS-xtreme fire helmet and the magnificent TWISTER fire boot. Make the most of the fitting station on Rosenbauer’s stand to see for yourself just why Rosenbauer’s PPE continues to dominate brigade trials nationwide. Pumps: the excellent range of Rosenbauer pumps will be shown and demonstrated at the NEC, highlighting the Otter, Beaver and Fox portable pumps with the excellent Rosenbauer UHPS also available to view. Rosenbauer will also proudly exhibit the excellent NH-series pump via the Compact Line pumping appliance. www.rosenbauer.co.uk

The Metz L32A-XS turntable ladder.

Metz B32 ALP: for many UK fire and rescue services, the Aerial Ladder Platform (ALP) is the only choice of aerial appliance due to its outstanding water delivery capability. The Metz B32 ALP is among the best on the planet with its relative speed, superb outreach, low noise and enviable body styling. The B32 has continued to impress brigades throughout the UK in 2014 as more and more brigades look to Metz aerials to increase their aerial efficiency and capability.

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The ARGUS Mi-TIC will be available for demonstration at ESS2014.

The SAFE GRIP 3 protective firefighter glove.

Emergency Services Times October 2014


16 | ESTPEOPLE

Graham Gash from Kent Fire and Rescue Service (KFRS) is hanging up his boots after more than four decades on the job. Graham was the KFRS project lead for the construction of the HS1 railway, helped develop the water mist fire system in the Dartford Tunnel, undertook the review following the Channel Tunnel fire in 2008 and is currently Head of Channel Tunnel Operations for KFRS. Throughout his long career, Graham has attended a number of large fires in residential, commercial and industrial premises and in September 2011, he received the Kent Medal, a rare and prestigious honour, for his outstanding service and commitment to the county and people of Kent. www.kent.fire-uk.org

Former combat paramedic Steve Nixon has been appointed National Sales Manager for Vehicle Conspicuity at Rennicks UK, a job in which he’ll talk to key contacts within the emergency services and Chapter 8 sectors on a daily basis. Rennicks UK provides a range of Nikkalite® high-performance conspicuity markings for a wide variety of applications including HGVs, trailers, police, ambulance, fire and Highways Agency vehicles. www.rennicksuk.com

Greenhead Councillor Judith Hughes has been appointed as the first ever female leader of West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Authority, the country’s fourth largest metropolitan fire and rescue authority. Cllr Hughes, who succeeds Councillor Mehboob Khan as Chair will be joined by fellow Councillor Tracey Austin (Labour, Wakefield North) as Vice Chair.

Appointment strengthens charity’s operational performance London’s Air Ambulance has announced the appointment of Charles Newitt to the newly created post of Chief Operating Officer (COO). Colonel Newitt, a former senior Army officer, will be responsible for all aspects of the charity’s aviation function, including its Safety Management System, under the regulatory framework imposed jointly by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and the European Aviation Safety Association Agency (EASA). Charles will also contribute more broadly to the organisation’s strategic direction by taking further responsibility for HR and facilities management. This senior appointment completes the restructuring of the charity under Chief Executive Officer Graham Hodgkin. It will allow him to embark on a more externally focused role in diversifying the charity’s funding base, securing sustainable support and patronage, while continuing to pursue the charity’s goal of securing a second helicopter and extending its daylight flying hours. www.londonsairambulance.co.uk

www.westyorksfire.gov.uk

The Chief Fire Officer of the London Fire Brigade, Ron Dobson, announced his resignation from the position of London Fire Commissioner on 2 September after 35 years service with the brigade. In a letter to the Chairman of the LFEPA, the Commissioner said, “This has been an incredibly difficult decision for me to reach because it has been an honour and a privilege to be the leader of what I consider to be without doubt the best fire and rescue service in the world. I believe now is the right time for both the London Fire Brigade and me to make this change.” The Commissioner will continue to serve as Chief Fire Officer for the next six months. www.london-fire.gov.uk

Colonel Charles Newitt, Chief Operating Officer (COO), London’s Air Ambulance.

ARCC officer’s hat trick of rescues

Flight Lieutenant Richard ‘Stino’ Stinson photographed at the incident site at Lossiemouth East Beach. Image Courtesy: Press and Journal Newspaper

A walk with his wife and children on Lossiemouth’s East Beach turned into a rescue incident for Flight Lieutenant Richard ‘Stino’ Stinson on 11 July 2014. Richard is no stranger to handling rescue incidents in his role as a Search and Rescue Coordinator and Duty Watch Manager in the UK Aeronautical Rescue Coordination Centre (ARCC) at Kinloss barracks, Moray. This time, he took a leading role in the rescue of three people after an 11-year-old girl who was being swept out to sea by a riptide after swimming in the River Lossie. Richard swam out to rescue the girl and made it back to shore just as RAF Lossiemouth’s Sea King helicopter arrived on scene. The RAF SAR helicopter’s winchman paramedic then checked the youngster’s medical condition before she was taken to Dr Gray’s Hospital in Elgin by ambulance to be treated for shock. Apart from this, Richard’s prompt action had ensured that she was otherwise safe and well. Two other people who had tried to assist the girl also found themselves

caught by the riptide, so Richard went back into the water and rescued both of them in turn. The second person he rescued was the woman who had been looking after the child. She attempted to reach the child but was caught in the same riptide. After rescuing her, Richard re-entered the water for a third time to rescue a board-surfer who also got into difficulties while trying to reach the young girl. Richard spotted the unfolding drama while out for a walk on the beach with his wife, their five-year-old daughter and two year old son. His colleagues on duty in the ARCC at Kinloss had received a separate request of help from the police and coastguard. They responded by despatching Rescue 137 from nearby RAF Lossiemouth, unaware that one of their own was taking his own direct action. “Coordinating rescues is my job, but this was a first for me to be actually involved,” he added. www.mod.uk

Duke of Cambridge to join EAAA as a pilot East Anglian Air Ambulance has confirmed that the Duke of Cambridge will join the charity as a helicopter pilot in spring 2015. The Duke will join the EAAA’s highly skilled team of pilots and clinicians who ensure that the highest standard of pre-hospital emergency medicine is provided to the scene of accidents and medical emergencies across the East Anglian region.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

Mr Andrew Egerton Smith MBE, Chairman of EAAA, said, “Having the Duke of Cambridge as one of our pilots is marvellous news as he brings much experience to the charity after his successful career as a search and rescue pilot. We have an outstanding track record of attending people in the hour of need, which is recognised and generously supported by our local communities.”

Jane Gurney, CEO of Essex and Herts Air Ambulance Trust, said, “It is a very positive development not only for the region’s air ambulance charities and the communities they serve but also for the UK wide air ambulance industry. We wish the Duke of Cambridge every success in his new appointment.” www.eaaa.org.uk

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18 | ESTRESILIENCE

Building resilience to extreme space weather Our sun continually emits radiation and plasma. Space weather describes how these emissions interact with the Earth. Severe space weather presents challenges, and can affect several countries’ infrastructures at the same time. Words: Chris Felton, Cabinet Office. Occasionally, from the sun, there are massive eruptions of X-rays and gamma rays (solar flares), proton bursts (proton events/radiation storms) and/or magnetised plasma clouds (coronal mass ejections). These events are associated with ‘sunspots’, active areas on the sun’s surface. The number of sunspots varies over an 11 year ‘solar cycle’. The current solar cycle peaked in 2013. But extreme events, potentially causing widespread disturbance to technology, might happen at any time. The most significant recorded solar storm was the 1859 Carrington Event, named after British astronomer Richard Carrington. Its impact was limited to the telegraph network. But as our reliance on technology has increased, so has vulnerability to the effects of these storms. A storm in 1989 caused a major power blackout in Quebec. The Halloween Storms of 2003 also had global impact. Global impact Severe space weather can lead to geomagnetic storms. As well as causing the Aurora (the Northern and Southern Lights), these storms can induce an electric field in the Earth’s crust and electric currents through the ground that can disrupt or damage power grids, pipelines, telecommunications and railways. It can disrupt satellite signals (eg Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS)) for days at a time, damage satellites and put them out of service, affect electronic systems in aircraft, and increase radiation for aircraft passengers and crew. The impact from disruption to satellite signals might be widespread; many sectors, including the emergency services, rely on this technology for positioning or timing. Infrastructure Disturbances to infrastructure in one country from severe space weather can impact other countries. These might be economic impacts, disruption to transport, and delays in delivering goods or services. Several countries simultaneously might need to replace infrastructure, such as power transformers, which can take up to one year from order to delivery (1)! This would affect each country’s ability to recover and highlights the need for effective engagement between countries on this risk. The UK has experienced the effects of past events – two transformers were damaged in the 1989 storm. This risk, based upon a ‘reasonable worst case scenario’ of the Carrington Event, was added to the UK’s National Risk Register (2) in 2012.

Risk to the UK Since then, there has been work to understand the risk faced by the UK and its infrastructure from solar storms, and increase our ability to forecast and mitigate its impacts. A Royal Academy of Engineers report in 2013 (3) was crucial, allowing the UK, led by the Cabinet Office’s Civil Contingencies Secretariat, to take an informed and proportionate approach, fitting with our wider strategy of using existing capabilities where possible and building new capability only where necessary. Although the space weather risk is less familiar than some other risks, we can make ourselves more resilient. Critical to doing so is a forecasting centre at the Met Office, which goes 24/7 this year (4), only the second round-the-clock space weather centre of its type in the world (5).

“The impact from disruption to satellite signals might be widespread; many sectors, including the emergency services, rely on this technology for positioning or timing.” The ability to respond relies on warnings that are as timely and accurate as possible, delivered speedily to stakeholders and tailored to their needs. The work of the Met Office aims to achieve this. Major challenges in providing alerts remain. The underpinning science is still developing. Satellite capability is in short supply and ageing. And when a large coronal mass ejection is earthbound, we won’t know whether it will affect infrastructure until about 30 minutes before it arrives. National Grid has increased its ability to withstand solar events through installing more resilient transformers, increasing stocks of transformers, and developing operational response plans (6). Work is being undertaken with a wide range of other sectors, some of which were previously unaware of their vulnerability to this risk. Another element of our approach is to make local responders aware of the risk and their role in a response. This focuses on the need to be resilient to the effects of solar storms (loss of power, loss of GNSS services, transport disruption) rather than being overly concerned about their cause.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

Photo: iStockphoto.com

The final element of our approach is to work closely with international partners, such as Sweden and the US, to develop a consistent approach, while recognising that each country’s infrastructure will not necessarily be affected in the same way. Increased awareness All this demonstrates the need to increase awareness in advance among vulnerable sectors, responders and central Government, make infrastructure more resilient, and improve readiness to respond. This work should be underpinned by tried and tested plans for responding to other emergencies, as well as by effective collaboration with other countries. The common view is that space weather is an ‘exotic risk’. This must be challenged. Severe storms have happened in the past and could occur at any time. One in July 2012 had the potential to cause a Carrington scale event (7). Fortunately, it was heading away from Earth. Severe space weather can damage infrastructure and cause disruption. Many of the mitigations are common to other risks. We need to address this risk as an integral part of the broad spectrum of work we do on risks identification and resilience building. www.gov.uk References: 1 http://www.oecd.org/governance/risk/46891645.pdf 2 https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ national-risk-register-of-civil-emergencies 3 http://www.raeng.org.uk/news/publications/list/ reports/ space_weather_full_report_final.pdf 4 http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/news/releases/archive/ 2013/space-weather-forecasts 5 The other 24/7 centre is the US’s Space Weather Prediction Centre in Boulder, Colorado. 6 http://www2.nationalgrid.com/WorkArea/ DownloadAsset.aspx?id=12151 7 http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/news/ fast-cme.html

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ESTPROFILE | 21

Real-time information sharing solution a ‘win-win’ for emergency responders ResilienceDirect™, which is making fantastic strides in the emergency response service arena, has been created specifically for ‘blue light’ responders and their public and private sector response partners. Luana Avagliano, Head of the ResilienceDirect team in the Civil Contingencies Secretariat – Cabinet Office, tells us more. Emergency Services Times (EST): Why do we need ResilienceDirect? Luana Avagliano (LA): It’s quite simple – to make the UK a safer place. ResilienceDirect is the UK’s secure platform for multi-agency partnerships to share information in both emergency response and in planning. It is essential that the resilience community have the best tools and services to support them in effective decision-making at the tactical and strategic levels.

“ResilienceDirect is the UK’s secure platform for multi-agency partnerships to share information in both emergency response and in planning.” EST: Whose specifications did you use to build this web service? LA: The resilience community users. ResilienceDirect was developed using agile methodology and open-source methods. It is an adaptable hub, capable of hosting new applications reflecting user demand and future trends in emergency planning and response. Our ethos is ‘with you’, ‘for you’ and ‘by you’.

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EST: How do you get access to ResilienceDirect? LA: It is a private network based across the UK. Local Resilience Forums, Local Resilience Partnerships, new organisations and users are nominated and these are submitted to the team. We, the team, then authorise access and create the organisations on the system and give access to additional users. EST: What benefits have you seen delivered to the resilience community LA: ResilienceDirect provides a free, intuitive, easy to use service, with no digital certificates, which is accessible from any mobile device. It provides real-time information sharing across organisational and geographical boundaries. By supporting emergency planning and response organisations to do more for less by cutting across organisational silos and multiple communication channels, enabling greater efficiency and increased joint working. By using agile development techniques the service was delivered within 16 weeks, which is an absolutely awesome achievement. Also because we don’t use proprietary software, we have saved money for the public purse. A win-win. EST: Why include OS mapping? LA: User feedback and the response to the mapping app have been phenomenal. The first thing that any multi-agency response needs is a map, which is what we were told when we identified users’ needs. There are many GIS packages, command and control systems and existing incident management packages already in place within each organisation, operated by experts and this will remain the case. The need has been for a lightweight, easy to use mapping app that provides a secure multiagency response picture that could be shared across all partners in real time, with the ability to draw cordons, sectorise them for evacuation and shelter, draw polygons, use the common symbology as created by the Civil Contingencies Secretariat within the Cabinet Office. We have used OS mapping as it is a trusted source of detailed and up to date mapping, which is already being used to support

Luana Avagliano, Head of the ResilienceDirect team in the Civil Contingencies Secretariat – Cabinet Office.

systems and operations across the blue light sector. It is important that the mapping is accurate and provides a clear picture of any affected area. EST: Why did you have to create a new lot of mapping symbols? LA: When working collaboratively it is important that everyone uses the same terminology and in this case, for mapping, the common symbology. A lot of hard work has gone into delivery of this by the Civil Contingencies Secretariat and by using this for the ResilienceDirect mapping app it will embed this at the heart of multi-agency responses. EST: What does the future look like for ResilienceDirect? LA: It is very exciting and we are currently scoping our future Technical Roadmap, for new apps to be developed and delivered at pace. We continue to work with our Resilience User Community and there are a number of areas we will focus on: interoperability, system integration, live data feeds for mapping and continuing to enhance ResilienceDirect. www.resilience.gov.uk

Emergency Services Times October 2014


ESTMASS FATALITIES | 23

Preparing a framework for an effective mass fatalities response In an age of growing uncertainty, planning for worst-case scenarios remains a challenging and often hidden part of an emergency responder’s work. However it is also something with which Dr Lucy Easthope, Senior Lecturer in Forensic Science at the University of Lincoln, feels incredibly privileged and proud to be involved. The task of preparing a ‘mass fatalities framework’ can be a daunting one and Dr Easthope advises planners both in the UK and internationally on how to tackle this. Dr Easthope says, “A lot of people assume that this will be a negative and depressing aspect of my work, but actually it can be a rewarding process, bringing out the most collaborative side of planners and is an example of a truly multi-agency plan.” To produce their plans, response agencies step outside their normal work to really consider the needs of families and communities in extremis, where a number of people have died and special arrangements are required, such as a transportation disaster. To plan effectively in this area responders are required to acknowledge a number of different processes, beyond the normal frameworks, and consider a wide range of logistical and legislative options.

“It is heartening to see the efforts that are put in to work that hopefully they will never have to use.” Framework considerations Some considerations when preparing a framework include: understanding the needs of affected friends and relatives; awareness of relevant legislation; the role of the HM Coroner; Disaster Victim Identification; and meeting the needs of responders. Understanding the needs of affected friends and relatives – this should be at the heart of the framework and should inform all aspects of the work. Responders should ensure that they are fully aware of the guidance available at www.disasteraction.org.uk, which, as a charity, represents bereaved relatives and survivors from numerous UK disasters and UK citizens caught up in overseas disasters. Awareness of relevant legislation – the framework must comply with a broad set of legal

Ground Zero. Photo: Dr Lucy Easthope.

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obligations that goes beyond the Civil Contingencies Act, including public health legislation, Human Tissue Act in England and Wales, health and safety, and, crucially, Coronial legislation, which changed last year The role of the HM Coroner – as awareness grows about the role of the Coroner as an essential part of the framework we see more and more good practice about how to integrate Coroners into both the planning process, exercises and training, and the final documents. Coroners are now advised on the particular challenges that a major incident could involve by a cadre of specialist advisory Coroners. It is also important to understand new developments that came into force last year, such as the role of the Chief Coroner. Disaster Victim Identification – this is a specific forensic process that applies scientific-means to the remains recovered to establish identity and links that back to data gathered from family and friends. The DVI process sits within the Mass Fatalities Framework and it is crucial that the logistics, staffing etc for this process to take place are fully considered. Meeting the needs of responders – this should never be an afterthought in the arrangements. There are a number of legal obligations on employers to ensure that responders are properly trained and prepared for this work and are supported both emotionally and practically throughout.

The Interpol DVI Form.

Latest challenges Recent case studies are also providing emergency responders with an insight into the very latest challenges that these incidents will bring: one example would be the large volume of personal effects that incidents may generate, particularly if a mode of transport is involved. Dr Easthope specialises in the preparation of personal effects management strategies within the mass fatalities plan and has campaigned for many years for responders to recognise the importance of ensuring

Dr Lucy Easthope (leasthope@lincoln.ac.uk) is a Senior Lecturer in Forensic Science at the University of Lincoln. She is the course lead for ‘Planning for Mass Fatalities’ courses, which run at the Emergency Planning College several times a year.

that consideration is given to how to store personal effects and make arrangements for their return to families. In August 2014 she visited the National Transportation Safety Board to explore how this challenge is being tackled by the American government and meets new expectations that have accompanied technologies such as smartphones and tablets. Other 2014 challenges include: the requirement for briefings and communication strategies that take into account the interest from all types of media into the specifics of the work, including the Disaster Victim Identification process; and ensuring that arrangements meet local authority procurement and governance arrangements, as local authorities are responsible for resourcing a mortuary on behalf of the HM Coroner. In summary For responders embarking on this planning process there are a range of resources to support their work and opportunities for peer review and mutual aid. “There are innovative, compassionate and finely tuned arrangements being put in place all round the country,” says Dr Easthope. “It is heartening to see the efforts that are put in to work that hopefully they will never have to use.” www.disasteraction.org.uk

Disaster Action has a new publication out this summer reviewing almost three decades of campaigning for change to support those affected by disaster. Information is available at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Collective-ConvictionStory-Disaster-Action/dp/1781381232

Emergency Services Times October 2014


ESTINTEROPERABILITY | 25

JESIP enters new phase By the time The Emergency Services Show 2014 opens its doors, Joint Endeavour – the major exercise in responding to disaster – will have been held on Merseyside. Much noise, simulated crashes, bloodstained ‘victims’ and ‘pretend’ media will have featured in highlighting and testing elements of the two-year JESIP programme. Words: David Jervis, JESIP senior communications advisor. Commanders from the three blue light emergency services will, I am sure, have adhered to the interoperability principles, used the mnemonic METHANE and religiously worked together through the JDM (Joint Decision Model) to manage the major incident effectively and efficiently. Over 800 people will have been involved in the exercise, including representatives of other

organisations such as the Armed Forces, the local authority and British Transport Police. This issue of Emergency Services Times would have been put to bed by the exercise date – 18 September – but it is firmly anticipated that, watched by various VIPs and ‘real’ media, the exercise will have demonstrated the overarching aim of JESIP – Working Together – Saving Lives.

Exercise Joint Endeavour will represent the culmination of the two-year life of JESIP – the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme. Sponsored by Government departments and driven forward by the three blue light emergency services, the most extensive and ambitious joint training programme has been designed and executed. Some 10,000 priority emergency services personnel will have attended a JESIP training course. They will have absorbed information about the JESIP principles and tools; they will have discussed, debated and discovered how to achieve the main aim – improving interoperability and joint working in the early stages of a major incident. The importance of good, clear, face-to-face communication, an understanding of different roles and responsibilities and the need for effective joint decision making – and much more – will have been reinforced and embraced.

“Although the two-year programme is ending, JESIP will continue – to coin a phrase, it is just the end of the beginning.” Team effort on a national scale Over 20 live validation exercises designed to test all aspects of the JESIP learning have been held, with Joint Endeavour being by far the largest. Creating the ingredients required to make this whole programme work has been the responsibility of a small, dedicated central team, drawn from the emergency services and Government. But ensuring that momentum is maintained and the training is delivered has involved many colleagues from the 105 emergency services and other organisations. The skill, professionalism and sheer effort of JESIP licensed trainers, the delivery leads, strategic leads and others in organising and running 700 courses has been magnificent. It has been a massive team effort on a national scale.

The JESIP principles and tools outlined in the Joint Doctrine, the Aide Memoire (shown here) and on the training courses are now being applied regularly at many incidents.

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Training material A library of JESIP training products, including PowerPoint presentations and e-learning material has been produced, enabling the crucial messages around joint working to be spread to many thousands of other emergency services personnel. Also, while the initial focus was on the ambulance, police and fire and rescue services, Category 1 and 2 Responders, including

Emergency Services Times October 2014


26 | ESTINTEROPERABILITY Designed, trained, delivered The training products were produced mostly in partnership with the College of Policing, National Ambulance Resilience Unit (NARU), Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) and Fire Service College. Courses were designed, trainers from the three services were trained together and, in partnership, they delivered the tri-service courses at venues across England and Wales. JESIP has been welcomed across the board and feedback from those attending training courses has been overwhelmingly positive. The JESIP principles and tools outlined in the Joint Doctrine, the Aide Memoire and, of course, on the training courses are now being applied regularly at many incidents and used at set piece events like the Glastonbury Festival and the F1 Grand Prix at Silverstone. So JESIP has travelled a long way and will continue that journey into a new phase from October. Joint Doctrine: The Interoperability Framework is the bedrock of this huge programme.

HM Coastguard, British Transport Police, Civil Nuclear Constabulary, and others from the wider resilience community have been involved – some in the actual training but many in exposure to JESIP products. Although the two-year programme is ending, JESIP will continue – to coin a phrase, it is just the end of the beginning. The story so far… Before looking at the new phase in JESIP’s life, let us reflect on what has gone before, especially for the benefit of those who may have missed the JESIP story so far. The need for better joint working was identified by the emergency services and JESIP was created as a two-year programme, sponsored by the Home Office and supported by other Government departments – Cabinet Office, Department for Communities and Local Government and Department of Health. The outcomes of inquiries following a number of major incidents, including the London bombings in July 2005, showed clearly that joint working between the emergency services needed improvement. A review by Dr Kevin Pollock into the findings of inquiries following 32 major incidents over the past 30 years revealed that lessons were not being learned – for example, communication between the emergency services was not good enough; there was poor joint working practices and planning; and inadequate joint training. A survey by Skills for Justice of emergency service personnel, which was commissioned in the early stages of JESIP, more than underlined the real need for joint training by the blue light services to improve joint working and understanding. A consultation process involving many key stakeholders resulted in the ‘Joint Doctrine: The Interoperability Framework’ which is the bedrock of this huge programme. The Doctrine, the Pollock Report and the Skills for Justice survey are all available on the website www.jesip.org.uk.

What is JESIP Phase Two? A transition period managed by a reduced central JESIP team (from 16 to seven) – still based in the Home Office – will spend six months building on the considerable work already done in preparation for the full legacy arrangements to kick in at the beginning of April 2015. On the ground much will continue as before – for example, there are over 2000 control room personnel to receive their newly designed JESIP training. But in driving JESIP forwards there will be a change of impetus away from the centre. The baton needs to change hands as the emergency services and other responder organisations fully embrace JESIP, embed it in their day-to-day business and take over responsibility for its maintenance and development.

Four main work areas Focus will be on four main work areas during the transition period and into legacy: 1. Joint Organisational Learning (JOL) – this will be at the absolute core of JESIP moving forward. The programme was created because lessons identified in the past were not being applied. A resilient process is being developed to ensure that this does not happen in the future 2. Training – this will continue apace as new recruits arrive and promotions take place. There will always be personnel who will benefit from joint training 3. Testing and exercising – doing this regularly will contribute to embedding JESIP and contribute to JOL 4. Joint Doctrine – this will continue to be the bedrock of interoperability and will be updated when necessary. More information about the JESIP legacy arrangements will almost certainly feature in future editions of this magazine and on the JESIP website. Examples of how the JESIP principles and tools are being applied throughout the country and beyond will, I am sure, increase in number. Long life ahead It has been said that JESIP’s true long-lasting success will be seen only when its principles and products have touched all operational staff in the emergency services and other responder organisations. That is a huge number of people so it is clear that JESIP has a long and busy life ahead as it continues to pursue its overarching aim of ‘Working Together – Saving Lives.’ www.jesip.org.uk

JESIP rocks up at Glastonbury JESIP turned up at the world’s most famous music festival to help look after a quarter of a million people. While Elbow were throwing their curtains wide; Dolly was working Nine to Five and Metallica roared Seek and Destroy, emergency service commanders were employing JESIP principles to help manage the massive operation that is Glastonbury.

It was also helpful that many of the commanders at the event had relationships that began at JESIP courses. In fact, there was even a meeting of delivery leads held on site at one point. During the festival, the three emergency services control rooms were co-located in Event Control with other services, eg security.

First some facts: • Glastonbury attracts 200,000 visitors and 50,000 staff • It has a larger population than Bath or Exeter • It runs over five days and is based on a Somerset farm, displacing (temporarily) 400 cows

Pete Brown, Resilience Officer (special projects) for SWASFT, described the event control area as an incredible facility. “It is fantastic and a great example to anyone responsible for managing planned or unplanned events,” he said.

South Western Ambulance Service Foundation Trust (SWASFT), Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service and Somerset Police cover the festival. Together with Festival Medical, 3000 patients were treated this year; 60 went to hospital and two sadly died. Tabletop exercises Prior to the event, two big tabletop exercises were held to embed JESIP principles into the event and to explore how they would be used to respond to incidents. All emergency services had agreed to use JESIP principles as an integral part of how the event would be managed and it was also agreed that, where possible, all commanders at the event had to be JESIP trained. In 2015 this will become mandatory through a Memorandum of Understanding.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

During the event: • The Joint Decision Model (JDM) was the tool used for all decision making • All crews were trained in the use of METHANE so all sitreps used that format • Airwave interoperability talkgroups were in use • Commanders met regularly face-to-face Pete said that working at the festival was a really positive experience. He said, “It is a very well managed event, still less formal than some other events and very good natured. Using JESIP actually allowed us to provide an evidence base for doing things, which in previous years might not have been possible.” www.jesip.org.uk

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JESIP training embraced by Staffordshire’s emergency services The structured programme of work for the initial roll out of the Joint Emergency Service Interoperability Programme (JESIP) ended in September impacting over 100 organisations. The programme has been fully embraced by emergency services in Staffordshire. Words: Heather Challinor, Media Manager, Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service. JESIP training involving Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service, Staffordshire Police and West Midlands Ambulance Service commenced in April this year. The weekly training sessions, which were held at the fire and rescue service headquarters, involved presentations and student participation in the use of the joint decision making model to support the multi-agency response to realistic scenarios. A total of 272 people have received the training to date. In addition to the emergency services, officers from Staffordshire’s Civil Contingencies Unit (CCU) have also completed the training. The CCU officers in Staffordshire provide a 24/7 on-call service and so it is essential for them to be familiar with JESIP as it now determines the way in which incidents, which they help to coordinate, are responded to. Consequently the JESIP model of response has been incorporated into all emergency plans and procedures. CCU also organises regular exercises with Category 1 and 2 Responders and JESIP has now dictated the way in which these exercises run.

Good working relationships Sergeant John Overend of Staffordshire Police’s Tactical Planning Unit assisted in delivering the JESIP training. He said, “The training has been very well received, with attendees enjoying the interaction between emergency service colleagues especially during the scenarios. Some good working relationships have been forged and valuable contacts made.” West Midlands Ambulance Service’s Area Support Officer, Brain Fanthom, added, “There has been absolute cooperation between all the blue light services for this training, which is now making significant changes to how we deal with all incidents. “The shared situational awareness model of METHANE for informative messages has been a welcome addition, both on the incident ground and in control rooms, as it is ensuring quicker communication and therefore a speedier response – improving the safety of our communities and the emergency responders themselves.”

