Page 1

Covering the entire spectrum of the Emergency Services

October 2015

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Volume 16 | 5


ESTCONTENTS | 1

IN EVERY ISSUE

60

COMMENT

3

NEWS

4

EVENTS

18

COMPANY PROFILE

32

PROFILES

37 | 42 | 45 | 46

PEOPLE

39

PRODUCTS

94

LAST WORDS

96

IN THIS ISSUE COLLABORATION

11

21

Joint working to ensure a safe resolution to the Alton Towers incident; what the health and social care services can learn from the emergency

13

services; what does the future hold for the Civil Contingencies Act?

89

Plus, fire crews in Scotland look to save more lives by attending cardiac arrest incidents.

THE EMERGENCY SERVICES SHOW 2015 48 Co-responding, community response and the expansion of blue light services into preventative and social care will be hot topics at this year’s Emergency Services Show. Taking place at the NEC, Birmingham from 23-24 September, this free-to-attend event features over 400 exhibitors and three free seminars covering Innovation, Collaboration and Training, in which senior figures from the fire and rescue, police and ambulance services share their knowledge.

64

32

INNOVATION

82

How the emergency services will be transformed by a more connected world; immersive training boosts realism for Essex Fire and Rescue Service and its partner agencies; the Institute of Engineering and Technology report ‘Contacting Emergency Services in the Digital Age’ calls for our emergency services to keep pace with technology; and the Met Police announces the winner of the National Uniform Managed Service (NUMS) contract, which will change the way in which police forces and other potential customers will procure uniform and equipment.

Online registration will remain open for The Emergency Services Show

21

2015 throughout the event – visit www.emergencyuk.com and click on REGISTER to sign up; it’s free admission and free parking!

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

October2015


2 | ESTA-Z

Companies Company Name

Page No

Company Name

Page No

Company Name

Page No

Company Name

Page No

Age UK..........................................................................................................25

Environment Agency...................................................................................53

London Fire Brigade............................................................................6, 9, 31

ResilienceDirect...........................................................................................51

Alternative Venues North West ..................................................................42

Essex Fire and Rescue Service........................................................6, 22, 85

Lucy Air Ambulance.......................................................................................6

RNLI ................................................................................................................9

Antares TDC.................................................................................................77

Essex Police ...........................................................................................11, 39

Maritime Volunteer Service ........................................................................40

Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service.................................................39

Association of Air Ambulances...................................................................18

Fire Brigades Union ..............................................................................28, 90

Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime .......................................................11

Royal Life Saving Society............................................................................77

Auto Electrical Services ..............................................................................64

Fire Service College ......................................................................................3

Meiko ............................................................................................................49

Royal Society for Public Health.....................................................................4

Ballyclare Limited..................................................................................39, 60

FLIR ........................................................................................................48, 49

Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service...........................................................4

Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents......................................9, 69

Bedfordshire Police.....................................................................................40

Ford .................................................................................................................4

Met Office.....................................................................................................53

RSG Engineering.........................................................................................80

Beechwood Equipment ..............................................................................73

Foreign and Commonwealth Office ..........................................................14

Metropolitan Police Service .................................................................11, 89

Scott Safety ..................................................................................................68

Bennett Safetywear.....................................................................................74

Globalstar .....................................................................................................70

Microwave Marketing..................................................................................78

Scottish Ambulance Service ......................................................................28

BMW Group....................................................................................................4

Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service...................................22, 25

Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service............................................9

Scottish Fire and Rescue Service ..............................................................28

Brecon Mountain Rescue Team.................................................................70

Greater Manchester Police.........................................................................22

Ministry of Defence .....................................................................................60

Scottish Government ..................................................................................28

Bristow Helicopters Ltd...............................................................................13

Hammond Drysuits........................................................................................9

MiX Telematics Europe ...............................................................................66

SHB Hire.......................................................................................................66

British Red Cross ......................................................................14, 32, 51, 53

Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service.........................................................31

National Air Ambulance Conference.........................................................18

Solarbright Limited......................................................................................94

Buckinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service................................................6

Health and Safety Executive.......................................................................96

National Ambulance Resilience Unit ...........................................................3

South East Coast Ambulance Service...................................................6, 39

Bull Products................................................................................................94

Health and Safety Laboratory.....................................................................96

National Association of Police Fleet Managers........................................45

South Western Ambulance Service...........................................................18

Cabinet Office..............................................................................3, 26, 51, 59

HM Coastguard............................................................................................13

National Police Chiefs' Council ..................................................................45

South Yorkshire Police...................................................................................4

Capital Air Charter..........................................................................................6

HM Treasury.................................................................................................31

National Police Coordination Centre.........................................................45

Southport Offshore Rescue Trust ................................................................9

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service ..............................................4, 6, 25, 37

Holmatro.......................................................................................................74

NCEC (Part of Ricardo) ..............................................................................60

SP Services ..................................................................................................53

Chief Fire Officers' Association...................................22, 25, 37, 39, 60, 90

Home Office...........................................................................................18, 63

New Local Government Network (NLGN) ...............................................22

Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service......................................................21

Civil Contingencies Secretariat..................................................3, 26, 51, 59

Hospital Aids ................................................................................................66

NHS England ...........................................................................................4, 25

Surrey Police................................................................................................66

College of Policing ......................................................................3, 11, 37, 45

Humberside Fire and Rescue Service...................................................9, 22

North East Urgent Care Network.................................................................4

Telecare Services Association ......................................................................6

The Community Heartbeat Trust............................................................6, 17

Humberside Police ........................................................................................4

North West Ambulance Service.......................................................9, 22, 39

Terberg DTS .................................................................................................48

County Durham and Darlington Fire and Rescue Service ..................4, 40

Ilasco Limited ...............................................................................................78

Northamptonshire Police............................................................................39

TEXPORT.....................................................................................................67

CrowdControlHQ...........................................................................................6

Independent Police Complaints Committee ............................................66

NSI Group.....................................................................................................42

TFT..........................................................................................................48, 49

Danish Ambulance Service ........................................................................92

Institution of Engineering and Technology................................................86

NXP Semiconductors .................................................................................82

Tracerco........................................................................................................94

Department for Communities and Local Government ........................4, 31

Institution of Fire Engineers........................................................................31

ORAFOL Europe GmbH.............................................................................54

TVS Ltd (Tactical Ventilation Solutions).....................................................68

Department for Transport ...........................................................................13

International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies .............32

Oughtred & Harrison (O&H).........................................................................6

UK Disaster Victim Identification................................................................45

Department of Health .................................................................................18

ISC.................................................................................................................70

Packexe Ltd ..................................................................................................54

Unifire ...........................................................................................................68

Derbyshire Constabulary...............................................................................4

ISG.............................................................................................................6, 68

PatrolStore ...................................................................................................42

University of Central Lancashire ................................................................40

Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service .....................................................4, 39

IST Group .....................................................................................................68

Peugeot.......................................................................................................4, 6

Vauxhall ...........................................................................................................4

Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service........................................40

JESIP..........................................................................................26, 31, 59, 73

Pickup Systems Limited .............................................................................73

Voluntary Civil Protection............................................................................51

DHL Supply Chain Ltd.................................................................................89

Keela International.......................................................................................78

POK...............................................................................................................68

Welsh Ambulance Service..........................................................................39

Dräger.....................................................................................................39, 64

Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service............................................................9

Police National CBRN Centre ....................................................................63

West Midlands Ambulance Service.....................................................21, 73

Dublin Fire Brigade......................................................................................67

Land Rover ...................................................................................................32

Police National Search Centre ...................................................................37

West Midlands Fire Service..................................................................25, 73

Dyfed-Powys Police.......................................................................................4

Le Maitre Ltd ................................................................................................94

Police Scotland......................................................................................40, 45

West Midlands Police ..................................................................................73

East of England Ambulance Service .........................................................40

Leader...........................................................................................................48

Practical Creative Solutions (PCS)............................................................81

West Yorkshire Police ....................................................................................4

EasyCabin.....................................................................................................94

Life Connections 2015................................................................................18

The Purple Company ..................................................................................78

Xplore Technologies Corp ..........................................................................92

Emergency Fire and Safety Limited....................................................18, 77

Local Government Association ..................................................................60

RAF ...............................................................................................................70

Xtreme Sales................................................................................................80

Emergency Planning College.......................................................................3

London Ambulance Service .......................................................................77

Rapid Response Rescue Services.............................................................80

Yamaha Motors UK......................................................................................74

Emergency Response Driver Training Ltd ................................................69

London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority .......................................9

Realsafe Technologies ................................................................................92

Yorkshire Ambulance Service ................................................................6, 40

Company Name

Company Name

Company Name

Advertisers Company Name

Page No

Page No

Page No

Page No

Auto Electrical Services ..............................................................................87

Emergency Fire & Safety Ltd......................................................................61

MiX Telematics Europe Ltd.........................................................................47

Securitas.......................................................................................................62

Alternative Venues North West.....................................................................5

EP Barrus .....................................................................................................72

NCEC (part of Ricardo)...............................................................................95

SHB Hire Ltd ................................................................................................76

Antares TDC.................................................................................................50

Excelerate Technology Ltd..........................................................OFC, 34-36

NHS Confederation.....................................................................................43

Sierra Wireless.............................................................................................83

APB Mobile Installations Ltd.......................................................................75

Ferno (UK) Ltd.............................................................................................55

OnStar...........................................................................................................52

Argo Vehicles ...............................................................................................38

Flamepro (UK) Ltd ......................................................................................65

Orafol Europe GmbH ..................................................................................84

Armadillo Merino® .......................................................................................75

FLIR...............................................................................................................30

Ortus Technology Ltd ..................................................................................10

Ambulance Service Institute.......................................................................95

Fourth Element TCS....................................................................................15

Orvecare.......................................................................................................76

Ballyclare Limited ........................................................................................88

G7SME Ltd...................................................................................................90

Paraid Medical..............................................................................................16

Beechwood Equipment Limited ................................................................75

Getac UK ......................................................................................................52

PatrolStore......................................................................................................8

TVS Ltd – Tactical Ventilation Systems......................................................87

Bennett Safetywear Ltd ..............................................................................87

Godiva...........................................................................................................47

Peli Products (UK) Ltd ................................................................................12

Terberg DTS .................................................................................................48

Bluelight Roadcraft Driver Training............................................................58

Goliath Footwear (YDS Boots) ..................................................................88

Personal Support Aviation Ltd....................................................................93

Terrafix Limited ............................................................................................19

BOC Healthcare...........................................................................................23

Haagen .........................................................................................................24

Physio-Control UK Sales Ltd......................................................................16

TEXPORT.....................................................................................................67

Bristol Uniforms Ltd.....................................................................................20

Haix® Group .................................................................................................69

Plas Menai ....................................................................................................58

Transvend Limited .......................................................................................38

British Red Cross .........................................................................................58

Helyx SIS Ltd................................................................................................71

Premier Hazard Ltd .....................................................................................27

BMW Group................................................................................................IFC

Holmatro UK Ltd..........................................................................................50

Primetech (UK) Ltd ...................................................................................IBC

TyTek Medical Inc.........................................................................................27

Camping Travel Store..................................................................................95

Interspiro Ltd ................................................................................................84

Quiss Technology Plc ..................................................................................52

Capita PIP.....................................................................................................24

ISC Ltd ..........................................................................................................30

Ram Mount UK Ltd......................................................................................71

Cold Cut Systems AB ..................................................................................79

Jolly Safety Ltd .............................................................................................62

Rapid Response Rescue Services.............................................................23

Crofton Engineering Ltd .............................................................................81

Ledco Ltd – LED Lenser .............................................................................43

Red One Limited..........................................................................................50

DMS Technologies ......................................................................................72

Le Maitre Ltd ................................................................................................79

Resilience Direct..........................................................................................43

Xtreme Sales................................................................................................79

Dräger UK ....................................................................................................41

Lyon Equipment Limited ...............................................................................7

RSG Engineering.........................................................................................38

YPO...............................................................................................................27

DuPont..........................................................................................................15

Manx Telecom..............................................................................................93

Ruth Lee Ltd.................................................................................................76

Zodiac Milpro UK Ltd...................................................................................91

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

SP Services (UK) Ltd ..............................................................................OBC Strongs Plastic Products Ltd ......................................................................44 Stryker...........................................................................................................91 Supacat Limited...........................................................................................72

VectorCommand .........................................................................................56 Vimpex Ltd....................................................................................................20 WH Bence Coachworks Ltd .......................................................................29 Woodway Engineering Ltd..........................................................................44

October2015


ESTCOMMENT | 3

ISSN 1472-1090 Date: October 2015 Editor: David J. Holden MEng(Hons) Twitter: @999editor davidholden@brodenmedia.com Advertisement Manager: David Brown davidbrown@brodenmedia.com Advertisement Sales: Carol Fox carolfox@brodenmedia.com Office & Events Manager: Lesley Stevenson lesleystevenson@brodenmedia.com Marketing Manager: Emma Nicholls emmanicholls@brodenmedia.com Circulation: Christine Knoll admin@hpcpublishing.com Joint Managing Directors: David Brown David Holden Published by

Robert Denholm House, Bletchingley Road Nutfield, Surrey RH1 4HW Tel: 01737 824010 Fax: 01737 824011 e-mail: davidbrown@brodenmedia.com www: brodenmedia.com Distribution: EMERGENCY SERVICES TIMES is free of charge to officers and managers who are buyers or specifiers actively involved in the procurement of equipment or services within the emergency response industry and based in the UK and Irish Republic. All other categories of reader are invited to subscribe at £130.00 to UK addresses and £165.00 overseas. Single copy price £25.00 including post and packing. The articles within Emergency Services Times are copyright and are the property of the publisher Broden Media Limited and cannot be reproduced in any media form without permission of the publisher. Application should be made in writing. Reprints of articles and advertisements are available, allow 28 days for delivery. PDF pages are available by email at £20.00 (+VAT) per page (€32.50, $33). Prices on application to the publisher. Printed by Manor Creative Tel: 01323 514400 Studio work by Friskywhiska Design Tel: 01947 811333 Mobile: 07976 917411 charlotte@friskywhiska.co.uk

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Collaborative training for multi-agency coordination Words: Dr Robert MacFarlane, Assistant Director (UK Resilience Training and Doctrine), Civil Contingencies Secretariat, Cabinet Office. It is now more than 10 years since the passage of the Civil Contingencies Act (2004) placed statutory duties on emergency responders, including the fundamental requirement to cooperate. Much has been achieved in those 10 years, but persistent challenges endure. The Pollock Report (2013)1 reviewed experience of major incidents over a 24-year period and predominant among the findings were persistent confusion over roles and responsibilities in responding to major incidents, the absence of a common system for inter-agency communication and the often frustrated need to quickly share information between parties. We recognise these of course as symptoms of weak interoperability, a term that has entered the mainstream in recent years. Effecting change