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Successful rescue The JESIP training came to the fore recently at an incident, which involved an injured runner who had fallen into a ditch and was unable to move. He rang the ambulance service. However, because he was in woods, he was unable to provide any landmarks to specify his exact location. A search and rescue operation commenced between the three emergency services and the local voluntary search and rescue team. Deteriorating weather conditions, darkness approaching and the risk of the casualty getting hypothermia meant that a speedy response was essential. Using JESIP the blue light services quickly determined who had primacy and then agreed search patterns. Communication was maintained throughout between the ambulance control room, the police helicopter and the incident ground. The search had to be conducted on foot, due to the terrain, and during a thorough search firefighters located the casualty before alerting the other services to their exact location. Those involved in the rescue believe that the JESIP training was integral to the successful conclusion of the incident.

“Quite simply JESIP is helping us to work smarter and faster together – ultimately saving lives.” Although the first two phases of JESIP (programme development and delivery and implementation) have been completed there is still

a need to re-visit phase two with quarterly training sessions being scheduled in for new managers who require the training. Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service is also including a session on JESIP as part of the new firefighter core skills course and embedding the concept into all aspects of command and control training. Legacy and sustainability The final step is to maintain phase three – legacy and sustainability. Regular exercises and refresher training have been scheduled for this. The ultimate aim of JESIP is to ensure emergency services save more lives when they experience major and complex incidents. In Staffordshire they are confident that they have achieved this and more. Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service’s Head of Training Ian Housley said, “We have been fortunate enough to have always had excellent working relationships with the other blue light services. However JESIP has given us the opportunity and the framework to take it to the next level and further. The training has been so well received here in Staffordshire that rather than just using JESIP at the major and complex incidents it has been designed for, it is filtering through to all multi-agency incidents. “Quite simply JESIP is helping us to work smarter and faster together – ultimately saving lives. I truly believe JESIP is the future of the emergency services.” It is safe to say that the JESIP strapline of ‘Working Together – Saving Lives’ is certainly ringing true in Staffordshire. www.staffordshirefire.gov.uk

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A joined up approach to training for CBRN incidents The Police National CBRN Centre was initially born out of the emerging threat from Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) terrorism and has undergone many changes since its doors first opened in 2001. Back in 2006 the Home Office highlighted a potential capability gap, which resulted in the implementation of the Police Operational Response Programme. The centre successfully developed doctrine and tactics for police service CBRN responders and commanders, procured CBRN PPE, including a ‘Quick Don’ PPE suit, CBRN scene management barrier systems, communication trailers and delivered training to every UK police force in a variety of specialisms. Since the end of the programme in 2010 the centre has continued to maintain and enhance the capacity, capability and coordination of the UK police service in preparing for, and responding to, the threat or acts of CBRN terrorism. The Police National CBRN Centre.

Exercise/training.

Joint training The Police National CBRN Centre delivers joint training to the UK emergency services and is involved in numerous national and international CBRN projects and exercise programmes, which included planning for the 2012 Olympics. The centre is multi-agency in its thinking and approach to all issues, with police, health and fire working together at every level – including having a multiagency senior management team. The centre works closely with the Home Office and the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme (JESIP) to enhance the ability of the emergency services to work effectively together – a significant requirement featured in this year’s CONTEST Annual Report. Saving life Over the last 18 months staff have been working with the Home Office and JESIP to design an

Officers in PPE emerging from the Scene Management Barrier system.

Initial Operational Response (IOR) to CBRN incidents based on new scientific studies and lessons identified from exercises and real incidents. The IOR starts from the very first call to the emergency services, with the focus being to save life. This programme is currently being rolled out across all three blue light agencies so every firefighter, paramedic and police officer in the UK will be trained in the most effective ways of saving life while keeping themselves safe from contamination at a CBRN incident.

“The centre is multi-agency in its thinking and approach to all issues.”

delivered to organisations such as the United Nations Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). The centre runs, on average, three courses per month and in 2013 over 500 officers passed through its doors to receive training. Continued Professional Development is delivered in roadshow format, with centre staff visiting 10 different regional locations throughout the UK each year to refresh and update emergency service professionals on the latest threats, challenges and developments in the CBRN arena. The centre is governed through the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) and the Home Office, Office for Security and Counter Terrorism (OSCT). The College of Policing hosts the Centre at Ryton-on-Dunsmore, Warwickshire, by providing the centre’s estate, IT, HR and finance services. www.college.police.uk

The centre provides a 24/7 operations centre that supports the UK police service and partner agencies in their local response to CBRN incidents. The operations centre provides specialist advice and immediate access to scientific advice from a variety of specialist sources supporting the response to around 400 incidents each year, such as chemical fatalities and white powder incidents. Testing and exercising The centre has recently established a testing and exercising section, which provides a capability to engage with relevant testing and exercising programmes across various agencies in the UK to identify and coordinate the learning emerging from CBRN related incidents and exercises. The core business of the centre remains the delivery of training to the UK emergency services but bespoke courses have also been designed and

Emergency Services Times October 2014

Training with the Scene Management Barrier system in the background.

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Tour de France success for Yorkshire’s emergency services The eyes of the world were on Yorkshire for the Tour de France (TdF) Grand De ́part in July and it was a chance for the region’s emergency services to show how well they could work together during this major event. Now that the dust has settled there’s the opportunity to reflect on how the cycling spectacle, which saw 162 riders sweep through Yorkshire, was managed. Around 2.5 million people took to the hills and dales of Yorkshire, lining the route of the Tour de France over the sunny weekend. Stages 1 and 2 covered almost 400km, taking in some of the most stunning scenery in the region. Facts and figures Looking at the numbers, almost 1000 police officers from the region’s forces were deployed along the roadways, as well as 500 Special Constables – all working alongside the French police and the Gendarmerie. More than 1200 medical personnel were positioned along the route. Over the course of the weekend 584 people in the crowd, or located along the race route, were treated by Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust and hub medical teams. Meanwhile, Yorkshire Air Ambulance flew 31 missions over 5 and 6 July, which is their busiest weekend on record.

“The coordinated effort of the emergency services, both on a regional and local basis, was enormously effective.” West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service had 56 emergency vehicles on the run and dealt with 41 incidents throughout the brigade area over the two stages, while North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service had 49 emergency vehicles available and dealt with 22 incidents. South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service had almost 30 engines available and dealt with 13 incidents during the stages. Some fire engines were strategically placed along the route in readiness, and fortunately no major incidents were encountered.

West Yorkshire FRS acted as the lead for North Yorkshire FRS, South Yorkshire FRS and Derbyshire FRS in the development of a regional response plan. This mirrored the arrangement that West Yorkshire Police had with their regional colleagues, while Yorkshire Ambulance Service also led on behalf of health. Emergency service personnel collaborated with local authorities and other key partners such as Welcome to Yorkshire and the TdFHUB2014, a subsidiary company of UK Sport, which had responsibility for delivering the wider event surrounding the race. Provision of the emergency response was coordinated through centrally located Gold and Silver teams who linked into local Bronze teams. Wildfire concerns A primary concern for the fire and rescue services was the potential impact of a moorland blaze given the, often remote, areas through which the race passed and this formed part of a public awareness campaign highlighting the importance of not dropping cigarettes and barbecue safety messages. Prior to the race West Yorkshire FRS also hosted a moorland exercise in the Calderdale district, on White Holme Moor above Cragg Vale, Mytholmroyd. Fortunately these precautions were not called into action during the event. Coordinated effort Dave Walton, Assistant Chief Fire Officer for West Yorkshire FRS, said, “The two days of the event were a tremendous success for all concerned and showcased the region in a way that no paid-for marketing ever could. We look forward to reaping the economic and reputational prizes for the region in the years to some. “The coordinated effort of the emergency services, both on a regional and local basis, was enormously

Positive public response The public response to the emergency services was incredibly positive with cheering crowds giving high-fives to the passing police convoy and taking to social media to post ‘selfies’ with personnel. Pre-event planning Emergency services and other partners had joined forces months prior to the event as the Safety and Security Group to plan for their response.

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Some fire appliances were strategically placed along the route in readiness.

effective and stands us in excellent stead for future such events. Fortunately the two stages of the race passed with no major incidents, but we were prepared and we were ready.” Group Manager Stuart Simpson, from North Yorkshire FRS, added, “Where we did attend incidents we were able to do so without disruption to the race and without delay.” South Yorkshire FRS Group Manager Stewart Layhe, said key to their success was the ‘cooperation and enthusiasm of our operational crews’. Ian Walton, Associate Director of Resilience and Special Services at Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust, added, “The event was not just a success for Yorkshire, but also for Yorkshire Ambulance Service and we are delighted that the many months of planning and preparations paid off. “We couldn’t have achieved this without the dedication and support of all of our staff, volunteers, Yorkshire Air Ambulance and our neighbouring ambulance services colleagues, namely North East Ambulance Service, West Midlands Ambulance Service, North West Ambulance Service and East Midlands Ambulance Service. Together we joined forces to form our very own winning team!” Assistant Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police, Mark Milsom, concluded, “The Tour de France has been a tremendous success for Yorkshire and, after the amazing scenes and atmosphere of the two days, I am certain that Yorkshire has also been a tremendous success for the Tour de France. “Everybody involved in planning and delivering this incredible event can be very proud. It has been a real privilege to be part of it. “From a policing perspective, it wasn’t just about making sure this world-class sporting event was delivered safely. We wanted to do it with a smile on our faces and really embrace the feel-good factor associated with the Tour de France.” www.westyorksfire.gov.uk

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ESTADVERTORIAL | 35

Mission critical communications. Connected. Always. Uninterrupted communication is essential for an effective emergency response. Whether in dense urban conurbations or remote rural areas, connectivity must be maintained. Always.

In the context of the Home Office Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme (ESMCP), for which companies including Arqiva are currently bidding, users will need to be exactly that. Connected. Always. Operating at the heart of broadcast, satellite and mobile communications markets, we provide communications solutions to many of the police, ambulance and fire and rescue services across the UK and Ireland, as well as to the RNLI, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, and the UK Borders Agency. Deploying the infrastructure needed for a nationwide communications network requires planning permission, sites and properties to be acquired and managed (often in sensitive areas), and the renewal of existing licences. It’s a task we take incredibly seriously and, with our many years of experience, something we have become pretty good at.

At the other end of the UK, Devon and Cornwall Police rely on a state-of-the-art Integrated Communications Control System (ICCS), provided and maintained by us, to help them police the largest geographical area in England. We successfully migrated the force to its new ICCS while keeping the existing live system operational to avoid any downtime or impact to 24/7 missioncritical operation. capability, our ingenious solutions range from the installation and maintenance of radios, mobile data terminals, automatic vehicle location systems and many other types of in-vehicle equipment, to full ICT managed services and control room solutions. We even provide the UK’s largest private paging network, connecting RNLI volunteers at more than 235 lifeboat stations, allowing them to quickly respond to emergency situations and save lives every day. 24/7 connectivity We know how important round-the-clock connectivity is for our Blue Light customers. That’s why we’ve invested heavily in our service delivery. At its heart is our 350-strong team of field engineers, based at over 30 sites across the UK and Ireland. They help our customers achieve seamless communications 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 52 weeks of the year.

We deliver some of the UK’s largest dispersed civil engineering network infrastructure projects, designing, building, acquiring and operating ingenious solutions. We’ve built our portfolio of over 10,000 geographically diverse sites by acquiring land rights and premises, obtaining planning permissions and renewing existing site licences. We also have rights to a further 6000 sites via existing third party relationships. Connecting people As the emergency services communications system undergoes a major transformation, we’ll continue to make connectivity happen for frontline emergency services organisations day in, day out. In fact we’ve been providing innovative and forward thinking solutions to the emergency services community for more than 50 years. They depend on our ability to connect people for an enriched and safer life. All our engineers and service teams understand the criticality of what we do. Our transmission networks are engineered to deliver service levels that are contractually guaranteed to be significantly better than standard commercially available products. But that’s not all. Beyond this resilient, network

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“As the emergency services communications system undergoes a major transformation, we’ll continue to make connectivity happen for frontline emergency services organisations day in, day out.”

Transformational programmes Successful installation and commissioning like that achieved in Devon and Cornwall is a fundamental part of any project and is often carried out in live environments. Our highly skilled and qualified engineers have the capabilities and knowledge to deliver the most complex and transformational programmes on live networks. They’re also on hand to provide everyday maintenance into our customers. This strength in networks and infrastructure transformation was epitomised when our engineers led the biggest broadcast engineering project in UK history with the successful completion of the Digital Switch Over in 2012. Over the last few months we have announced a site share agreement with CTIL (the Telephonica and Vodafone UK partnership) to provide network consolidation support and deployment of 4G LTE, to cities, towns and more rural locations in the UK, utilising our neutral and shareable infrastructure. Additionally, our recently announced partnership with SIGFOX means we are able to build the first national Internet of Things network. Looking to the future We know the world of communications will continue to evolve, and we work on innovative and reliable ways of bringing this to our customers. Our aim is simple, to keep you connected. Always. Visit www.arqiva.com to find out more about the work we do with Emergency Services organisations. www.arqiva.com

We help to save lives on a daily basis. Ambulances from hospitals across Northern Ireland depend on the TETRA digital radio network that we supply and maintain. 60 percent of fire and rescue services across the UK use our mobilisation solutions, including North West Fire and Rescue Services, covering Greater Manchester, Cumbria, Cheshire and Lancashire.

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ESTCOMPANY PROFILE| 37

From entertainment to emergency services – Amputees in Action celebrates its 10th anniversary This year marks the 10th anniversary of the launch of Amputees in Action. Over the course of its 10 years, the agency – the largest of its kind in the UK – has developed to serve three primary markets: film and television, the military and the emergency services. One of the most important early developments implemented by Amputees in Action was the introduction of an accredited training programme for its actors, ensuring not only that they are able to conduct themselves with the highest standards of professionalism wherever they are working but also that they are able to remain in character. This level of realism is made all the more shocking by the agency’s own team of dedicated make-up, moulage and prosthetics artists who use the very latest products and techniques to create a wide range of ultra-realistic, medically accurate injuries of the type that might be encountered in any real-life trauma incident. This ability to provide emergency services personnel with the opportunity to learn and practice their ‘drills and skills’ in a highly realistic, adrenalin-fuelled scenario has been proven to prepare them so effectively that survival rates are measurably increased in real-life trauma incidents.

“The realism we can simulate really can help to save lives.” Expanding markets The first agency to provide this kind of support for casualty simulation exercises, Amputees in Action has continually sought new ways to expand its markets. Recently, the agency took the decision to expand the service it provides to extreme working environments – from deserts to offshore oil and gas platforms – in which prolonged pre-hospital care can quite literally be a matter of life and death. The agency has also launched its own Cassim Skills training course. Designed to equip delegates with the ability to create highly realistic, indeed

shocking, simulated injuries – from bruising and burns to lacerations and gunshot wounds – the course is delivered by PTLLS-qualified instructors and covers the principles and products of Special Effects, Moulage and Casfake with a strong emphasis on health, hygiene and safety. The first course of its kind to be awarded CPD accreditation, making Amputees in Action a market leader in the field, it was described by the CPD Standards Office as ‘one of the most inventive and creative that they have seen for some time’. 10th anniversary In August of this year, Amputees in Action celebrated its 10th anniversary with an event at the historic Shaw House in Newbury, Berkshire. During the course of the celebrations, John Pickup, Amputees in Action’s Managing Director, outlined some of the company’s achievements over the last 10 years. John spoke of the growing demand for the agency’s services from film and TV production companies and about how Amputees in Action had grown its Defence division with major contract wins for large defence clients in the UK and Europe. He also highlighted the importance of recent work undertaken within the emergency services sector. Plane crash exercise In May, for example, the agency supported the London Fire Brigade in the largest and most comprehensive exercise in its history – a three-day exercise based around a plane crash in the capital. Amputees in Action provided actors and special effects artists who created simulated burns, cuts and bruises as well as crush and blunt trauma injuries. It was a unique opportunity for the blue light services to work together effectively to practice, in realistic scenarios, the life-saving skills that would be used should a major incident of this kind ever occur in the capital.

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Professional casualty simulation John Pickup, who lost his right arm after a motorbike accident at the age of 17 and was the 2009 winner of the Stelios Award for Disabled Entrepreneurs in the UK, said, “Over the last 10 years, the agency has developed dramatically. In addition to introducing professional training programmes for our actors and our moulage artists, we have also secured a number of ISO accreditations to ensure the highest professional standards in everything we do. We also moved to new premises in 2012 to accommodate the expansion of our business and provide new training facilities. In addition, we’ve developed ever closer relationships with the emergency services and the military, working with them on the development of a number of new techniques, and proving time and again that the realism we can simulate really can help to save lives. So, we have plenty to celebrate!” www.amputeesinaction.co.uk

Film and television At the forefront of the specialist support artiste industry, Amputees in Action offers casting agents, agencies and directors unique access to a highly experienced roster of professional actors with a range of real-life amputations. Emergency services Most of Amputees in Action’s actors have lost limbs as a direct result of a trauma incident and are uniquely placed to bring their experiences and insight to casualty simulation training exercises for paramedics and other frontline staff in the emergency services. Military Amputees in Action supports pre-deployment and Integrated Management System training for the Army’s medical corps and other troops both at home and abroad. These simulations are often performed by actors from the agency who have themselves lost limbs while on active service.

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DuPont leads the way in firefighter protection and enhanced comfort levels with advances in fabric technology Zoltan Nahoczky, Marketing Manager at DuPont Protection Technologies, discusses the increasing demands being placed on firefighters and their turnout gear as they respond to more complex call-outs, created by a growing population and urban development. Emergency Services Times (EST): How have the demands placed on firefighters changed over the last few years? Zoltan Nahoczky (ZN): Firefighters are now being called out to deal with new and increasingly complex threats in addition to the traditional fire fighting role that they are primarily trained for and protected against. Although these threats have always existed, they have become intensified in recent years by increased and more complex industrial activity and a changing urban landscape. This means that, aside from having to withstand the high temperatures of a fire, garments must also be designed and developed to protect the wearer in scenarios that include road traffic accidents, industrial clean up operations or flood rescues. Electric arc is also a growing hazard in the industrial environment and can create a conducting plasma fireball with temperatures reaching upwards of 20,000°C. Arc flash injuries include external burns to the skin, internal burns from inhaling hot gases and vaporised metal, hearing and eye damage. Each of these scenarios carries its own set of risks and garments must therefore be adapted to offer multi-function protection to accommodate increasing demand for turnout gear to work harder and last longer. EST: How do these new risks affect garment design and what are the latest developments in fabric technology as a result? ZN: Because firefighters risk their lives to save others, we work hard to ensure that they are protected against the hazards that they face as part of their job. While no PPE [Personal Protection Equipment] will ever provide complete protection against all fire fighting risks, DuPont is constantly developing ways to improve turnout gear to reflect the changing roles and demands of the modern firefighter. We rigorously test each of our garment solutions to ensure high standards of safety not only in the fighting of fires but also when exposed to the rigours of day-to-day wear. As a result of growing demand for turnout gear that offers both high levels of protection and comfort for the wearer, DuPont has developed a new outer shell fabric – DuPont™ Nomex® 3DP. This incorporates new patented Intelligent Flux Technology, which comprises two layers of fabric woven together, an inner layer of DuPont™ Kevlar® with an outer layer of DuPont™ Nomex®.

When subjected to intense heat, the outer layer of DuPont™ Nomex® thickens instantly and creates an expanded insulation barrier, reducing heat transfer and providing the firefighter with extra seconds of safety. This is supported by an inner layer of DuPont™ Kevlar®, which offers high mechanical strength. The intelligent weaving structure of DuPont™ Nomex® 3DP also offers the wearer outstanding electric arc protection, high levels of comfort, flexibility and protection while also optimising durability. Incorporating this new technology within firefighter garments means that they can be confident they have the time to respond to an incident safely, whatever the scenario.

“DuPont works closely with firefighters to develop optimum fibre blends and fabric solutions to keep them safe.” EST: Does all this new technology mean higher prices? ZN: UK firefighters are equipped with some of the best PPE in the world. However, because it incorporates innovative technologies doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s the most expensive. The long-standing partnerships of DuPont with fire and rescue services around the world mean that we understand the need to provide turnout gear to the highest standards of protection as well as achieving favourable cost versus wear life. The use of Nomex® ensures that garments are long lasting, with lower repair and replacement costs. EST: How has DuPont™ Nomex® 3DP been received by firefighters? ZN: We recently tested DuPont™ Nomex® 3DP at a facility in Germany and invited fire and rescue services to witness the results on DuPont™ Thermo-Man® using the industry standard eight second flame impingement test. This life-sized mannequin system developed by DuPont is one of the most advanced thermal burn injury evaluation devices in the world. DuPont™ Nomex® 3DP achieved an impressive zero burn prediction on all sets of turnout gear tested. It also qualified for outstanding ATPV results of 18cal/cm2 against electric arc hazards.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

These results, alongside a remarkable absence of garment damage, highlight the quality and high level of protection offered to wearers. To ensure that DuPont™ Nomex® 3DP can withstand Zoltan Nahoczky, Marketing Manager at the rigours of DuPont Protection Technologies. everyday fire fighting, it has also been tested in the field by five brigades across Germany, France and Belgium. We received very positive feedback particularly around the enhanced comfort resulting from exceptional ease of movement in the garment, as well as its high mechanical strength and premium level of heat protection. DuPont™ Nomex® 3DP is also available in a range of piece-dyed colours, making it suitable for use by brigades with different coloured uniforms. EST: So, with the development of these new fabrics and technologies, is heat stress still an issue for firefighters? ZN: Heat stress remains the number one cause of injuries and fatalities among firefighters despite significant advances in technology. Essentially, heat stress is caused by the body’s core temperature rising as a result of being exposed to heat and physical exertion. While sweat glands work to keep the body cool, garments with high heat insulating properties, such as those worn by firefighters, can prevent sweat from evaporating and drawing heat away from the body. If a firefighter’s core body temperature rises too much, this can lead to impaired judgment and accidents. We understand that the same garment that protects firefighters must also allow for the release of heat. DuPont works closely with firefighters to develop optimum fibre blends and fabric solutions to keep them safe, such as the new DuPont™ Nomex® 3DP, which offers high air permeability. However, the nature of a firefighter’s job ultimately means that issues such as heat stress will always pose a risk. www.dupont.com www.nomex.co.uk/solutions

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ESTWATER RESCUE & FLOOD RESPONSE | 43

The greatest test: lessons learned from the National Flood Events of 2013-14 Last winter’s severe weather of widespread flooding, huge coastal storms and tidal surge posed a significant risk to the United Kingdom, and resulted in the largest mobilisation of National Resilience High Volume Pump assets to date. Here we examine what lessons have been learned from the National Flood Events of 2013-14. Words: Steve Ray, CFOA National Resilience HVP Capability Lead & Richard Gordon, CFOA National Resilience Flood Response Capability Lead. During the winter of 2013-14, Britain faced one of the most extreme series of weather events ever experienced. The tidal surge affecting the east coast of England in early December 2013 was the largest in 60 years, and in some cases even higher than in the tragedy of 1953. The storms over the Christmas and New Year period were unprecedented, and were subsequently followed by the wettest January in the south of England since records began. Rainfall for December 2013 to February 2014 was measured at 500mm, the highest recorded for 100 years. Groundwater levels became exceptionally high and as a result compounded the overall effects of flooding. The groundwater levels remained particularly high and posed a prolonged risk of further flooding for several weeks after the main flooding events had receded. At the beginning of February 2014, the highest waves ever measured in Britain were recorded as impacting against the south west coast of England. As a result of all of the above factors, serious wide-area and coastal flooding occurred in many different parts of the south of England and parts of Wales. Largest simultaneous operational deployment From a fire and rescue service (FRS) perspective, the unprecedented scale of mobilisation in support of a number of affected FRSs during the winter period is considered to have been the largest simultaneous operational deployment of emergency personnel and equipment since the Second World War. The arrangements outlined within the National Coordination and Advisory Framework (NCAF) were implemented in full. The arrangements are considered to have worked extremely well in providing strategic oversight and support across all incident locations.

A Strategic Holding Area was set up at Taunton Deane Services from where the National Resilience assets were mobilised. Photo: Dave Benson

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Photo: Carl Haslam

The map shows the scale of flood-affected regions at the height of the severe weather.

National Incidents December 2013: East Coast Tidal Surge 4 December: The Met Office identified a significant area of low pressure massing in the Atlantic Ocean. 6 December: A combination of high tides, large waves and gale-force winds led to a significant tidal surge along the East coast of England. Areas including Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, Humberside, Lincolnshire, Kent and North Yorkshire were inundated with calls throughout this period, and requested

assistance with the provision of national assets under mutual aid arrangements: • NCAF arrangements were established, with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) Operations Room set up • 24 High Volume Pumps (HVPs) formed part of the pre-emptive deployment to the affected FRS areas. The deployment utilised just less than 50 percent of the total HVP assets usually available in England and Wales • 39 Flood Rescue teams available from the National Register of Assets within England and Wales were mobilised from several FRSs and non-governmental organisations to assist in the affected areas • Four specialist FRS Enhanced Logistics Support (ELS) teams were mobilised and established in order to support the effective and timely deployment of assisting assets into the areas affected by or at risk from tidal flooding • 16 specialist Tactical Advisers (10 x Flood Response and 6 x HVP) were mobilised in support of both the HVP and Flood Response capabilities in order to provide expert tactical advice to incident commanders regarding the utilisation of supporting specialist assets.

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Following both a reduction in the severity of the weather and tidal conditions, along with comprehensive risk reviews being conducted within the affected areas, the majority of specialist assets were stood down during the course of the day and returned to their home locations.

“The unprecedented scale of mobilisation in support of a number of affected FRSs during the winter period was the largest simultaneous operational deployment of emergency personnel and equipment since the Second World War.” January 2014 – Somerset Levels The various large-scale deployments to mitigate flooding in early 2014 commenced with the response initiated following a statement given by the Prime Minister to the House of Commons on 29 January regarding the ongoing flooding situation across the Somerset Levels, which involved approximately 65 square kilometres of inundated land. As part of a multi-agency response, HVP, Flood Response and ELS capabilities were mobilised in response. After 29 days, and against the backdrop of improving weather and receding flood water levels, FRS operations began to scale down towards the end of February. February 2014: Thames Valley Constant rain throughout February, coupled with already saturated groundwater levels, led to thousands of properties becoming flooded and urban communities requiring assistance. National Resilience assets from all nine of the CFOA regions within England, supported by assets from Welsh FRSs in the form of HVPs, Flood Rescue Teams and ELS, provided assistance to the affected communities within the Thames Valley area. • At one point at the height of the emergency response phase within all of the affected regions, all National HVP assets within England and Wales were either actively deployed or engaged in strategic cover moves • The National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT) enacted its operational role as defined within NCAF, providing support to all incident locations • HVP Tactical Advisers were deployed extensively in support of the ongoing FRS operations across Somerset, Cornwall, Hampshire, Berkshire, Oxfordshire, London and Surrey

• Additionally, significant numbers of nationally declared Flood Rescue Teams and Flood Rescue Tactical Advisers were deployed throughout the winter period of severe weather. Lessons learned 1. One particular innovation realised at an early stage during the National Flood Events saw an NRAT Operations Support Cell established at the National Resilience Centre, Fire Service College. The cell provided a focal point for the central coordination of information and support to the DCLG Operations Cell, the Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser (CFRA), the NRAT and the NRAT Duty Officer 2. Following the initial basic development of a web-based National Resilience asset status tool for the December 2013 East Coast Tidal Surge, the opportunity was realised to further ‘dynamically’ develop the status tool in support of the emergency response during the national flooding event. This allowed the effective sharing and updating of critical asset status information between all NCAF locations and the NR Operations Support Cell in support of the CFRA and National Strategic Advisory Team (NSAT) Officers’ strategic objectives 3. The deployment of a HVP Tactical Adviser into a multi-agency Gold cell proved to be an innovative solution to ensuring timely and effective liaison and coordination of the operations of several HVP Tactical Advisers working across multiple locations within affected FRS in the Thames Valley area 4. A national flood debrief process led by the Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA), was held for multi-agency stakeholders at the Fire Service College in April. Subsequently, an operational debrief report was published by CFOA in July. The report identifies a number of opportunities from lessons learned that may enhance the existing effectiveness of the FRS response to major wide-area flood events affecting the United Kingdom in the future. The National Flood Events of 2014 have brought into sharper focus the work already being

Completely surrounded by flooded farmland, the tiny community of Muchelney on the Somerset Levels was accessible only by boat for some time. Photo: Devon and Somerset FRS

Emergency Services Times October 2014

Homes under water meant misery for many. Photo: Carl Haslam

undertaken within the CFOA National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT) to explore the identified synergies between the management and use of HVP assets and Flood Response assets at major incidents. This has both informed and further stimulated the ongoing work to explore the potential for a modular mobilising concept for HVP and Flood Rescue assets in response to major flooding incidents within the UK. This concept would allow an affected FRS the option to request national mutual aid on the basis of the desired effect to be achieved in order to successfully resolve the incident, rather than requesting the perceived number of flood response assets required. Furthermore, the concept will be underpinned by capability-specific advice delivered by Tactical Advisers to ensure a suitable and proportionate response to any request for that assistance.

“The National Flood Events have been the greatest test of National Resilience arrangements since their inception.” Future enhancements The National Flood Events of 2013-14 have prompted the consideration and investigation of a range of potential HVP capability enhancements for the future. This may ultimately enable an even stronger position in HVP capability readiness, flexibility and resilience nationally for when an event of similar (or even greater magnitude) is once again encountered due to the effects of severe weather. The National Flood Events have been the greatest test of National Resilience arrangements since their inception, and FRSs, along with partner agencies, can be rightfully proud of the highly professional operational response, which was provided in extremely demanding circumstances. Members of the National Resilience Assurance Team will be on hand to explain their work at The Emergency Services Show 2014, on Stand Z248. www.fireresilience.org.uk

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ESTWATER RESCUE & FLOOD RESPONSE | 47

Search and rescue drysuits: essential maintenance and care! With over 30 years’ expertise in the manufacturing and repairing of search and rescue drysuits, I’m well aware of the kind of punishment they take when in service. So it’s worthwhile knowing what features to look out for and how to keep your search and rescue suit in the best condition so that, with a bit of care and attention, you can keep it protected – ensuring that you won’t get caught out, exposing yourself to the risky environments in which you work. Words: Chris Hammond, MD of Hammond Drysuits Ltd. Emergency services teams are being called upon to work in ever more challenging environments – having a reliable drysuit enables you to go into those situations with greater confidence. Zips For our specialist search and rescue suits, we generally replace zips with metal 8bdm (eight teeth/in) as these are far safer than the plastic zips used for recreational drysuits. They do nonetheless require a little more care and attention to avoid potentially hazardous wear and tear. To protect your metal zips, begin by lubricating your zip by striking paraffin wax (candle) or bees’ wax along the inside and outside of the zip teeth. This will get it running smoothly by coating any abrasive build-up or oxidisation that has occurred during storage or as a result of salt water. You can also buy special zip-lube products; however, avoid using things like WD40 at all costs because it corrodes your zip as well as some suit fabrics. Also avoid the use of silicone on zips as this easily transfers around the suit, making any repairs on these areas impossible, as the glue will not bind to the silicone. When out on the sand or silt, or in other dusty environments, always try to keep your zip clear of grit and dirt. Never try to force the zip as this may break the teeth. Latex seals If your suit has latex seals, they should be talced before you use the suit, then cleaned with fresh water and re-talced after use. Talcing latex seals prolongs their longevity because it acts as a lubricant between the skin and the latex, reducing stress on the material during regular use. The talc also helps prevent the latex from sticking to itself during storage. Also try to minimise exposure of latex seals to direct sunlight when you’re not wearing the suit. Another important thing to consider is that latex socks should always be worn with footwear but do not walk on them directly as this might puncture the material. As an alternative, suits can be supplied with high quality safety boots with steel toe and mid-sole, fitted in place of socks.

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Neoprene seals Neoprene seals are a good alternative to latex seals for many reasons – including comfort, allergies and fit – and are a popular choice for repairs or replacements. Unlike latex seals, they don’t need talcing; however, neoprene seals may be lubricated with baby lotion on the smooth skin side. Wipe the lotion on and then leave it to absorb for 24 hours. Neoprene seals should always be cleaned with fresh water after use. You can also have your standard suit fitted with special elasticated gaiters, which cover the wrists and ankles and protect the seals against being ripped, thus breaking the watertight seal.

“Regular washing is highly recommended, making sure you allow the suit plenty of time to dry – inside and out – before storing it.” Drysuit fabric and cut At Hammond Drysuits, our Search and Rescue SR140 is made from tri-laminate nonbreathable nylon materials, which are specifically designed for hard wearing use and abuse; non-breathable materials are also more robust than breathable materials so require less maintenance and, unlike breathable suits, are not affected by the build up of salt crystals after use in salt water. If you are using a suit with a breathable fabric pay more attention to the fact that, after use in salt water, the fabric must be cleaned in fresh water. The salt crystals can develop and damage the breathable membrane, potentially splitting the suit’s material. (Hammond Drysuits produces a Search and Rescue suit in a four-ply breathable fabric, but this is only recommended in a search environment, such as a patrolman.) Regular washing is, in any

The Search and Rescue SR140 from Hammond Drysuits is made from tri-laminate non-breathable nylon materials.

case, highly recommended, making sure you allow the suit plenty of time to dry – inside and out – before storing it. Our customers have the choice of materials and colour ways; wherever possible, it’s recommended that you incorporate high vis panels to enable easy detection when working in limited visibility conditions. Look out for curved panel construction to ensure your movement isn’t restricted and allow greater flexibility and comfort while working in extreme conditions. If you are expected to spend prolonged amounts of time wearing your suit, consider having one made to measure so that it’s tailor made to your exact size. Storing your drysuit The best place to keep your drysuit is in a clean, dark, cold environment that is ideally between 10 and 20 degrees Celsius. Latex seals will try to return to their original liquid state if stored at high temperatures; these areas then go exceptionally sticky and will stick to anything it touches! Always ensure the suit is protected from direct sunlight and fluorescent lights as this may cause perishing. Try to leave the zip open after use, allowing fresh air to circulate and help to protect the zip. When packing your suit away again, try to minimise excessive folding of the zip, especially when leaving it open as this may cause the teeth to break. When you’re transporting your drysuit, try not to compress it. Always have the zip fastened as this can be cracked very easily during transportation when left open, and ultimately any cracks will lead to a leak. www.hammond-drysuits.co.uk

Emergency Services Times October 2014


48 | ESTWATER RESCUE & FLOOD RESPONSE

National water strategy for mountain rescue A national ‘Water Strategy’, published in May 2014, sets out how the Water group from Mountain Rescue England and Wales (MREW) hopes to guide water rescue capability within mountain rescue (MR). The group’s aim is to reduce risk to the members and ensure members at all levels have access to all the necessary standards and guidance material and a means of sharing information. Words: Andy Lee, MREW Water Officer. Since the 2007 floods, water safety has been high on our agenda. Sector experts from mountain rescue and other lead organisations were brought together to input and review the DEFRA Concept of Operations document. The MR and DEFRA modules, shown below and produced with our involvement, identify the standards required for all rescuers working near or in water. During the initial production of the MREW water standards, the availability of qualified instructors, training venues, equipment and associated costs, as well as the training time involved for already highly committed volunteers was a huge factor. Five years have passed since the first draft and we now feel it is time to complete this piece of work and release standards for all relevant levels.

This comparison of MR and DEFRA standards has been simplified to help represent the correlation of standards. Currently, while most teams complete full module training with external agencies, some variations exist within written standards. We are keen to develop an option for regional approaches to their training and response capability, be this through LRF or as declared teams on the DEFRA asset register.

Swiftwater training.

Photo: Swaledale MRT

Over the past five years the Water group has developed a draft training syllabus for Module 2 Bank Team Training, also known as Margin Search. This year will see a review of these standards to ensure the DEFRA Module 2 is fully met and remove any uncertainties that exist. Training in water awareness MREW is committed to ensuring all members receive training in water awareness and to providing an option for Module 2 training (MR Bank/DEFRA First Responder). Various options have been reviewed and we now have a proposal for a trainer development programme to develop a self-sustaining capability. Some teams, knowing their own risk profile for the area they serve, will have identified the need to have members trained to Module 3 (MR Water Team or DEFRA Swiftwater Technician). A number of teams are keen to interact regarding water incidents with their local LRF or join the list of teams who currently sit on the national DEFRA Asset Register. The organisational priorities are being met and, while Module 3 training is not currently provided, we recognise the advantage of having members trained to this level.

Both the MR and DEFRA modules, which identify the standards required for all rescuers working near or in water.

Online resources Looking forward, once we’ve achieved the delivery of sustainable Module 2 training, we will move onto developing online training resources to support the maintenance of competence and help

Emergency Services Times October 2014

ease the limited training time available to teams. Along with this will be clear online guidance for each level with a simple overview, a set of standards and finally options for delivery and maintenance to help guide teams and their members. Careful financial planning is fundamental but the development of internal water trainers is set to save significant amounts of money at team level as well as provide local contacts and training at times which best suit the membership.

“The need to provide advice and guidance on water equipment suitable for both training and operational deployment for a range of uses is key.” Equipment The need to provide advice and guidance on water equipment suitable for both training and operational deployment for a range of uses is key. As part of the strategy, we hope to provide nationally available resources along with the intention to increase national assets for training and large incident deployment at regional and national level. We acknowledge that team equipment is not a national asset but, through the use of a water asset register and existing systems, it is envisaged an upto-date picture can be maintained of MREW availability of water equipment assets.

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Bankside searching during the April Jones search. Photo: Kinder MRT

Incident management Andy Lee, Al Read and Martin Bills delivered the first Mountain Rescue Water Incident Manager course, in November 2012. In order to deliver relevant training to all who request it, we will offer an intermediate course with limited prerequisites and a qualification, which is simpler to maintain. It’s also important to ensure a cohort of instructors exists to deliver this and that the right people are attending the course. MREW will support a regional approach to the availability of water incident managers. The Adviser role identified in 2011 will be reviewed, though this is a lower priority. Communication We recognise the need to increase the availability of information, expertise and communication to members, and that this is a two-way process. Besides the creation of a water resource centre on the MR website, we plan to provide a ‘Water Who’s Who’ and also use the six-monthly meetings, the water conference, the Mountain Rescue magazine and, where information is safety-critical, the MREW National Bulletin to inform members. A feedback form has also been created, to be completed by the regional reps for the May/November meetings, to help inform decision making. Research and development There are many external organisations and experts we can engage with and we are currently leading a piece of work to provide official access to information for our teams with the Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC), looking at options to offer various methods of alerts and training so that this information is utilised to maximum effect. Work is also being undertaken in conjunction with the ICT team to provide information to teams from other organisations that provide river and water data. Many research and development projects are ongoing, with some clearly of a higher priority. This area is often seen as the first area to cut during times of financial challenge and these projects will very much be dependent on organisational priorities, the need to manage organisational risk, and the availability of funding and the volunteers necessary to support the work. We hope to maintain momentum and continue to make progress for the future MR response. www.mountain.rescue.org.uk

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Emergency Services Times October 2014


50 | ESTWATER RESCUE & FLOOD RESPONSE

Lifesavers take up flood fighting! Surf Life Saving GB (SLSGB) Lifesavers are to increase ‘flood fighting’ activity after the charity’s successful ‘SAR to Resuscitation Conference, 2014’ (www.flood-fighters.com/14Index.html). Chair of Conference, Deputy Chief Jeff Dulin (Charlotte FD, North Carolina, USA) was quite clear, saying, “There is a need to have a facility to develop and train skills in flood response to the highest professional levels.” Supported by many of its 6000 members and 70 clubs, SLSGB is now commencing a programme for those wishing to further serve their communities to become trained volunteer flood responders. Words: David Lane MIFireE, Director of the Flood and Water Rescue Academy, Poole. Surf Life Saving GB (SLSGB) is a national SAR asset declaring charity and Life Saving Sport’s National Governing Body (NGB) dedicated to lifesaving for aquatic activities by helping to make our beaches safer. The charity is led by education and training, and the qualified volunteer lifeguard to save lives. SLSGB lifesavers begin as ‘Nippers’ aged eight and by age 16 may have taken a range of awards leading to the SLSGB Surf Lifeguard Award, the internationally recognised gold standard and occupational lifeguard qualification for RNLI Beach Lifeguards. SLSGB awards and qualifications are for people of all ages and abilities, helping them to become trained lifesavers for communities, whether inland or beach: Basic safety awards; Emergency First Aid; Beach Lifeguard Support; Professional Beach Lifeguard; Inshore Rescue Boat crew and driver; and commercial awards, such as Surf Coach and Coasteering. As skills evolve, so these qualifications evolve into ‘Lifesaving and Drowning Prevention’, through: life saving educational programmes; sport life saving; water event safety; and flood working and search and rescue.

South Worcester Life Saving Club crew under instruction for unpowered IRB use in North Wales.

Inland water safety SLSGB works for all on: inland water safety in flood response; moving water rescue tactics; medical considerations; and strategic management. A voluntary organisation having professional standards, SLSGB methodology together with awards/qualifications, training courses and occupational learning will be applied to the demands of flood and water rescue. A successful proof of concept is complete and fully operational with the South Worcester Life Saving Club, an audited, declared, fully trained Team Type B on the national register to the Concept of Operations standards. Assessments of likely resource requirements indicate that a full blown ‘tidal surge’ may need more than 500 boat rescue teams – the national

flood rescue asset register currently has about 130. In the December 2013 East Coast tidal surge, an incident well short of worst case, available teams ran out. In the February inland floods, DCFO Roy Harold of Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service indicated at SAR 2014 that, except for a small minority, available trained assets were not used and other, less well trained and poorly equipped resources were pressed into service. Since February, many local volunteer groups have ‘sprung up’ and need a management structure around them for their own and others safety. With their culture, structure and the accredited training, SLSGB volunteers could provide a range of services from the less demanding but still vital roles, eg ‘hearts and minds support for elderly and infirm’, wading rescue, evacuation and logistics to the technical Type B rescue team. Some of these embryonic community response flood volunteer teams have approached SLSGB in significant numbers asking for structured training options. This includes requests from many regions covering a swathe of flood prone areas, like Wessex Flood Rescue Unit, to train people and provide flood responders. Some have assets that include highly trained volunteers and powered craft. Those ‘signed up’ are being developed through support and training, to work under the legislative process to the operational direction of the respective authorities as a declared assets under the ‘ConOps’ and the new National Operating Guidance. Funding issues As with any other voluntary first responder organisations, funding is a key issue, just when the flooding problem is getting worse and threatening more lives; costs for the teams have to be found as best they can, in the same manner as for any voluntary sector teams.

David Lane, Emergency Manager, Trainer and Film Producer, formerly a UK Senior Fire Officer, is the Director of the Flood and Water Rescue Academy, Poole.

Community mandate SLSGB recognises that volunteers should be registered as properly accredited and constituted Flood First Responder Teams, able to be safely tasked to any flood incident both locally for their own communities, and desirably anywhere in the country where needed. Within SLSGB, the Head of the charity’s dedicated specialist Flood and Water Rescue Academy, which is now open at Poole, will direct the initiative. The project will enable trained Community Flood Responders, within the various levels set by the Concept of Operations document, to provide support within local communities and to provide a much needed national asset. Tim Coventry, CEO of SLSGB, said, “The Academy will enable and support trained volunteer teams to be declared flood rescue assets and under the legislative process work to the operational direction of the respective authorities under the Concept of Operations – a significant development which we whole heartedly support.” We will welcome visitors to our stand at The Emergency Services Show to discuss and explain our initiative to provide volunteer lifesavers with the gold standard in ‘Flood fighting awards’. www.slsgb.org.uk www.flood-fighters.com

South Worcester Life Saving Club rescue boat crew during this year’s floods on the River Avon during training.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

All photos courtesy of David Lane and South Worcester Life Saving Club.

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Emergency Services Times October 2014

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ESTPROCUREMENT | 53

The fire and rescue procurement landscape post Firebuy It is now more than three years since Firebuy was wound up and the national framework contracts were novated to The Consortium. Since then, the procurement landscape has become less clear (it never was straightforward) with some frameworks being renewed by fire authorities, some by various Professional Buying Organisations (PBOs), some being duplicated by competing approaches and others that have been allowed to lapse. What is clear is that the demise of Firebuy left the fire and rescue sector with no central resources for coordination of forward plans, no common approach for spend analysis and no plans for aggregation/consolidation of spend. Words: Mike Pearson, Director of Corporate Services, Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service. There have been some notable examples of good collaborative procurement practice in this period, eg the South East and North West PPE frameworks, which are used by 19 authorities with a combined spend of £1.394m pa. However, it is true to say that wider collaboration is not the norm and the fire and rescue sector generates enormous degrees of bespoke requirements that result in suppliers spending a lot of time responding to tenders for more or less the same thing but with any number of minor variations in requirements.

“Perhaps the landscape may start to become a little clearer, more joined up and less confused – let’s hope so.” Spend analysis Against this backdrop of bespoke requirements and disaggregated spend, the Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) worked with DCLG on a spend analysis research project during 2013. Fourteen fire authorities took part in the research and the resulting report (Fire and rescue procurement aggregation and collaboration) was published by DCLG in March this year. Key findings in the report were: • Collective spend data is largely unavailable and what there is lacks common definitions and systems and this continues to stagnate efforts to identify collaborative opportunities • Aggregating demand could save £18m pa • Significant variations were found in prices paid for the same products – some authorities paid over 200 percent as much for their products as others • Bespoke specifications are costing more and are a barrier to aggregation • Best prices given where volumes are known/guaranteed • Contracts where a number of fire and rescue authorities work together deliver better value for money (by providing known/guaranteed volumes and avoiding the duplication of procurement activity). This latest report provides a lot of evidence to support what best practice practitioners have been

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articulating for years. Indeed, the frameworks put in place by Firebuy were not without shortcomings. The National Audit Office (NAO) published a report in 2010 (Reducing the cost of procuring fire and rescue service vehicles and specialist equipment) which found that, ‘Firebuy’s approach has allowed expensive bespoke procurement to continue’ and that, ‘fire and rescue services can use Firebuy contracts simply as ‘a way to market’ to procure whatever bespoke equipment they like’. In support of this, the latest research project found that, ‘where fire and rescue authorities simply bought from a framework agreement the cost was higher. This is because the framework limits the number of suppliers and therefore the competitive pressure applied to the transaction. Fire and rescue authorities possibly do this because they do not have capacity to run multiple competitions’. Vision for the future One of the difficulties in articulating a vision for the fire sector is that, as sure as there will always be death and taxes, there will be alternatives to any vision put forward. The recommendations from the recent research project are as good a place as any to start: • Use of a common spend management tool across the fire sector • Improvement of spend management in the sector, creating a pipeline of savings opportunities • Development of a national plan that shows the renewal of contracts and equipment • Coordination of a series of collaborative projects that deliver savings • Signposting fire and rescue authorities to areas where non-fire collaboration may bring greater efficiencies • Spreading best practice in procurement and fostering a competitive market in the fire sector Where do we go from here? CFOA has written to all Chief Fire Officers with an initial strategic response to the spend analysis research project report. The response makes a compelling argument for the need for fire authorities to change their approach to procurement and embrace genuine and meaningful collaboration. This means being prepared to contribute to the development of common specifications as the norm, not the exception, and to use those specifications to participate in

Ann Millington, Chief Executive, Kent Fire and Rescue Service.

collaborative procurements that encourage and facilitate the aggregation of demand, allowing competitions to be run with known/guaranteed volumes. To achieve this will involve working differently. A common spend analysis tool is already being deployed by up to 23 fire authorities to support the data analysis and forward planning. Fire authorities are being asked for their support for a category management approach, with fire authorities taking a lead role for particular categories supported by a small central resource. Quite what this will look like as a model is still evolving but the emphasis is very much that it will be sector owned and driven. However, it is anticipated that some of the key PBOs will continue to play a vital part by working closely with relevant CFOA groups and undertaking some major procurements. National Procurement Group CFOA’s National Procurement Group (chaired by Mike Pearson, Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service) is coordinating this work together with the strong leadership being given by Ann Millington, Chief Executive of Kent Fire and Rescue Service and a member of the CFOA Board of Directors. Both Ann and Mike have spoken at a number of fire sector events over the past six months about the need for a new approach. Being realistic, we won’t get all 46 English fire and rescue authorities on board from the outset and so the strategy will be based on those that are willing to contribute, think and work differently. Positive support for the CFOA initial strategic response is starting to turn into the formation of a substantial ‘coalition of the willing’ on which a clear, strong and deliverable strategy can be based. So the initial signs are encouraging, and perhaps the landscape may start to become a little clearer, more joined up and less confused – let’s hope so. www.cfoa.org.uk

Emergency Services Times October 2014


54 | ESTCOMPANY PROFILE

Bence rises to the big challenge of compact vehicles The last 12 months have been a very exciting time for WH Bence in regards to product development and new opportunities in the emergency services vehicle sector. The company is looking forward to meeting up with its customers at The Emergency Services Show this September to showcase its vehicles and introduce a new product range to the market. WH Bence has been successful in its tendering opportunities this year. The company has been awarded a place on Lot 1 of the Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service Framework Agreement, which enables it to tender for any pumping appliance and special vehicle opportunities with any UK fire and rescue service who utilise this framework. Contracts and frameworks The company has also been successful in obtaining a framework agreement with Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service (GMFRS) for the supply and fit of ultra-high pressure cold cutting equipment. Bence has recently completed the installation of the first system, and is currently in the process of fitting the equipment to the remaining 43 GMFRS appliances in the contract. It is also able to supply other emergency services organisations with the cold cutting equipment through the framework agreement, which is an exciting venture for the company.

“Vehicles with specific fire fighting equipment are now being provided to manage a change to the type of incidents fire brigades are facing.” WH Bence has also entered into an agency agreement with DAP/Translink, based in Denton near Manchester. Through this agreement, the company is able to offer the full range of DAP aerial and water tower equipment to be fitted to emergency services appliances; the agreement supports the supply of both new vehicles and refurbishments of existing vehicles both in the UK and overseas. One of the most prestigious contracts that WH Bence has won this year is the design and manufacture of six compact fire appliances for Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service. Below is a case study for the implementation of these vehicles and how WH Bence was able to meet the fire authority’s requirements. Compact fire appliances Modernisation and stricter financial constraints of the fire and rescue service has not only had an impact on the brigades but also on the suppliers to the industry. Altered operational requirements for each fire authority has led in turn to a change in

the types of vehicles required, with fire authorities looking at working with smaller fire crews and more cost effective vehicle purchases. There has also been a change in the type of fires that crews are being asked to attend. With the prevalence of ‘small fires’ and inner city access requirement not every station requires two full Type B appliances. Other vehicles with specific fire fighting equipment are now being provided to manage a change to the type of incidents fire brigades are facing. Bence has seen a move towards small rapid response vehicles for the ‘small fire situations’ the firefighters are more regularly facing. Naturally this has led to difficult challenges for both the brigades and suppliers alike. The choice for the brigade is speed and reduced vehicle size versus limited equipment and payload capacity, and for the supplier the challenge is providing a safe solution while still meeting the brigades’ requirements. One of the key factors to be considered is the vehicle GVW with many of the small rapid response vehicles based on or below 3500kg. The fire and rescue services industry has considered the pickup truck solution and, although these vehicles are categorised as 3500kg, in most cases they all have a GVW of 2800kg or a maximum of 3200kg. The base vehicle kerb weight, when transporting three fully equipped firefighters and a suitable water tank leaves little payload for the equipment and pump capacity. There have been several modifications offered through the aftermarket service sector to assist with increasing the payload to 3500kg. In most cases these solutions are produced ‘after-market’ and have not been ratified by the vehicle OEM. Additionally, these changes to the suspension system are designed for vehicles, which are driven for commercial use at normal road speed, and not for high-speed emergency response and manoeuvring while fully laden. Although these aftermarket products have been well received in the marketplace Bence felt that the future for fire appliances was to provide a compact solution that was both supported and warrantied by the original vehicle manufacturer. Future needs considered Looking to the future needs of the fire and rescue services and the re-emergence of the compact fire appliance, Bence has worked closely with Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service, having been awarded the recent contract. The project for Suffolk FRS was to find a solution still offering the equipment stowage capacity required, while offering the service a running cost saving by using a lighter weight chassis, and a capital cost saving with a compact

Emergency Services Times October 2014

body design so reducing the overall purchase price. “WH Bence is at the cutting edge of new fire engine design, with an in-house design and a variety of manufacturing services,” says Sales Director Oliver Brown. The contract from Suffolk FRS for a compact solution for their new fleet vehicle came through the Consortium Fire and Rescue Framework and offered a big challenge for Bence. The key design problem was that the customer, in this case Suffolk FRS, did not want to sacrifice any carrying capacity for their equipment, while providing a smaller fire appliance solution. Finding storage space for the normal quota of fire fighting equipment offered a new complexity to the design criteria. The Bence design department stepped up to the mark and produced what Bence believes is a great solution for its customer. In conjunction with Volvo, and using one of its narrow track chassis cabs, the new vehicle has achieved all its operational objectives. Design developments The main outstanding design developments are as follows: New slimmer and shorter body to match the narrow track cab: the new slimmer body offers a greater level of manoeuvrability and allows the firefighters increased access to difficult rural and urban areas. Single centre mounted hose reel: the hose reel has been positioned above the pump in order to maximise the flexibility of a narrower vehicle. Low overall height with the total vehicle height being below 3m: this vehicle has the added benefit of being considerably lower than a standard fire appliance. This can make a huge difference when accessing inner city areas with listed buildings and reduced height bridges. Specially redesigned ladder gantries, unique to Bence, have been fitted to this vehicle in order to maintain the low height profile required for the Suffolk team. Modern CAN bus vehicle/pump control system: all the latest chassis are fitted with an electronic CAN bus control system. The Volvo is

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one of the most advanced vehicles in the market. In order to operate the pump from the rear of the vehicle it is necessary to break into the CAN bus system. In the pump bay Bence has provided a specially programmed 10in screen, which provides information about pump pressures and controls the engine RPM at the touch of a button. There is also a miniature version provided for driver information fitted within the cab area. Bence has the ability to programme CAN bus control systems in house and are therefore able to offer Suffolk FRS a control and display system to their operational requirements.

“Bence felt that the future for fire appliances was to provide a compact solution that was both supported and warrantied by the original vehicle manufacturer.”

Latest tilt slide light weight shelf units: Bence has utilised the latest light weight slide and tilt shelf units and has fitted a developed slam lock shelf retaining catch. This system allows the firefighter easy access to a shelf, which, before tilting, can be above shoulder height. Repositioning the shelf after use is straight forward using the very robust slam lock system. Equipment stowage is easily achieved by using the standard Bence bollarding system, and this system has been designed to allow easy reconfiguration as and when the equipment needs changing. The new slide rails allow for 110 percent extension, and when fully extended, are rated to a maximum payload of 350kg. Sales Director Oliver Brown says, “This is a huge increase in payload allowance when the shelves are fully extended.” Redesign cab stowage to accommodate all the equipment for four firefighters, Officer in Charge and driver: the smaller cab layout has provided quite a challenge for Bence. Having to find room for four firefighters fully equipped in a reduced size cab has posed some interesting ergonomic problems for the design team. In conjunction with Suffolk FRS, Bence has provided a comfortable and safe seating system in the crew cab area. The design parameters included fitting suitable headrests to protect the crew and to meet current VCA standards. As the vehicle has been subjected to a full VCA test it was essential that all the equipment carried in the cab was correctly stowed

and secured. Items like torches and portable radios can become dangerous missiles if there is a collision involving the vehicle. This stowage system has been designed using Bence’s 3D software and CNC cut and plastic welded for a precision finish. Innovative design Bence is continually looking to innovate and progress the design and manufacture in the fire market and is looking forward to the challenges that lie ahead. The new Suffolk FRS vehicles are now nearing completion and first impressions from Suffolk are very favourable. WH Bence is looking forward to welcoming visitors onto its stand (J52) at this year’s Emergency Services Show. www.whbence.co.uk

Medical focus for multi-agency training centre The Emergency Services Training Centre has been delivering specialist simulation and training to the emergency services and offshore sectors for 22 years and was developed to meet the growing needs of these sectors worldwide. The centre has the unique ability to merge any agencies to test their resilience under arduous conditions and, unlike its competitors, has concentrated on the medical aspects of rescue and recovery rather than rescue itself. All of the facilities at the centre can be hired – organisations can run their own courses at the venue or students can simply attend a course run by the centre and let its experts do the rest. Alternatively, if a blend of both would suit your needs, the choice is yours. The Emergency Services Training Centre can host your scenario as it does for government agencies such as JESIP, the fire and rescue service, police, ambulance and the MOD.