The JESIP programme (now Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Principles) has not been the first national interoperability initiative, but it has effected change out of proportion to its predecessors and its resources. The support of both senior politicians and emergency services’ principals has been pivotal in this, but clear doctrine, good administration and effective joint training has seen it become embedded at all levels. In the UK we benefit from having sector-specific and multi-agency training institutions of the highest calibre, and the College of Policing, EPC (Emergency Planning College), Fire Service College (FSC) and National Ambulance Resilience Unit (NARU) all committed to promulgate JESIP principles and guidance. From its inception, the focus of JESIP has been the blue light emergency services, the on, or close to scene levels of command and the first hour of a major incident. This remains the prime focus, but all involved are keen to realise wider interoperability gains wherever possible, drawing

in the full range of emergency responders, and higher levels in the command, control and coordination arrangements. Given the centrality of training in achieving higher levels of interoperability we now are exploring the degree to which the colleges and training establishments named here can themselves collaborate to specify, scope, design and deliver training that has multiagency performance at its core. There are established precedents in the field, notably the Multi-Agency Gold Incident Command (MAGIC) course that is led by the College of Policing and co-delivered with FSC and NARU. The EPC has no single-agency affiliations and exists to deliver multi-agency training. Each of these institutions has different expertise and variable associations with different emergency responders. Following the principle that is core to interoperability, that we can be better informed, do more with finite resources, manage risk better and achieve a greater effect through working together, the College of Policing, EPC, FSC and NARU are at the early stages of a collaborative initiative to scope, design and deliver joint training for Strategic Coordinating Groups (SCGs). Exciting and welcoming

The performance of SCGs is critical in major incidents and wide-area emergencies, but they face an inherently demanding task. They are activated under circumstances that tend to be high-risk, uncommon, novel in some respects, ambiguous and subject to close scrutiny. Additionally, the participants are diverse in their culture and organisational objectives, sometimes unfamiliar with each other and have different sets of experiences and resources at their disposal. SCG performance is self-evidently an interoperability challenge, and the colleges’ commitment to work together in pursuit of this is an exciting and welcome initiative.

www.epcresilience.com Ref: 1 www.epcresilience.com/EPC/media/Images/ Knowledge%20Centre/Occasionals/Occ6-Paper-v2.pdf

October2015


4 | ESTNEWS A report from the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) calls on the wider workforce to support efforts to improve the nation’s health. Rethinking the Public Health Workforce identifies workers from across the public and private sectors that could contribute to keeping people safe and well in their communities. It also identifies a number of occupations, including fire and rescue services, which have already begun to support public health work across the country.

Health and fire discuss partnership opportunities

https://goo.gl/DW822i

Dyfed-Powys Police will deploy the first of four new mobile police stations to Pembrokeshire in the next few weeks. Local police intend to use the new vehicles at community events, carnivals and local marts. Teams will also use it to visit town centres and villages in rural communities on specific days and times. The mobile stations will also act as a base for local officers to use in communities that may not have previously had any operational police base or station. www.dyfed-powys.police.uk

A new training centre for County Durham and Darlington Fire and Rescue Service (CDDFRS) is now open and running courses. The 4.5-acre site in Bowburn, Durham, has modernised training provision and brought together the service’s training facilities into one location. The new centre also includes impressive incident command training facilities, which will not only be used by CDDFRS incident commanders but also by Durham Constabulary, which will use the Hydra Minerva suite to train and test their senior police officers in a range of incidents simulated via a control room on site. The training centre will host its official opening on 6 October. www.ddfire.gov.uk

The opening of the new joint police and fire headquarters in Derbyshire came a step closer on 3 August when a ground breaking ceremony took place at the site. The ceremony celebrated the start of the construction work on the shared headquarters, which will provide a more cost effective building for both blue light services. The building will house mainly the administrative functions for both organisations. The sale of the fire and rescue service headquarters, currently at Littleover, Derby, will help fund the fire and rescue authority’s contribution to the new build along with a grant from the Department for Communities and Local Government. www.derbys-fire.gov.uk

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

From L to R: DCFO Phil Garrigan, Merseyside FRS; Clare Duggan, Director of Commissioning Operations, NHS Cheshire and Merseyside; and DCFO Mark Cashin, Cheshire FRS.

A Cheshire and Merseyside Health and Fire Summit was held recently at Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service to identify how partnership work between organisations across the two counties can help target the most vulnerable people. Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service, Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service and NHS England met with partner organisations to discuss further ways of working together to reduce risk to vulnerable people in the community, particularly the elderly. Both fire and rescue services in Cheshire and Merseyside are keen to support the national programme of work to assist the health agenda. At the summit delegates discussed ways in which the home visits carried out by fire and rescue services could further assist other organisations in their objectives to help vulnerable people. www.merseyfire.gov.uk

Vanguards tasked with joining up urgent and emergency care The North East has been selected as one of eight areas to be at the forefront of transforming urgent and emergency care in the UK. The so-called ‘Vanguards’ are tasked with changing the way in which all organisations work together to provide care in a more joined up way for patients. Urgent care will be delivered, not just in hospitals but also by GPs, pharmacists, community teams, ambulance services, NHS 111, social care and others, and through patients being given support and education to manage their own conditions. Another aim is to break down boundaries between physical and mental health to improve the quality of care and experience for all.

Working collaboratively

The North East Urgent Care Network (NEUCN) already has a strong history of working collaboratively to deliver successful innovative projects to support the recommendations made in the Urgent and Emergency Care Review as well as, importantly, improving patient outcomes and experience. This programme will enable the NEUCN to transform the regional UEC system and its services to further improve consistency and clinical standards, reduce fragmentation and deliver high quality and responsive health and social care to patients Professor Keith Willett, NHS England’s Director of Acute Care, who is leading

the Urgent and Emergency Care transformation, said, “This proves a modern NHS needs a very different approach and shows, we can transform patient care. “These networks and new Vanguards will support and improve all our local urgent and emergency care services, such as A&E departments, urgent care centres, GPs, NHS 111 and community, social care and ambulance services, so no one is working isolated from expert advice 24 hours a day.”

Enormous benefits

“All over the country there are pockets of best practice yielding enormous benefits; but to ensure our urgent care services are sustainable for the future every region must begin delivering faster, better and safer care. Now it is time for the new urgent and emergency care Vanguards to design the best solutions locally.” The launch of the Vanguards comes in the face of pressure on all NHS frontline emergency services, with increased A&E attendances and emergency admissions, and both ambulance and NHS 111 services facing rising demands. They are a key element within the NHS Five Year Forward View and represent the next step in the transformation of Urgent and Emergency Care for the NHS, which was announced by Sir Bruce Keogh, NHS England’s National Medical Director, in 2013. www.neas.nhs.uk

Police secure huge fleet savings deal A total of £5.3m has been saved under a national vehicle purchase consortium led by West Yorkshire Police. The buying group, which contains 22 forces across the UK, has confirmed a deal that has secured the use of Peugeot, Ford, BMW and Vauxhall vehicles. Steve Thompson, Head of Transport, West Yorkshire Police, said, “Over the past six months, we have been working together with other northern forces and some further south to negotiate the best deals for the purchase of our vehicles. This work developed into the creation of a national buying group, led by West Yorkshire Police. “The combined purchase power of this consortium has enabled us to achieve the best possible contract and bring about some substantial savings. As we continue to face austerity measures, this will make a real difference, not just for policing in West Yorkshire, but up and down the country.

“The range of vehicles we have negotiated meet all the nationally required specifications and actually improve upon those we currently have across our fleet. By moving to more fuel efficient vehicles, we estimate there will also be additional savings of £40,000 for West Yorkshire alone, once the replacement programme is completed. “We anticipate that the vehicles will be introduced across the 22 forces from late autumn." The Regional Procurement Unit, under the leadership of Nigel Hiller, the Director of Finance for Humberside and South Yorkshire Police, conducted the tendering process. Nigel said that by going to market as a consortium, it has brought tangible benefits to the region. “This collaborative way of working coupled with the innovative use of an online auction process allowed us to drive down costs even further and save in the region of a million pounds,”

said Nigel. “This is the first time that such a large volume of fleet for blue light services has taken this approach.” David Wilkin, National Policing Lead for Vehicle Procurement and Standardisation, said, “For a number of years, police fleet managers have led the way in standardisation and collaborative procurement to create better value for money and ensure police officers have the right equipment to undertake their roles. “This is a great result and a similar exercise will be undertake later this year for the remaining forces to maximise savings across the country.” www.westyorkshire.police.uk October2015


6 | ESTNEWS London Fire Brigade is leading an advance in electronic safety systems and has embarked in a partnership with the Telecare Services Association (TSA), which supports safety health and care in the home and community. The partnership will see the two organisations share information about fires in buildings, which are fitted with telecare, in order to build knowledge on how the systems work and better equip the brigade with information before they arrive on scene following an alarm’s activation. www.london-fire.gov.uk

South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SECAmb) received a Gold Standard Award for Equality at this year’s Employers Network for Equality & Inclusion (ENEI) awards. The trust’s Inclusion Hub Advisory Group (IHAG) was also highly commended in the Team of the Year category while Inclusion Manager, Angela Rayner, was shortlisted for the Equality and Inclusion Champion of the Year award. www.secamb.nhs.uk

Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust (YAS) is making a major investment in newly designed vehicles to its Patient Transport Service (PTS) fleet. Over 100 purpose-built Peugeot Boxer vehicles will be introduced to PTS across the region in the coming months. The new vehicles, built by Oughtred & Harrison (O&H) Vehicle Conversions in Goole, will improve both patient safety and comfort, with additional features to support patients’ needs.

Emergency telephones for communities to accompany defibrillators The Community Heartbeat Trust (CHT) charity, the leading charitable UK organisation in the provision of community defibrillation, has launched a new service to support community-based defibrillators. Many communities work with CHT to adopt and use their telephone kiosks as defibrillator placements, and working with CHT ensures the access to the electrical supply, plus renovation of the much loved K6 – red – telephone kiosk. However, many communities are also concerned about the loss of an emergency telephone in the community. CHT has worked with BT and others and is now able to supply a 999 emergency telephone back into communities.

The telephones are single button emergency telephones, and pressing the call button will link you direct to the 999 operator. The telephones can be placed adjacent to existing community defibrillator sites or, where the telephony has been removed from a kiosk, CHT has permission to add the 999 phone back into the kiosk. The telephones come in two types, one landline, and one cellular. The cellular versions work off all networks and are therefore able to work even where there is a restricted signal. The cost for running this service is £1 per week, plus installation costs. www.communityheartbeat.org.uk

Essex Fire and Rescue Service Lucy appoints purchase hits the ‘hot spot’ Capital

Scott Safety will be demonstrating the X380 on its stand (H32) at The Emergency Services Show 2015, along with the launch of some exciting new communications technology.

The Trustees of Lucy Air Ambulance for Children have announced the charity’s alliance with Capital Air Charter, following £1m of Government support. Lead trustee of Lucy Air Ambulance for Children Jill Williams said, “We are absolutely delighted with this news and thank the Government for their acknowledgement and support for our charity. We can now run the service on a firmer footing, and this new working relationship will now enable the charity to offer a first class paediatric transfer service to many more deserving children and their parents throughout the UK.” Captain Malcolm Humphries, Managing Director and Chief Pilot of Capital Air Charter Limited, said, “Capital Air Charter is delighted to be associated with Lucy Air Ambulance and is privileged to have been chosen as the preferred provider of aircraft and medical crew, led by Dr Terry Martin, for the charity’s paediatric and neonatal aeromedical transfers. This is a very significant and valuable partnership that will see growth and development of paediatric and neonatal transport capability on the mainland and the islands of the UK.” Lucy Air Ambulance for Children charters specially adapted fixed wing or rotor air ambulances, as appropriate. This flexible approach means that the best and most cost effective service can be offered, on a case-by-case basis. The charity works alongside the NHS and provides the service to children in need up to the age of 16, at no cost.

www.essex-fire.gov.uk

www.lucyairambulance.org.uk

www.yas.nhs.uk

Buckinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service’s new Incident Command Unit is now in operational service and heralds a new generation of mobile emergency command vehicles designed to deliver huge improvements in managing the many types of incident a modern-day fire and rescue service has to deal with. Fully fitted out with communication systems and software, it cost just under £235,000. http://bucksfire.gov.uk

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service is using a social media risk management and compliance platform from CrowdControlHQ to monitor and govern its corporate social media accounts including Twitter and Facebook. Using CrowdControlHQ makes it possible to manage corporate social media accounts from a single point. More than 30 users across Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service access corporate social media accounts via the platform’s central dashboard. www.crowdcontrolhq.com

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Acting Chief Fire Officer Adam Eckley from Essex FRS (centre) takes delivery of the new thermal imaging cameras.

Essex Fire and Rescue Service has recently taken delivery of 80 X380 thermal imaging cameras from Scott Safety. Powered by ISG Technology, the cameras will enable firefighters to have far better situational awareness of a fire scene when they enter.

Dominant technology

“Advanced thermal Imaging from Scott Safety is now a dominant technology platform in the fight to save lives and property,” said Justin Harper, Scott Safety’s Business Development Manager. “This is due in part to the greater level of scene data it provides firefighters compared to other cameras available; for instance hot and cold spot tracking. The X380 has continued to stand out during rigorous testing set by UK fire and rescue services and it has

become the firm favourite for improved visual awareness and firefighter safety.” The simplicity, robustness and image quality were all contributing factors to the selection of Scott Safety as a thermal imaging partner by Essex FRS. “Our eyes are literally opened by using thermal imaging camera, and the X380 is just so clear and easy to use that it saves us valuable time when at a scene,” said Steve Foster, Technical Services and R&D Officer at Essex FRS.

See it at ESS2015

October2015


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ESTNEWS | 11

Considering the impact of body worn video on policing “I robbed him, he didn’t give me what I wanted, so I stabbed him before I left!” Metropolitan Police Service officers captured this confession, by a blood soaked suspect, sitting in the midst of a crime scene, on a body worn video (BWV) camera last year. The Met, along with other police services both in the UK and abroad, has been watching the development BWV technology closely in recent years, and while this incident demonstrates the ability of these devices to quickly and accurately corroborate the evidence from witnesses at the scene, there are other, more wide ranging policing issues to consider. Words: Inspector Ben Clark, MPS Body Worn Video project, Metropolitan Police Service. Well publicised incidents, such as police shootings in the United States and, closer to home, the ‘Plebgate’ affair have all led to what some commentators have described as a ‘crisis in confidence’ in policing. Can BWV provide a mechanism for increasing accountability and transparency? Certainly there are many who think so, but the fact is, the evidence base is still somewhat limited. There have been a number of studies to date that show that BWV can have an impact – for example, a trial in Rialto, California, demonstrated that there could be significant reductions in use of force incidents, while in the UK, research conducted by the College of Policing in Essex Police found that BWV could lead to improvements in policing outcomes for domestic abuse victims. However, both these studies, and others, were relatively small scale – could the Met and other large forces see the same outcomes? Were there other opportunities that could be tested? Could BWV actually deliver tangible results?

“The Met and the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) took the decision to commission the largest trial of BWV use in the world to date.” Impact on confidence Realising that the use of evidence-based methodology would lead to the most effective results for decision-making, the Met and the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) took the decision to commission the largest trial of BWV use in the world to date. The College of Policing was asked to formulate and evaluate the trial, which looked at the impact of BWV on key drivers of confidence – complaints, stop and search encounters and around outcomes in the wider Criminal Justice system. The College of Policing recommended a random control trial as the best method of ensuring accurate evidence – so the MPS equipped two emergency response teams out of five across 10 London Boroughs, leaving the remaining three teams as the ‘control’ group.

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Photo: Metropolitan Police Service.

There were also limited deployments into armed policing and public order teams. This meant that over 1000 cameras were being evaluated as part of the pilot.

Evidential material Running for a year, the teams were soon recording in excess of 6000 videos a month – with incidents ranging from everyday beat duty policing to high-risk firearms incidents being recorded and used as evidential material. Over the course of the pilot to date, the Met has retained over 30,000 video clips that are of evidential value or are required for disclosure in criminal cases. Working with the Crown Prosecution Service, the Met was also soon piloting methods of streamlining criminal justice work – enabling digital streaming into courts in various London areas. Simultaneously, The Met also worked with other forces, key stakeholders such as the Information Commissioner’s Office and the College of Policing to fine tune policy and ensure that concerns around privacy and proportionality were addressed appropriately.

Unexpected benefits The evaluation methods used by the College of Policing were wide-ranging and varied – from statistical analysis of the data through to interviews, observations

and surveys of both officers and the public. There have been some unexpected benefits identified already – The Met has pioneered methods of allowing community representatives to scrutinise footage of stop and search encounters in order to demonstrate transparency and capture opportunities for improvements where necessary. Officers themselves have reviewed footage for personal development – identifying best practice and lessons to be learned from incidents and then sharing it with their colleagues. As BWV technology evolves and expands into other markets, evaluations such as this are likely to inform and drive development and deployment decisions further afield – not just for emergency services partners, but across swathes of the private sector too. The main results of the pilot are due to be released imminently, and with other studies across the United Kingdom also delivering their results, one thing is for sure – that evidence base that was limited is about to get a lot bigger!

http://content.met.police.uk/Home Discover more on Body Worn Video applications from Ben Clark on 23 September at The Emergency Services Show 2015, where he will deliver a paper in the Innovation Theatre.

October2015


ESTNEWS | 13

Civilian search and rescue helicopter service marks milestone The new civilian search and rescue (SAR) helicopter service is now live from four new bases across the UK. As the UK-wide service takes shape, Emergency Services Times finds out how busy the bases have been so far, looks at how Bristow Helicopters Ltd and Her Majesty’s Coastguard have managed a smooth transition from the military, and looks ahead to what comes next as they prepare for the next three bases going live. possible thanks to the support of other emergency services who have taken the time to train with us and share their local knowledge and close cooperation and support from the military.

“The transition from the military to the civilian SAR service has been made possible thanks to the support of other emergency services.”

New S92 helicopter on a training exercise with the RNLI.

Bristow Helicopters Ltd was awarded the 10-year UK SAR contract by the Department for Transport back in March 2013. Since then, the company and HM Coastguard have been working closely to prepare for the service going live. Six new purpose-built helicopter bases have been constructed and four of the 10 strategically located facilities are now live, responding to taskings from the Aeronautical Rescue Coordination Centre (ARCC). Coastguard bases at Humberside and Inverness went live on 1 April with the base at Caernarfon in Wales following at the start of July and the facility at Lydd in Kent took responsibility for the service in August. The first four months of operations saw crews respond to over 200 operational taskings at Inverness, Humberside and Caernarfon. The bases at Inverness and Caernarfon have proven the busiest, with Inverness responding to 110 taskings between April and July, and the Caernarfon base responding to 47 call outs in July alone. Humberside’s crews have responded to 45 call outs in its first four months.

Combined with the two Gap SAR bases in Sumburgh and Stornoway, which Bristow Helicopters already operates on behalf of HM Coastguard, this brings the total number of taskings the Coastguard aircraft have responded to between April and July to 324.

Varied operations Taskings in the first four months illustrate the varied operations carried out by UK SAR helicopter crews. The very first tasking for the Humberside crew is cited as one of the most memorable by the base. They were called to rescue a 15-year-old girl who fell some 200ft down the cliffs at Filey sustaining serious head injuries. The crew swiftly evacuated her to hospital and she has since made an excellent recovery with no long-term injuries. Meanwhile, both the Inverness and Caernarfon bases have been largely focused on mountain rescue operations due to their proximity to the Ben Nevis range and Snowdonia respectively. The Inverness base received its first tasking almost immediately to assist in the search for a missing person in the Ben Nevis area. With the RAF aircraft from Lossiemouth already responding, the crews worked together to provide a thorough handover to the new civilian service.

Partnership working

Aircraft coming in to land at HM Coastguard SAR helicopter base at Caernarfon.

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“We are fortunate to have many familiar faces who have joined us from the military, bringing their experience and knowledge of the various regions. “It has been a busy start for our new SAR bases with a high number of taskings over the summer months. The taskings we have responded to have been varied and challenging at times but the new aircraft have been superb, our engineers have maintained them to the highest levels, our crews are well trained, and state-of-the-art equipment we have on board has proven our capability.

Between operational taskings the crews continue to train hard and work closely with other emergency services to make sure they are familiar with the new aircraft and onboard SAR equipment. Samantha Willenbacher, Director of UK Search and Rescue at Bristow Helicopters, said, “The transition from the military to the civilian SAR service has been made

For L to R: Richard Parkes, Director of Maritime Operations at the MCA; Samantha Willenbacher, Director of UK SAR at Bristow Helicopters; and Captain John McIntyre, Chief Pilot at Inverness.

“We are looking closely at the transition process at each of the live bases to see what has worked well and what lessons we can learn as we move towards live operations at the remaining UK SAR bases. Operations will commence at St Athan in Wales this October and we are readying the aircraft and completing training, including training operations with other emergency services, to ensure we’re ready to hit the ground running. As ever, their professionalism and support is extremely valuable.” Bases at Prestwick and Newquay will go live in January 2016. Existing bases at Lee-on-Solent, Sumburgh and Stornoway will transition to the new contract in 2017.

http://bristowgroup.com October2015


14 | ESTNEWS

British Red Cross responds to Tunisia terrorist attack The world’s attention turned to Tunisia on 26 June, when a gunman opened fire on tourists staying in a popular beach resort in Sousse. The news caused anxiety in the UK straight away; it was well known that many of the holidaymakers in the area were likely to be British. We now know that in terms of UK nationals affected, the attack would turn out to be the deadliest terrorist attack since the London bombings in 2005. When disasters strike overseas, be it an earthquake or a terrorist attack, emergency responders back in the UK have a number of priorities. British nationals who have been directly and indirectly affected need to be identified, repatriations may need to be arranged and people with relatives and friends in the affected country are likely to be worried and seeking information. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has overall responsibility for providing consular assistance to British nationals who are overseas. For the past 10 years, the British Red Cross has provided additional support in disasters, primarily those involving multiple casualties, in the form of a team of psychosocial support volunteers who are able to provide practical and emotional support to people in times of crisis.

Years of experience The Red Cross psychosocial support team (PST) is on standby 24 hours a day, seven days a week and is made up of a roster of volunteers who have professional experience of supporting people in difficult and sometimes traumatic situations. Some work full time as counsellors, others draw on skills from previous careers as nurses or social workers. The PST is always deployed at the request of the FCO and draws on years of experience, having been present at some of the most harrowing events in recent history, from the Westgate mall massacre in Kenya to the Nepal earthquake earlier this year. The PST embeds within the FCO’s rapid deployment unit, which is generally one of the first responders for British people affected by an emergency overseas and is responsible for identifying British nationals and assessing what assistance they might need.

“The aim is to give people the emotional support they need and help them to understand what has happened to them so as to help them come to terms with it.” Deploying to Tunisia Within hours of news of the attack breaking, the decision was taken to deploy the PST to Tunisia. Although not all details were clear at this stage, it was known that there were several UK nationals among the

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A British Red Cross telephone support line volunteer. Photo: Matthew Percival/British Red Cross.

38 people confirmed dead and many more injured. In line with a contractual agreement with the FCO, which requires volunteers to be at an airport within six hours of a call, two Red Cross volunteers were at the Riu Imperial Marhaba hotel less than 24 hours after the killings, where British consulate staff had arrived the night before. As the scale of the tragedy unfolded and a number of family members of relatives who had been injured or killed in the attacks decided to travel to Tunisia, the decision was quickly taken to deploy two more PST volunteers. The PST does not offer counselling or formal psychological therapy, which is believed to be inappropriate in the immediate aftermath of trauma. Instead, the team is on hand to listen to concerns and offer support if needed, while allowing space and time for people to draw on their natural resilience. Upon arrival in Tunisia, the team found a number of survivors who, having been close witnesses to the attack and in some cases injured, bereaved or witnesses to the deaths of others, felt they were almost out of control with anguish, fear and general upset. Much of the Red Cross’s role was to listen to people and reassure them that this was very much the reaction that any person would have to something that was so sudden, unexpected and devastating, according to PST team leader Chris Beck, who normally works for the British Red Cross as an Operations Director. “There were some people who had been awake since it happened. They didn’t want to shut their eyes because of the pictures that would flash before them. They would start reliving seeing the gunman, seeing people being shot, seeing people injured, so they were keeping themselves awake, which meant they were sleepdeprived as well as emotionally distressed,” said Beck. Others who had witnessed the attack were so

traumatised that they didn’t want to leave their hotel rooms afterwards due to fears for their safety, despite also wanting to return home.

Minimise distress In situations like this, the PST try to minimise distress by listening to people who want to discuss their anxieties and provide reassurance that they are experiencing normal reactions to an abnormal situation. This isn’t always delivered through structured sessions, but can take the form of practical support. In Tunisia, for example, the PST made numerous visits to injured UK nationals who were recovering in hospital and to the site of the attack to accompany relatives to lay flowers. The team also escorted a number of survivors to the airport and even back to the UK. The aim is to give people the emotional support they need and help them to understand what has happened to them so as to help them come to terms with it.

10 years of working together The PST’s deployment to Tunisia came shortly after the British Red Cross and FCO marked 10 years of working together in disasters overseas, the first time following the Boxing Day Tsunami in 2004, and is one of over 50 deployments that have taken place since. In terms of scale, it was one of the largest deployments and saw the Red Cross provide further support back in the UK. This included setting up a dedicated telephone line in order to provide additional support and advice to anyone, regardless of whether or not they were directly impacted, who had concerns in wake of the attack. The Red Cross was also asked to provide psychosocial support volunteers at Brize Norton as the bodies of victims of the attack were repatriated over four days.

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October2015


ESTNEWS | 17

Community defibrillators – governance is key! The Social Action, Responsibility And Heroism Act (SARAH) received its Royal ascent in April 2015. Covering the area of protection for a lay rescuer in an emergency, this new law will aid the development of community defibrillation and give reassurance to members of the public wishing to help in an emergency. However the placement of a community defibrillator is not just about making sure all legal aspects are addressed in the actual rescue. You need the right equipment, the right governance, the right support, and the right attitude. Buying ‘cheap’ does not always mean buying the ‘best’ solution for the community. Words: Martin Fagan, National Secretary, The Community Heartbeat Trust. Proceeding with a community defibrillator installation is a very beneficial project, but must be done right, with consideration for governance, to include liabilities, planning, listings and other laws, addressing items such as disability access and regular maintenance. Just registering the defibrillator with the local ambulance service is not effective governance. These are medical devices to be used on people, and thus the project has to be done with eyes wide open, and a full realisation of the needs, not only of the community as a whole, but with consideration of the various potential liabilities.

“The correct make of defibrillator to choose is the one that keeps the rescue as simple as possible for untrained members of the public.” Enthusiasm sometimes gets ahead of compliance; or features of the equipment overtake practicality and realism. There are, for example, around 40 different defibrillator models a community could use – so which ones are the most suitable for community use? In reality all manufacturers will claim theirs can be used in a public place, but serious consideration needs to be given to issues such as untrained users, user disabilities, such as colour blindness, reduced visual and hearing handicaps, and could a non-English speaker use the defibrillator? What about storage; does this also meet the issued guidelines? Is it BSI certified and is it electrically safe? Is it made to a high standard from an ISO certified manufacturer? There are numerous examples of inappropriate storage solutions being offered, which may lead to the owner being at risk from negligence.

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What are the essential features of a community defibrillator? It is important to choose equipment that is suitable for the tasks being asked of it. Different defibrillators have different specifications and features, some of which might not be required, or others that, in practice, offer no tangible benefits for the untrained lay user – ie a community defibrillator. All makes of defibrillator will deliver a shock in an emergency if required, so the issue is not generally whether the equipment will deliver a shock. However, the correct make of defibrillator to choose is the one that keeps the rescue as simple as possible for untrained members of the public; ie it gives clear audio and visual instructions; is easy to use and comes with long term support; is cost effective to buy and to run; and does not have extra features that offer either negligible real benefit or otherwise might be misunderstood or misused in the stressful situation by untrained people. Ideally choose one specifically designed for use by community rescuers, and which also gives CPR protocols for bystander CPR, supported by a metronome.

“Good governance should also help the public understand the issues of liabilities, duty of care, and every aspect of their defibrillator solution.” Ambulance services hold a unique position – the public sees them as a source of unbiased information. However different trusts have different views, and within trusts different people hold different views. Hence all cannot be right or wrong! Often the ‘recommendation’ is through a personal perspective rather than any objective survey of community needs, and very occasionally the recommended approach is the cheapest, and not necessarily the most suitable taking into account every aspect. Add to this that ‘governance’ in ambulance terms is often merely checking the equipment is operational, and generally does not cover public liability, planning permissions, and policies and procedures. Hence the term ‘governance’ has become ambiguous, and widely misunderstood.