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Variety of courses The Emergency Services Training Centre has a variety of courses to suit your needs: • MPHTLS – Military Pre Hospital Trauma Life Support: this is ideally suited to the Firearms Police Officer who may be required to provide medical intervention during hostile situations • PHTLS – Pre Hospital Trauma Life Support: a must for health care professionals who work in the pre hospital arena on a regular basis • FPOS – First Person On Scene: a good intermediate course for non medical personnel • Rope Access: the centre has 150ft indoor training rigs that can test the students to the limits. Ranging from industrial rope access to rock face and building setup. The centre aims to provide the most varied approach to training delivery • Confined space rescue: the centre boasts one of the most complex confined space rescue rigs in Europe. It is complex and very challenging for the students, which allows for development and confidence building • ALS – Advanced Life Support: this course provides the student with all the necessary skills and knowledge to manage a cardiac

arrest. Both in hospital and out in the pre hospital arena the student will become confident and able to manage the team approach. • DMT – Diver Medic Technician Course: mandatory for commercial divers, the course prepares the diver to work in a pressurised environment while offshore. It covers a wide variety of medical skills and is run over a twoweek period. The Emergency Services Training Centre is situated on a 4.5-acre site in close proximity to Junction 1 of the M53, making the facility readily accessible. www.emergencyservices-training.com

Emergency Services Times October 2014


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The new world of road safety for fire and rescue services The Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) has, throughout 2014, continued to make a significant contribution towards the Government’s road safety agenda (The Strategic Framework for Road Safety), which in turn has enabled our partners to move towards their goals within the road safety field. CFOA has developed a road safety strategy to direct individual fire and rescue services who themselves have unique qualities and exceptional staff who can deliver crucial road safety messages to a wide range of target groups. Words: Martin Dowle, Vice Chair of CFOA Road Safety Executive Board & Prevention and Road Safety Manager for Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service. The UK currently has one of the safest records for roads in the world and we have seen a steady decline and decrease in casualty figures over the last decade. This is a testament to the multi-agency work of service providers such as the Department for Transport (DfT), police, road safety and health professionals, highway engineers, charity organisations and vehicle designers, while recognising the responsibility of drivers and UK citizens to ensure their own safety and adopt a safe approach. However, CFOA recognises that there is no reason for complacency; this is a positive sign of what can be achieved with the right leadership, policies, actions, attitudes and behaviours, and with agencies working in partnership to coordinate their efforts. Key priority for CFOA Road accidents cause immense human suffering. During 2013 this equated to nearly five people being killed on the roads of the UK each day. Road safety is one of CFOA’s key priorities. The association believes that much of the harm and cost associated with road traffic collisions (RTCs) is entirely avoidable and is not an inevitable consequence of road transport. CFOA considers that further measures can be taken that will provide high value for money and lead to a safer, healthier and more sustainable society. The Fire & Rescue Services Act 2004 and the Fire (Scotland) Act 2005 provided the first significant changes in the law on the operation of the fire and rescue service in over 50 years, and states that we have a responsibility to prevent RTCs occurring and this can only be effectively achieved through partnership working. The Acts include a number of different provisions that enable fire and rescue authorities to work with each other, and with other partners, to deliver services flexibly and more efficiently. One of the core functions the Act sets out for fire authorities is to ensure they will undertake ‘(a) rescuing people in the event of road traffic accidents in its area.’ and ‘(b) protecting people from serious harm, to the extent that it considers it reasonable to do so, in the event of road traffic accidents in its area.’ CFOA’s UK Road Safety Week 2014 The Chief Fire Officers’ Association's UK Road Safety Week took place from 9-15 June 2014. During this national week of activity, fire and rescue services promoted targeted road safety

messages to road users including pedestrians, car drivers, cyclists and motorbike riders in their local communities, with an overarching message of ‘Be Safe Out There’. A combination of national and local events showcased the work that the fire and rescue service does in the area of road safety, through targeted local educational programmes, and its world leading expertise in casualty care and extrication techniques after road traffic collisions. In addition to fire and rescue services (FRSs) across the country, a number of national stakeholders took part, including the Highways Agency (HA), DfT, Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO), Brake, Road Safety Great Britain (RSGB), Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), RoadSafe, Tyresafe, Living Streets, the Royal Automobile Association (RAC), and the Motorcycle Action Group (MAG). Key messages Over 40 FRSs took part in CFOA’s fourth national road safety event, with CFOA HQ staff coordinating the event, making available leaflets and flyers, a comprehensive toolkit along with a generic evaluation/questionnaire, which were used by many partners/stakeholders on or after the event. CFOA UK Road Safety Week 2014 targeted four main groups: cyclists; motorcyclists; pedestrians; and young drivers. Information relating to the four targeted audiences was given to individual fire and rescue services, partners and stakeholders as follows: • Cyclists – Be safe, be seen: Get yourself noticed with hi-vis and a helmet • Motorcyclists – Be safe, hydrate. Dehydration is a hidden danger. It affects your concentration and your reaction time • Pedestrians – Look out, listen up: Be aware when you’re out there • Young Drivers – Dangerous distractions: Be smart – keep your ‘I’ on the road. The overall response from services increased again this year following on from last year’s success, as CFOA has begun to build better relationships strategically, which has allowed better local partnership working with road safety teams. A Twitter campaign helped us to reach over 200,000 members of the public, many of whom would normally be outside of CFOA’s reach through high-profile re-tweets from personalities from the media.

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Conclusion Collaborative work to deliver this fourth, weeklong CFOA led National Road Safety event was undertaken by over 40 individual fire and rescue services. A great debt of thanks is owed to all of those staff who took part in various ways, either through planning in the lead up to, or in delivery of the aims and objectives on the day: they are to be congratulated on their success.

“CFOA is fully committed to the UK’s road safety agenda.” Thanks go to our operational crews, support staff, and volunteers including our partners during the week – ACPO, RSGB and the HA to name but a few, as over 42 stakeholders were involved in the planning and delivery of this event. Between us we delivered a positive road safety message to the public, enabling people to stay safe on the road – whether as a pedestrian, driver/rider or passenger Commitment of staff The success of this event is down to the credible message delivered by all our staff across the country during the week. The weather may have hampered some local initiatives but it did not dampen the enthusiasm at any of our planned events. This shows the commitment of our staff to still deliver an important message to the public, no matter what the weather throws at them. CFOA and the UK fire and rescue services are very proud of their exemplary track record in community based fire safety education. www.cfoa.org.uk

NB This CFOA led event is separate from and does NOT replace Brake’s long-running Road Safety Week, which will take place as usual across the UK from 17-24 November 2014, and in which FRSs are also encouraged to take part.

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Counter-terrorism search training for the UK police service Many will remember the terrorist attack carried out by the Provisional IRA (PIRA) upon the British Government at the Grand Hotel, Brighton in 1984. An Improvised Explosive Device (IED), with a long time delay facility, had been secreted behind a bath panel in a room within the hotel. The device detonated and, as it had been planted on an upper floor of the building, maximum effect was achieved from the resulting mass collapse of masonry. The explosion resulted in five deaths and 23 serious injuries. The taunt from PIRA after the attack underlined the threat, ‘You have to be lucky every time, we only have to be lucky once.’ Words: Superintendent Tony Ismay, Head of the Police National Search Centre. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher ordered an urgent review of security measures following the attack, instructing that the police become better at protecting the Government and ultimately the country from terrorism. Sir John Hoddinott, the Deputy Chief Constable of Hampshire Constabulary at the time, conducted an urgent review and made a number of recommendations for improvement, one of which was the need for UK police forces to be trained and equipped in counter-terrorism search techniques.

And so the Police National Search Centre (PNSC) came into existence, with authority from the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO), to be the sole providers of counter-terrorism search training to the UK police service. The centre was originally co-located within a military establishment and was resourced by soldiers from the Royal Engineers and police officers from the former Royal Ulster Constabulary. Today, the PNSC is part of the College of Policing and is currently located at Bramshill, Hampshire. The centre has an establishment of 13 staff, comprising UK police officers, Warrant Officers from the Royal Engineers and civilian support staff.

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Three core courses The PNSC remains the only approved provider of counter terrorism search training to UK police forces and delivers three core courses: 1. Licensed Search Officer (LSO) course – one week in duration and designed to teach proven systematic search procedures and techniques applicable to all aspects of counter terrorism and crime searches. The course includes training in the construction of IEDs, different methods of attack and threat, forensic recovery of evidence and practical assessments of search abilities 2. Police Search Adviser (PolSA) course – three weeks in duration. A PolSA is capable of planning, managing and controlling both counter terrorism and other search activity, eg crime and missing persons. A PolSA is also recognised as a national adviser to senior officers for all matters associated with search operations 3. CT Security Coordinator (CT SecCo) course – two weeks in duration and designed to equip those responsible for the coordination of security operations and other large scale events. Missing persons In recent times there has been a growing demand for specialist training in connection with the search for missing persons. One week of the PolSA course is devoted to training in the management of missing person searches. On average, the police service receives approximately 300,000 reports annually of persons who are missing. The majority are found safe and well in a short period of time but unfortunately a small number result in not being found and/or the subject of lengthy search and criminal operations, eg April Jones and Madeline McCann. The PNSC, alongside its training responsibility, is able to provide support to

forces who experience such events. Support includes the peer review of ongoing missing person investigations and the ability to inject staff into a search management cell in the early stages of a missing person enquiry. Voluntary organisations such as Lowland Rescue and Mountain Rescue, with whom the PNSC has developed excellent working relationships, provide a very professional and well equipped response to assist police forces in such searches. Forces across the country rely heavily on such support to provide greater resilience and resources for missing person searches. Colleagues from these voluntary bodies also attend the annual PolSA Continued Professional Development (CPD) events organised and delivered by the PNSC. In addition to these core courses the PNSC is also able to support other partners and organisations with the delivery of bespoke search training. In the past 18 months staff have been deployed to Canada, Australia, Abu Dhabi and Qatar to assist those countries build their own search capabilities. www.college.police.uk

Visit College of Policing Ltd on Stand R54.

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Another year, another show, and the changing ambulance landscape We’ve all heard the stories and seen the coverage – the ambulance market is changing. As the largest trade association for regulated independent ambulance services in England, we at the Independent Ambulance Association (IAA) are only too aware of these changes. Words: Keerti Baker, Communications Advisor, Independent Ambulance Association. Commissioners are seeking a new, more constructive dialogue with providers to deliver greater innovation and improved patient experience not only in non-emergency patient transport but, for the first time, in urgent care as well. Consequently, providers both public and private have to ‘up their ante’ to even be considered for a conversation. This is a profound change and one that the IAA welcomes. In April this year, we published a perspective of independent ambulance services in England ‘The Vital Link’, which shows how private providers are largely misunderstood, therefore often misquoted and misrepresented by critics in Parliament, the public healthcare establishment and particularly in the media. Encouraging excellence The association would instead like to see a more mature outlook, acknowledgement that the private sector can offer viable, long term solutions and a more open attitude towards engagement with the IAA to help regulate, manage and encourage excellence. We are pleased to see more competition;

this is healthy and we would encourage broader procurement of services by commissioners. The fact is that private providers are working in partnership with the NHS to help trusts achieve their targets – and in many cases this has been happening for many years – they are regulated in the same way and we now have members who provide services nationwide for the very first time. The changing healthcare landscape also does mean that private providers are and should be seen as a wider part of the NHS family – perhaps, to begin with, as those distant cousins that you’re not too sure about, but ones you can rely upon because the reality is that they’re part of your network. While embracing this change as part of the future of healthcare delivery, it’s important to stress on the benefits of consistent change. Benefits of consistent change The IAA is working in partnership with regulators such as the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to ensure regulations are standardised and applied across the board of ambulance services, whether the provider is a regional single site operator, specialist event organisation or a national multi-site firm. Consistent accreditations and inspections will promote fair competition, behind which we at the IAA will be the driving voice. In addition to the CQC, we will also be working with bodies such as Monitor, to make certain that ambulance firms deliver services true to the profession. Consistency is also necessary in the ambulance service’s approach to training and standards. Over the next 12 months, the IAA will continue to champion a standardised approach to training and is working to provide best practice guidelines to providers. We will also

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be building relationships with other organisations from both public and private sectors and, where relevant, will be collaborating efforts in joint lobbying initiatives. The fact is that the healthcare landscape has changed and is continuing to change, and healthcare policymakers will have to consider the benefits, skills and resources of the independent ambulance industry.

“Consistent accreditations and inspections will promote fair competition, behind which we at the IAA will be the driving voice.” There is a lot on offer from the independents in the field, from innovative solutions, differentiation and redefined systems that are all key components of a complete service offering. The healthcare industry can embrace this change, adapt it and grow with it or continue to shun it. While politicians may choose to make this an active cause in their campaigns, we as an industry have to work together to uphold the profession’s reputation that solely stems from the constant objectives of safe and excellent patient care. www.iaauk.org

Visit the Independent Ambulance Association on Stand Z227.

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Game-changer! With its genesis as a tool devised to monitor any national security incidents surrounding the London Olympics, the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS) Reporting Tool has developed into an invaluable visual aid to record asset availability and current deployment status. Used to great effect during the winter floods, it was most recently utilised by the FRS Support Room at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games. Words: John Fairweather, CFOA National Resilience Command and Control Capability Adviser. The FRS Reporting Tool was originally developed by CFOA National Resilience in support of the London 2012 Olympics to provide a means to monitor significant incidents across England during the games period. It operates on a basic traffic light system, and was monitored from the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) operations cell in London throughout the Olympic Torch Relay and the duration of the Olympic Games. The success of the system was acknowledged and, following the relevant CFOA approvals, the original system is now being further developed by the CFOA Command and Control capability under the guidance of CFO Simon Pilling.

• The UK map is divided into FRS boundaries for England and Wales, with some development work also being undertaken for Scotland • The system is required to meet the needs of a number of stakeholders including: The Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser (CFRA); DCLG; and the Resilience and Emergencies Directorate (RED) • The web-based system allows all FRSs to provide information about incidents directly into the FRS Reporting Tool as they occur, consequently turning their status from ‘steady’ (green) to ‘affected’ (red) or ‘assisting’ (amber) on the national map.

2 August 2014: From the London Olympics to the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, we have been mesmerised by the outstanding performances of Jamaican athlete Usain Bolt, here powering home to win the 4 x 100m relay. PHOTO: Robert Perry/REX

The system allows any affected fire and rescue service to be easily visually identified. Specific information relating to any incident that has occurred is available to view by clicking onto the relevant FRS. Individual control rooms may only view incident details for their own FRS. The CFRA (or his duty officer) will be able to make an assessment on the impacts that an incident may have to national coverage, and then in consultation with the relevant CFOA Capability Lead Officer, will be able to agree any required additional moves based on information and intelligence from other agencies. Database of capabilities The database that is held contains all of the National Resilience (NR) resources that have been declared within the country, both the vehicles (IRU, DIM, USAR, HVP, ELS and Flood Rescue) and personnel (Tactical Advisers). This list of nationally declared capabilities may increase in the future as other capabilities are developed and agreed through the CFOA structure. These systems have been developed to meet the needs of all stakeholders, and input will come from various locations should a major incident occur, with the outputs providing up-to-date information to the National Coordination & Advisory Framework (NCAF).

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Information on specific incidents is provided through the FRS Control Room personnel and is submitted through the web portal to which they have access. This allows all FRSs to have a direct link into a central Monitoring and Mobilising Centre (MMC) from where the CFRA will operate should there be any major incidents.

“The system is able to provide the central management team with both incident and resource details across the country.” The CFRA will contact FRS Chief Fire Officers for specific information on incidents as required and, together with other national information, the CFRA will brief the Minister or COBR as necessary. In the absence of the CFRA, there is a cadre of CFOs who make up the National Strategic Advisory Team (NSAT) who may stand as required. Resources from each of the nationally declared capabilities are held on the central database and are able to show current availability in both list and

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map format. This is extremely useful when making operation decisions during spate conditions such as those experienced during the floods last February.

Overcoming hurdles At first the outline specification that was required for the system did not appear too complex, but it soon became apparent that this was not the case. Once the ‘what if’ scenarios were looked into and the issues and recommendations that were recorded from some of the CFOA debriefs were also taken into consideration, it was clear that this was going to be quite a challenge. Consider this hypothetical example: • An HVP from Manchester goes to a Strategic Holding Area (SHA) in Royal Berkshire where the prime mover vehicle drops off the sled with the HVP and 1km of hose • The HVP is taken for use within Royal Berkshire, but the 1km of hose is taken to another SHA in Surrey on the back of a different HVP sled and prime mover vehicle • The original prime mover is then taken out of service for a day for routine safety checks. Many such examples have been considered during the development of the system to enable it to meet the needs of all of the stakeholders for the duration of the incidents. This has also included the Prime Contractor (Babcock International) and how it would support the recovery, decontamination and repatriation requirements following the incident. The electronic system in England will provide the facility to support the Prime Contractor (Babcock International) with up-to-date information on vehicle and module locations, which is especially useful when assets are on long-duration deployments and away from their normal host location, as was experienced during the winter floods 2013/14. Developments on track A significant amount of work has been put into the scoping of the command and control (C&C) project to enable the system to be developed and cope with the extremely large number of variants. This will provide the flexibility required in the recording of assets by the Enhanced Logistics Support teams who manage the assets when a SHA is set up. The end result is that the system is able to provide the central management team with both incident and resource details across the country.

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The CFOA C&C capability has been updated with progress as the project has developed, with CFO Simon Pilling reporting into the National Operation Committee (Chair, CFO Roy Wilsher) and the National Resilience Board (Chair, CFO Dan Stephens). Future developments may be directed from Central Government, the CFRA, the CFOA National Operations Committee or the CFOA National Resilience Board in order to meet each of their needs, with any changes and developments to the system agreed and managed through the C&C capability.

“Support to the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games was provided through an adapted version of the FRS Reporting Tool.” Within England, as the system has developed to address each of the stakeholders’ needs, additional functions have been integrated into the original databases in order that it may be used in support of other events or issues with a potential national impact, such as staff shortage. Where specific information is required centrally, bespoke pages may be developed and utilised for the individual FRS to submit their information. This flexibility will allow the Reporting Tool to be developed as directed by the CFRA, DCLG and CFOA. www.fireresilience.org.uk

Visit CFOA (National Resilience) Ltd on Stands Z248 & OS445.

Passing the baton...

Support to the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games was provided through an adapted version of the FRS Reporting Tool. Based on a system similar to the England version, but without their individual assets featured, it provided the Games Support Room, based in Johnston, with the ability to monitor all eight of the mobilising areas from one central point, which was being used as the FRS support link into the multi-agency centre.

AACE: championing the modern ambulance service The Association of Ambulance Chief Executives (AACE) is playing a key role in the ongoing Urgent and Emergency Care Review by NHS Medical Director Professor Sir Bruce Keogh. The review – aimed at providing better and more appropriate health services for the public – is drawing on the experience of patients and all professionals in the NHS and across social care, which is why it is vital that the ambulance service’s views are represented at the highest level. Much of the input has revolved around explaining the huge number of initiatives that ambulance services across the country are involved in to help patients avoid unnecessary trips to hospital and provide faster, better care which alleviates pressure across the whole NHS.

Constant challenge Gone are the days when the ambulance service was seen as simply a mechanism for conveying patients to hospital. Today, with demand for ambulance services at its highest ever, and showing no signs of abating, the 10 NHS services across England are engaged in a constant challenge to find new and better ways to care for patients while meeting the most stringent response targets of any ambulance service in the world. Martin Flaherty, Managing Director of AACE, says, “AACE is showing what the modern ambulance service is doing to help the whole NHS healthcare system. Some people still perceive us as just a blue light service but we are working hard to demonstrate that we are strategically positioned to help alleviate system pressures in both hospitals and primary care, and to highlight the giant advances the NHS ambulance service and the paramedic profession have made in the past decade in terms of their abilities and confidence. “Our underlying message is that we want people to understand the absolutely crucial part the ambulance service plays in the whole NHS picture, we want to show the excellent results we are getting with limited resources and we want to make people realise what could be achieved with more funding.” www.aace.org.uk

Visit Association of Ambulance Chief Executives on Stand Z131.

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Capabilities for today, assurance for tomorrow Triggered by the 9/11 terrorist attack on the other side of the Atlantic in 2001, the UK Government recognised the need to enhance the nation’s response to ‘serious’, ‘significant’ or ‘catastrophic’ incidents. With these capabilities now established, a specialist team of National Resilience officers monitors and manages the Assurance programme required to ensure that FRS assets continue to meet current expectations. Words: Dave Benson, CFOA National Resilience Assurance Capability Officer. Following the Al-Qaeda-led attack on the World Trade Center in New York in September 2001, HM Government assessed both the threat level to sovereign territories and the ability of the emergency services in the UK to respond to attacks of a similar nature. The outcome of this assessment was the New Dimension Programme, which delivered a series of enhanced capabilities with which the fire and rescue services across England and Wales could respond. Through the programme, the fire and rescue service was equipped to respond to major incidents and catastrophic disasters, primarily those related to: CBRN(E); collapsed structures with entrapment; wide-area or complex flooding incidents; and coordination, command and control of resources mobilised. Provision of these additional capabilities enables the fire and rescue services, in conjunction with other key stakeholders and organisations, to minimise loss of life and injury, and reduce damage to critical infrastructure and the financial effects of any consequential loss. Well equipped and trained Critical to the successful outcome of complex and major incidents is consistency in procedures and equipment utilised across the piece, preventing deviation away from national policies and procedures due to a wide range of local and regional factors. CFOA National Resilience Ltd (CNR), through the National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT), provides assurance to Central Government and the public that the UK fire and rescue service is well equipped and trained to provide the full range of specialist capabilities designed to respond to a range of serious, significant or catastrophic incidents that have national impact. The desired outcome of the process is to ensure that fire and rescue services who host New Dimension assets are assessed as being able to meet obligations outlined within the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004, The Fire and Rescue Services (Emergencies) (England/Wales) Order(s), and the National Mutual Aid Protocols. The Assurance Process was developed to identify where national expectations are not being achieved, with a team of competent specialist officers providing oversight and, where necessary, support and guidance to fire and rescue services in order to maintain national consistency and interoperability.

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Outline of the Assurance process The Assurance process encompasses all of the following elements: 1. Operational Response This area covers policy, procedures, resilience and response, and ensures that the mechanisms required to support and maintain mobilisation are in place. Delivery ➢ Annual Assurance Programme – scheduled visits to key fire and rescue services (FRS) were undertaken that originally focused on a single capability. From 2014/15 onwards this transitioned over to a multi-capability focus covering all FRSs across England and Wales. This primarily focuses on policy and procedures that enable a response to be mobilised and maintained ➢ Assurance Toolkit (formerly OAT) – an electronic platform designed to capture statistical data from incidents, exercises and issues that: • Enables evaluators to be assigned to exercises for oversight of practical operational delivery • Identifies areas of concern and provides an audit trail capturing resolution • Identifies trends for rectification that would otherwise remain hidden • Provides reportable data for individual capabilities and respective CFOA Leads, the NRB and DCLG. ➢ Incident Reports – major incidents or wide-area emergencies produce data and information that is collated and reported upon with associated recommendations allocated and attached. Work plans are then developed and owners assigned to actions to ensure resolution/completion; recent examples include the East Coast Tidal Surge (Dec 2013) and Wide-area Flooding (Feb 2014).

This screenshot reveals part of the web-based Assurance Process programme designed to monitor FRS asset hosting.

11 September 2001: The World Trade Center’s Twin Towers, struck by two suicide passenger jetliners, caused the collapse of both skyscrapers and more than 2000 deaths.Photo: Sipa/Press/REX

2. Training This area covers course placements, acquisition of skills and delivery of training provision. Delivery ➢ Training Needs Analysis (TNA) – a managed system utilising an electronic platform that allows individual FRSs to bid for places on the Central Training Programme (CTP). Prudent management ensures that FRSs are not overprovisioned and that numbers of trained personnel match outlined KPIs, which keeps costs for the CTP as low as reasonably practicable ➢ Central Training Programme: • Training providers – regular reviews of the overall approach (policy and procedure) are undertaken to ensure that training providers meet outlined expectations; any areas for improvement identified are acted upon thus ensuring that students receive the best possible learning experience

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“Critical to the successful outcome of complex and major incidents is consistency in procedures and equipment utilised.” • Training delivery – individual capabilities periodically assess training delivery to ensure course content is being adhered to and that a suitable system of assessment is in place • Course content – individual capabilities undertake annual reviews to ensure course content meets current needs; amendments are made in line with technical and legislative changes. ➢ Exercising – NRAT evaluators are assigned to pre-identified exercises to assess practical application of skills by responders and interoperability of response. 3. Asset Refresh This area covers maintenance and servicing and ensures that operational appliances and equipment are maintained to the highest standards in preparation for use. ➢ Defect reporting – assessment is undertaken on a monthly basis to highlight equipment that requires replacement under the annual asset refresh programme ➢ Contractual maintenance – individual capabilities periodically assess the servicing regime undertaken on appliances and equipment to ensure the Prime Contractor adheres to specified servicing/maintenance schedules. On the basis of all the information outlined above, all aspects of provision for assurance of national resilience within the fire and rescue service are comprehensively covered, ie: policy and procedures; acquisition and maintenance of skills; appliance and equipment serviceability; and health and safety.

Business benefits In all, the Assurance Process enables an annual Statement of Assurance to be given to the Department for Communities and Local Government that provides confidence in the response capability of the fire and rescue service as a whole, and which also outlines the benefits achieved by continuation of funding for a critical Government programme. These benefits are outlined below. Benefits to Government • Confirmation of a ‘steady state’ response capability against Government Concepts of Operations (ConOps) set against national risk assessments and planning assumptions • Early notification where capabilities may be in doubt with the ability to provide alternative options to address shortfalls • Reduction in expenditure by adaptation of an existing response to meet emerging risks • Identification of areas where capabilities can be re-aligned to meet the ever-evolving national risk picture • Additional intelligence to support risk reduction by identifying areas/locations where usage is higher than average • Reduction in reputational damage to Government when incidents occur by ensuring an effective and efficient response by the FRS at the local level • Confirmation of capabilities to support highprofile events such as the G8 and NATO summits, the Olympics, Party Conferences, VIP/dignitary visits, etc.

“The New Dimension Programme has proved to be one of the most successful ever delivered by Government.”

Training exercises such as this one featuring a simulated plane crash in central London tested the effective and coordinated response of multiagency partners. Photo: London Fire Brigade

Benefits to fire and rescue services • Confirmation that response capability meets outlined standards and legislative requirements • Discharge of duties (CCA) in terms of exercising plans through participation in the National Exercise programme • Provision of a ‘driver’ for closer interoperability through multi-agency training and exercising • Provision of a ‘driver’ for self-assessment, which helps to identify internally where policies, procedures and plans need to be reviewed or updated • Standardisation of response capability to support mutual aid thereby reducing the physical and financial burden of addressing IRMP assumptions at the local level • Reduction in cost at the local level through provision of centralised acquisition training for responders • Reduction in cost through identification of asset usage for other incident types at the local level, eg DIM for HazMats • Reduction in cost of provision of specialist assets/equipment through identification of options for sharing/pooling resources, eg USAR for non-USAR FRS to respond to heavy rescue • Dissemination of lessons learned from training and exercising (both positive and negative) across all FRS to support improvements in response at the local level • Improvements to health and safety of responders through central reporting by all FRS of near misses, accidents, etc for effective resolution at the earliest opportunity. In all, the New Dimension Programme has proved to be one of the most successful ever delivered by Government. However, this could not have been achieved without the full support and innovative approach taken by fire and rescue services across England and Wales. The Assurance Process helps to ensure that this vital aspect of emergency response is always fit for purpose and ready to respond to the needs of the communities we serve. www.fireresilience.org.uk

Last winter’s wide-area flooding brought unprecedented demand for the use of High Volume Pumps, in this instance in Surrey. Photo: Carl Haslam

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Visit CFOA (National Resilience) Ltd on Stands Z248 & OS445.

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Delivering National Operational Guidance for the fire and rescue service By March 2015, the National Operational Guidance Programme will have published guidance covering topics such as incident command, fires and fire fighting and performing rescues. The average time taken to produce new guidance has been cut from over three years to under 18 months, and this autumn sees the publication of no less than five pieces of new draft guidance for consultation. Online publication will result in material that can be easily searched, quickly updated and revised when necessary. This article looks at how national operational guidance supports the interoperable and intraoperable emergency services across the UK. Developing new guidance A crucial part of writing new guidance has been to establish, as far as possible, the distinction between corporate policy and operational policy. The programme has drawn this distinction by limiting the scope of operational policy to the activities and hazards encountered during a fire and rescue service response to an incident – not the training manuals, technical notes, procurement guides, or other important pieces of information, that support such a response. Guidance defines the hazards that could be faced by firefighters at an incident, and activities that eliminate or reduce their impact. It will be for the more specific operational procedures to provide specific step-by-step guides as to how policies are delivered in an incident environment.

Adhering to guidance is not statutory and there is no legal obligation for fire and rescue services to follow it. Nevertheless, it is part of an agreed programme of work that includes the most up-todate thinking from subject matter experts inside and outside of the fire and rescue service. It has been scrutinised and approved by the representatives of the service and the wider fire sector, and its status as ‘industry good practice’ makes it the benchmark that fire and rescue services will be held against when challenged or scrutinised. The story so far Two pieces of operational guidance covering Environmental Protection and Water Rescue and Flooding have been published on the programme website (www.ukfrs.com). Due to the nature of its content, guidance on Marauding Terrorist Firearms Attacks has been published in a secure area on the ResilienceDirect website. A 10-week consultation period on Incident Command guidance ended in mid-September and is due to be published in December. Consultation on guidance for fires and fire fighting, performing rescues, fires in the built environment, operations and the initial operational response to Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (Explosives) will start in October, with all being published between December 2014 and March 2015. See www.ukfrs.com for more information and to participate in the consultation.

Next steps Although the National Operational Guidance Programme has sought to create a distinction between operational policy and procedure, what is clear is that they are interdependent. A partnership in which a number of fire and rescue services collaborated to write common operational procedures is coming to a close, with a view to integrate this work with the National Operational Guidance Programme. The programme is a key part of the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme (JESIP) proposals for the governance of the relationship between emergency services in the future, with a specific focus on operational doctrine, training, exercising and learning. Those proposals have been approved by ministers from the Cabinet Office, the Department of Health, the Department for Communities and Local Government and the Home Office. www.ukfrs.com

Visit the National Operations Guidance Programme on Stand Z240.

RAF Mountain Rescue Service: true all-weather search and rescue capability specialist area search capabilities for regions where access is difficult or dangerous. ‘Whensoever’ is their motto – please drop into Stand SAR7 to see the equipment and people who make up the RAF’s only true all-weather search and rescue capability.

Best known for rescuing people from snowcovered mountains, the RAF Mountain Rescue Service is established to generate and sustain a world-class, high-readiness incident response capability to carry out search and rescue (SAR) and aircraft post-crash management operations. To achieve this, the RAF has three Mountain Rescue Teams (MRTs) at strategic locations across the UK. Unsurprisingly, the majority of tasks undertaken by the RAF’s MRTs arise from police requests to find and rescue people in remote areas. Each MRT has a small core of permanent

www.raf.mod.uk/rafvalley/aboutus/mrs.cfm

Visit RAF Mountain Rescue on Stand SAR7.

staff with the bulk comprising part-time volunteers. The latter give up three out of four weekends and several weeks leave each year to train to the required level for MR operations. RAF MRTs arrive with a comprehensive communications suite to augment communications in remote or disaster-hit areas. They are self-sufficient and capable of sustained operations for protracted periods. While they are most often seen operating on the mountains with their civilian counterparts, they can also provide

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Voluntary sector strengthens UK’s civil protection arrangements The Civil Contingencies Secretariat in the Cabinet Office, in 2003, asked the British Red Cross to coordinate a working group in order to provide a framework for engagement between the government, emergency services, local authorities and voluntary organisations. Out of this the Voluntary Sector Civil Protection Forum (VSCPF) was formed. Words: Simon Lewis, Chair, Voluntary Sector Civil Protection Forum & Head of Emergency Planning and Response, British Red Cross. The Voluntary Sector Civil Protection Forum (VSCPF) continues to thrive and to demonstrate, at a UK level, the voluntary sector’s commitment to strengthening the UK’s civil protection arrangements and the way in which the voluntary sector can work in a truly cohesive and coordinated way. The working group is made up of representatives from the voluntary sector, central and local government, and statutory authorities. Membership includes: Cabinet Office (Civil Contingencies Secretariat); Department for Communities and Local Government (Resilience and Emergencies Division; Local Government Association; Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO); British Red Cross; St John Ambulance; Salvation Army; Royal Voluntary Service; Victim Support; Cruse Bereavement Care; and Raynet (Radio Amateurs’ Emergency Network). Amazing resource The voluntary sector has an amazing resource of trained, skilled, competent people, vehicles, other equipment and premises. In the emergency response sector, we have formed solid practiced relationships with our statutory partners. It is these relationships that allow us to provide support to people in an emergency situation. With the healthy mix of national, regional and local organisations,

we can, through mutual aid structures, provide robust support across the UK. The voluntary sector is often best placed to provide support to what is often referred to as the human aspects of an emergency – that practical and emotional support that people are extremely likely to need following a sudden emergency. In addition to response, we, as a sector, are also very much involved in emergency preparedness and the recovery stages of an emergency. From experience, I see that the recovery stage is often planned and resourced to a lesser extent when compared to the response. It is during recovery that the media spotlight fades; however, it is often the time when people affected are most likely to need the practical and emotional support I mentioned above. More can be done The voluntary sector already provides support in an emergency, however, I always feel that there is more that we can do. One way in which we can do more, is to grow our relationships with individual statutory agencies as well as through Local Resilience Forum and equivalent groups in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Only by doing this, will we reach more people in need. This is a two way street though, and I would absolutely encourage all statutory agencies to seek out local

and national voluntary sector organisations who can add value to the service they provide. During the extreme weather events in the south of England earlier this year, the voluntary sector provided support to people in need numbering well into five figures. I can almost guarantee that there is so much more the voluntary sector can provide, but we do need to be involved. This involvement needs to occur before the incident. If you have any questions or comments – or if you would just like to discuss how the voluntary sector might be able to assist you in an emergency please do not hesitate to contact me (simonlewis@redcross.org.uk) and I will endeavour to put you in touch with the most appropriate voluntary sector partner. www.gov.uk/government/groups/ voluntary-sector-civil-protection-forum

Visit British Red Cross Society on Stands OS29 & Z204.

Working to keep gun crime levels falling NABIS, the National Ballistics Intelligence Service, which works with police forces around the UK, was formed in 2008 following a spike in levels of gun crime. The team, headed by Detective Chief Superintendent Iain O’Brien (below), is split into three main priorities – Forensic Services, Knowledge and Communications and the Intelligence Cell. The Forensic Services team analyses ballistic material submitted by police forces across the UK and utilises the latest technology to connect incidents nationwide.

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NABIS experts, located at hubs in Birmingham, London, Manchester and Scotland provide detailed reports to police officers to help them crack cases and build up a national picture of the criminal use of firearms. The Intelligence Cell compiles information about people, objects, locations and events associated with gun crime in the UK. This information takes the form of intelligence packages, which are available to police forces and provide a detailed account of the current picture of firearms offences. Members of the Knowledge and Communications team manage the NABIS database and carry out training for police officers and police staff. They also work with forces and other partner agencies to spread the word about NABIS and tackling gun crime. The team also works closely with Deputy Chief Constable Dave Thompson, ACPO lead for the Criminal Use of Firearms portfolio.

Large event Clive Robinson, Head of Knowledge and Communications, said, “We are looking forward to taking part in September’s show at the NEC. It is useful for NABIS to be part of such a large event with colleagues from around the blue light services and other important areas of business. “We hope lots of visitors will come and see us on 24 and 25 September and find out much more about NABIS. Levels of gun crime have fallen consistently over the last few years and we are working hard to keep it that way.” Staff from the NABIS team will be on hand at The Emergency Services Show to answer questions and explain more about the work they do to tackle firearms offences. www.nabis.police.uk

Visit National Ballistics Intelligence Service on Stand Z249.

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NARU: Preparing for the future, protecting lives today The National Ambulance Resilience Unit (NARU) is playing an increasingly important role in local and national resilience at a time when the UK emergency preparedness agenda remains undiminished. The threat of UK-based terrorist attacks by international groups remains substantial, while unusual natural events such as freak weather causing flooding and damage, or the incidence of highly infectious diseases such as Ebola, are frequently in the news. To help protect the public and save lives when extremely challenging incidents occur, NARU is in place to support NHS England by providing, on behalf of the national NHS ambulance service, a strategic and operational contribution to all Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response (EPRR) issues related to the NHS.

World leader NARU is increasingly recognised as a world leader in what it does and the NARU Education Centre, for example, has just been awarded the coveted Skills for Health Quality Mark. Keith Prior, NARU Director, says, “The key is that NARU is part of the NHS, run by the NHS for the NHS. The NHS needs to be ready at all times to protect the public when major incidents occur and that’s where NARU comes in. We provide the right education, training and equipment – as well as the highest quality guidance on operational response to specific threats – to enable the NHS to deal with these challenges at the sharp end.” Four strands of work The four key strands of NARU work are as follows: 1. To provide NHS ambulance services with the right clinical advice, training and equipment to enable them to respond efficiently and effectively to major, mass casualty incidents or those that involve patient care in significantly challenging or hazardous environments

2. To assist NHS England, the Department of Health and other key stakeholders with the development of high level strategic ambulance policy that is designed to help the NHS manage specific threats to the health and wellbeing of UK citizens 3. To support NHS ambulance service commissioners by ensuring the regulatory and professional compliance requirements of high risk ambulance operations are correct and in place, while also providing quality assurance when commissioning these capabilities nationally 4. On behalf of all NHS ambulance services, to provide and maintain a crucial communications link with a range of national and international stakeholders on all matters related to pre-hospital care in the context of Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response (EPRR). www.naru.org.uk

Visit National Ambulance Resilience Unit on Stand Z242.

RLSS launches two new water safety courses Last summer saw more than 30 people drown across the UK and, during the first few months of this year, vast areas were flooded putting many people at risk. These examples highlight just some of the situations faced by the emergency services on a daily basis. What’s more, with flood emergency response being extremely challenging in its own right, situations can become significantly more challenging where officers and crews are working in partnership with untrained ancillary staff. Two new modules In response to this issue, the Royal Life Saving Society UK (RLSS UK) is set to launch two new

NWSMP training.

modules as part of its existing and recognised National Water Safety Management Programme (NWSMP) at this year’s Emergency Services Show in September – NWSMP Flood and Aquatic PPE. Cliff Nelson, RLSS UK’s Head of Water Safety Management, said, “We know that blue light services often find themselves working alongside local government staff, utility workers and well meaning volunteers. We also know that if these personnel have not received appropriate training then they can add to the problem rather than be part of the solution. “This is why we are adding these two new modules to our suite of water safety training with the aim of equipping people with the right training to enable them to support professionals in emergency situations, safely and effectively.” RLSS UK research shows that foundation-level training in water hazard, risk and basic response options will significantly improve performance and minimise the likelihood of tragedy. Cliff added, “Most of the risks presented to those first on scene at water-related emergencies can be significantly controlled by simple, straightforward and effective water-hazard awareness – which is what NWSMP delivers – but the flood module is that extra level of training, to be taken as part of the NWSMP or as a stand-alone

Emergency Services Times October 2014

qualification, specifically tailored for a flooding situation. We are excited to launch this at this year’s ESS.” Occupation-based training RLSS UK also offers the National Water Safety Management Programme (Emergency Services), a flexible training award, which enables emergency services authorities to provide officers/paramedics with a sensible and proportionate level of occupation-based training – focused around the first few minutes on scene and before specialist back-up arrives. President of the RLSS UK and former Assistant Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire Police, Peter Moyes, has been a lifesaver for more than 25 years and was a member of the Association of Chief Police Officers’ (ACPO) lifesaving committee. He said, “It is essential for all personnel working in, on or near water to fully understand the risks and make effective decisions about what to do in the management of safe activity around water. The NWSMP enables valuable insight to be gained and used in practise situations and the new modules mean even more high standard, tailored training is available.” www.rlss.org.uk

Visit Royal Life Saving Society UK on Stand Z116.

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One too many Every year, alcohol misuse takes up thousands of hours of the emergency services’ time. The real cost to the NHS, police and fire and rescue services is more than financial, as alcohol is linked to hundreds of assaults on staff. Alcohol Concern is working with trade unions and employers to look for some solutions. Words: Andrew Misell, Cyfarwyddwr / Director, Alcohol Concern Cymru & Alan Lofthouse, National Officer, Ambulance Lead, UNISON Health Group. It could be Cardiff, Carlisle, or Colchester, a busy Saturday night in town is guaranteed to keep paramedics, police, the local A&E busy. Or maybe it’s a call out to a domestic disturbance, road traffic accident, or a simple trip or fall. In many of these cases, the common factor is alcohol, and it is all too common for the emergency services staff who attend these incidents to be the subject of a physical or verbal assault. Conflict resolution training can help to reduce the risk of physical injuries, but often these situations change so quickly that staff find themselves being attacked without provocation or warning.

“There is no sane reason, but what we found is that alcohol and drug abuse is a common factor. People just don’t realise that they are attacking those people who are there to help them.” John McPoland, Northern Ireland Ambulance Service

Assaults have a lasting impact on staff and their families. A violent incident can lead to serious injuries, both physical and psychological, and can lead to extended periods of absence from work. In theory, everyone agrees that staff should be able to do their jobs in safety and not be subjected to verbal or physical abuse, but as these incidents become more common so does the acceptance by staff that it is ‘just part of the job’.

Action needs to be taken Front line emergency resources are already overstretched, and every front line ambulance, police or fire crew that is engaged in a preventable alcohol related call is one that is not available to deal with a crime, medical emergency, serious fire or a road traffic incident. It is just not sustainable to keep dealing with the increase in alcohol related incidents, and action needs to be taken. It has been estimated that alcohol-related health problems – ranging from twisted ankles to terminal illnesses – cost the NHS in England £3.5bn each year. Elsewhere in the UK the picture is same. In May this year, the Scottish Government reported that almost 700 people per week are admitted to hospitals in Scotland due to alcohol. Frontline staff know well enough what this means in terms of time spent managing situations that often could have been avoided, and intoxicated clients who can range from helpless, through unhelpful to outright aggressive. The Northern Ireland Ambulance Service has recently reported an average of five attacks on their crews each week, leaving it short staffed when injured crews have to come off their shifts. For the London Ambulance Service, alcoholrelated incidents make up six percent of their total workload. In 2013-14 they handled 71,868 emergency incidents that occurred because somebody had too much to drink. Practical solutions Alcohol Concern is the leading national charity working on alcohol issues, and aims to reduce the harm caused in our society by excessive alcohol use.

We are working with UNISON and other public service unions this year to highlight the pressure alcohol misuse puts on public services, and to seek practical solutions. At this year’s Emergency Services Show in Birmingham on 25 September, we will be holding a seminar to examine the impact of the UK’s drinking habits on staff and services they provide. We would like to invite you to join us and give us your views on what works well, the problems that you encounter as an employer or employee, and share good practice to reduce the impact on staff. We’ll also be running a survey of the views of paramedics, nurses, police officers, firefighters and any other frontline workers who deal day to day with the results of others overdoing it. Maybe you’d like to see more training for staff, better procedures, or more action to tackle some of the root causes of the problem. This will be your chance to let us know. The short survey should take just five minutes to complete, and will help us make the case for safer workplaces and better use of resources. We’ll be sending out the survey via emergency service unions, or you can contact Andrew Misell directly at Alcohol Concern for a copy on amisell@alcoholconcern.org.uk. www.alcoholconcern.org.uk www.unison.org.uk

Visit Unison on Stand Z253.

Vehicle recovery demo with a difference The Road Haulage Association recovery members are laying on a vehicle recovery demonstration with a difference this year. Last year’s demo focused on casualty extraction from the vehicle and how the recovery crew can assist the emergency services. This year the emphasis is on rapid route clearance techniques. For the demonstration this year Billy Calvert, MD at CF Motoring Services Ltd, Newcastle, has kindly agreed to include the Goldwing Retriever Motor Bike. Because of its construction the bike does have limited use and needs to be specially

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licensed and used only under very limited conditions. Nevertheless, its versatility in assisting with road clearance can get traffic moving that much quicker. The bike is used to access an area that a normal recovery vehicle would find difficult. Designed to create a clear route for the other recovery vehicles it can wind its way through the stricken vehicles and start work that much quicker. Not only does the rider have to be top class they definitely need an advanced sense of balance!

RHA Recovery and IVR (Institute of Vehicle Recovery) work closely together promoting the recovery industry skills and professionalism with a view to assisting the emergency services in providing a more enhanced service to the public. Anyone wishing to learn more of Billy’s bike can contact him on 0191 491 2550. www.rha.uk.net

Visit Road Haulage Association on Stand Z200.

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Top speakers lined up for EPS Conference This year’s Emergency Planning Society (EPS) conference – being held alongside The Emergency Services Show – has an array of topline speakers making valuable contributions to the resilience sector, from the current Ebola crisis to the 2013/14 national flooding events. Nuclear incidents One of the key sessions will be on how the aftermath of two of the world’s worst nuclear incidents, Fukushima and Chernobyl, were dealt with and the EPS will be welcoming two key speakers. Ito Jiro, Manager of the international division of the Japanese Consumer’s Co-operative Union, will outline how his organisation is reassuring the local population on which foodstuffs are safe, and

helping to check levels of contamination. After Fukushima, there were fears throughout Japan of radioactive contamination leaking into the food system, which caused consumers to reject products. The Japanese Co-operative movement has played a critical role in combating this, teaming up with partners such as Fukushima University to rebuild confidence in local produce. Meanwhile, Sergiy Vygivsky, Director of the Social Psychological Rehabilitation Centre in the Ukraine, will describe their work in rebuilding public confidence in the wake of Chernobyl. Sergiy will explain the projects the centre undertakes, such as the education of children in contaminated areas. Generally, the centre plays a pivotal role in rebuilding public confidence, combatting feelings of helplessness, and reviving the social abilities of the community. There are also plans to discuss the impact of the current Ebola outbreak, while the Chief Executive of the Environment Agency, Paul Leinster, will outline some of the lessons identified from this year’s winter floods. Operating since 1952, the Emergency Planning Society offers all those in the resilience and

emergency services sector an opportunity to enhance their professional status, through learning, training, networking, webinars and a recognised ‘Continual Professional Development’ system that will evidence your competency to help your career path. It also gives members access to online resources, best practice case studies and an international network of professionals in this field. Resilience relaunched The society’s quarterly magazine, Resilience, is also being re-launched in a new format at the conference, and will prove to be an important read for all those in the emergency response sector. The EPS conference takes place on 25 September, the second day of The Emergency Services Show. Non-EPS members are welcome, and tickets are available for £150. To book go to www.the-eps.org or Tel: 0845 6009587. www.the-eps.org

Visit Emergency Planning Society on Stand R50.

Live incident streaming looks to revolutionise emergency call-handling and response Smartphone users could soon be streaming live images to a fire and rescue service’s control room, helping to ensure the right resources are sent to emergencies. West Midlands Fire Service (WMFS) is developing the web-based 999 Eye system, believed to be a world first for the blue light sector. The 999 Eye idea came from a WMFS officer who needed to call the NHS Direct telephone advice line when his young daughter was ill. Watch Commander Matt Wroughton, of the brigade’s Technical and Operational Support Directorate, said, “It was challenging to describe her physical symptoms and accurately answer questions. Our perceptions can differ, and finding the right words was difficult. We then had to take a follow-up call before she eventually went to hospital. “Only hours before I’d been video calling a relative in New Zealand, and the two experiences got me thinking about how we could be putting advances in technology to much better use in how we initially resource emergency incidents. “We often get to scenes where members of the public are using smartphones to upload pictures and footage to Two thirds of the 999 calls to social media, often WMFS are made from mobile while the initial phones, with the majority of these from smartphones. emergency response is

still taking shape. I think we can capitalise on this and use live streaming and mapping to make a real difference to the quality of information available to our colleagues in fire control and responding crews and specialists.” Interesting concept Matt submitted his idea to the brigade’s Research and Development programme, Bluelighthinking, which encourages staff to forward suggestions for improvements and advancements in service delivery. The concept is now attracting interest from around the world. “We know that two thirds of the 999 calls we get are made from mobile phones, and that the majority of these are smartphones,” added W/Cdr Wroughton. “We’ve been working closely with BT and providers to understand the capabilities of the 999 system, smartphones and networks. We’re now looking forward to running a pilot scheme. “During the pilot, an emergency response will be deployed to incidents as usual. Our control room will send a link to callers who agree to use it to stream footage back to them. This will then be relayed to first responders en route and appropriate partner agencies.” Research carried out at the same time by Coventry University will be fed into the overall evaluation. “West Midlands Fire Service is committed to a five-minute response standard for incidents when life or property is in danger,” said W/Cdr Wroughton. “We believe that this system could have huge

Emergency Services Times October 2014

West Midlands Fire Service is developing the web-based 999 Eye system.

potential in helping us maintain this standard, and potentially revolutionise emergency call-handling and response. “The pilot is an exciting opportunity for UK emergency services to be involved and set a path for other countries to follow. Our aim will be to offer the final system free or at very low cost to other UK blue light services.” The team will be at The Emergency Services Show on the WMFS stand, and will be presenting in the 11:15-12:00 slot at the Innovation Theatre, in association with Vodafone, on Thursday 25 September. www.wmfs.net

Visit West Midlands Fire Service on Stand R55.

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Rugged at every level Words: Peter Molyneux, President of Getac UK. While it is possible to purchase consumer-grade equipment and place it in a ruggedised case, do you really want to rely on a compromised solution when life and death could be in the balance? Emergency service operations often take place in harsh environments where equipment failure is not an option. In such situations, relying on the same hardware that a home user would use for e-mails, photos and web browsing could put the success of a callout at risk. Getac has total ownership of the design and manufacture of its rugged mobile computing solutions, its products use the latest technology, materials and manufacturing processes, ensuring every component is fully ruggedised. Reliable performance Getac’s hardware is designed to perform in critical working environments reliably at the highest performance. Placing consumer hardware in a rugged case may be a seemingly cost-effective alternative, but by definition, that case is designed to be opened – which means it comes with an inherent vulnerability, creating a high risk of failure. Getac rugged computers are designed with separate GPS and 3G/4G modems with separate antennas to ensure independent performance in applications requiring both functions simultaneously. Most consumer technology offers a single modem for both functions, resulting in reduced performance under the same conditions. It is also important to have access to a range of form factors to meet every challenge – be that a fully rugged server for a critical large threat scenario, or a secure tablet for processing and sharing data from a vehicle or while on patrol. For a balance of portability and power, the Getac V110 convertible notebook tablet offers an 11.6in high-definition screen, the latest Intel® 4th generation Haswell processing technology and LTE compatibility. Additional marketleading features include Getac’s new 3D aerial technology (enabling fast download/upload speeds), dedicated SiRFstarIV™ GPS (offering faster positioning and improved accuracy) and dual hot-swap battery (providing 8-10 hours’ operating time). It is one of the world’s thinnest and lightest devices of its type in the world, yet is also MIL-STD-810G and IP65 rated, meaning it incorporates military-grade ruggedisation without compromise on performance. Without compromise For more demanding applications where server capability is required, the X500-G2 Rugged Mobile Server offers users the ability to deploy a mobile rugged server to the field giving instant server capability at the start of operations. MIL-STD-810G certified and IP65 rated, the X500-G2 offers as standard a large 15.6in QuadraClear® display (800nits), which provides enhanced screen readability under sunlight and graphic capability in outdoor environments. Powered by the Intel® Core™ i7 vPro™ processor with 32GB RAM and 500GB storage, multiple applications can be run simultaneously without compromising on performance. RAID expansion is possible, holding up to five shock-protected disk drives, offering up to five terabytes of storage. For those applications where portability is crucial, the Getac T800 offers all the power, performance and usability of a high-quality consumer device, without compromising on the tablet’s full ruggedisation. With its 8.1in screen, the optimal screen size for Windows 8, a thickness of 24mm and weighing just 0.88kg, the innovative T800 is small enough to fit in a pocket or your hand, but still offers all the power and performance an emergency services professional needs. www.getac.co.uk

If you would like to discuss any aspect of your rugged computing requirements, call 01952 207 221, e-mail: Sales-Getac-UK@getac.com or visit www.getac.co.uk

Peter Molyneux is the President of Getac UK

Emergency Services Times October 2014

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Rail Industry Fire Association makes ESS debut With the privatisation of the UK Railways in 1995, it was recognised by all concerned, that there would no longer be one management body with the overall responsibility for fire safety across the rail industry. RIFA, the Rail Industry Fire Association, was therefore established by those rail

industry organisations supporting the launch, as the appropriate body for continuing this function, and to act as the industry voice for the benefit of its members and to maintain fire safety standards throughout the industry. RIFA is a global association established with the objective to share information, experience and best practice in the management of fire safety throughout the railway industry. The association’s membership comes from railway operating and infrastructure companies, suppliers of equipment and services to the rail industry and from the fire fighting services. Fire safety information Fire prevention and protection for life safety and assets within railways involves special consideration that requires understanding of the operational railway and its users. Whether it’s a heavy haul goods operation, high speed rail, metro or light rail there are impacts from fire that have to be considered; RIFA is an independent and authoritative source of fire safety information for rail industry best practice.

The association has a global membership, which enables information on practices and solutions from around the world to be available to all its members, which includes those from across Europe, North America and the Middle East. RIFA has been actively involved in a number of industrial development and improvement plans. Working groups have been set up within RIFA to provide technical and professional support and advices to these plans. Works being carried out recently included reviewing current and contributing to the new BS and EN standards, maintaining high level of rolling stock fire safety and re-introducing a fire apprentice scheme for the industry. Come and talk to RIFA representatives on Stand Z233 to discover what the association can bring to your business. www.rifa-rail.co.uk

Visit Rail Industry Fire Association on Stand Z233.

A new voice for Community First Responders A new organisation will be launched at The Emergency Services Show 2014, an organisation that has been thought about, discussed and recommended for a number of years. Ever since the provision of such a body was recommended in a CQC report, several medical professionals got together to pool ideas. They involved a like-minded group of people, both those who supported and those heavily involved in delivering the service itself. Over the last few years voices have been listened to at events such as The Emergency Services Show, when colleagues and friends met in passing, and their comments have been heard at numerous conferences and seminars. This large group of volunteers can be found across the UK in cities, towns and villages, in urban and rural environments serving their communities and showing high standards of patient care and professionalism. They are, of course, the approximately 10,000 Community First Responders (CFRs) that provide a service to both their local ambulance NHS trust and their local communities.

Valued members This new organisation wants to look at topics such as uniform, kit and support, training and governance, and ask for and receive comments from CFRs, ambulance trusts, governing and monitoring bodies, shake them about a bit, and seek positive answers. To enable CFR volunteers to maximise their individual attributes and skills to provide high standards of patient care to local communities and to work in partnership alongside ambulance services as valued members, The Emergency Services Show 2104 will see the launch of the National Association of Community First Responders (NACFR). This new charity’s team of trustees comprises: • Prof Douglas Chamberlain, highly respected in his field and recognised as the man who brought the first paramedics to the UK and Europe • Duncan Parsonage, a paramedic, who was involved in some of the first CFR groups in the UK and, before he took a career change, was looking after 37 CFR teams, who were

trained to FPOS Enhanced and drove on blue lights • Shaun Ingram, a Director with Cardiac Science, who has years of working in a pre-hospital environment • Stuart Ballinger, who has been involved at Director level with advertising company JC Decoux • Mike Taylor, a Staffordshire CFR for many years who is also involved in training • John Davies, a Warwickshire CFR and trainer for many years (also currently an Appointed Governor, sitting on the WMAS Council of Governors) • Carol Oldroyd, a qualified nurse, who was a CFR in Warwickshire and is currently part of the department training paramedics at a midlands university. Visit the NACFR on Stand Z210 and let the association know what you would like to see for CFRs both now and in the future. Visit the National Association of Community First Responders on Stand Z210.

See you next year! www.emergencyuk.com

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Brize Norton: the largest manned RAF Fire Station Royal Air Force Brize Norton, also known as ‘The Gateway to Defence Operations’, is one of the MOD’s largest and most operational airfields, committed to enabling air power 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It also acts as a Military Emergency Diversionary Aerodrome (MEDA). Ensuring that operations continue by providing Crash Cat 5A (ICAO 8) is left in the capable hands of the Royal Air Force Fire and Rescue Service. With a current establishment of 78 personnel, Brize Norton is the largest manned RAF Fire Station. The management team is made up of one Commanding Officer, one Warrant Officer and one Flight Sergeant. The duty crews are made up of seven Sergeants (Watch Manager), 27 Corporals (Crew Manager) and 41 Aircraftman (Firefighter). Although the establishment generally remains the same, personnel rotate positions to alternate RAF bases every two to five years.