Are the public covered for clinical liability? Most ambulance services will take the view that a member of the public is covered by the trust insurance for clinical liability through the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) members package. However this agreement specifies ‘trained first aiders’ only, which would therefore exclude most members of the public, if taken at face value, and therefore members of the public are beginning to ask questions re clinical liability. Good governance should also help the public understand the issues of liabilities, duty of care, and every aspect of their defibrillator solution. Cardiac arrest in an under eight year olds occurs very infrequently, so for a village community, the chance of a cardiac arrest in a child under eight in a primary school is very rare, with one source suggesting an occurrence in a primary school of about once every 60-100 or so years. Members of the public become confused about the term ‘child’ and may use or buy paediatric solutions when they are not generally needed. They should also understand that the risk of using a paediatric solution adds to the liability they have to accept. Governance is key, but it has to be looked at holistically, and full information for the community as to what are the downsides, as well as the upsides, to community defibrillation should be made very clear, and discussion on these topics not avoided.

www.communityheartbeat.org.uk October2015


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October2015


ESTCOLLABORATION | 21

Joint working ensures safe resolution to Alton Towers incident On 2 June Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service dealt with a complex rescue still attracting national attention several weeks on. At 2.41pm the emergency services switchboard alerted Staffordshire and West Midlands Fire Control to an incident on The Smiler ride at Alton Towers. Five pumps, a rescue tender, an aerial ladder platform and a rope rescue team were immediately mobilised. West Midlands Ambulance Service was already on site. On arrival crews were faced with two carriages that had collided on the ride, one carriage was empty while the other contained 16 guests. The carriages were suspended within a dip at a 45 degree angle, approximately seven to eight metres from the ground. There were four serious casualties located at the front of the carriage and a further 12 passengers in the rows behind. Alton Towers engineers had already erected a platform to the ride allowing full access to the passengers for initial treatment and to support the evacuation procedure. The JESIP model of response was employed and a silver command point was set up in addition to the rescue zone. Working very closely with the Alton Towers team, briefings in both areas took place every 30 minutes with responders discussing their actions and rationale.

Very delicate operation Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service Station Manager Dale Harrison was the officer in charge of the incident. He said, “Our priority was to ensure that we did not cause any further injuries to the casualties involved and this meant that we had to carry out a very delicate operation, in a controlled environment, alongside the first responders from Alton Towers and the paramedics and doctors from West Midlands Ambulance Service. “The footplate and hand barrier had collapsed inwards on those sitting in the front carriage and so our job was to cut these free in order to release them. We had firefighters harnessed in working at height gear and they used hydraulic rescue equipment to cut the casualties free. This was a lengthy procedure because, on advice of the doctors, we were unable to release the pressure on the casualties too quickly for fear of worsening their conditions.”

“The extrication of the four serious casualties in the front carriage took approximately four and a half hours.” While the extrication was taking place one firefighter was tasked with finding out the mechanics of the carriages to find out the best way to release the chest harness. Alton Towers’ engineers demonstrated how to best achieve this using a dummy carriage. This showed that by releasing a control ‘fly’ lead connected to the rear

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of the carriage casualties could then be individually released to ensure the safety of the others still on the ride. The extrication of the four serious casualties in the front carriage took approximately four and a half hours. During this time the other 12 passengers remained in situ and received support and care from paramedics and Alton Towers first responders throughout.

Minimising risk Dale continued, “The reason we didn’t release the other people straight away was because we didn’t know if moving them would cause the carriage to move, potentially causing further injury to the most serious casualties – it wasn’t a risk we were willing to take. Fortunately the remaining passengers were extremely patient and understanding considering the circumstances.” Of the most serious casualties one was stretchered onto the aerial ladder platform and transported to ground level. The others were put on flexible stretchers and moved across to the platform erected by Alton Towers’ staff. From there level 3 rope rescue firefighters lowered the casualties to the floor, which was below ground level, for further assessment by paramedics before Alton Towers’ rope rescue team then raised the casualties up to ground level for transportation to hospital. The remaining 12 passengers were freed from the carriage and each was harnessed individually and lowered to the floor by the rope rescue team. From there approximately half were raised back up to ground level using the park rope rescue team while the other half chose to use a ladder. All remained harnessed throughout.

Reflecting on the incident, Dale said, “On arrival I briefed the crews and said this will be the most technical rescue you will carry out in your career and I think it’d be fair to say I was right. So many factors such as the confined working environment, the injuries of the casualties, how the carriage was suspended and the fact that although we were below ground level we were also working at height, all contributed to this being an extremely complex incident.”

Joint working Director of Prevent and Protect Dean Stevens, who was also at the incident, said, “We regularly train and exercise for all types of incidents with both our colleagues in the emergency services, as well as the team at Alton Towers, and these skills were fully utilised. The professionalism and the joint working between all agencies and the Park was outstanding and ensured the safe resolution of this very tragic accident.” All 33 firefighters involved from Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service have now been put forward for Chief Fire Officer Commendations.

www.staffordshirefire.gov.uk Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Services will be speaking in the Training Seminar Theatre at The Emergency Services Show 2015 on 23 September at 2.15pm. Officers will provide an overview of the multi-agency response to the Alton Towers incident providing an understanding of the key issues faced and the subsequent learning for all responding organisations. For more information visit www.emergencyuk.com

October2015


22 | ESTCOLLABORATION

Collaboration and the prevention agenda Ask any child what a firefighter does and they will be clear: they are the heroes that run into burning buildings to save people’s lives. But at NLGN, we believe that while there will always be a role for firefighters’ traditional heroics, there can be so much more to what the fire and rescue service (FRS) can do. Words: Dr Claire Mansfield, Head of Research at NLGN. The fire and rescue service have been increasingly working on their prevention agenda – making sure that fires don’t start in the first place. And they have been very successful; the number of fire incidents is down by 40 percent in the last decade. Our report, Fire Works: a collaborative way forward for the fire and rescue service, supported by the Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA), looked at how the FRS can widen its prevention work. In particular, looking at a number of areas that are already starting to branch out into further prevention work, and how successful these have been. Given this, we had a particular focus on the contribution and support that the FRS can give to health and social care organisations.

Reducing the burden While fire incidents have decreased, the demand on many other public services has increased exponentially. Health and social services in particular are under enormous pressure as decreased budgets collide with demographic change. Demand is up just as supply is down. The FRS’s capabilities, in combination with its trusted brand, means it is ideally situated to help reduce the burden on other public services. A recent budget survey published by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) noted that ‘there are more than 400,000 fewer people receiving social care services since 2009-10 and of those who are still supported, a significant number will get less care.’ In addition, the NHS ‘Five Year Forward View’ highlights the need for greater NHS investment in early intervention and a simplified approach to patients with multiple health needs. Across the country FRSs have effectively reduced demand for fire response through prevention work and they have the skills and capacity to do the same for health and social care. The firefighters’ trusted brand and work on targeted prevention and demand management is particularly important in this context.

Manage multiple needs There is also a crossover of needs, as a large majority of those who have benefited from the FRS’s preventative work are among the over 70s who have pre-existing health issues. There is a large overlap between the individuals most vulnerable to fires and those most regularly in contact with health and social care professionals. By equipping firefighters with the skills to deal with low-level health issues, there is potential for fire and rescue services to manage multiple needs in a single visit. Not only would this reduce demand on health and social care professionals, but it would also provide a better service to vulnerable individuals. This is not new. There is a huge diversity of initiatives aimed at earlier intervention and being run by local FRSs taking place across England. For instance in Essex the FRS run a ‘Fire Break’ scheme for 10-24 year olds that aims to reduce the risky lifestyle choices of some young people and raise awareness of the consequences of fire, fire setting and hoax calls. In Humberside, their

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FRS runs a 'Cold Alarm Service'. Elderly patients who live alone are having cold alarms installed in their property and when the temperature falls below 16°C an alarm is triggered. The response will come from a multiskilled team consisting of workers from social services, community nurses or the fire and rescue service who will visit and employ measures to increase the ambient temperature within the home.

“Across the country FRSs have effectively reduced demand for fire response through prevention work and they have the skills and capacity to do the same for health and social care.” Our research also looked in depth at the CRIT (Community Risk Intervention Team) that is being developed in Manchester. Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service (GMFRS) recently started working with the North West Ambulance Service (NWAS), Greater Manchester Police (GMP) and local authorities to facilitate community intervention work. They have formed this new team to help drive further reductions in risk to the most vulnerable communities through a wider approach to prevention activities. The CRIT works to help reduce demand for emergency services and health and social care through early interventions for those with multiple needs; and respond to life threatening and high volume low risk calls. They provide holistic safety assessments and lowlevel interventions to try to reduce the incidence of fire, falls in the home, support those with mental health issues and reduce the risk of crime. As well as planned visits, the CRIT also support the ambulance and police services. 75 percent of calls to the Greater Manchester Police are not crime related. Many relate to ‘concern for welfare’ or mental health issues. CRIT have been providing support in these areas by responding to many of these calls on behalf of the police, allowing officers to focus on their core service of solving and preventing crime. The CRIT also respond to high volume, low-priority 999 calls to falls in the home on behalf of the ambulance service. This remit goes far beyond fire safety, reflecting GMFRS’ cultural stance that ‘fire and rescue’ can provide greater value by expanding its efforts beyond its traditional limits. They emphasise that their core purpose to ‘protect and improve the quality of life of the people in Greater Manchester’ is in no way limited to fighting fires.

Dr Claire Mansfield, Head of Research at NLGN.

However, while these examples demonstrate that intervention work is ongoing in many areas, it was also apparent that, to date, this has been developed and delivered on an ad hoc basis. There is no single view on what value the FRS can add in terms of community interventions nor agreement across the piece that this is indeed the right future for them. However, the examples show what is possible and the enormous value this can have for communities. As a result, we recommend that all FRSs should now seek to work far more closely with other public services in their area, and work to vastly improve health and social care All services are at different starting points, so there is no single uniform blueprint for what the fire and rescue service should look like in the context of community interventions. At the very least, local authorities and fire and rescue services should be working together to develop a strategy for future collaboration on the prevention agenda. Different FRSs are at different stages with regards to their relationships with partners and it is vitally important to get this right. Understanding between all organisations is key to making sure that intervention work is done well. This will clearly be a gradual process and a direction in which the FRS and other public sector and community organisations should aim to travel, rather than a prescribed end goal. The fire and rescue service were in danger of becoming victims of their own success. As fewer fires take place, more questions were asked about the size of the service and whether it should be residualised. However, we do not believe this is the right answer for the future of a service whose demands will always be vital and unpredictable. It is far better to utilise the time they have freed up with their successful prevention work to help to ease the crushing capacity burden on other services, continue and expand their vital work in intervention and protect and improve people’s quality of life.

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Can the emergency services rescue our health and social care services? Over the last six months we (the Chief Fire Officers’ Association and NHS England) have been discovering the generally untapped potential that can come from fire, health and social care services working together locally to better support their local population. Words: Jacquie White, Deputy Director, Long Term Conditions, NHS England & Peter O’Reilly, Chief Executive, Greater Manchester County Fire and Rescue Service, and Strategic Health Lead for the Chief Fire Officers’ Association. There are common risk factors between health, fire and other services, which increase demand such as multimorbidity, cognitive impairment, smoking, drugs, alcohol, physical inactivity, obesity, loneliness and cold homes. The risk for someone over the age of 65 of dying in a fire is more than twice as high as the average risk for all ages. In the NHS 250,000 people go to A&E every year as a result of falls. Older people use three-and-ahalf times the amount of hospital care of those aged under 65 and almost two-thirds of general and acute hospital beds are occupied by people over 65. Fifteen years ago, fire and rescue services (FRSs) realised their current working model was unsustainable. The increasing number of fires made chasing demand the wrong strategy. They switched focus to preventing, rather than just reacting to, fires. As a result they have reduced the demand for their services by 50 percent.

‘Safe and well’ visits So how does this help the NHS, FRSs and others work together? Each year FRSs in England deliver safety checks in over 670,000 homes. Many visits already include some health interventions, like a hearing test to check the fire alarm can be heard, to assessing risks of falls and trips and fitting a wide range of equipment – which may already be in the van, reducing the need to wait! These checks are being developed into ‘safe and well’ visits with the objective of assessing and identifying wider health and care support needs. These include basic sight tests, discussing safer heating options, brief interventions, health promotion, home modifications, supporting self management as well as directing people to additional support from wider public services, such as benefits advice, telecare and much, much more.

“Tapping into the potential of all this great work could bring significant benefits.”

Peter O’Reilly, Chief Executive, Greater Manchester County Fire and Rescue Service, and Strategic Health Lead for the Chief Fire Officers’ Association.

Professor Sir Michael Marmot for its work to tackle health inequalities through prevention and community safety work. WMFS provides targeted interventions for those with frailty, mental health and terminal illness, delivering full needs assessments and tailored packages of care.

Health and care interventions Every FRS is different and even those who don’t think that they are doing anything out of the ordinary are actually, as part of their day job, providing a number of health and care interventions. West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service, on a daily basis, provides preventative advice, liaises with telecare monitoring leads, makes safeguarding referrals, completes falls assessments, in some circumstances fits grab rails, completes joint visits with community mental health staff and more. Many areas are starting to use their fire stations as community centres, offering football clubs for local kids, cooking classes, use of the gyms and, more generally, a place for people to come together. The Salford fire team is opening a free community room and fitness facility at its station at Irlam and has adapted the station’s drill tower as a climbing wall for local people to use. It is an important FRS aim to support community development and cohesion.

Community engagement Springboard (Starting a Proactive Response, Introducing New Gains, Benefiting Older-people and Reducing Dependency) is a local initiative set up by Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service and Age UK, which uses each visit as an opportunity to work with the older person to address a range of issues, including managing the home environment, social networks, healthy lifestyles and maximising income and reducing unnecessary expenditure. West Midlands Fire Service (WMFS) has become the first in the country to receive endorsement from

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Jacquie White, Deputy Director, Long Term Conditions, NHS England.

and reduce risk in the homes of asset rich but cash poor older people who, a lot of the time, are living on their own. Fire and rescue services across the country are an asset to the health of their local population and we are working together to provide national support and encouragement for local FRS to connect with NHS commissioners and services to support this way of working to be rolled out across the country. This will help transform care, achieve better outcomes for local people and better value for the money spent on public services. We know there are good examples of community support and prevention activities from other emergency services, for instance the ambulance service supporting frequent callers and the police being trained as dementia friends, to reference just a couple. Tapping into the potential of all this great work could bring significant benefits – it’s the same population, with the same needs, and the same outcomes trying to be met from the same public purse – doing it better together just makes sense – doesn’t it?

www.england.nhs.uk/tag/long-term-conditions www.cfoa.org.uk For further information or to get involved contact england.longtermconditions@nhs.net

The FRSs often works with their local communities to develop a volunteer workforce to complement an already successful community engagement strategy. Volunteering enables individuals to close functional skills gaps and significantly contributes to the development of individual CVs. FRS volunteers complete Home Safety follow-up visits to ensure that those at risk remain safe; they train and act as Fire Service Cadet Leaders; they carry out clean up operations after fires in homes, while Rotary Club members double up as FRS volunteers to connect with,

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The Civil Contingencies Act – what does the future hold? Now over 10 years old, the Civil Contingencies Act (CCA), continues to provide the basis for activity at local level to plan and prepare for disruptive events. It is worth pausing to consider how it came about and what it was designed to achieve, to reflect on its impact and effectiveness, and to look ahead to what the future might hold. Words: Ian Whitehouse, Deputy Director, Cabinet Office Civil Contingencies Secretariat. Many readers will no doubt recall the big response and recovery efforts of the early 2000s: the significant flooding and fuel protests of 2000 and the outbreak of foot and mouth in 2001. These events served to expose the limitations of the country’s ability to deal with complex, long-running civil disruption. The subsequent formal review of the emergency planning arrangements concluded that change was required and that this change needed to be underpinned by new legislation. It is striking to note that the legislation which the CCA replaced was the Civil Defence Act of 1948: a little over a decade ago the law governing the organisation of local resilience (as we might now call it) dated back to a time when the Cold War was just getting started. What the new legislation sought to deliver (in Part I of the Act) was a more broadly based set of requirements for the different dimensions of effective preparation for emergencies. It introduced clarity about where responsibilities rest at local level. Crucially, it also placed an emphasis on joint working in partnership and sharing of information, as embodied by the Local Resilience Form (LRF). The CCA provided a broad framework for bringing these new ‘responder’ agencies together in a coordinated way, while allowing a high degree of flexibility in how its provisions could be implemented in each LRF area.