Fire fighting capability The primary role of the RAF Fire and Rescue Service is to provide both an aerodrome and structural fire fighting capability responding to aircraft and domestic emergencies. In aircraft emergencies, the fire crew has 120 seconds from time of call to deploying at the incident (anywhere within the aerodrome); once on scene they have a further 60 seconds to create survivable conditions. The sheer size and continually expanding infrastructure of RAF Brize Norton Station ensures that no domestic incident is the same. It is the aim of the fire crew to save life and minimise damage to mission critical equipment. All fire personnel must maintain competencies in areas outside of the fire trade. All individuals maintain high levels of fitness while keeping current in common core skills. Essentially, this means remaining in date with weapons handling and firing skills enabling Brize Norton Firefighters to support the Royal Air Force Overseas Operational commitment, providing up to 20 firefighters at one time to Ops in Afghanistan, The Falkland Islands and bases in The Middle East, while simultaneously deploying manpower to short notice exercises both in the UK and around the world as an Expeditionary Air Wing.

carry out monthly continuation training, with the addition of a phase two development package, which is aimed at personnel newly posted in from the Defence Fire Training and Development Centre Manston, where they undertake basic Firefighter training. Newly qualified Firefighters arrive at Brize Norton working towards an NVQ level 2 in Aviation Operations On The Ground; as Firefighters continue to progress and with further promotion training they can gain accreditation to both the Institution of Fire Engineers and the Institute of Leadership and Management. As Brize Norton is one of only two Tier One Major Accident Control Regulation Sites in the UK, due to the high volume of fuel stored, it is vital that RAF Fire Crews carry out training with Oxfordshire Fire and Rescue Service. Regular training incidents take place, ensuring that there is a good level of interoperability and enhancing powers of communication.

“It is the aim of the fire crew to save life and minimise damage to mission critical equipment.”

Notwithstanding its fire fighting responsibilities, the RAF Fire and Rescue Service Fire Safety Department provides mandatory fire training for the 5000+ personnel who serve on the base. The recent change of airframes operating from RAF Brize Norton has seen an increase in both upgraded and new infrastructure throughout the unit. The appointed RAF Fire and Rescue Service Project Fire Officer will ensure these buildings are upgraded and built to comply with current fire legislation, as well as maintaining Fire Risk Assessments and the other 600+ buildings within their area of responsibility. www.mod.uk

For any further information about RAF Brize Norton Fire and Rescue Service please contact Flying Officer Phil Haines – Tel: 01993 897220.

Training facilities A purpose built aircraft simulator and a recently acquired breathing apparatus training facility ensures that personnel have all the training aids required to enhance development. All Firefighters

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Primetech supports Tour de France success with major satellite and voice communications network The recent high profile Tour de France cycle race through Yorkshire presented a number of public safety challenges for emergency services and local authorities. Millions of people would be turning out to watch the race along its route, but much of the route, because of its isolated rural nature, would have very poor communications, certainly not of the level required to guarantee public safety in the event of a major emergency. A new approach would be required, to ensure that all multi-agency emergency communications could provide sufficient bandwidth to cope with all eventualities, and that systems resilience could be guaranteed. Given the remoteness of many of the roads along which the Tour de France was due to travel, and the lack of comprehensive 3G and 4G mobile phone coverage in these areas, it was decided that only mobile satellite broadband systems could provide the kind of comprehensive communications coverage required. The solution was provided by Primetech (UK) Ltd, a leading UK developer and provider of mobile satellite broadband and other high tech communications solutions to fire and rescue services, police forces, government departments and businesses for many years. Temporary mobile satellite network To support local authority event management and public safety for the Tour de France, Primetech, with its long established expertise in this field, was chosen to install a temporary network along the race route, utilising the high bandwidth capabilities of the new Ka satellite system. Using a chain of Ka satellite receivers positioned at key points along the route, some mounted on mobile cranes, Primetech was able to deliver integrated high bandwidth mobile broadband and voice over internet (VoIP) communications for personnel managing the public safety aspects of the race. Primetech’s technical team, under the supervision of Senior Design Engineer Simon Land and Technical Director Henry Walker, set up, on very short notice, a comprehensive mobile satellite

The Tour de France attracted large crowds and created major public safety communications challenges for multi agencies, which were supported by Primetech’s Ka-band satellite network comprising up to 15 mobile satellite broadband stations.

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broadband and wireless communications network along the entire race route, comprising up to 15 individual base stations. On both days the race route was divided into sectors. Each sector was covered by one or more VHF and UHF repeaters providing four channels for management of the 2500 event support staff with radios, medical staff, and traffic management staff and marshals, ensuring that the race and spectators were safe.

“This temporary network guaranteed that local authority and emergency services had reliable, interoperable, high bandwidth communications to support multi-agency public safety operations.” The satellite broadband facilities provided by Primetech were used for the 15 sectors where no other means of getting broadband communications was available. Communications needed to be relayed back to the multi-agency command centre so that the inter-agency response and sector handover could be coordinated. This entire support network was put in place in only five days, including planning, training of unskilled staff and network management. Incident command and network management Primetech’s Trojan-based Cobra Rapid Response Strike Vehicle, with its high speed access to the satellite network, was used as an incident command and network management platform, so that the sector equipment could be monitored and changes in the bandwidth usage indicating faults proactively reported to the radio network managers. Simon Land, the Primetech Senior Design Engineer responsible for the project, said, “The challenge was to provide systems and training at

Primetech’s Cobra Rapid Response Strike Vehicle with Ka band satellite communications played a key role in monitoring network resilience.

very short notice. The Primetech team’s background in rapidly deployable communications systems for military, police and other emergency services, together with an excellent set of newly developed equipment and management tools, enabled us to set up and deliver the service in a very short period of time. Using industry-standard interfaces enabled equipment interoperability and allowed us to provide sector links back to the main command hub. Near-instant bandwidth management and monitoring allowed us to manage the links so that the customer was regularly updated. “This temporary network guaranteed that local authority and emergency services had reliable, interoperable, high bandwidth communications to support multi-agency public safety operations. Given the large numbers of people, cars and high speed cyclists that were going to be in the area, it was essential that the local authority control centre could communicate with its personnel at command centres along every section of the route, and that meant rock solid communications were required.” The network set up by Primetech worked smoothly throughout the duration of the Tour, and no major incidents were reported. www.primetech.co.uk

Visit Primetech UK Ltd on Stand G70.

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Serco Fire Services look to drive innovation and deliver real value Global services operator Serco has launched a fresh offer to the emergency services market with the introduction of Serco Fire Services. Serco already has impeccable credentials in the UK and overseas through managing fire and rescue services and providing a range of ancillary services such as talent management and emergency planning. Serco Fire Services will draw this expertise together to drive innovation and deliver real value to its clients. Across its operations, Serco employs 400 firefighters and provides fire and rescue services at civilian and military airfields around the UK and internationally. Serco Fire Services’ clients include the Ministry of Defence, NATO, CERN, the German Air Force and the Atomic Weapons Establishment. The company expects to add to its portfolio of clients and capabilities in the next 12 months – it is currently bidding for a number of new contracts here in the UK, the Middle East and across Europe as clients respond positively to an offer of tailored services blending proven expertise. Serco Fire Services leader, Ronnie Coutts, said, “The fire market is changing. Pressures on costs, the application of new technologies and ongoing developments in the regulatory environment mean operators in the public and private sector are looking at options. They need to protect people and assets while adapting to new and evolving realities. Serco’s capability in this field goes back many years and the evolution of different contracts and services has resulted in a broad and deep expertise. This expertise is now being coordinated in a way that will make it easier for clients to get the advice and innovation they’re looking for.” Significant asset base Serco Fire Services operates a significant asset base of vehicles, training rigs and equipment. Ronnie Coutts is keen to point out, however, that it is the people who make the difference. He says, “How can we keep our customer promise unless our teams are expertly trained, fully equipped and totally engaged? We’re asking our teams to be ready to put themselves in the way of danger so part of our settlement with the teams is that Serco Fire Services will be the employer of choice in this field. We do this in a planned way with meaningful development, a structured career path and the opportunity to move into other Serco operations, fire and non-fire, around the world. This alloy of support and opportunity appeals and this is seen in our staff retention levels and by the number of cases where our firefighters have moved on and up.

“Developing Serco Fire Services benefits the client, yes, but it also means the fire professionals we have in the business are part of a real community. This develops knowledge, fosters an esprit de corps and creates opportunities.”

“The IFTC is an important part of the Serco Fire Services offer as it combines equipment and expertise to deliver a genuinely unique customer experience.” International Fire Training Centre One of the better known parts of Serco Fire Services is the International Fire Training Centre (IFTC), a world leader in equipping aviation and industrial firefighters with the skills needed to face any fire emergency effectively and confidently. The IFTC was acquired from the UK Civil Aviation Authority in 1996 and, with investment from Serco, now offers customers access to the best fire ground of its kind anywhere in the world. This is

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demonstrated by the growth in export sales that IFTC has achieved over recent years. Investment in new rigs, major foam tenders, a virtual reality suite and the business infrastructure is attracting clients from around new markets and increasing penetration of existing ones. For example, the IFTC is the only training provider outside France that has secured accreditation with the DGAC, the French aviation authority, to deliver accredited courses to aerodrome firefighters. Equipment and expertise “The IFTC is an important part of the Serco Fire Services offer as it combines equipment and expertise to deliver a genuinely unique customer experience. It’s not me saying that but the 10,000 delegates we train each year who feed this back to us. It’s recognised by the aviation industry as a real asset in the UK’s resilience capability and we will continue to invest in the business to ensure what the customer is getting today will be even better tomorrow,” Ronnie added. Serco Fire Services is part of the Serco Defence business unit, which works effectively and seamlessly with all three forces and is headed up by former Air Vice Marshal, Matt Wiles. www.serco.com www.iftcentre.com

Visit Serco Fire Services on Stand P61.

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Seeking out the next generation of strategic emergency crisis managers Talented professionals push themselves out of their own comfort zones as they develop and enhance new skills to manage incidents and events on the Emergency Planning College Strategic Emergency Crisis Management Course. Words: Paul Kudray MSc MEPS, Associate – Strategic Resilience, Emergency Planning College. It is an obvious fact that the landscape has changed in regards to incident and event management as a result of the loss of key, experienced professionals across all agencies involved in civil protection duties. Leading up to the Olympic and Paralympic Games of 2012 in London, the United Kingdom (UK) had an enviable wealth of experienced leaders at strategic level of command, however as organisations change and cost improvement programmes begin to bite, some of those leaders will no longer be ‘in charge’ when the crisis situation occurs in the future. However, by developing the next generation of leaders across multi-agency responders there is always opportunity to ensure that the public is protected. It is critical that collectively we ensure the identification, selection and education of new talented individuals who are ready to step up to the mark and take on strategic roles and responsibilities.

New faces pushing their own boundaries to take on new knowledge Earlier this year, I had the privileged opportunity to be involved in a Strategic Emergency Crisis Management Course (SECM) delivered by the Emergency Planning College (EPC). The course cohort included individuals who were all professionals and competent within their own organisation but who were now identified as the leaders of the future within their own organisation’s response and recover arrangements to incidents and events. These new strategic managers (or commanders) had a common bond between them. They all knew their own organisation’s role and responsibility in providing quality civil protection to the public and they took on board their own obligations to learn, develop and practice new skills to ensure the right plans, were delivered in the right place and at the right time. What was the difference? It is inevitable that we all pick up knowledge and experience from our peers and the strategic leaders who have taken on those roles previously. However in developing the next generation of strategic

“By developing the next generation of leaders across multi-agency responders there is always opportunity to ensure that the public is protected.” emergency crisis managers, it is essential we enable the content of appropriate courses to be innovative, challenging, realistic and educational to allow the individuals to develop their own competence and confidence in the right environments, if they are to deliver quality command and control in a real world situation. The SECM course clearly provided the opportunity and exposure for multi-agency, partnership working that is unique because of the vast educational resources available to support the individual and collective learning experience. The SECM is up to date, supporting the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme (JESIP), and looks at lessons identified from both UK incidents and global learning.

“Knowing that there are individuals who will take on that responsibility to make a difference is both refreshing and encouraging.”

help save lives and protect the communities and industries. Using innovation to enable better capabilities will help save more lives in the future. Putting people first – taking on the responsibility My observations as an experienced strategic commander myself was that the cohort as individuals always considered the needs of the people involved in the emergency situation first and foremost. This included those caught up in the situations, (either through case studies or scenario testing) or the individuals responding to help others. The cohort demonstrated that not only did they have the ability to understand and interpret legislation, policy and procedures, but also they were humanistic at the same time – a true quality in going forward as a new strategic leader for the future. Disasters involve people and they are naturally complex situations but knowing that there are individuals who will take on that responsibility to make a difference is both refreshing and encouraging, especially when we should all acknowledge that we are members of the public too. www.epcollege.com

Visit Emergency Planning College on Stand P16.

Public expectation – the requirement to develop the best quality to save lives Today’s technology of 24 hour television and social media inevitably means that incidents and disasters are broadcast live and as they are unfolding. The use of modern media from across the world publicises disasters more frequently, which contributes towards the belief that they are happening more regular than they did. Scrutiny and public expectation therefore is focused right away on what the responding agencies are doing to

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Ballyclare meets all the needs of modern fire fighting The days of a firefighter approaching every operational situation wearing a wool jacket and PVC leggings are long gone. Today they are protected by specialist personal protective equipment (PPE) and clothing that is specially developed for the task at hand. With a heritage that stretches back over decades, Ballyclare has been at the forefront of the development of high performance bespoke garments that are designed specifically for every operational environment, including structural fires, USAR, water rescue and wildland fire fighting. The company has developed an unrivalled range of specialist protective clothing solutions that is backed up by a national service network that provides first class care and maintenance. Working in partnership Ballyclare’s structural fire suits combine innovative design with the most technically advanced fabrics available today. The company works in partnership with fire and rescue services to continuously evaluate performance and ensure that garments are designed to meet the specific needs of each customer; this results in structural fire fighting suits that provide the highest levels of protection and comfort and will stand up to the day-to-day rigours of fire fighting. The record levels of flooding in the UK this year illustrate the need for specialist waterproof clothing. Ballyclare’s range of waterproof suits is designed to protect firefighters in foul weather and incorporates high performance waterproof, breathable fabrics to ensure comfort and performance. USAR operations require high protection and durability and the company’s two-piece USAR suit delivers this, along with additional protection from blood pathogens and common chemicals. When it comes to the unique operational needs of wildland fire fighting, Ballyclare’s one piece single layer coverall combines lightweight flame protection with comfort and high visibility, allowing the firefighter to work safely for longer and reducing the risk of heat stress.

Committed to customer support This extensive range of product solutions is backed by a commitment to support customers with the highest standards of service. Ballyclare operates a national network of facilities in Livingston, Stockport, Barnsley and Uxbridge, providing customer support, care and maintenance.

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Saving your life is a way of their lives The Saviour Medical Rescue Stretcher from DS Medical is the latest versatile rescue stretcher to be available to the emergency, resilience and rescue services as a single product solution. Ideally suited for work in confined spaces, rescue, hazardous and water based environments, the stretcher is an innovative design encompassing some of the very best elements of other rescue stretchers and enhancing those capabilities to deliver an incredibly versatile and effective life saving device.

There are significant statutory obligations related to the management of PPE. Any fire and rescue service that is not able to clearly demonstrate robust tracking and tracing systems for the issue, use, maintenance, repair and replacement of PPE issued to their employees is at risk of prosecution by the HSE in the event of an injury to a firefighter. Ballyclare’s unique tracking and tracing system uses the latest barcode technology to ensure that every single item of PPE is closely monitored – from top to toe. This means that full garment history is accurately maintained and readily available. The provision of detailed analysis of PPE maintenance allows customers to accurately forecast their needs and budget accordingly. Customers have total confidence and peace of mind that firefighters are properly protected, that their kit is professionally maintained and ‘fit for purpose’ and that the fire and rescue services are fully compliant with PPE regulatory requirements. The company’s high standards of care can extend the operational lifespan of garments, increasing the return on investment and delivering efficiency savings for fire and rescue services. Carlton Greener, Managing Director, Ballyclare Limited, said, “We have developed an extensive portfolio of specialist high performance garments that protect firefighters across the wide range operational challenges that they face. Our team has decades of experience and understanding of fire fighting and we continue to work in close partnership with brigades to research and innovate new PPE solutions that will protect tomorrow’s firefighter.”

Infection control compliant This lightweight device (5kg) with its polyethylene skin and removable straps is infection control compliant. The stretcher is neutrally buoyant, making water based rescue possible and the sandproof and waterproof design of the fixings further supports such use. The stretcher, fixings and strap system are load rated to 200kg (31 stone) making it suitable for most patients. The integral headblock and double skin in the spinal area assists in the management of patients with potential spinal injuries. The stretcher is supplied as a rolled device in a robust carry bag, making it compact and aiding access to confined spaces as well as requiring little storage space. The device is also X-Ray translucent and CT friendly. The simplistic, colour coordinated strap system ensures there is little additional training requirement. The stretcher is CE marked and manufactured in the UK. The Saviour Medical Rescue Stretcher has already been rigorously tested across the UK by a renowned water based rescue organisation. The tactical variant of the stretcher is also in use by the military.

www.ballyclarelimited.com

www.dsmedical.co.uk

Visit Ballyclare Limited on Stand J11.

Visit DS Medical on Stand M30.

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New rescue gear puts ISC in control ISC’s new ‘D’ range of work/rescue and escape descenders includes the company’s highly innovative D4 work/rescue descender and D2 emergency escape descender. D4 is an evolutionary development in the world of rescue descenders. Two years of comprehensive trialling and evaluation with rope rescue and rope access users around the world has resulted in the D4 being the highest spec rescue descender available and is compliant with CE, ANSI, NFPA and the stringent BCCTR test with 240kg, making it perhaps the most durable, high performance work/rescue descender on the planet! It offers a 240kg (500lb) Working Load Limit, which means it is suitable for two-man rescue on ropes of 10.5mm-11.5mm (7/16in) and it features a unique and innovative progressive cam action, which offers precise control at slow or fast speeds. Development process Outreach Rescue in North Wales was involved in the development process because of the organisation’s specific knowledge of the emergency services/rescue industry. The D4 easily meets the demands of Outreach Rescue’s user group as a work/rescue descender, a belay device and even as a progress capture device for high lines. The 240kg WLL is especially useful for both rescue and bariatrics, where no other device on the market can match the rating on the D4. Current users of the D4 include, among others, the Tech Rescue Group from London Fire

D4 descender on rope. Brigade; Singapore Civil Defence; Beijing/North

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D4 on descent from national lift tower.

China Mountain Rescue; Melbourne Fire Brigade; Western Australia State Emergency Services, SAR Chile, City of Cape Town Fire Rescue Service, Turkish Fire/Rescue training college and Berufsfeuerwehr Zwickau (western Germany).

maximum height of lift and an incredible WLL of 250kg standard unit or 350kg for a new bariatric unit under development, again in partnership with Outreach Rescue. More than 20 of these kits have recently been delivered into the Singapore Civil Defence to replace their old Rollgliss devices.

“D2 is quickly gaining ground as the escape kit of choice for the wind turbine industry. “

www.iscwales.com

D2 was originally designed as a bail-out device as a result of lack of choice for that user group of devices with anti-panic brakes. Due to the heights from which it can be used (120m) and the availability of (fire resistant) Technora rope, however, the D2 is quickly gaining ground as the escape kit of choice for the wind turbine industry. The fact that it uses 8mm diameter rope (polyester or Technora) means that it can be packed into a small kit, which is much handier than the big bulky kits that are the norm with 11mm devices or even controlled rate descenders. Further developments in the D range are upcoming, including a D5 device to work on 0.5in ropes, primarily for the US market, and a D3 for use as a single-person load belay device. R-ALF rescue kits can be used for rescue, hauling and confined space. The R-ALF kit offers features such as an auto-locking overspeed brake, flexibility of rigging (from 2:1 up to 5:1), a 35m

Visit ISC on Stand B26.

R-ALF rescue kits can be used for rescue, hauling and confined space.

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Location, location, location New paging and location technology is helping to safeguard emergency services personnel who work alone in potentially hazardous environments. Words: Nigel Gray, Director at PageOne. hydrants, which tend to be positioned in remote or hazardous locations. Accurately monitoring their wellbeing is integral to DFRS while meeting their duty of care and also adhering to health and safety regulations.

Nigel Gray, Director at PageOne.

Paging still remains at the forefront of critical communications technology. Hence why the majority of UK hospitals and a large proportion of fire and rescue services continue to rely on paging to communicate with frontline employees. This specialisation towards critical applications has also seen further advances in this technology, geared towards speeding up an emergency response. For example, Dorset FRS (DFRS) has recently invested in PageOne’s Trio lone worker device to ensure the safety and security of field-based Hydrant Officers. These employees carry out the inspection, test and repair of 14,500 defective

Cloud based messaging solution The Trio device integrates seamlessly with Connect, PageOne’s cloud-based messaging solution, allowing control room staff to easily view the last known location of each employee via a secure web dashboard. The device also incorporates a manual SOS alarm and periodic welfare check that prompts employees to check-in at pre-defined intervals so location information is always accurate and up to date. The recent location information is then tagged on every alert, minimising the potential for delay should help be required. With tilt and motion sensors that can detect impacts, falls or periods of inactivity, which then automatically triggers an alert in the control room, the Trio device provides a sophisticated solution to address health and safety concerns and provides peace of mind to lone working staff.

“We have a duty of care to safeguard all vulnerable individuals, particularly those who spend significant amounts of time working alone or in more remote or hazardous environments.”

Connect is PageOne’s cloud-based messaging solution.

incident response processes. He said, “SOS alerts are auto-forwarded to a pre-defined list of contacts so the right people are notified and kept in the loop. When an alert message is received, there is a link to Google Maps which shows the last known location, along with a date and time stamp meaning we can quickly and easily find and assist staff in distress.” In the course of their day-to-day roles the emergency services frequently put themselves in situations of potential risk. And when something unfortunate occurs the ability of the control room to quickly establish an accurate location, potential hazards and the nearest vehicle access points can make all the difference. We have a duty of care to safeguard all vulnerable individuals, particularly those who spend significant amounts of time working alone or in more remote or hazardous environments. www.pageone.co.uk

Visit PageOne Communications Ltd on Stand E3.

Operational messaging and alerting Outside of lone worker management the device also functions as a two-way pager, offering real-time acknowledged messaging and the opportunity for the user to send back a canned message response. It can therefore be incorporated into normal day-today operational messaging and alerting, providing added resilience to communications while also acting hi-tech lone worker monitoring device. Ian Crabb, Water and Foam Officer at DFRS, explained how it has been incorporated into the service’s

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Customised waterproof maps Specialist map company Hope Digital will be showcasing its Aqua3™ customised map production service, which has been specifically developed to provide mapping of high risk areas for fire and rescue services. The service uses detailed information from Ordnance Survey Mastermap® data to produce highly legible, waterproof maps that cover precise locations. Hope Digital’s map specialist works with individual fire and rescue services to produce the customised maps, which are then printed using a patented process to create waterproof maps that can also be written on. Flood rescue Northumberland Fire and Rescue Service (NFRS) recently commissioned a set of maps to be used in flood rescue situations. NFRS is a partner on the Northumberland County Council strategic flood improvement delivery group and also held an internal fire and rescue service debrief, which identified a number of action areas for NFRS. One priority was the development and provision of waterproof high quality maps of high-risk areas to be used for incident command and control and to aid evacuation and search and rescue. The NFRS’s map systems use Ordnance Survey data that is held by the county council under a PSMA license. Hope Digital is able to access that data to prepare detailed mapping of specific flood risk areas and produce them in a waterproof format. Ian Long, Group Manager, Area Team South, Emergency Response, said, “We knew what information we needed on the maps but didn’t know the technicalities of how to access and manipulate the data. Mike Thompson, Hope Digital’s mapping specialist, worked closely with us to figure out how to produce maps that showed exactly the operational level of detail we needed for specific high risk areas.” Complements existing mapping Hope Digital produced 12 x 1:1250 scale maps to cover Morpeth and other high-risk river flood areas. These maps complement existing mapping systems used by NFRS to enable precise identification of house numbers and street names, all of which were pulled from OS Mastermap® data. The maps cover whole high-risk urban flood areas, rather than the river course and flood inundation areas having to be split between different maps. The maps have also been designed to show the flow and topographical detail of the riverbanks, to enable a more efficient search and response plan to be implemented. www.aqua3.com/rescue-emergency-services.asp

Visit Hope Digital on Stand P30.

CRI hoping to reel in visitors CRI will be introducing visitors to its all-new 1600 Series range of hand crank and motorised hose reels at the show. This resourceful and adaptable range offers an extensive array of capabilities through a multitude of component configurations as well as a wide range of sizes. The 1600 Series offers a generous variety of drum and disc diameters for a number of hose sizes and hose lengths and is currently available in 1in and 1.5in versions with either BSP or NPT threads and with steel or stainless steel fluid paths. The range has been designed to be extremely durable yet light in

weight and can handle the most demanding requirements the industry has to offer and can fit into virtually any allocated space in most equipment. Add-ons include a universal bracket kit that can accommodate the bevel gear manual rewind system, idlers to reduce speed and increase torque on motorised versions. The company is also pleased to offer, for the first time, a three-way brake incorporating solid lock, drag friction and freespinning functions utilising a high performance composite brake pad material. www.crireels.com

Visit CRI Reels on Stand OS435.

Specialist PPE for firefighters FlamePro will be exhibiting new structural firefighter’s suits at The Emergency Services Show in September, together with a range of specialist garments specifically designed for fire and rescue services (FRSs). The new suits use advanced materials from Tencate: Gemini XTL™ is the best-performing PBI® based outer shell incorporating a patented high strength grid, which combines extreme durability and outstanding resistance to abrasion with lightweight comfort and excellent thermal protection; Advance Light™, available in a range of colours, is a high-performing plain weave ripstop outer shell combining a high percentage of para-aramid with meta-aramid and antistatic yarns to ensure outstanding resistance to cuts and punctures, excellent durability and exceptional strength retention. Outer shell fabrics FlamePro continues to offer the ever popular Kermel® HTA Ripstop and Kermel® A90 outer shell fabrics for structural firefighters turnout gear, with the A90 available in a range of colours and certified to the Marine Equipment Directive (MED, Wheelmark). PBO™ Millenia Light™ 450 system structural firefighter’s suits provide remarkable levels of comfort by enabling greater levels of work output while reducing heart rate when firefighters are subjected to heavy workloads or in hot and humid conditions. The modern firefighter in a FRS has to undertake a much wider range of operational activities than just fighting fires. Structural kit is not suitable for many of these activities and since high levels of thermal protection are not required it makes sense to use garments actually designed for more specific rescue operations. Specialist clothing FlamePro has a great range of specialist clothing, using fabrics that provide high levels of durability

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and comfort while actively giving the levels of protection required. One area in which the company excels is that of offering bespoke garments for individual firefighter’s requirements, whether that is for a perfect fit or for additional features such as specialised protection, pocket styles or types of fabrics. FlamePro has many years’ experience in garment design, specialist textiles and waterproof, breathable membrane systems and it enjoys using this knowledge to guide firefighters towards the best solutions for their requirements. FlamePro finds that a major problem with the FRSs is the lack of a proper understanding of modern textile systems and the company prides itself on being able to educate and advise procurement managers in this area. As a footnote to this point, the delegate list at a recent European Standards clothing committee included Notified Bodies (test houses), garment manufacturers, yarn suppliers, weavers, membrane suppliers and scientists; all these people no doubt having the best interests of the fire and rescue services at heart, but there was not a single active firefighter, the end users of the garments being discussed, in attendance to represent the FRSs. www.flame-pro.com

Visit FlamePro (UK) Ltd on Stand J14.

The new FlamePro® Level 1, flame retardant, waterproof breathable jacket is currently being used by the Magnox Emergency Response Team at Oldbury Nuclear Power Station in Gloucestershire.

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TEXPORT strengthens its market position in Europe Last year saw the 20th anniversary of TEXPORT, a milestone that was celebrated with exciting new developments and a fresh brand image and website. Now the Austrian PPE manufacturer is ready to expand its successful function as a high quality supplier and continue its unparalleled success for the decades ahead!

By equipping 100 percent of the professional Austrian fire brigades, almost half of Germany’s professional fire brigades and various numbers of volunteer firefighters, TEXPORT has quickly established itself as a high quality PPE manufacturer all over Europe. In recent years, the trend has continued, with significant contracts being awarded in various brigades spanning the globe. For the last 20 years TEXPORT has driven the PPE market with its highly innovative and customised solutions, culminating in the new fabrics IB-TEX® and PBI® NEO® and the new product lines ‘Fire Phoenix’ and ‘Fire Explorer’, which all premiered at last year’s A+A trade show in Dusseldorf. Also launched at the show, was TEXPORT’s new contemporary rebranded look, as well as the official launch of the new user friendly website. Experience driven patents and innovations The company’s headquarters are situated in Salzburg and run three separate and wholly owned production sites. Internally developing new models allows TEXPORT to create products, which are defined by functional solutions and the high protection levels as well as perfect fit and comfort. Last year saw the introduction of new additions to TEXPORT’s long list of market driving innovations.

With the premium IB-TEX® fabric, TEXPORT set a new milestone for aramid-based fabrics. Extremely high mechanical values in combination with best protection and optimal aesthetics makes IB-TEX® the strongest and best aramid based fabric currently available.

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With PBI® NEO®, TEXPORT presented a newly developed PBI®-based fabric that raised the bar in terms of mechanical values as well as aesthetics. The fabrics were officially showcased at A+A 2013 in Düsseldorf within the two new model lines being the ‘Fire Explorer model’ (with IB-TEX® outershell) and the ‘Fire Phoenix model’ (with PBI® NEO® outershell). In combination with other well known patents – like TEXPORT’s own material structures ‘X-TREME®’ and ‘X-TREME® light’ as well as the innovative textile reflective stripe ‘TRIPLE FABRIC®’ – these new models surpass the imagination of users and herald a new era in PPE.

“TEXPORT continues to take the global fire market to the next level.” No sub-contracting! Unique in the PPE sector, TEXPORT is able to produce its high quality garments within their wholly owned production sites. The risks associated with subcontracting to third party producers are therefore totally eliminated. The ISO-certified sites are controlled out of Salzburg and consist of fully trained tailors and machinists who make and check every product produced. For these reasons TEXPORT is able to boast its constant levels of quality and guarantee some of the shortest lead times within the sector.

Fire Phoenix model (with PBI® NEO® outershell).

Recent success A combination of all the aforementioned factors have persuaded established brigades like Madrid, Rio de Janerio, Berlin and Vienna to choose TEXPORT as the preferred company and product for their firefighters. TEXPORT has also achieved recent success by securing more reputable brigades like Rotterdam, Brasilia and Utrecht. A major win in Dublin Fire Brigade and Lisbon Airport have further increased Texport’s market share. With a wealth of technical knowledge, expertise, innovative patented solutions and a growing global market share, combined with the history, experience, reputation and IT infrastructure, TEXPORT continues to take the global fire market to the next level. TEXPORT will be showcasing its latest product range and the company’s innovations with Hunter Apparel at The Emergency Services Show 2014 on Stand L19. www.texport.at

Fire Explorer model (with IB-TEX® outershell).

Direct contact for the Irish and UK PPE market: Chirag Chudasama, Export Sales Manager (chirag.chudasama@texport.at).

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ISG prioritises firefighter safety UK’s first Pre-Hospital Emergency Services Skills course Over the last two decades, thermal imaging in the fire industry has moved on dramatically from when ISG pioneered the first thermal imaging camera (TIC) for fire fighting in the early 1990s. What started as technology designed to aid a firefighter in extreme environments has moved into a range of products intent on impressing the user with certain features and gadgets that in truth have little to do with the primary function of a TIC.

The Thermal Layer Reference Guide provides you with the ability to quickly identify key temperature ranges in the scene being imaged. This function further enhances the colourisation feature by allowing you to relate the colours in the scene to key temperatures. This essential tool means that you can generate a course of action to attack those areas, which are of the highest risk, helping to keep you and your team safer. In order to provide the best possible image quality, the thermal imager constantly makes quick scene adjustments to its settings. With Automatic Mode Switching, you’re always provided with the best scene information, no matter what the surrounding environment, helping improve your decision making capability.

No gimmicks ISG Infrasys has moved away from this approach, instead opting to provide the very best in imaging technology, coupled with image enhancements, rather than added features. Each enhancement further optimises the usability of the TIC, providing more information from the scene to enable the user to make better decisions. This means there are no gimmicks with ISG products, and rather only tools that offer the user a genuine performance advantage in a variety of scenarios. Whether its improving visibility or providing added scene details for better decision making, with ISG Infrasys you’re guaranteed enhanced performance without the jargon of added features. Additionally, ISG’s advancement in thermal imaging engine technology has enabled huge progress in perfecting the more basic functions of an infrared camera, defined as how the camera produces an image and how the user can interpret what they see on the display. Colourisation provides the user with the means of recognising different temperature ranges depicted in a scene. Objects in the scene are identifiable based on their temperature, with cold objects appearing as black, scaling through grey, white, yellow, orange and red as the temperatures get warmer. Using the human mind’s assumption that black relates to cool, yellow relates to warm and red relates to hot, ISG’s colourisation enables you to immediately identify key scene details of your surrounding environment so you can quickly assess your situation and highlight any high-risk areas.

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After sales care As well as world leading thermal imaging cameras from ISG, you’ll also have access to the company’s exceptional after sales care packages where you can take advantage of 48-hour turnaround time on warranty repairs, not to mention its exclusive and unique Batteries for Life package. ISG has invested huge resource in streamlining its internal processes so that any camera returned to the company for repair or service is submitted to its internal Repair Centre within 30 minutes of arrival at the factory. ISG’s expert engineers can then assess the returned camera and provide a diagnosis and proposed solution within a matter of hours so that it can respond quickly, and get your camera returned to you within 48 hours. If you’re after complete peace-of-mind then ISG recommends you take advantage of its Batteries for Life programme, the world’s first and only lifetime warranty on batteries meaning that for a one-off subscription fee, you’ll receive replacement batteries anytime you have a breakdown during the life of your product. One thing is guaranteed with every ISG Infrasys product purchased: you’ll be getting the most technologically advanced thermal imaging solution, designed specifically for your application in the most extreme environments, and you’ll get total peace of mind and absolute support with ISG’s complete after-sale service throughout the life of your product.

UK based training provider PGI Training is set to launch the UK’s first Pre-Hospital Emergency Services Skills course this November. The unique two-day course will extend trained pre-hospital practitioners with advanced life saving skills. The two-day Pre-hospital Emergency Surgical Skills Course is open to doctors, nurses and paramedics and Class 1 military medics. The course Medical Director is Dr Bob Winter, Consultant Anaesthetist and intensivist from the Queens Medical Centre Nottingham. Bob is also a pre-hospital care doctor and Medical Director for PGI. The course is run in partnership with Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and is taught from the Clinical Skills and Competency Centre NUH Trust, City Campus. Those on the course will learn and train on cadaveric models as this gives the best opportunity for anatomical landmarks for surgical procedures. Animal models are also utilised. Taking bookings PGI Training will be exhibiting at The Emergency Services Show 2014 (Stand Q16) and will be available to give information and take bookings for this course and all other courses over the two-day event. Dr Bob Winter said, “This course is innovative and beneficial for any pre-hospital clinician working in a remote environment.” PGI Training specialises in medical solutions and is the training arm of Protection Group International, a risk mitigation company, which works with public and private organisations in both the UK and internationally. The company offers accredited medical courses mainly in the prehospital environment, which range from First Aid at Work to Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support. With the team’s experience it has the ability to tailor its courses while keeping its core values. Along with the company’s ability to tailor courses, PGI Training has the understanding and knowledge to design specialised packages to meet clients’ specific needs. PGI Training has training facilities across the UK and capability to satellite products on request. The faculty consists of a diverse range of backgrounds, which include pre-hospital doctors, critical care practitioners and UK special forces paramedics.

www.isgfire.com

www.pgitraining.com

Visit ISG Thermal Imaging on Stand H60.

Visit PGI Training on Stand Q16.

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Fifteen chances Discover more about Dräger to win a book! Class Professional Publishing will be conducting an hourly prize draw from its stand at the show to win a copy of the publication Anatomy & Physiology for the Prehospital Provider (worth £44.99). With eight books available to win on Wednesday 24 September and seven books available on Thursday 25 September, visitors should visit Stand C14 to register for the draw. Winners will be contacted by phone but Class Professional Publishing will also be Tweeting every winner so make sure you follow #ESS2014 during the event. The company will also be offering a show discount of 20 percent so anyone who misses out on the prize will at least have the opportunity to purchase the book at the discounted rate. www.classprofessional.co.uk

Visit Class Professional Publishing on Stand C14.

In this, its 125th anniversary year, manufacturer of safety and medical solutions, Dräger, is inviting Emergency Services Show visitors to discover more about the innovative products and services, which have helped establish it as one of the leading international holistic solutions providers for the emergency services. A trusted and loyal partner to fire and rescue services around the globe, Dräger will showcase its experience and expertise, with specialists on hand to discuss product features, service, training and maintenance options. Both breathing apparatus and communications systems are vital pieces of equipment for the fire and rescue service and Dräger’s versatile, integrated and comfortable solutions, mean that firefighters working on the frontline can carry out their jobs in a safer and more effective manner. Hands-on demonstrations will showcase these applications to visitors stopping by the stand during the whole two-day event. Dion Griffith, Fire & Rescue Account Manager (Northern UK) from Dräger, said, “We are thrilled to be attending The Emergency Services Show this year and look forward to showcasing our range of innovative products for the emergency services. “On our stand, demonstrations will include a glimpse of the advanced Merlin Telemetry Board plus our award-winning helmet – the HPS 7000 – which is an innovation in comfort and safety for every individual firefighter.

“We’re looking forward to welcoming people from across the emergency services to Stand R43, during the show." Futureproof The Dräger stand will also showcase its full product and training portfolio, showing why it is one of the market leaders in these areas. Dräger is inviting visitors to the stand to celebrate its 125-year anniversary and discover more about the company, its years of experience in the safety and medical industries and the products, which will continue to support our vital services in the future. www.draeger.com

Visit Dräger on Stand R43.

Sign up for PPE study sessions with TenCate The field of protective clothing for firefighters is continually changing, as new fibres, fabrics and technologies become available. What are the latest developments and trends? At this year’s Emergency Services Show, TenCate is organising a free study session on this subject. The Study Session will be given twice: Seminar Day 1: Wednesday 24 September, 1.30pm-4.30pm; Seminar Day 2: Thursday 25 September, 9.00am12.00noon. Three experts in the field of PPE for fire and rescue services will talk about topics that include international standards, human physiology and ergonomics and a best practice case of a PPE approach to protective clothing. Don’t miss this excellent opportunity to get up to speed on what’s happening today in the field of firefighters’ protective clothing. Admission is free, but pre-registration is required, as seats are limited. Topics and speakers The line up of speakers includes: Russell Shephard, Manager Standards for the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council (AFAC), who will provide delegates with a European and International perspective on the relationship between standards, manufacturers and the end users, including of difficulties on a PPE procurement process; and

Ronald Heus, Senior scientist protective clothing and equipment, who will discuss research into physiology and ergonomics as the basis for improving firefighter clothing. The speakers will be joined for discussions by David Matthews, a leading EU and world expert on PPE. TenCate looks forward to welcoming visitors to the show at one of the company’s Study Sessions,

Russell Shephard, Manager Standards for the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council (AFAC).

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either on Wednesday afternoon or on Thursday morning. Everyone will have an opportunity to ask questions, share their expertise and swap experiences so don’t forget to register! http://eepurl.com/YmRvD

Visit TenCate Protective Fabrics on Stand H8.

Ronald Heus, Senior scientist protective clothing and equipment.

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Autumn launch for Bristol’s new glove range The Bristol Uniforms stand will be particularly busy this year with a number of new products on show along with a dedicated area looking at the current ICP Technology Refresh programme. The ICP Technology Refresh programme is currently underway with completion due in 2015. A series of exhibits will focus on the ICP’s success over the last seven years, the extensive programme of garment and wearer trials now underway, and looks ahead to next spring when the new ICP/CPCC (Central PPE and Clothing Contract) range will be unveiled. It will provide an ideal opportunity for non-ICP user fire and rescue services to appraise its operational and financial advantages. New users joining from 2015 could reap the benefits over the coming seven years.

Bristol glove using TITAN® 1220 fabric in red.

Fire gloves first In a further extension of its own-manufacture product strategy, Bristol has designed a range of three structural fire fighting gloves to meet EN659:2008 and which have focused on providing class leading protection and manual dexterity. The new gloves, which have been designed by Bristol’s in-house design team as part of Bristol’s New Product Development Programme (BNPDP), have been fully tested by UK firefighters before going into production and will be available in three different fabric combinations. The first product will be available from the autumn of 2014, which is an all-black, soft, flexible leather design incorporating a Gore CROSSTECH® membrane with a Kevlar lining. Special features include silicone finger and palm grips and a knitted Nomex® cuff. Two other gloves in the range, which will be available in 2015, will incorporate Hainsworth TITAN® fabrics – the former using TITAN® PBI 1260 and the latter a TITAN® 1220 in red. In common with the leather glove, these both include a Gore CROSSTECH® membrane with a Kevlar lining. Identifying features include silicone palms, reflective piping, knuckle protectors and knitted NOMEX® cuffs. All three gloves in the range will be available in a wide range of sizes from 6-12 and XXS-XXL. Commenting on the planned autumn launch, Roger Startin, Bristol’s Joint Managing Director, said, “This new fire glove range is further evidence of our long term plan to use our inhouse design experience and capability to bring more own-manufactured firefighter PPE products

Bristol’s all-black, soft, flexible leather glove incorporates a Gore CROSSTECH® membrane with a Kevlar lining.

to market beyond our traditional ranges of specialist coats and trousers. Previously the BNPDP has seen the introduction of fire hoods and a firefighter motorcycle suit in 2012 followed by our new EN469:2005 Level 1 firefighter motorcycle suit earlier this year. We’re looking forward to showing our new gloves at The Emergency Services Show in September.” Bristol’s latest USAR kit, RescueFlex™, HART technical rescue garments for the ambulance service and protective rescue garments for air ambulance aircrews will also be on show. www.bristoluniforms.com

Visit Bristol Uniforms Ltd on Stand J3.

Mariner outboards chosen for water and flood rescue training EP Barrus Ltd is working in partnership with R3 Safety and Rescue Ltd, which is set to become one of the UK’s leading water and technical rescue training providers. R3 courses carry international certification from Rescue 3, one of the world’s largest technical rescue training organisations. Rescue 3 courses are compliant with relevant competencies and standards for rescue agencies and technicians as laid down by organisations such as the UK Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA)/Defra Flood Rescue National Enhancement Project and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). The courses have been carefully designed to meet the training and development needs of the safety and technical rescue sectors, focusing primarily on water, rope and inland boat rescue. Swift water capabilities Barrus recently took part in R3’s National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT) Flood SMA Event where over 20 fire and rescue services undertook swift water demonstrations at Tees

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Barrus recently took part in R3’s National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT) Flood SMA Event.

Barrage International Whitewater Centre, near Middlesbrough. This purpose-built facility complements the natural river venues of North Wales and guarantees swift water conditions at all times. Barrus supplied a Zodiac FC 470 inflatable boat fitted with a Mariner 50hp outboard engine and a Mariner 30hp, which R3 fitted to an Arancia boat. Paul O’Sullivan, Managing Director, R3 Safety & Rescue Ltd, said, “The engines were great and I

think we were able to highlight the effectiveness of the FC 470/Mariner 50/prop guard and the Arancia/Mariner 30/prop guard combinations. “We operated both boats for two days doing more runs up and down the course than anyone else, including night runs. The only boat able to make it up the channel carrying six people on board was the FC 470/Mariner 50/ prop guard set up,” Paul concluded. Barrus has demonstrated and supplied a number of engines in the past but the company will be sponsoring a Mariner 30hp and a Mariner 50hp outboard engine for R3’s two demonstration boats. Barrus is now working with over 45 fire and rescue services around the UK supplying Mariner two-stroke outboard engines from 25-40hp and other equipment, including water rescue pumps. www.barrus.co.uk

Visit EP Barrus Ltd on Stand A7.

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Scott Safety showcases new RPE ranges

MC Products has it covered MC Products UK Ltd, with 30 years’ experience in manufacturing, offers a bespoke custom made service for equipment holders for gas bottles, defibrillators, scientific equipment, speed cameras, body worn CCTV, basically any item that needs a cover or specialised carrier. The company will have a wide range of equipment belts and holders on view for NHS, police, security, and enforcement officers, with a bespoke service if required for special requirements. Waterproof clipboard New to the range is the Hi-Visibility waterproof clipboard ‘Stormwriter’, which is ideal for workers in all industries to keep their paperwork dry while working outside in wet or windy weather conditions. It is available in portrait and landscape orientation in black and hi-visibility yellow and there is also the option for companies or groups to have identification labelling added to the item. MC Products is also a leading developer for vests for various operations with off the shelf options in black, yellow and orange or the company’s in house research and development team can advise and develop products to your bespoke requirements. Major Incident Tabards Emergency planning is establishing a service wide approach with a command structure that requires having the right equipment in place and being able to identify the necessary people involved. Part of this is the Major Incident Tabards, which show the rolls of the emergency response team. This simple but very effective design offers a

versatile and quick deployment of the tabard. It can be manufactured in various colours and reflective markings, with various designation depicting the rolls of the wearer; some of the standard designs will be on show for examination and members of staff available to discuss and advise. Protecting your designs, signing non-disclosure forms is not a problem when developing client’s own ideas to a prototype stage and MC Products UK Ltd realises that working together benefits both parties. A range of bags, equipment vests and holders will be on display, with the popular new addition Stormwriter ready for immediate despatch. www.mcproducts.co.uk

Scott Safety, a global leader in the design, manufacture and supply of personal and respiratory protective equipment (RPE), will be returning to ESS 2014 to reveal leading new ranges of respiratory protection and gas detection products. The new ProPak range of Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) provides the ultimate comfort, reliability and performance. This lightweight set offers the highest levels of protection while providing the wearer with ease of movement and comfort. Scott Safety’s new 379bar high-pressure cylinder will also be unveiled at the show. At 25 percent higher pressures than the current 300bar SCBA, it offers significantly increased duration with minimal increases in size and weight. At the size of a typical 60-minute cylinder, the 379bar is able to provide a duration of 75 minutes. Also available on the stand will be the popular Protégé Multi-Gas Monitor and Protégé ZM Single Gas Monitor; both offer an ergonomically designed hand-held solution to monitoring potentially hazardous levels of combustible gases, enabling the operator to focus on the situation at hand.

Visit MC Products UK Ltd on Stand A38. www.scottsafety.com

Visit Scott Safety on Stand G27.

Smart bags designed to optimise your skills

Proflight works with all of the emergency services and is passionate about creating bags that enable users to best practice their talents and knowledge. One instance of this is the company’s expansive range of first aid bags, which come in varying shapes and sizes but are specifically designed to hold the products users need neatly, compactly and securely. The zip compartments even Velcro in and out of the bag so you can just remove the specifics you need in each instance. Another example is Proflight’s recent adaptation of its popular gas cylinder covers. The company has added anti-entanglement straps, which bridge the small gap between the cylinder and harness. This

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prevents any debris becoming trapped between the two essential and potentially lifesaving components; a small and simple addition, which has proved an invaluable safety enhancer and highlights the company’s passion for detail and safety enhancing solutions. This innovation is already being adopted and positively received by fire and rescue services, including Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. The company will be showcasing its latest products, including the first aid bags, cylinder cover, stowage bags, helmet bags and more, on its largest stand to date. www.proflightbags.co.uk

Visit Proflight on Stand F35.

The new ProPak range of Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA).

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Wireless gas monitor improves first responder safety RAE Systems Inc, a leader in wirelessly connected gas and radiation detection solutions, has launched the industry’s first wireless, portable, four-gas pumped and diffusion gas monitor that will significantly enhance worker safety in industrial environments and better protect first responders. RAE Systems’ new QRAE 3 is a versatile, rugged, one-to-four-sensor gas monitor that provides continuous exposure monitoring of Oxygen (O2), combustibles, and toxic gases, including Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) and Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN). The QRAE 3 is certified for use in hazardous environments, and is designed for use across a broad array of industries where exposure to toxic gas is a constant safety threat. These industries include a broad range of industrial, oil and gas, environmental, first responder and national defence applications. Real-time data When a situation arises, safety officers must make critical, split-second decisions about how and where to deploy resources.

They need access to real-time threat data, which QRAE 3 can provide, to help make faster, more informed decisions to protect lives and property.

“With the QRAE 3, emergency responders now have wireless access to Toxic Twin gas information, which can help protect their long-term health and safety.” The QRAE 3’s wireless communication capability enables access to real-time, remote instrument readings and alarm status – including an innovative ‘Man-Down’ alarm – from any location, for better visibility and faster response. Real-time hazard readings can also be communicated to the ProRAE Guardian Safety System and the EchoView Host Closed-Loop Wireless System for safety-enhancing wireless monitoring outside the hot zone, from a plant safety office or from a remote, enterprise location. This can help facilitate faster, data-driven decision making to alert responders, save lives and protect assets. “RAE Systems has been the industry leader in advancing wireless gas detection technologies that help save lives and assets for more than a decade,” said Thomas Negre, Vice President of Products and Marketing for RAE Systems. “With the addition of the QRAE 3, RAE Systems now offers the most extensive line of area, survey and portable wireless gas detectors making affordable, cutting edge toxic gas detection solutions available to more customers across a broader range of applications. Our wireless monitors include single-gas, four-gas, multi-gas with gamma (radiation detector), transportable multi-gas with gamma and semi-fixed with gamma for enhanced organisational safety.” Toxic Twin gas information “The toxic vapours present in fire smoke, particularly Hydrogen Cyanide and Carbon

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Monoxide, the ‘Toxic Twins’, are increasingly recognised as the most dangerous and deadly part of any fireground operation. As such, it is essential for incident commanders to have access to critical, real-time threat data to help protect personnel from dangerous exposure levels,” said Jason Krusen, Chief of Special Operations at Columbia, SC, Fire Department and President of the FireSmoke Coalition. “With the QRAE 3, emergency responders now have wireless access to Toxic Twin gas information, which can help protect their longterm health and safety.” Breakthrough technology The QRAE 3 offers breakthrough gas detection features and capabilities, including: • Advanced wireless functionality – first and only solution that is rapidly deployable in both closed-loop and global, 24/7 Internet-based systems • Enhanced organisational safety and compliance – organisations can leverage policy enforcement features (RAE Systems AutoRAE 2 bump and calibration stations) to ensure users follow calibration and bump test procedures and that their instruments are working properly • Protection against the ‘Toxic Twins’ – the QRAE 3 provides a wireless fire smoke configuration to detect for the ‘Toxic Twins’ (CO and HCN) • Advanced User Interface – the QRAE 3 features large graphical display, icon-driven user interface through intuitive, two-button operation. The QRAE 3 also includes a ‘Man Down’ alarm and automatic flip screen. All ToxiRAE Pro, MultiRAE and QRAE 3 monitors now feature a similar menu, navigation and icons • Available in multiple, user-configurable monitors – all configurations are available pumped or diffusion, and wireless or non-wireless, and with various sensor configurations. The QRAE 3 includes a three-year warranty on standard sensor • Compatible with RAE Systems wireless safety systems – QRAE 3 real-time threat data can be monitored on mobile devices via the ProRAE Guardian Wireless Safety System, 24/7, through a secure Internet connection, or via the EchoView Host Closed-Loop Wireless System. www.raesystems.com www.honeywell.com

Visit BW Technologies by Honeywell on Stand P58.

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Baselayers can be lifesavers Firefighters experience many stresses, strains and challenges when performing fire fighting duties in personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE is an essential component of modern day fire fighting equipment designed to save lives and reduce injuries. Extensive research has been conducted looking at the outer protective layers but little research has been undertaken to determine the effectiveness of next-to-skin clothing as part of a layered system.

Research In 2013 Guelph Humber University in Canada researched four different base layers during live fire evolutions to identify the next generation of baselayer systems for firefighters. Four different garments’ systems were tested and compared with live physiological monitoring and perceptual/sensorial measurement. The research finding ranked Armadillo Merino® as the number one choice of next-to-skin clothing with 67 percent selecting Armadillo Merino® as their first choice and 100 percent as their first or second choice. Armadillo Merino® garments don’t melt or drip and provide natural flame resistance up to 600°C. They feature no static generation, high UVA and UVB protection and highly effective thermo-regulation in both hot and cold conditions – sweat is actively managed in both the vapour and liquid state keeping users comfortable while preventing odour production and helping to maintain a more stable core body temperature. Head-to-toe system Buckinghamshire and Milton Keynes Fire and Rescue Service (BMKFRS) chose Armadillo Merino® to supply a head-to-toe clothing system in the UK. “We were looking for base layer garments, which had fewer limitations and challenges than cotton or synthetic materials,” explained CFO Mark Jones, BMKFRS. “We wanted a T-shirt style top that could be worn at all times when on duty, without the need to issue alternatives.”

The work of the Buckinghamshire technical rescue staff required base layer clothing that could be adapted to meet the physiological demands of challenging environments and differing weather conditions. The team is part of the national urban search and rescue (USAR) capability, meaning they can be deployed to incidents anywhere in the UK for extended periods of time. High flame resistance The trials found the Armadillo Merino garments offered a higher level of flame resistance than existing next-to-skin clothing. The outcome of these trials was crucial in the purchase decision, stated CFO Jones. “After a series of extensive and punishing wearer trials, the Armadillo Merino garments outperformed the cotton and synthetic alternatives, providing a good solution on the grounds of effectiveness and wearer comfort. Whilst there are less expensive garments available and money is always tight in this service, we felt that we needed a greater focus on improving base layer clothing in addition to outerwear PPE. “This represents a significant investment to improve the health, safety and welfare of our specialist staff that fits well with our ethos of seeking high quality to achieve the best value over time.” www.armadillomerino.com

Visit Armadillo Merino on Stand L12.

Managing all your hose needs Parkland Engineering, established in 1978, is a major manufacturer and distributor of hose, couplings and fittings throughout the UK and Europe and classified as a Grade A supplier to several world leading OEMs. Now part of the Kiowa Group, which includes Border Hydraulics and Pneumatics Ltd, Parkland Engineering not only has the backing of two well aligned companies with extensive knowledge and experience of industrial products, the company has have a national support network of six fully equipped branches who provide from stock a range of industrial, hydraulic, metallic, PTFE and silicone hose assemblies. Combine this with localised branches, which are interlinked via a sophisticated computer system, you can ensure products are delivered when you need them and even through next day timed deliveries when required.

high quality of Parkland’s own manufactured hoses, produced within the company’s 41,000sqft premises; supported by on-time delivery and exceptional technical advice and service to meet your requirements. The highpressure fire reeling hose is unique to Parkland and has a design-registered highly visible fluorescent strip with black arrows pointing the way to safety. The Parkland manufactured hose range is reinforced by a variety of items bought only from internationally renowned manufacturers such as Merlett and Dantec for whom Parkland are the UK’s largest distributor of their composite hose range. A range of Layflat fire hoses, Reelcraft hose reels and Scorpe/Elkhart Brass fire and rescue equipment complete the range. To complement Parkland’s products, the company also provides a full hose management service, which can be tailored to meet your needs.

Recognised high quality For the past decade, Parkland Engineering has been a major supplier to the fire and rescue service. Success is due to the recognised

Emergency Services Times October 2014

On site testing The onsite testing and hose management service is carried out by probably the most experienced test team in the UK, having detailed knowledge of the majority of the UK’s fire brigades, chemical, oil and distribution facilities. The team also holds ‘passport to safety’ clearance, which allows personnel to work unsupervised on site to provide a comprehensive computerised database for full hose traceability. Parkland is an ISO 9001 approved supplier and a registered member of NEPIC and NAHAD. www.parkland-eng.co.uk

Visit Parkland Engineering Ltd on Stand B48.

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ESTESS2014: EXHIBITOR FOCUS | 113

Lightweight vehicle drawers SlideandTilt has quickly established itself as a market leader in emergency vehicle drawer solutions. Over recent years the company has brought a fresh approach to the engineering of products for storage solutions by using the latest techniques in manufacturing plastics and alloys to offer lightweight corrosion free components while also looking after the environment. This year sees the launch of the company’s new

lightweight drawers, put together without welding or bolts. Further products include: telescopic slides; slide and tilt kits, including bespoke drawers; drawer front handles; general moulding; and an in-house design facility.