More than just legislation The recent story of civil resilience in the UK is of course not just about a piece of legislation. The requirements of the act (and accompanying regulations) have helped give drive and focus to the action that government has taken to provide support and guidance to help responders fulfil their responsibilities. Risk assessment and information sharing are particularly worth highlighting. Unsurprisingly, the CCA placed risk assessment at the heart of the local planning process and much effort has gone in to refining and improving how that is done, locally and nationally. At national level, the publication of the first National Risk Register (NRR) of Civil Emergencies in 2008 has been followed by four further iterations. It is a public resource for individuals and organisations to use to underpin work to help them to manage risks and plan for and recover from emergencies. The NRR is an unclassified version of the National Risk Assessment (NRA), a more detailed assessment of the risks of civil emergencies facing the UK over the coming five years, which is available on a restricted basis to support local planning activity in pursuit of the CCA requirement. Nationally, the NRA has reached a stage of maturity as the key document underpinning the resilience cycle and is recognised as world leading. In CCS, where we lead on the production of both the NRA and NRR, we work closely with government departments and experts and

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are continually seeking to strengthen these documents, which are so crucial to facilitate capability building at both national and local levels. In addition, we continue to work with LRFs and their secretariats, drawing on national risk guidance to support local activity. The introduction of Resilience Direct last year to replace the NRE is a demonstration of government (and CCS specifically) putting in place capability to support responders to discharge their responsibilities, enabling them to share information in a way that meets their needs. The new service is also worthy of mention because it illustrates the pace of change in technology and the role it can play in supporting resilience activity. We need to continue to keep pace with the change and ensure that we are exploiting the opportunities as well as keeping on top of the risks.

“It seems clear that the Civil Contingencies Act has brought structure to the resilience landscape and a professionalisation of this sector, which was very much needed.” These are examples drawn from a wide range of activity to support and enable action at local level. This starts from the provision of statutory guidance (in Emergency Preparedness). It includes non-statutory guidance, ‘doctrine’ and other advice designed to provide a shared language and commonality of approach. It covers the work that departments do to lead areas of response capability (as overseen and tested by a cross-government programme), the advice and support given by the CLG Resilience and Emergencies Division (RED), and the opportunities provided by the Emergency Planning College.

Where are we now? It seems clear that the Civil Contingencies Act has brought structure to the resilience landscape and a professionalisation of this sector, which was very much needed. The implementation of the CCA seems to have achieved a good balance between the consistency that comes from central direction and the flexibility to meet different needs, which comes from allowing local determination within an overall framework. With an eye to the future, over the last year we have asked colleagues to give us their views on whether the CCA remains fit for purpose. LRF members report that the partnership arrangements envisaged by the CCA

and at the heart of effective planning and response work well and in the best cases the working relationships have ‘gone beyond’ the requirements of the letter of the legislation. There seems little appetite at local level for significant change to the Act. What is more, many areas have felt the impact of real events and the systems have broadly stood up to the test and there had been powerful learning, which has fed back into improved preparedness. Some areas are recognised as world leaders. This is of course not to say that there is no room for further progress to be made: the CCA was never claimed to be a solution or an end in itself. The recent National Capability Survey, the voluntary biennial online survey of Category 1 and 2 responders across England and Wales, has provided the responder community and government departments and agencies with valuable self-reported information about areas for improvement. JESIP (Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Principles) continues to address the need for improvement in the way ‘blue light’ responders work together in the first stages of a response – [and my colleague Rob MacFarlane writes on page 3 in this issue about the work being done to build on this by looking at wider training collaboration].

Looking to the future Government is currently engaged in its Strategic Defence and Security Review and the associated Comprehensive Spending Review, which will set budgets and priorities for the next five years. Outcomes will be made known later in the autumn. We expect a new National Security Strategy to be published to a similar timescale. All will be critical to the way in which resilience functions are delivered. This is not just about the way domestic crisis management and response is reflected in national security priorities (where the high level priorities for resilience currently sit), but also the impacts of departmental budget settlements right across Whitehall departments on areas of spend relevant to resilience. It seems safe to assume that spending pressures will continue to be felt; that the public sector will continue to be subject to evolution and change, as it always has been; and that expectations of the public and ministers will continue to be high. These trends will bring new challenges for resilience, but will also act as incentives to find more efficient and effective ways of working. We will also inevitably experience events which test and challenge our arrangements (and assumptions) and from which we will need to continue to learn. The detail remains to be seen. But the broad consensus seems to be that the framework provided by the CCA continues to provide a sound basis for the way in which resilience is organised in the UK.

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Saving more lives in Scotland – fire crews to attend cardiac arrest incidents Firefighters will be at the heart of an initiative to save lives from cardiac arrests as Scotland looks to become a world-leader in handling these emergencies. Under the plans, Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) crews in Aberdeenshire, East Lothian, West Lothian and the Scottish Borders will be sent to emergencies where cardiac arrest is suspected. Each year, almost 3500 people in Scotland undergo attempted resuscitation after suffering an out-ofhospital cardiac arrest. Fewer than one in 20 survive to be discharged from hospital – far less than the one-third of patients in Scandinavia who survive to return home. The cardiac arrest response trials are part of SFRS’s commitment to supporting the Scottish Government’s Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Strategy, which is aiming to dramatically increase patients’ survival chances. The goal is to save as many as 1000 lives by 2020.

Absolutely crucial Assistant Chief Officer Dave Boyle, the SFRS Director of Service Delivery, described how firefighters could help save patients’ lives. He said, “Time is absolutely crucial to the chances of survival and we have been exploring with the Scottish Ambulance Service how we can support it in responding to out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. “There are more than 350 fire stations across Scotland and many of these are in rural and remote communities where a paramedic could be a considerable distance away. Our retained and volunteer crews live and work within five to eight minutes of their stations, meaning they may be able to provide a faster response when emergencies arise.

Dave Boyle, Director of Service Delivery, Scottish Fire and Rescue Service.

“In urban areas where we have stations with 24-hour staffing these crews could be available to immediately respond at times when our ambulance colleagues are busy attending other calls. “These trials build on the already strong partnerships between the fire and ambulance services and will lead to a better understanding of how we can help save lives in this area.”

Best chance of life At the centre of the approach is the ‘Chain of Survival’ – a concept describing the factors known to be crucial to

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Chief Officer Alasdair Hay and Board members being trained in CPR by the British Heart Foundation.

giving a person the best chance of life. It includes early recognition that a cardiac arrest is happening, early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to buy time, early defibrillation to restart the heart and post-resuscitation intensive care to restore quality of life.

“Close working between ourselves and our ambulance colleagues clearly benefits the public and we will always look for opportunities to develop it further.” Firefighters participating in the trials will receive enhanced CPR training to better equip them to deliver life-saving treatment until ambulance crews can reach the scene. The initiative follows talks between SFRS and the Scottish Ambulance Service, the NHS, the Scottish Government, the Fire Brigades Union and third sector partners. ACO Boyle added, “The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service is dedicated to protecting the public and we are tasked with working in partnership with others to

improve the safety and wellbeing of people throughout Scotland. Close working between ourselves and our ambulance colleagues clearly benefits the public and we will always look for opportunities to develop it further. “These trials are among a number of ways in which we are delivering on our commitment to supporting the Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest strategy. We will also work with our ambulance colleagues to ensure the location of all our defibrillators is mapped on their database and that these are placed where evidence shows they will offer the greatest benefit.” He continued, “Our network of fire stations will be made available to give potentially life-saving CPR training to the public and voluntary groups and it could lead to our personnel becoming trainers themselves. We will also aim to train every member of our support staff in the use of CPR. “When a patient leaves hospital after being successfully treated for cardiac arrest they receive a discharge or care plan, which includes assessments of their needs to ensure they can live safely in their homes. By working with the NHS and other partner agencies we can include a variety of safety messages within these assessments in support of our preventative activities like home fire safety visits. “People who have medical conditions or difficulty in getting around can be at higher risk from fire and other causes of harm in the home, so this joined-up approach will help save lives. It’s a clear example of how integrated services help protect the public and that will always be at the centre of everything we do.”

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National Operational Guidance – the journey continues It’s hard to believe that the National Operational Guidance Programme has been going over three years and is now at its half way point. The decision to create new National Operational Guidance for the fire and rescue service to replace the documents coming out of DCLG and its predecessors is now well accepted and has seen some great collaborative working take place. Words: Doc Holliday, Programme Manager, National Operational Guidance Programme. online means that it can be quickly updated and users can be reassured that what they are looking at is always the latest version.

Current Projects

The diagram shown above illustrates the extent of the National Operational Guidance Programme and all 30 projects that will be completed by 2018. Green coloured projects are complete; red coloured projects are in progress and white shaded ones are yet to commence. The diagram is a simple way to show what’s being produced but it also shows how the guidance can be used to assist with all areas of operational response. The most recent guidance focused on incident command. Published in July 2015, this guidance supports the work of fire and rescue services to put in place a system for an all-hazards approach to incident command. It is an essential guide to the safe systems of work needed at an incident and is aimed at policy writers in all fire and rescue services.

“Being inclusive and collaborative is at the heart of the programme.” This guidance is complemented by a substantial piece of research called the Foundation for Incident Command. This provides the detail required for assertive, effective and safe incident command to be practised and applied. In addition to the guidance on incident command, the programme has already published guidance on: fires and fire fighting; operations; performing rescues; initial operational response to a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear explosive incident; fires in the built environment; water rescue and flooding; environmental protection; and marauding terrorist firearms attack. All of the guidance can be found on the programme website (ukfrs.com). Guidance will only be provided online, which is a departure from the previous approach taken by Government. Keeping the guidance entirely

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Having delivered a raft of guidance already, the programme is now focused on delivering the next wave, which includes: SOR CBRN(e); fires in waste sites; hazardous materials; transportation; fires in buildings under construction or demolition; and wildfires. As with the previous projects, the programme offers opportunities for consultation on the content of the guidance. Pre-consultation events, taking place in the autumn, are a vital way of sharing the materials in advance, getting user feedback and ensuring that the final product truly reflects the current best practice within the fire and rescue service. The leadership of each of the guidance projects is so important to ensure that not only does the guidance get published on time and to a high level of quality, but also that it truly reflects the best practice that exists in the service. Being inclusive and collaborative is at the heart of the programme.

Implementation Forum Chaired by ACO Andy Bowers from Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service, the Implementation Forum has been set up to make sure that the tactics developed for each piece of guidance are accurate and realistic. The Forum comprises representatives from each region and devolved administration. Meeting regularly, it also provides a crucial opportunity for individual fire and rescue services to share how they are adopting or adapting it at a local level. The programme will use experience from fire and rescue services to form the basis of case studies that will be shared service-wide to inspire others to integrate the guidance within their own policies and procedures. This innovation recognises that the size of individual fire and rescue services varies along with the internal resources available to work on policies and procedures.

Multi-agency outcomes On the face of it, it might look like the programme is all about the fire and rescue service, but really it’s about how the service works with other emergency responders to achieve better outcomes. Where fire and rescue services are operating in a consistent way, those who interface with them – the other emergency services in particular – will know what to expect. One particularly interesting result of this

collaborative approach is the creation of a cross service definition of survivability. It is work like this that makes great in-roads in interoperability and a joined up approach that leads to safer working. The programme has a great relationship with JESIP, the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme. Both programmes were established in 2012 and while JESIP completed its initial work in 2014, there continue to be substantial synergies between them. Moving forward, JESIP now refers to a set of principles, rather than a programme, with the remaining core team now focused on reviewing the Joint Doctrine. The programme is committed to continuing to work alongside the JESIP team to make sure that the Joint Doctrine continues to be changed and improved as it is tested and incorporated into business as usual.

Operational learning One development that the team is excited about is a new focus on operational learning. Time and time again, the learning from incidents is not exposed to those who are not directly involved. Recognising this gap, the programme now seeks to capture the learning from incidents and share that service-wide. To achieve this goal, a new project has been established. Roy Bishop, Director at the Institution of Fire Engineers (IFE) is the Project Executive and will provide strategic leadership for the project. More information will be available on this new project later in the autumn. The programme has been fortunate to receive substantial funding from DCLG along with contributions from every fire and rescue service in the UK. The programme is in discussion with DCLG about funding from 2016/2017 onwards and, like the rest of the public sector, these talks are in the context of the spending review announcements from HM Treasury that indicated the need for further reductions in public spending.

Delivering on ambition It is clear that the programme has delivered on its ambition so far and continues to work apace to deliver the complete suite of guidance by March 2018. It is a long journey. In the end, the programme will have been successful if it can show a quality product, where its usage is normalised and delivers outcomes that improve both firefighter and public safety.

www.ukfrs.com The programme is always looking for people to get involved and welcomes any approaches, which can be made by email: nogpteam@ukfrs.com.

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Six decades of the Defender and the Red Cross around the world For over 60 years, the Land Rover Defender has been one of the vehicles used by the British Red Cross and International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies around the world. This article highlights just a few examples of how the Defender has been used for emergency relief following natural disasters and to support humanitarian projects across the world. 1980s and 1990s Land Rovers continued to be used to distribute aid and reach vulnerable people in crisis. Defenders were sent to Sudan in 1984, to help distribute aid following the disastrous drought and famine that left eight million people at risk from starvation.

2000s

In 2008, Land Rover donated 60 vehicles, including Defenders, to the British Red Cross on the occasion of the company’s 60th birthday. The vehicles were formally handed over at a ceremony at Buckingham Palace. Photo: Jonathan Banks

1950s Land Rover donated a long wheelbase Defender Series 1 to the British Red Cross in 1954, for use in Dubai – part of the Trucial States. This was modified for use as a mobile dispensary with a stretcher, water and washing facilities. It was used as a base for treating over 5000 patients in Dubai and the surrounding desert areas, travelling more than 17,000 miles in under nine months. That same year saw Defenders being adapted and used elsewhere as mobile dispensaries. In Kenya and Korea, their role was to visit outlying, remote villages, enabling staff and volunteers to run clinics, distribute milk and provide health education. The British Red Cross annual report for 1954 noted the observations of aid worker Joan Wittington – later to be recognised with an OBE – as she travelled across Kenya in a Defender. It reports, ‘Many of the villages are 9000ft up. I went to several of them, travelling in a Land Rover … the Red Cross team have a Land Rover and visit each village several times a week, running clinics, organising milk distribution and giving health teaching and handcraft instructions to the women and girls …”

1960s Land Rover Defenders were adapted to act as ambulances and transport medical supplies and people to hospitals in Angola and South Africa. In 1961, the British Red Cross reported that, “The ambulance arrived safely in Durban, South Africa. From there it was driven up the spectacular Sani Pass, which is only negotiable by four-wheel drive vehicles and over the Drakensberg mountain range where the jeep track reaches a height of over 10,000ft. The shining white ambulance with its Red Cross markings … was to play

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such an important part in helping to save the lives of their sick and injured. No longer would they have to endure the agonising journey on horseback to the hospital in Mokhotlong village, many miles away.”

1970s Land Rover Defenders transported relief aid in emergencies and natural disasters in places as far afield as Rwanda, Ethiopia, Turkey, the British Virgin Islands and Nigeria. In the Biafran conflict in Nigeria, Defenders enabled aid workers to distribute food and milk to communities in remote areas. On the other side of the world, Defenders were used following Hurricane Fifi in late 1974, the catastrophic cyclone that killed thousands of people in Honduras. The hurricane caused widespread flash flooding, landslides and damage that left many people homeless. When thousands of people were made homeless in earthquakes in Turkey in 1976, a Land Rover Station Wagon and a Land Rover pick-up van were sent to help transport supplies of tents and other relief aid. The British Red Cross sent two consignments of winter coats, sleeping bags and tents, to help the 60,000 people made homeless by the ‘quakes. Two years later, the British Red Cross airlifted vehicles to help the huge relief effort for refugees, displaced by years of fighting in Ethiopia. In response to an appeal for help from the Ethiopian Red Cross, the British Red Cross airlifted four Land Rover Defenders to the area together with three tonnes of medicines donated by the Red Cross in the Federal Republic of Germany. Land Rovers were used elsewhere for community support programmes.

Vehicles continued to be used in UK and international operations. The relationship between Land Rover and the International Red Cross Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) started to move to a formal footing, and 2007 saw the first phase of a partnership with Land Rover raising over £2.5m and helping the IFRC reach nearly 100,000 people around the world. In 2008, Land Rover donated 60 vehicles, including Defenders, to the British Red Cross on the occasion of the company’s 60th birthday. The vehicles were formally handed over at a ceremony at Buckingham Palace. Half the fleet remained in the UK, while the other 30 were shipped overseas to Liberia, Lesotho, Mongolia and Sierra Leone. Eight Land Rover 4x4 vehicles were donated to the Sierra Leone Red Cross (SLRC) to help volunteers reach people in remote and vulnerable communities to recover from the trauma of civil war, and provide counselling, basic education, vocational training and help them reintegrate into their communities. As road conditions across the country were poor, the SLRCS had struggled to reach vulnerable people until the Land Rovers arrived.

Eight Land Rover 4x4 vehicles were donated to the Sierra Leone Red Cross (SLRC).

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ESTCOMPANY PROFILE | 33 Other Defenders were also sent to Kyrgyzstan where the Kyrgyzstan Red Crescent Society used them to reach the elderly, disadvantaged, children and young people, vulnerable women and migrants, and people living with HIV and TB. A combination of economic collapse, high rates of poverty, and mountainous, frequently inaccessible terrain at high risk of earthquakes, avalanches and landslides meant that reliable transportation for volunteers on the health and social care programmes was essential. The Defender was put to daily use, both in the capital Bishkek and throughout the country, and was frequently called on at short notice to respond to natural disasters in the region, allowing the disaster team to reach remote areas without accessible roads or snow passes. In Mongolia, the Red Cross used Land Rover Defenders for its health and social care programmes, including a social inclusion programme for isolated and vulnerable people. With its extreme climate, vast steppes and fragile soil, Mongolia is one of the most sparsely populated countries in the world. The Mongolian Red Cross is often reliant on 4x4 vehicles to access vulnerable people in rural communities cut off by significant snowfall, earthquakes and floods. With Land Rover’s support, the British Red Cross was able to support a Mongolian Red Cross project called Social Care for Vulnerable and Elderly, which helps with household and personal chores and bringing food and medicines in Ulaan Baatar. From disaster relief in Turks & Caicos following Hurricane Ike in 2008 to the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti, and severe flooding in Pakistan in 2011, Defenders have continued to play their part in ensuring that volunteers could provide essential relief in large-scale emergencies and natural disasters.

The Defender continues to be used by the British Red Cross.

In 2013, the partnership was extended for a further five years with an ambitious new target of providing £15m-worth of support to some of the most vulnerable people around the world. The projects fall into three distinct areas aligned to Land Rover’s CSR strategy: health and social care; water and sanitation; and helping communities develop a resilience to cope with potential disasters and crises.

Today The Defender continues to be used by the British Red Cross all year round as part of its fleet of vehicles

stationed around the UK, which are ready to help in an emergency, reach people in crisis living in isolated areas, or in periods of bad weather such as heavy snow and flooding. The vehicle also continues to be used overseas – in South Africa, Rwanda and Sudan, for example, where Defenders are used at projects such as a water and sanitation installation in Sennar State – one of many funded by the company.

www.redcross.org.uk For further information please contact Penny Clifton: Pclifton@redcross.org.uk

‘Defender 2,000,000’ set for auction Bad winter weather in the UK in 2010 saw Defenders well used across the country to reach vulnerable and isolated people.

2010s Bad winter weather in the UK in 2010 saw Defenders well used across the country to reach vulnerable and isolated people. Additional vehicles were loaned by Land Rover for use in Cumbria. Staff and volunteers used specially adapted Red Cross four-wheel drive Land Rovers and ambulances to support the ambulance service in the East Midlands and in Hampshire where they reached 1000 drivers stranded overnight on the snow-bound A3. 2010 was also the start of a new global CSR initiative, Reaching Vulnerable People Around the World, between Land Rover and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC). This involved Land Rover supporting projects with financial assistance and vehicles provided to a hygiene and sanitation project in South Sudan (via the Austrian Red Cross) plus funding and employee volunteering to support the Portuguese Red Cross’ health and social care work. As a result Land Rover won the award for best long-term partnership at the Third Sector Business Charity Awards 2011.

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A unique vehicle has been built to commemorate the UK production of the two-millionth Series Land Rover and Defender. With a bespoke design, ‘Defender 2,000,000’ has been created to be a fitting tribute to almost seven decades of Land Rover production in the Solihull plant, UK. Collectors and Defender fans will be given the opportunity to own this unique piece of Land Rover’s history when it is auctioned by renowned auction house, Bonhams. The vehicle will be auctioned at a Mike Adamson, CEO of British Red Cross, helping to fix a part of prestigious charity event, held at the Bonhams auction the two-millionth Defender. house in New Bond Street, London on 16 December. Reflecting Defender’s heritage, all proceeds will be donated to Land Rover’s humanitarian and conservation partners – the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the Born Free Foundation. Production of the original Land Rover Series I began at the famous Lode Lane facility in 1947 ahead of its launch at the Amsterdam Motor Show on 30 April 1948. Since then two million examples of the Series I, II III and Defender have been produced at Solihull. www.jaguarlandrover.com

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CFOA welcomes new President After two years serving as Vice-President Elect and Vice-President, I am hugely honoured to be taking over as Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) President for the coming year. I’ve had the good fortune to work with two fantastic past presidents since joining the team and have an equally talented Vice-President and Vice-President Elect to support me going forward. Words: Paul Hancock, Chief Fire Officer, Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service & President, Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA).

CFO Paul Hancock, President, Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA).

Of course there is also the rest of the CFOA board both past and present who continue to contribute hugely to the association and, by extension, the fire and rescue service. I’m looking forward to working with them all. It would be fair to say we’re well placed for the coming 12 months.

Challenges and opportunities This is a good thing, because the challenges and opportunities don’t look like letting up. The Chancellor has recently told government departments – and by extension the public services for which they are responsible – to plan for cuts of 25 or even 40 percent. Fire and rescue services and local government more generally has already shouldered a heavier burden than most public services, so these cuts, when (rather than if) they come, are going to require radical changes and innovative thinking and ways of working. I have no doubt

that our sector is more than capable of changing to meet these challenges, but it is going to be more important than ever that CFOA is able to provide the leadership and the support fire and rescue services need. The much delayed Thomas Review is going to ask some serious questions about the leadership, culture and conditions of service within the fire and rescue service, and CFOA and its members are going to need to be in a position to answer them. We are already working on a comprehensive code of ethics for strategic managers in the FRS, in partnership with colleagues from SOLACE and elsewhere in local government. We’re going to require all our members to sign up to the code and put in place procedures to ensure it can be enforced. Beyond that we will look to engage with partners in the representative bodies and local government to consider culture and values in the round. This might not always be easy, but it is better that we tackle this ourselves than wait for someone to deal with it for us.

“I really believe we can position the fire and rescue service as a key health asset.” New opportunities Of course for every fresh challenge we are finding new opportunities to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of services provided to the public. Our work with colleagues in the NHS and public health has come on leaps and bounds over the past year, and we fully intend to keep pushing this forward. The possibilities are enormous and I really believe we can position the fire

and rescue service as a key health asset. In many cases, the benefits are obvious and build on the fantastic prevention and response work that services are already doing. I strongly believe that CFOA can only succeed with the support and involvement of all our members. I will be placing great significance on communication with our members and understanding their needs and views, and hope to visit every region personally over the next year. We will look to build on the many engagement forums we already have, such as FRS Council, Members Sounding Board and our events, to ensure we can get the best input and discussion of key issues.

Future vision We particularly recognised the role of member input in the formation of our new Strategic Direction Making the Difference Needed, which sets out our future vision for the fire and rescue service and the steps that CFOA will be taking to deliver it. At a fundamental level, it recognises the enormous potential within the fire and rescue service and the fantastic people it employs. Critically, this is a long-term document, which recognises that many of these issues will extend beyond the tenure of any one president or board. It is also ‘live’, so that we have the capacity to take on board the inevitable political or policy shifts and changes. The document is available for everyone to read here – www.cfoa.org.uk/19912 – and I would welcome views and thoughts. All round, it promises to be another interesting year, and I am really looking forward to it. The UK fire and rescue service is quite rightly a hugely respected institution, and I am extremely proud to be playing a part in leading it over the next 12 months.

www.cfoa.org.uk

30 years of specialist search training The Police National Search Centre (PNSC) is a joint police and military unit internationally recognised as a world leader in the development and training of counter-terrorism and missing persons search techniques. Developed after the 1984 Brighton hotel bombing, the centre has trained thousands of officers in techniques that help keep the UK public safe. Officers attending courses are trained to search for anything from missing people to evidence at crime scenes, improvised explosive devices and their associated component parts. Inspector Graham Peffers, who temporarily heads up the centre at Ryton-onDunsmore, near Coventry, said, “There are in excess of 6000 licensed search officers in the UK and our centre is the only place that accredits and provides the specialist training for these officers.”

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There are 11 staff members at the centre – seven are seconded from the police service across the UK and two are from the Royal Engineers, supported by a Course Development Specialist and an Administration Manager. The PNSC has assisted in also offering specialist advice in many high-profile missing cases, including the searches for Ben Needham, Madeleine McCann and April Jones. Inspector Peffers said, “A huge amount of police work involves searching for missing people, and our expertise is often sought nationally and internationally.”

The college runs a variety of search courses: • Police Search Team (Licensed Search Officer) – 24 courses scheduled this year so far, each with 24 students and a week in duration

• Police Search Advisor (PolSA) – a three-week course, each with 20 students, four courses this year • PolSA Relicense – PolSA’s must re-licence every three to five years. Nine courses this year, four days in duration, with 12 students each course • Counter-terrorism Security Coordinator – three courses this year, each with 20 students and two weeks long • Several bespoke courses to other agencies including: Financial Conduct Authority, Crime Scene Management and other specialist delivery.

www.college.police.uk For further information please contact Christopher.Gilgan@college.pnn.police.uk or Gary.Fretwell@college.pnn.police.uk

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New Deputy Chief Constables for Essex and Northamptonshire Two police forces have announced the appointments of new Deputy Chief Constables. Assistant Chief Constable Matthew Horne is to become Essex Police’s new Deputy Chief Constable while Andy Frost has been appointed as the Deputy Chief Constable of Northamptonshire Police.

Matthew Horne currently leads the joint Kent and Essex Serious Crime Directorate. He will succeed current Deputy Chief Constable Derek Benson when Mr Benson retires this October. Essex Police Chief Constable Stephen Kavanagh said, “Matt's passion for policing, strategic awareness and leadership skills stood out during an extremely competitive process and he will make a fantastic Deputy Chief Constable. Matt inspires loyalty, encourages new ideas and leads from the front and the [appointment] panel were impressed by his approach on both strategic and tactical challenges facing Essex Police. Since being appointed Assistant Chief Constable in May 2014, Mr Horne has played a key role in developing Essex

Police’s strategic priorities to combat crimes which cause high-harm to communities, including the targeting of organised crime groups and modern slavery (human trafficking and labour exploitation). Northamptonshire Police’s new Deputy Chief Constable, Andy Frost, started his policing career in Northamptonshire as a patrol officer in Daventry in 1987. He also worked in Northampton and Corby, as well as the Force Control Room, before moving to Bedfordshire Police in 2004 to take on the role of divisional commander. Promotion to Assistant Chief Constable in 2010 saw Andy move back to Northamptonshire Police. He has been temporary Deputy Chief Constable since the spring, when Martin Jelley moved to Warwickshire Police. Chief Constable Simon Edens, said, “I am delighted to appoint Andy to the role of Deputy Chief Constable following a recruitment process. It is clear that he knows the force, Northamptonshire and the people we serve extremely well,

www.ballyclarelimited.com

Andy Frost, Deputy Chief Constable, Northamptonshire Police.

something I have been very impressed with in my first two weeks in post.” DCC Frost said, “I was thrilled to move back to Northamptonshire five years ago and am pleased to take the next step and become Deputy Chief Constable. I am Northampton born and bred and have a real passion for ensuring we provide the best possible police force for the county.” www.essex.police.uk www.northants.police.uk

New Chief Executive for Welsh Ambulance Service committed to the challenges ahead Tracy Myhill is to be the new Chief Executive of the Welsh Ambulance Service NHS Trust. Mrs Myhill, who has been the Interim CEO since October 2014, is a former Deputy Chief Executive and Director of Workforce and Organisational Development at Cardiff and Vale University Health Board with more than 30 years’ experience in the Welsh NHS. Speaking about her appointment,

Mrs Myhill said, “It’s an absolute privilege to lead this organisation. In the 10 months since I joined as Interim Chief Executive, I have taken time to meet as many staff as possible and understand the job they do. “I have been humbled by the clinical skill and compassion of our staff and blown away by their work in caring for some of our most vulnerable and sick people.