Protective eyewear

www.SlideandTilt.com

Visit Slide and Tilt. Com Ltd on Stand B29. Bollé Safety, a world leader in the design and manufacture of protective eyewear, will be launching a new version of the market leading Atom goggle at this year’s exhibition, a new versatile, high impact protection double lens safety goggle. The new sealed double lens Atom with Equalizer technology, which filters and regulates moisture levels, and Platinum double-sided anti-scratch and anti-fog coating ensures that the lens will not fog up any extreme conditions. It has been tested and approved to EN 166 1BT KN 3, 4, 5 and EN 170 2C-1.2. The Atom is an extremely versatile, low profile goggle that has been tested and approved to meet the highest levels of impact protection, EN 166 1BT KN, and also provides the wearer with protection against chemicals, dust and gases. There is a prescription insert available but the Atom will also fit comfortably over prescription spectacles. Adding to its versatility, the Atom is also available with an easy to attach visor and tear off lens protectors. All Bollé products provide the wearer with protection, style, comfort and an exceptional field of view due to their lightweight design, advanced material technology and Bollé Safety’s world renowned optical class 1 lens quality. And as with all of the range of products from Bollé Safety they also offer you the customer excellent value for money. www.bolle-safety.com

Visit Bollé Safety on Stand G33.

SP celebrates 25 years in style SP Services, a leading supplier of emergency medical and rescue equipment, celebrated its 25th Silver Anniversary on 5 July 2014 with a private party at the beautiful Weston Park, located on the Staffordshire/Shropshire border.

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The SP team donned black tie and ball gowns to enjoy an evening of fine dining and entertainment in celebration of this magnificent milestone. Over the past 25 years SP services has grown into a market leader in the emergency medical and rescue equipment sector, with a strong and loyal following of customers and advocates of the quality and service provided. The party was a huge success and a chance for the team to come together and acknowledge all that has been achieved over the years. “After 25 years I feel we have a lot to be proud of,” said SP’s Managing Director Steve Bray, “The next 25 years look bright for SP Services and I think I speak for everyone at SP when I say we’re all looking forward to what we can do in the years ahead.”

Show only offers If you are attending the The Emergency Services Show from 24-25 September at the NEC be sure to visit SP Services on Stand L52. Be among the first people in the industry to see the new products and specialist emergency service equipment on offer, meet with the friendly and helpful customer services representatives who will be on hand to help you with all of your enquiries, and purchasing needs and grab a fantastic show only offer available on many product lines. www.spservices.co.uk

Visit SP Services (UK) Ltd on Stand L52.

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114 | ESTCOMPANY PROFILE

Step inside the world of crime scene cleaning Run by a dedicated team on the west coast of Wales and recognised by police forces around the country, the National Academy of Crime Scene Cleaners is (NACSC) is a pioneering force. Students for the course come from all over Great Britain, with some travelling from further afield in Europe to learn the definitive way to clean crime scenes. The students come from police and local councils, as well as cleaning companies who want to get onto the approved list. The NACSC course is designed to give a complete insight into the world of crime scene cleaning. And it’s seriously dirty work – the training involves cleaning mocked-up scenarios where fake-blood, skin and body fluids are splattered across rooms. Trainees will also see footage filmed at previous extreme cleans, which helps to show them the truth of the job. They will have to be introduced slowly, because the reality can be shocking. Trainees are also given advice and educated on how to cope with people traumatised by the scene they are cleaning. This can be grieving family members, or even the landlord, left to deal with the aftermath of criminal activity. The threat that crime scenes present is now recognised to be considerable, including Hepatitis B and other pathogens. The recent tightening of health and safety regulations means those overseeing crime scenes have to take this threat to health into account; they have a statutory duty to ensure the health and safety of those at the crime scene and afterwards.

“Cleaners regularly cleanse murder scenes, suicides, trauma sites, and decomposing bodies.” Increased professionalism The consequence is the increasing professionalism of crime scene cleaning, with clients now recognising that, in order to discharge their responsibilities properly, they should use cleaning operatives who have been properly trained on an accredited training scheme. The National Academy of Crime Scene Cleaners (NACSC) was launched in 2009 to meet this need – to provide rigorous training, which preserved the health and safety of cleaning operatives and others while enabling the police and other bodies to be sure that they are meeting their statutory responsibilities. The NACSC network The NACSC course graduates have the option to become part of the NACSC network of qualified crime scene cleaning operatives, having crime scene enquiries passed onto them. Academy members are able to deal with any bio hazard incident, from a

simple needle collection, house clearance, waste removal, to full trauma scene clean up. To date the academy has 450 cleaning companies in its network across the UK, enabling the NACSC to offer a two hour response time anywhere in the country. Clients always know that, by contacting the Academy Network, they will have a professionally qualified service, with operatives trained to the highest standards. Services include: clean crime scenes and trauma scene locations, including police cells and contaminated vehicles RTA and crime scene equipment; deodorise, remove contaminated flooring; control pests; house clearance; road traffic accident clean up; animal death clean up; collect hypodermic needles; cleaning and sanitising personal effects; removing hazardous waste to meet specialist waste carriers regulations (including all blood borne pathogens); sanitation services that include both minor and major outbreak control; health and safety method statements and risk assessments; dealing with the client or member of the public offering a compassionate service in their time of need; renovation services; and ATP monitoring and auditing.

Cleaners regularly cleanse murder scenes, suicides, trauma sites, and decomposing bodies. They are the first on site to incidents where suspects have trashed their police cells, as well as other smaller blood and body fluid incidents. Each job requires a different approach, and a range of cleaning tools and products. You will get to understand the process and protocols, and the science behind the method. The cleaners work in a specific way to avoid cross contamination of bodily fluids, while keeping their own safety paramount. They also have to be respectful, as often it’s the family members who are left behind to pick up the pieces. The cleaning will include – decontaminating rooms, insect infestations, and tracing and removing body fluids. The teams also then replace property, repaint rooms, and get everything habitable again for the client. New pathogens are being discovered every day! NACSC has the safe solution to the problem. www.nacsc.co.uk

The cleans Cleaning a crime scene is not easy and a long way from the work of a regular industrial cleaner – though most qualified crime scene cleaners do the day-to-day stuff too. Crime residue and other biological waste and matter, especially hypodermic needles, need correct handling. Without the right procedure the team could be at risk of Hepatitis, HIV/AIDs, and other nasty infections and diseases.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

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ESTVEHICLES | 115

Efficient and effective in the extreme The East Midlands Ambulance Service (EMAS) faces many diverse challenges on a daily basis, one of which is the terrain in the High Peak of Derbyshire. The organisation is committed to providing staff with the right tools for the job and having 4x4 vehicle capability was identified as crucial to enable crews to retrieve patients from remote areas and farms. Two cars – conversions based on the Nissan Pathfinder – currently fulfil this 4x4 role for EMAS. However, one of the vehicles has limited patient carrying capacity due to head space so it can only be used to move the patient to the waiting ambulance for transport to hospital. This is clearly not ideal as it results in delays in the patient’s arrival time. The need to provide better facilities led EMAS’ fleet services department to consider the options available. The choice was narrowed down to two base vehicles – the Land Rover Defender and the VW Amarok. Unfortunately, the Land Rover is due to be discontinued in 2015 and it was felt this might cause problems in future years so this left the Amarok 4x4 as the vehicle of choice. The Amarok has a proven pedigree and has been tested under the most demanding conditions, for example, as the official support vehicle for the Dakar rally in 2010. Having decided on the most suitable vehicle, EMAS began work on developing a specification, which met their needs. The base vehicle is a stretched version of the VW Amarok (VW LONO) with a modular-structured ambulance body. 132kW of engine power, eight-speed automatic transmission and four-wheel drive ensures agile performance on tarmac and off road. Work on the chassis extension and body were completed by European specialist partners of VCS, namely VETH and Tamlans, and VCS in West Yorkshire completed the internal conversion and electrical interface to EMAS’ specific requirements. Safety was a very important factor. Tamlans carried out load simulations and practical safety tests in its numerous research facilities. The Amarok body can withstand heavy point loads and retains its shape even if the vehicle was to roll over. The structure of the body is both durable and light – it was subjected to 20G dynamic loads, double the requirement of CEN compliancy. Maintenance Replacing parts and other maintenance tasks have been made as simple as possible. The design of the ambulance provides unobstructed access to maintenance points and adequate space for all tasks. All electronic systems have been placed in one location on the cockpit’s wall. The composite

ambulance body is rustproof and, in case of damage to the cockpit, the body can be reused on a new platform. Design and use EMAS’ Head of Fleet Services, Steve Farnsworth, asked staff that would be using the vehicle for their input in designing the internal layout as they were the best qualified people to know what would be required and, equally as important, what would not. VCS in Huddersfield was commissioned to convert the basic shell and, through the guidance of VCS Sales Engineer Mark Sockett and Sales and Operations Director Mark Kerrigan, was able to produce a working vehicle so the design team could get a feel for the finished product. The only things that were fixed were the Stryker stretcher and the doors.

“The positioning of medical instruments and equipment always requires some compromises but the design team’s goal was never to veer away from making the vehicle as ergonomic and safe for paramedics as possible.” This ‘blank sheet’ approach to the design process with input from engineers and medics resulted in what EMAS feels to be the best possible layout of the vehicle interior. Around 90 percent of the contents of a full size ambulance were slotted into some unusual places! There were many evolutions in the ‘mock up’ stage, which avoided costly mistakes/changes later. The positioning of medical

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instruments and equipment always requires some compromises but the design team’s goal was never to veer away from making the vehicle as ergonomic and safe for paramedics as possible. Every piece of medical and patient immobilisation equipment has its own place, providing easy access for quick use. The joint input from EMAS’ design team, VCS engineers and production technicians has resulted in the best possible finished product.

Improved patient experience The Amarok 4x4 vehicle will help EMAS staff perform their duties more efficiently and effectively under what can often be extreme circumstances. The Amarok 4x4 is capable of going off road to retrieve a fallen walker or cyclist, get to snow bound villages and farms to pick up the patient and then travel to hospital without the need to transfer the patient to another vehicle thus reducing hospital admission times by at least 30 minutes and providing a much improved patient experience. Whatever the challenges posed by terrain or weather conditions (or both) EMAS no longer has to compromise. Its staff will able to offer treatment at the point of injury or illness and then take patients direct to hospital saving vital time, which will be a huge benefit in the most critical cases. www.emas.nhs.uk

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116 | ESTPRODUCTS

Police officers to be even more highly visible in Hertfordshire Mobile, secure and robust laptops rolled out across Hertfordshire put the Constabulary at the ‘cutting edge’ of new technology in policing and officers can spend more time out and about in communities and on frontline police work. Chief Inspector Damien Kennedy leads the Mobile Data Team. He said, “With the roll out of the Panasonic Toughpad in 90 vehicles across the force, we are really starting to reap the benefits. The mobile technology is saving operational officers’ time, because they can complete a number of enquiries ‘on the go’ at the touch of a button without having to return to their patrol base. This in turn means officers are more highly visible and accessible to residents.”

“Hertfordshire have invested £3m to make savings in the future” The team has been working closely with Panasonic and Vauxhall to develop the Panasonic Toughpad FZ-G1 rugged tablet with Windows 8 Pro, featuring an 8.4in high-resolution multitouchscreen in-car screen developed by KME (Kent

Modular Electronics Ltd) and a 4G compatible broadband router enabling high-speed internet connectivity. Huge savings Chief Insp Kennedy said, “We had problems of connectivity last year in many parts of the county when we were testing the Toughpads, but we worked hard to address this. Hertfordshire is at the cutting edge of technology within policing having invested £3m, which will enable us to make huge savings in the future. By being more efficient at investigating crime, officers will be able to deal with more crimes as well as being a visible deterrent to offenders.” Multi-agency initiatives The technology is not only used to deal with incidents in real-time, it is also being used by Safer Neighbourhood Teams during events and initiatives, for example Safer Streets, where Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs) including the council, police and fire and rescue service work

with residents to improve quality of life issues, for example clearing up litter or fitting smoke alarms. www.herts.police.uk

Vehicle climate control solutions

The Cube 12V portable air conditioner provides vehicle cooling even when the engine is not running. Cube could be the ideal answer for cooling surveillance vehicles, dog vans and speed enforcement camera equipped vehicles. It does not need to be permanently installed and can be easily removed when a vehicle is moved on. For larger vehicles, Espar’s Dirna Greenline range of roof and bulkhead mounting 12V and 24V air conditioners can provide effective engine off

dehumidifying and cooling up to 3.2kW for large multiple dog carriers and multi-manned surveillance vans. Also available are Espar’s low cost range of roof and bulkhead mounting Ebercool and Dirna evaporative coolers for use when dehumidified air is not a requirement. As well as its range of air conditioners, Espar provides 12V and 24V DC electric hot water heating for hand washing and hot drinks. The company’s diesel fired cookers are ideal for messing vehicles and its range of DC refrigeration keeps stored food at a proper stable low temperature. The portable Polarn diesel fired heater can be used to heat an area away from a vehicle, ideal for keeping casualties warm in situ and keeping rescue service staff warm when outside a vehicle during cold winter days and nights. Visit the website below to discover how Espar can help cool, heat and provide cooking and hot water facilities for your special application vehicles. www.espar.co.uk

Emergency Services Times October 2014

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ESTPRODUCTS | 117

Haemostatic gauze use in the pre-hospital environment Ever been on a ‘shout’ as a responder where time is critical, either due to the severity or number of injuries or injured you need to deal with? Maybe a casualty remains trapped so blood loss is initially low and the casualty remains hypertensive. As soon as the pressure is freed, blood loss immediately accelerates and hypotension and shock are real risks. This was a real scenario and stopping the bleeding quickly was just one of the priorities for the attending responders. In this case, Celox Rapid haemostat was used to control the bleeding in under one minute, allowing rapid evacuation after extrication. Major haemorrhage can kill a casualty as fast as a compromised airway. In 2006,T J Hodgetts et al (1) proposed a revised protocol, changing the ABC paradigm to <C>-ABC, with the <C> standing for ‘Catastrophic Haemorrhage’, meaning any catastrophic haemorrhage needs to be dealt with first. The latest JRCALCS guidelines (2013 revision) include use of a haemostatic gauze within the catastrophic haemorrhage protocol. Haemostatic technology has advanced significantly, although legacy myths about burning etc still seem to cause confusion and hesitation about its use. The Celox Gauze products produce no heat and the latest version, called Celox Rapid Gauze, speeds up the treatment by increasing the product’s muco-adhesion (ability to stick to wet tissue) allowing it to stay in place where it is needed. Speed of treatment Primary clinical concerns include, time to haemostasis (how fast it works) and mechanism of action (how it works). Most testing on haemostatic dressings have used a 2-3 minute ‘hold’ times after dressing application, which may not be possible in practice. Celox Rapid dramatically reduces the need for three minutes compression to 60 seconds. A study by N R Kunio et al (2) showed that this

significantly reduced blood loss and treatment time. Time saved with Celox Rapid is similar to the time taken to apply a more complex tourniquet, with the advantage that it can be used on areas of the body where a tourniquet cannot be applied. Celox haemostats work by a purely physical mechanism, so they are effective on blood that is hypothermic or containing anticoagulants, such as warfarin. Cases reported to Celox attest to the product working in hypothermic blood and blood containing anticoagulants. Practical use The technique for packing Celox haemostatic gauze is the same as packing standard gauze into a wound, the main difference being the compression time specified to stop the bleeding. With Celox Rapid, the speed of treatment effectively frees up the responder’s hands after a minute to allow work on other treatment or preparing for casualty transfer. In a hazardous area response or a ‘Hot Zone', products that free up the responders’ hands quickly, can dramatically impact both the casualty or responder’s safety and security.

“Major haemorrhage can kill a casualty as fast as a compromised airway.” Celox (on the right) against competitor haemostatic gauze showing bleeding stopped after 2ft of gauze packed, reducing blood loss compared to 12ft of competitor haemostatic gauze.

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Economic considerations Economic considerations are important for a public seeking value for money and emergency

services having budgets squeezed. Where Celox products have been used it has been shown to minimise blood loss (below left). The costs of transfusion, blood products and after care for hypovolaemic shock far outweigh the cost of a haemostatic gauze. Celox Rapid Gauze now has a four-year shelf life, representing a reduced ‘lifetime cost’. Conclusion Use of haemostatic gauze like Celox is now considered a standard accepted treatment in clinical protocols for severe haemorrhage. Celox Rapid Gauze provides a proven, fast way of getting bleeding under control with a strong cost-benefit rationale. Haemostatic gauze should no longer be seen as a tool of last resort and we should look forward to a time when responders reach for Celox. Think Celox, for the <C> in <C> A B C. www.medtrade.co.uk www.celoxmedical.com

References: (1) Emergency Care Paradigm, TJ Hodgetts et al, Emergency Medical Journal 2006 23:745-746 (2) Chitosan based advanced hemostatic dressing etc, NR Kunio et al, The American Journal of Surgery 2013

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118 | ESTPRODUCTS

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AIRPOWER® X1 and R91 – HAIX®

www.haix.co.uk

The AIRPOWER® R91 model from HAIX® is a flexible work boot for everyday use. With a leg height of 19.5cm and its patented fast-lacing fit system, this boot combines the comfort of a midheight boot with an optimum fit for daily use. Once the two-zone lace system has been adjusted, it's a matter of stepping in, pulling on, fastening up and you’re ready to go. An alternative is the proven AIRPOWER® X1 model with classic lace-up system. A non-penetrable sole and, for the R91 model, an integrated instep protector provide protection, especially for technical operations. The integrated CROSSTECH membrane also prevents the penetration of body fluids such as blood. Both models will ensure you are well equipped, even when wearing the boots for long periods.

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HDS Kevlar Gloves – Hammond Drysuits Ltd

www.hammond-drysuits.co.uk

Leading British drysuit manufacturer Hammond Drysuits Ltd has announced its new HDS Kevlar Gloves. These hardwearing gloves are ideal for commercial use, and are already proving popular with Hammond Drysuits’ fire and rescue customers, such as East Sussex Fire and Rescue Service, and the Environment Agency. Featuring heavy duty Kevlar protection across the palm and fingers, together with a high gauntlet and Velcro wrist adjuster, these gloves offer all the protection that fire and rescue workers could need when working in a hazardous environment. An ergonomic cut means full articulation is retained, and the lightweight neoprene material to the back of the wrist ensures protection across the whole hand.

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HD-SDI periscope camera – MEL Secure Systems

www.melsecuresystems.com

The new high performance HD-SDI Periscope camera from MEL Secure Systems is designed for law enforcement and broadcast applications in a wide range of mobile or fixed covert surveillance operations. The camera will deliver reliable and resilient performance in all weather conditions and includes an HD-SDI interface to transmit uncompressed surveillance images in 1080p resolution at full frame rates over coaxial cable making installation a quick and troublefree process. It uses a Sony day/night camera module with image stabilisation and transmits HD images at high speed to be received at distances of up to 100m without requiring repeaters. The camera has full PTZ functionality with 360˚pan and 60˚ tilt with continuous rotation. MEL Secure Systems also provides a compatible video link, telemetry link, 10.4in LCD colour monitor, camera telemetry controls, rechargeable battery pack and solid state recorder, all of which are built into a rugged, weatherproof case that can be used in any location.

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Crane Sling and Spacer Bar – Promove UK Ltd

www.promove.uk.com

Developed at Promove UK Ltd in collaboration with technical rescue specialists in the UK fire and rescue service (FRS), a new Crane sling and Spacer Bar is designed to assist FRS teams to rescue bariatric casualties from road traffic accidents. Currently in the UK the preferred method of extracting obese or bariatric casualties from road traffic accidents is to remove the vehicle roof and lift the person out. This is done by lifting the casualty manually, using the ProMove Barikit, or mechanically by a rope and pulley assembly mounted on a temporary scaffold or with a lorry mounted crane. The Crane Sling can be placed beneath the seated bariatric individual even in a restricted location, with the individual’s weight supported from head to knees by the sling, and stirrups supporting the lower legs and feet. The Spacer Bar is designed to keep the sling and stirrups in an open position, thereby avoiding pressures on the bariatric individual and providing a single central lifting point.

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Stronghold® Mobile Anchor Point and Barrier System – Glazesafe

www.glazesafe.com

Award winning inventor and London Firefighter Daniel Cheddie has teamed up with Capital Safety and the Youngman Group to produce the Stronghold Mobile Anchor Point and Barrier System, which provides an instant safe and secure dedicated anchor point. The system is designed to maximise safety for fire crews, other emergency service personnel and the public when working at height during line rescue from a window, lift or other vertical opening. The Stronghold is free standing and does not require any fixing to the walls or floor. Therefore unlike fitting anchor bolts no drilling, curing time or pull tests are required, saving valuable time at an incident. Two horizontal life lines are connected to the Stronghold in seconds, providing the harness attachment point for two crew members, protecting them both in either a fall restraint, fall arrest or work positioning mode. The Stronghold also has separate anchor points to attach tools or other equipment to via load straps and lanyards. Manufactured in strong, lightweight aluminium the Stronghold weighs little over 30kg.

Emergency Services Times October 2014

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| 119 VEHICLE MOUNTED BOILING WATER SYSTEM

Cold, wet and dehydration can reduce performance and impair safety. By fitting a ‘TeaMate’ water boiler, crews can make themselves a cup of tea, coffee or other hot beverage to keep warm and hydrated, therefore maximising concentration and keeping fatigue to a minimum.

KNEE & ELBOW Protection

Comprehensive range to suit every application w Ergonomic design w Comfortable and secure fit w Reliable protection w Tough and hard wearing w Manufactured to the highest standards from selected quality materials w marking throughout w NATO Stock No: 22c 8415-99-8873869 w

Gotec Trading Limited Boulton Road Pin Green Stevenage Her ts SG1 4QL Telephone 01438 740400 Fax 01438 740005

Compact commercial grade throughout. Self contained fully automatic. 24v and 12v models available. Makes up to 9 mugs per filling. WHISPAIRE LTD Email: info@whispaire.co.uk Web: www.whispaire.co.uk T: + 44 (0)1794 523999 F: + 44 (0)1794 519151

WANTED photographs of Ambulances and Police vehicles from 1950's - present day. please call Paul Hill after 6PM on 01752 360315

MAKE IT EASY WITH

HOT PACK™

Self-Heating Nutritious Meals In 12 minutes, you can create a delicious hot meal, with Hot Pack Self Heating Meals, anywhere you need it. Everything is in the pack to produce a satisfying hot meal without using any other equipment. Even cutlery and a dish are included! Choose from seven great tasting, ready to eat recipes: Chicken Casserole, Lancashire Hot Pot, Chicken Dopiaza Curry, Sausages and Beans, Spicy Vegetable Rigatoni, Meatballs & Pasta and Vegetable Curry. Make it easy. Enjoy a HOT PACK™ meal – anywhere! Contact Canland UK Ltd, Wellington House, Lower Icknield Way Longwick, Bucks HP27 9RZ Tel/Fax: 01844 344474 E.mail: info@hotpackmeals.co.uk Web site: www.hotpackmeals.co.uk

EMS (UK) Ltd. EMS (UK) is a private ambulance provider based in the North East. We are looking to recruit a number of ‘bank

IHCD Technicians and

HCPC registered Paramedics

To receive every issue of EST magazine visit www.emergencyservicestimes.com and click on 'Get your copy'

for our growing service and demands. Please Contact us for more information on (01388)720512 or submit your CV and covering letter to vacancies@ems-uk.co.uk

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120 | ESTLAST WORDS

Keeping superbugs at bay The Ebola crisis and the escalating fight against untreatable bacterial and viral diseases show no signs of abating and point towards a new level of risk for paramedics and other emergency responders. Words: Ian Samson, Training Manager, DuPont Protection Technologies. The recent outbreaks of Ebola virus in West Africa and the public fear surrounding the possibility of global transmission has put the risks from highly communicable and non-treatable diseases firmly in the spotlight. Keeping ahead of deadly bacterial and viral pathogens is an uphill struggle and emergency services need to be prepared for the worst. However, without deriding the natural anxiety in the UK over Ebola, the level of public fear is perhaps a little unwarranted given that should this particular disease be detected in the UK it will probably be relatively easy to contain. Unlike some other untreatable diseases, Ebola is not especially contagious and, although highly virulent, its symptoms manifest themselves quickly, which allows for the rapid isolation of those infected. Risk is very real Nonetheless, in an age of two billion air passengers every year and increasingly porous national borders the risk of deadly and difficult to control diseases arriving on these shores is very real and growing. And it is a threat that sits alongside the problem of more familiar homegrown diseases that are fast becoming resistant to modern antibiotics. According to a recent BBC report it is estimated that drug-resistant strains of bacteria are already responsible for 5000 deaths a year in the UK and 25,000 deaths a year in Europe. What is a bio-hazard? A biological hazard – ‘bio-hazard’ – is any biological micro-organism or agent that poses a threat to humans, animals or the environment. In the vast majority of cases, micro-organisms are either beneficial or completely harmless to man. However, a small proportion are highly dangerous, sometimes deadly, and with their tenacity, ease of transmission, ease of replication, tendency to mutate, complete invisibility and unremittingly invasive behaviour, can present a unique challenge when it comes to their suppression and eradication. According to the World Health Organisation dangerous pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites are responsible for over 16 percent of the annual deaths worldwide. Bio-hazards can present themselves in numerous ways and their very omnipresence can make them very difficult to manage and control. Bio-hazards may be bacterial, viral, parasitic or fungal and any source materials, such as contaminated body fluids, tainted packaging and dirty work surfaces are potential bio-risks. Causal origins of biological hazards range from decaying foodstuffs and faecal bacteria to highly virulent medical wastes and germ warfare agents. All of these bio-hazards and many others relate to the presence of infectious biological agents and biologically-derived toxins or

contaminated materials, including organic dusts and mould spores. Bio-hazards also have widely varying transfer mechanisms. Some infectious diseases, influenza for example, can be contracted directly by touch or by inhaling respiratory droplets while others, such as tuberculosis, are mainly spread by airborne transmission. Malaria, on the other hand is transmitted by mosquitoes, while Ebola and AIDS generally require the direct transfer of infected body fluids. Protective procedures and barriers In practice, things are never so clear cut. Ebola, for example, can survive and remain infectious for 48 or more hours outside the human body so it can be contracted simply by contact with a contaminated surface. And this means that stretchers, ambulances, medical equipment and PPE need to be rigorously decontaminated in the event of any possible exposure. Keeping these areas clean to the standard necessary to contain highly virulent pathogens such as Ebola is a challenge in itself and requires money, education and commitment. Such measures would no doubt put the emergency services under considerable strain should Ebola or a similar disease gain a foothold in the UK.

“Stretchers, ambulances, medical equipment and PPE need to be rigorously decontaminated in the event of any possible exposure.” As can be seen from the recent Ebola outbreaks, exposure to biological contaminants can have very serious and rapidly escalating health consequences, which means there is little room for complacency or delay when it comes to putting the correct protective procedures in place. The vast number of potentially dangerous micro-organisms and the huge range of possible biological risk conditions means that the selection of personal protection equipment (PPE) for personnel faced with life threatening pathogens can be a very complex exercise indeed. Cases of paramedics and first responders contracting infectious diseases from patients and then passing them on are not unknown. In addition to effective protection against naturally spreading infections and diseases, there is a need for personal protection in emergency response scenarios whenever biological agents are being manufactured, handled, distributed, studied, administered, neutered, removed or disposed of. The types of sites where these activities can occur

Emergency Services Times October 2014

EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department (ECHO).

include hospital facilities, defence and military establishments, medical and biological research laboratories and biotechnology production facilities. Bio-hazard precautions are also necessary in a wide range of crisis scenarios from flood management operations to trauma scene cleaning to bioterrorism responses. Seeking guidance In all cases of biological hazard exposure a dedicated risk assessment must be carried out on all PPE, ideally with reference to the performance classes described in European Standard EN 14126. Biological agents are classified into four categories and, due to the extremely wide compass of risk involved with infective agents, it is absolutely essential that expert guidance is sought when selecting appropriate PPE for the different levels of hazard. Safety for emergency responders isn’t just about having the right protective gear. The correct training is every bit as important. It is a fact that many cases of biological hazard exposure have been due to lapses of attention or procedure; things that can easily happen in the stressful conditions of an emergency response situation. Armand Sprecher, the medical adviser to Doctors Without Borders for haemorrhagic fevers, affirmed this in a recent interview for NPR in the United States. He said, “Where we see health care worker infections when the PPE is in place, [the worker] did something to override the PPE: they didn't wear it appropriately or contaminated their hands in the process of getting [the suit] off.” Summary In many people’s view it is only a matter of time before a major national or international medical emergency occurs involving an incurable or very difficult to treat disease. The risks are hard to quantify; the difference between an isolated case and a global pandemic might be a single infected traveller stepping undetected off a plane. But if and when such a disaster strikes it will be the emergency services that put themselves on the line to protect, serve and support the public. We need to be preparing now to ensure this is a battle we do not lose. www.dupont.com

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EST October 2014  

The October issue of Emergency Services Times – the show issue for The Emergency Services Show 2014, which takes place at the NEC in Birming...

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