“Of course, we have our challenges and I am absolutely committed to working with our staff, stakeholders and the people of Wales to provide a clinically-led ambulance service that bears scrutiny with the best in the world and one of which the people of Wales can be proud.” www.wales.nhs.uk

SECAmb appoints new Medical Director South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SECAmb) has appointed a new Medical Director.

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Dr Rory McCrea replaces Interim Medical Director Dr David Fluck. His role will be part time with him working at the SECAmb two days each week. Having trained as a GP in the early 1990s, Dr McCrea has developed a wealth of experience having held leadership positions in both the public and private sectors. He still practises as an NHS GP on a part-time basis with his team in Waltham Abbey, Essex. Dr McCrea was attracted to joining SECAmb because of its innovative approach to pre-hospital care. He said, “I am delighted to have the opportunity to be Medical Director of SECAmb. I have a passion for patient safety and

Ballyclare Limited has recently made two new appointments to its Senior Management Team: David Snelling as Sales and Marketing Director; and Diane Doxey as Procurement Director. David joins from Swedish premium brand work clothing manufacturer Blåkläder and brings a wealth of experience to the role. Diane’s role will be to help both Ballyclare’s Product Development and Supply Chain teams deliver to its customers.

excellent clinical outcomes and the opportunity to play my part in supporting the highly innovative developments at SECAmb is very exciting.” SECAmb Chief Executive Paul Sutton, welcoming Rory, said, “I’m delighted that we have appointed Rory. He brings a huge amount of experience to SECAmb and will contribute greatly to the development of the trust as we continue to innovate in the care provided to our patients. I’d like to thank David for all his effort in the recent months and wish him the very best for the future.” www.secamb.nhs.uk

Andy Fry, Chief Fire Officer of Royal Berkshire FRS, has been elected to the CFOA Presidential Team. Andy will join as Vice-President Elect at this year's AGM and will become President of CFOA for the period 2017-18. www.cfoa.org.uk

Dräger has appointed a new Marketing Manager for the fire sector. Martyn Lamb brings a wealth of experience having worked in the fields of quality engineering, manufacturing and project engineering, production and product management for more than 15 years. In his new role at Dräger, Martyn has responsibility for UK product portfolio management on new products and services for the fire and rescue sector. He will be based in the UK, spending time between Dräger’s Blyth and Hemel Hempstead sites, as well as out in the field meeting customers. www.draeger.com

The NHS Trust Development Authority (NHS TDA) has appointed Richard Groome as Non-Executive Director of North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust. Richard Groome is a Chartered Engineer and member of the Royal Society of Public Health. Previously a Non-Executive Director with the Shropshire Heath Authority, he has also worked with West Midlands Ambulance Services (WMAS). Richard Groome has been appointed from 6 August 2015 until 5 August 2017. www.nwas.nhs.uk

Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Authority is to begin a recruitment process for a new Chief Fire Officer/Chief Executive in September 2015. The authority’s temporary management arrangements have been in place since March 2014. Initially the authority’s Brigade Managers’ Appointments Panel is seeking operational applicants from Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service only. Upon appointment of the new Chief Fire Officer/Chief Executive, Joy Smith will return to her substantive role as Deputy Chief Executive for Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service. www.derbys-fire.gov.uk

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42 | ESTPROFILE

Meeting the kit and clothing needs of the uniformed services PatrolStore.com was launched in May 2007 to meet the needs of the uniformed services market to offer kit, clothing and equipment to individuals within the police, military and security industries. Using the extensive specialised knowledge and experience of the company’s employees as former police officers, paratroopers and private security operators, PatrolStore developed a specialist range of products designed to provide the ultimate in functionality and performance for any tactical situation. highest rated and most trusted supplier of police, security and military kit rating a 9.5/10 on Trustpilot with over 320 reviews and counting!

Reviews have included:

From L to R: PatrolStore’s Callum Allison and Aran Lackey.

PatrolStore’s unique selection of products, combined with its strong focus on customer service and competitive pricing has seen the company grow rapidly to quickly establish a trusted name within the law enforcement and armed forces communities. With its large range offered across the UK and Europe, PatrolStore caters for individuals, through team leaders and devolved budget heads to government procurement contracts. Even if you can’t see an item listed on the website the company can source goods quickly and economically from around the world and deliver internationally.

Philosophy PatrolStore’s philosophy is to continually and consistently provide high quality products at affordable prices to meet the increasing needs and requirements of the uniformed services market be it police, security, emergency services or prison services, to name but a few. PatrolStore’s customers range from the casual hiker to the rapid response team members who always expect and in fact demand, exceptional kit at exceptional prices.

Customer services PatrolStore’s customer services team’s primary goal is customer satisfaction and the team will go that extra mile to ensure that every customer’s needs and requirements are met. In fact, the company is also the

• “Simple… Spent a while hunting for some boots, happened to find them on Patrolstore. Held out a week and they had a sale so got the boots I wanted for £25 less than manufacturer price, with next day delivery included in that pricing. Boots arrived next day in brand new condition. Very quick, very simple, could not be happier with service. Will definitely look to purchase from here in future.” • “Exchange policy – I brought a pair of Magnum Panther boots from patrol store in November 2014, and the zip broke in June 2015. Phoned up patrol store, explained the situation, and said that I'm still covered by the warranty, which is 12 months, got me to send photos of the boots, fill out an exchange form, and they processed the claim straight away. This was yesterday, 29th July 2015 and I got the boots today (30th July). Excellent customer service. Well done to all concerned!!!” • “Excellent Service – I have bought numerous items from Patrol Store over the years and have found them to be prompt and accurate with my orders.”

Business to business team Heading up the PatrolStore business to business team is Aran Lackey, Operations Director. Aran joined the NSI Group back in 2005 and has, over the years, acquired extensive understanding of every aspect of the business, from customer services, to stock management, to sales and product development. His product knowledge of PatrolStore’s entire range is second to none, and he has, over the years, become an expert on a broad range of products. The business to business team was set up to help security companies, government agencies, including

police forces and small business clients from all around the world, find the right kit and equipment that has the quality they want at the price they need. Thanks to PatrolStore’s sales service, relationships with manufacturers and its ability to develop kit from the ground up, the company is able to be the single point of contact for all your purchasing needs. PatrolStore’s quality checking procedure means that all its products, both ones designed and developed in-house and also sourced from other manufacturers, are checked by its staff and the suppliers to ensure premium quality on delivery.

“PatrolStore caters for individuals, through team leaders and devolved budget heads to government procurement contracts.” Callum Allison joined PatrolStore in May 2015 to work alongside Aran Lackey to help deal with corporate clients and ensure that the chain from initial quote to fulfilment goes as smoothly as possible. Callum has worked extensively in the past within a customer facing role and is able to meet any challenges that may come his way. The PatrolStore Corporate Team offers a bespoke service to its clients whatever the size of order, whether just a few items or a large-scale request. Pricing is available on demand, and the team is happy to provide a bespoke quote.

www.patrolstore.com Please call 01737 223062 for further information.

Looking for a North West training venue? Alternative Venues North West offers all types of training facilities on the MoD’s Reserve Estate. This consists mainly of Army Reserve (formerly Territorial Army) Centres and Cadet training facilities. It also includes the Naval Regional Headquarters Northern England (home to the Royal Marines and Royal Naval Reserves), as well as Altcar Training Camp, located near Formby in Merseyside. The sites have both indoor and outdoor space, and are perfect for physical training, vehicle, weapon and dog training. In addition, Alternative Venues also has some fantastic facilities, which can be used for large and small vehicle and equipment storage.

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Buildings and surrounding grounds are extremely secure, as well as discreet, making them ideal if you are conducting training, which is of a sensitive or covert nature. The company’s sites are located throughout the North West of England, and many of them have onsite accommodation and optional catering facilities, as well as fully equipped gymnasiums, classrooms, meeting and conference rooms. In addition, Alternative Venues’ facilities, which are already in use by many public protection agencies, can provide social facilities in the form of an officers’ mess, making them a good choice

for team building or working lunch/dinner type activities. Both long-term and short-term contracts are available – or if you just need to book a facility for a day or even a few hours, Alternative Venues will be happy to discuss your requirements.

www.alternativevenuesnorthwest.com

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Police Scotland Fleet Department: right vehicle, right place, right time Police Scotland was created on 1 April 2013, which resulted in bringing together the previous eight territorial policing organisations, Scottish Police Services Authority (SPSA) and Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency (SCDEA). Now into its third year there have been major changes in the Police Scotland fleet, which is the second largest in the UK behind the Metropolitan Police. Tony Chalk, Head of Fleet, is responsible for 3458 vehicles and 1100 pedal cycles. The road map for change is critical. Before the creation of Police Scotland, there were varied approaches to fleet management across the country. Opportunities now exist to review and consider the fleet across Police Scotland in terms of the number of vehicles, their use and location.

Fleet strategy Within Police Scotland’s fleet strategy, the key elements are: • Examine the fleet utilisation to present further opportunities to optimise the size and use of the vehicle fleet while ensuring that it remains flexible and responsive to the dynamic nature of policing • Understand the future requirements for fleet in a dynamic industry and enable a more efficient and effective approach to the deployment and maintenance of Police Scotland vehicles in support of operational delivery • Support the front line delivery of operational policing while maximising the opportunities to reduce costs and vehicle downtime.

NAPFM National Association of Police Fleet Managers (NAPFM) membership and Associate membership covers all police forces from England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Head of Fleet Tony Chalk is currently Vice Chair of the NAPFM and will take on the role of Chairman of the association in 2016. NAPFM has continued to develop and seek innovative solutions to ensure that it meets the demands of modern day policing by providing best value vehicle fleets that are fit for purpose. Tony’s first task is the next five-year strategic plan, which will be challenging in times when cost savings are at the forefront of fleet departments. The balance needs to have the right vehicle in the right place at the right time and offer best value. Scotland, of course, itself presents some unique policing challenges. It has one of the most changeable climates in the UK and some of its most isolated communities; in short, its officers are expected to cope with everything from the snows of the rugged Cairngorms to the busy city centre beats of Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

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The Fleet Headquarters, based in Glasgow, is well situated for the M8 and M74 motorways, which means that Scotland’s biggest conurbations – Glasgow and Edinburgh – are in easy striking distance, with journeys to all nine fleet bases all in relatively easy reach; Tony’s longest trips are to Inverness, which are about three and half hours away. Tony has 109 staff working for him around the force workshops; four senior managers, including three area managers, make up the management team. The challenge over the last two years was to deliver an effective and efficient Fleet Department to support Police Scotland. Also to provide a streamlined structure to deliver a cost effective fleet provision. This has: seen the centralisation of senior management and streamlining the departmental structure, reducing duplicated roles; delivered staff and non-staff savings; introduced a national fleet management system; seen the standardisation of service and repairs; and the removal of under-utilised vehicles.

Collaborative approach The goods and services supplied by the Fleet Department are essential to support the effective running of the fleet and it is critical that Police Scotland enters into contracts and manages them in a way that not only meets the force’s operational requirements but also is ethical as well as offering best value for the organisation. Tony Chalk recognises the value in promoting opportunities to work collaboratively with partners to allow the organisation to be flexible and responsive to the needs of its communities, while making the best use of its collective resources in a manner that enhances public confidence and community safety, in line with Police Scotland Corporate Strategy.

The Fleet Department’s intention is to continue to seek to collaborate and co-locate workshops with other emergency services where there is mutual agreement to do so. The Shared Emergency Services Group leads the governance for this approach. There are several examples of agreements to share workshops with other emergency services.

What next? Telematics in vehicles is the way forward for large fleets. Other UK police forces, which have introduced telematics, have been able to properly evaluate the vehicle usage and therefore better manage their running costs. The Fleet Department is currently working with the Police Federation with a view to trial and implement a telematics solution to provide Police Scotland with data that is currently unavailable or has to be manually generated to get the right vehicle in the right place at the right time.

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Better prepared policing – managing and mobilising police assets The National Police Coordination Centre (NPoCC) coordinates the deployment of police officers and staff from across UK policing to support forces during large-scale events, operations and in times of national crisis, eg large-scale disorder and civil emergencies. The NPoCC carries a further remit to: • Coordinate a continuous testing and exercising regime to ensure effective mobilisation of national assets in a crisis • Coordinate, collate and act as a national repository for capacity and capability in relation to the Strategic and National Policing Requirements on specialist UK policing assets • Develop reporting mechanisms with the Home Office, key stakeholders and Central Government crisis management • Support the Chair of the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) in COBR during times of national crisis and for large-scale events.

Launched in April 2013 and overseen by the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), formerly the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO), NPoCC replaced the Police National Information Coordination Centre with a wider remit to ensure policing is better prepared to deal with wide scale disorder or mobilisation of police assets. The team comprises officers and staff seconded from across the UK with a wealth of experience in event planning, police operations and investigative support. The last few years has been tremendously busy for the centre with high demand for the sharing of specialist police skills for large-scale events such as the NATO Summit in South Wales and Commonwealth Games in Glasgow but also for business as usual. Demand doesn’t just come from the obvious areas, such as public order policing, but a raft of specialist areas including crime investigations. This can be viewed in two ways, not enough to go round or an efficient way to use limited specialist resources.

Mapping specialist skills For the Head of the Unit, Commander Chris Greany, it is the latter, with NPoCC playing a key role in coordinating this. He said, “Our current focus is on effectively mapping specialist police skills available across the UK so that forces are aware of what expertise is available regionally and nationally. This is the first time the service has ever captured data across so many roles and will allow them to make best and most efficient use of its specialist resources against national threats.”

“Our current focus is on effectively mapping specialist police skills available across the UK so that forces are aware of what expertise is available regionally and nationally.” Mercury, a web based IT system already used to manage regional and national police mobilisation, has been developed and provided to all forces, at no additional cost, to allow them to capture and share capacity data of their force. Launched in March this year, the system currently captures data, on a quarterly basis, for 15 specialist areas, including firearms, public order and more. For each of these areas NPoCC has worked with NPCC National Leads, Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) the College of Policing and other key stakeholders to create nationally agreed role profiles – more than 150 so far.

Commander Chris Greany, Head of the NPoCC.

Search the data Moving forward, the launch of a new query tool will allow forces, regions, NPCC Committee Leads, SMEs and chief officers to search the data and see what the service has and where it is. This will help inform ongoing and future decision making around effective sharing of resources and on-going collaborative projects as well as helping to understand the issue and impact of ‘multi-skilling’. New specialist areas will be captured each quarter and future development will also explore capturing details of available equipment and more. As well as mapping national capacity of specialist roles, NPoCC links in to regional and national testing and exercising events to ensure the impact incidents can have on the mobilisation of national support is clearly considered and understood. It also regularly tests forces’ availability to be in a position to supply 10 percent of its public order requirement within one hour in line with the national public order mobilisation plan.

Disaster Victim Identification UK Disaster Victim Identification (UK DVI) also sits within the unit. Coordinated by two officers, the role of UK DVI is to coordinate the national capability of the police service to respond to mass fatality incidents in the UK. The team works with police services, government departments, local authorities and other agencies to do this and organises or contributes to training and exercising and coordinates the UK police response to mass fatality incidents overseas when requested by HM Government. The creation of an International Policing Hub later this year, to be hosted within the unit, will help maintain an oversight of all international deployments of UK officers overseas for the first time and reflects the continuing growth of NPoCC and its important position in supporting the UK police service.

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Terberg launches new multi-service vehicle Telstar at ESS2015 The focal point of the Terberg Fire and Rescue stand at this year’s Emergency Services Show (ESS2015) will be the launch of the latest vehicle within the company’s extensive range of proven fire vehicles, known as Telstar (Terberg Emergency Life-saving Support Tactical Ancillary Rescue). Uniquely designed to provide both fire service and first co-response ambulance support, Telstar provides a safe haven for emergency services, giving an effective response to the increasing number of callouts requiring combined fire and ambulance response. In support of this new product launch, Terberg will also be displaying a range of new fire support products from leading brands exclusively supplied through the company’s Fire and Rescue Division, including the TFT Impulse branch with a trigger valve system, new battery powered PPV fans from Leader, as well as new FLIR thermal imaging cameras and the Meiko SCBA washing systems. Announcing details of the company’s display at the show, Alisdair Couper, Managing Director, Terberg DTS, said, “At Terberg, we have developed a reputation for providing the emergency services with a one-stop shop for both fire vehicles and fire fighting equipment. The new product line up at ESS is testament to the ongoing development of our 2015 portfolio of products, with the continuous development of exciting, innovative new equipment for the industry.”

New fire vehicle from Terberg Making its first ever appearance is Telstar, which is based on an extra-long wheelbase Mercedes Sprinter five-tonne chassis and combines a specialist Terberg designed collaborative body with joint fire fighting and paramedic first response equipment. Telstar is designed to be based at local fire stations and meets the eight-minute target response. At the rear of the truck is a fully compliant ambulance compartment, manufactured to full ambulance regulations with easy operator access. This section of

Uniquely designed to provide both fire service and first co-response ambulance support, Telstar provides a safe haven for emergency services, giving an effective response to the increasing number of callouts requiring combined fire and ambulance response.

the vehicle houses self-loading stretchers and all medical support requirements. The middle compartment houses the fire fighting equipment, including an Hale HPX75 pump, a 60m hose reel and 500-litres of water, together with full

breathing apparatus and cutting equipment for rapid entry. Telstar is designed to carry four crew, if required. Other configurations of Telstar can be designed to meet with individual fire and rescue service requirements. “By using this collaborative approach, Telstar can save fire brigades a significant amount of money in comparison to the equivalent new fire engine, as well as providing full first response ambulance support. The first Telstar is now in service with Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue on evaluation,” said Alisdair Couper.

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New fire fighting equipment from Terberg As part of the extended range of fire and rescue service equipment seen for the first time on the Terberg stand at ESS, will be the new TFT Impulse branch with a trigger valve system. This system can be integrated into many of TFT’s highest performing fire fighting branches as an option, providing complete branch operator flow control with only a single hand, allowing the other hand to consistently control stream pattern selection.

The new TFT Impulse branch with a trigger valve system.

The Impulse trigger controller operates smoothly and easily throughout the branches’ rated flow and pressure range and offers the ability to hold multiple valve positions at the operator’s discretion.

“The new product line up at ESS is testament to the ongoing development of our 2015 portfolio of products, with the continuous development of exciting, innovative new equipment for the industry.”

SCBA washing unit Completing the new product demonstrations on the stand will be details of the arrangement between Terberg and Meiko who have partnered together to provide the first fire and recue service automatic SCBA washing unit as well as the Top Clean range for washing masks, respirators and disinfectants. “ESS will be an exciting event for Terberg as it will provide visitors to our stand with an opportunity to see the latest innovative developments for their operations,” added Alisdair Cooper.

http://terbergfireandrescue.co.uk Further information about the full range of Terberg fire vehicles and fire equipment can be obtained by visiting the website on http://terbergfireandrescue.co.uk

Thermal imaging cameras Also on display will be the ground breaking FLIR K2 and K65 thermal imaging cameras for firefighters, that are rugged, reliable and extremely economical cameras specifically designed for fire fighting applications and severe conditions. FLIR’s new NFPAapproved K65 allows firefighters to see more clearly in the harshest environments, manoeuvre more strategically, stay better oriented, and find victims faster. Continuing with the new product theme, Terberg Fire and Rescue will also be demonstrating the new complete range of battery powered PPV fans from Leader that use the Easy Pow’Air technology, developed by Leader. Terberg Fire and Rescue will be demonstrating the new complete range of battery powered PPV fans from Leader.

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The FLIR K2 thermal imaging camera.

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Resilient in times of crisis Words: Luana Avagliano, Head of ResilienceDirect Team, Civil Contingencies Secretariat, Cabinet Office It has been an amazing year for ResilienceDirect and for our stakeholders and users across the UK’s Resilience Community. Instigated by the Cabinet Office, underpinned by Ordnance Survey mapping data, ResilienceDirect™ is a multi-agency collaborative information sharing system that allows UK emergency services and their partners to share information securely in real-time, when dealing with crises and disruptive events. The platform also provides access to the Devolved Administrations, Crown Dependencies and the voluntary sector and currently has over 11,537 users in over 2000 groups.

Transforming partnership working Since it was launched in March 2014 we have already seen the system transform the way local resilience forums and partnerships work together, and it does this by giving them all access to the same information. Shared situational awareness saves time and gives the emergency services the opportunity to make fuller assessments and decisions more quickly. UK emergency services perform a critical role and to do this to the best of their abilities they require the best technology and solutions available. The inter-agency interoperability and mapping features contained within ResilienceDirect gives emergency services access to a secure and fully accredited information sharing platform that is designed to offer them the best help in overcoming the challenges of coordinating response and recovery. With it they can share information effectively during response planning, because

ResilienceDirect works across the different processes and technologies that have been adopted by each emergency service. With the growing number of different and innovative potential methods of attack on the UK, as well as the natural hazards, we need to ensure that we have the right services, processes, policies and procedures in place that ensure effective leadership for response, planning and recovery.

Bringing location context to data Ordnance Survey has been integral in delivering the first government bespoke app that provides situational awareness at both national and local level, supporting a multi-agency response. The world-class mapping data contained within ResilienceDirect allows responders to communicate accurate information with each other and to pinpoint risk down to and including individual buildings. Responders use ResilienceDirect to bring location context to data and can integrate this with other live third party datasets that can be overlaid on the existing Ordnance Survey geospatial, demographic and infrastructure data. This means the possible impact of an event can be plotted and visualised on a single map in real-time. This information is then made available across local emergency planners, responders, agencies and departments, and results in a united approach to informed and accurate decision making. In just over a year of being in existence, ResilienceDirect has been positively received by

Luana Avagliano, Head of ResilienceDirect Team, Civil Contingencies Secretariat, Cabinet Office.

agencies that have implemented it, with users describing it as an ‘easy-to-use platform’, ‘free to use’ and ‘accessible anywhere on almost any device’. The system, which has been designed to drive efficiency across strategic and tactical levels, has already delivered £760,000 in efficiency savings.

www.os.uk/rdess2015 @RD_GOV Email ResilienceDirect@cabinetoffice.gov.uk Luana Avagliano will be delivering a paper discussing how ResilienceDirect is transforming the way that planning, response and recovery are managed across the UK Resilience Community on 23 September at The Emergency Services Show 2015 in the Innovation Seminar Theatre. For more information please visit www.emergencyuk.com

Unlocking the voluntary sector’s potential The Unlocking the Potential of the Voluntary Sector project was commissioned by the Civil Contingencies Secretariat (CCS), Cabinet Office to encourage a more efficient and effective use of Voluntary Sector capacity and capability in local and national planning, preparedness, response and recovery. The voluntary sector has played a significant role in the response to, and recovery from, a multitude of significant incidents and emergencies, in particular the recent severe weather and flooding in the winter of 2013/2014. Voluntary sector partners were mobilised to staff rest centres, delivering relief items including fuel and provide psychosocial support to affected communities. However, it is clear that, throughout the UK, significant voluntary sector capability remains untapped. Engagement with the voluntary sector is a mixed picture. Emergency planning, response and recovery are delivered primarily at a local level and, therefore, voluntary sector capacity and capability is most effectively utilised through the Local Resilience Forum (LRF). The current extent, to which LRFs engage with the voluntary sector, and the methodology they choose to do this, varies greatly across the country. For example, in some LRFs, the voluntary sector is well engaged and represented at the Executive level. In others, there is more irregular and informal engagement with the sector at a sub group level.

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Free up emergency services capacity

Innovative solutions

Following the floods of 2013/14, there was considerable interest in how statutory responders might better utilise the voluntary sector in both response and recovery in order to mobilise their skills to full potential and, importantly, to free up emergency services capacity to carry out their statutory responsibilities. The Unlocking the Potential of the Voluntary Sector project was commissioned to encourage a more efficient and effective use of voluntary sector capacity and capability in local and national planning, preparedness, response and recovery. Kicking off in January 2015, Johanna Phillips, Secretary to the Voluntary Sector Civil Protection Working Group and Deputy Head of Emergency Response for the British Red Cross, has been leading on the project and has consulted with almost 100 Category 1 and voluntary sector partners to identify challenges and potential solutions to improve engagement, trust and understanding in the sector at both the local and national level. Challenges including lack of understanding of voluntary sector capability, reticence to engage due to concerns regarding insurance, indemnity and liability and the lack of consistency and coordination of the sector in peacetime and response repeatedly came up as problems.

However, alongside these challenges, a multitude of potential innovative solutions were also identified. Each of these – for example, a governance structure and standardised framework for effective collaboration, control and coordination of the voluntary sector, minimum standards of policies and procedures, standardised templates, guidance, competencies, training and exercising – are currently being considered by CCS and it is anticipated that those supported by the Cabinet Office will be implemented over the course of the next 12 months. Each of the solutions identified should lead to tangible improvements in engagement, trust and understanding of the voluntary sector – and fully unlock the vast potential of the sector in response to civil emergencies.

Awareness event Help your understanding of the capacity and capability of the voluntary sector by attending the Voluntary Sector Civil Protection Event at The Emergency Services Show 2015, which takes place on 23 September at the NEC in Birmingham. If you are interested in attending, please RSVP to oliviaburke@redcross.org.uk with your name, organisation and which session you will be attending.

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A tablet for every operative? Words: Peter Molyneux, President of Getac UK. There is a technology revolution coming to the blue light sector, and time is of the essence for emergency services needing to prepare for it. That revolution is the Emergency Services Mobile Communication Platform (ESMCP), which launches in 2016. In its simplest form, essentially it is a dedicated, nationwide 4G mobile broadband network for the use of emergency services personnel. It should be immediately clear what this means for the emergency services sector: in addition to significantly improved connectivity for voice communications this network can be used for the transmission of vital data across the country, including documents, pictures and video. Firefighters will be able to access up-to-date plans of buildings to risk-assess the site; ambulance operators can retrieve and exchange vital patient data, sharing images to confirm the best course of treatment; and police can retrieve criminal data to determine the best action for public protection. And that is just the beginning of the potential benefits to the public.

Unique challenge The possibilities will dramatically increase the capabilities of the blue light sector – but only if operatives have the means with which to access the network and that data in a reliable and consistent method. That means procurers in the emergency sector will face a unique challenge – the possibility of having to equip every single operative with a personal mobile device. In the police alone, that theoretically means bringing online 240,000 tablets – each of which will need to be rugged enough to survive without the need for constant replacement, and secure enough so that should such a device end up in the wrong hands, it cannot be used for criminal purposes. Therefore, it is vital that operatives get the right device, which offers reliability and a competitive total cost of ownership for its lifetime use. For instance, imagine the headaches that would be caused by ordering a quarter of a million low-cost tablets and finding a fifth of those need replacing after six months because they simply cannot survive the rigours of the job in the field? Making the wrong decision could prove very expensive and lead to a potentially life-threatening situation. Good advice and an understanding of the true lifetime costs are essential. As both a specialist designer and manufacturer of rugged mobile devices, Getac is expertly placed to provide the right advice needed for a successful project – and we’ll be sharing that advice on our stand, J18, at The Emergency Services Show in Birmingham on 23-24 September.

Make the most of ESMCP We have a unique understanding into what a rugged device will truly cost over its lifetime, thanks to more than 25 years of experience dedicated to developing and supplying rugged computer solutions to the market. We share our experience to ensure the best product, configuration, deployment and support and services for the success of a project throughout its lifetime. Understanding the objectives of the project and working closely with the customer is fundamental. The ESMCP is a huge opportunity – come and see us at The Emergency Services Show to find out how to make the most of it.

www.getac.co.uk If you would like to discuss any aspect of your rugged computing solution requirements, call 01952 207 221, e-mail: Sales-Getac-UK@getac.com or visit www.getac.co.uk

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Red Cross to launch Emergency app Following its award winning First Aid app, the British Red Cross, is launching an innovative Emergency app, available to the public for free download from 23 September. The Emergency app will deliver real-time alerts for severe weather and other potential threats around the UK, providing users with helpful and personalised information to keep them and their family and friends safe. As well as alerts straight to your phone, the app will also provide clear, practical advice on how to deal with a range of common emergencies such as flooding, power outages, and even terror threats. Users will be able to set several locations for the app to monitor, so you not only know what is happening where you are, but can also be sure of anything happening near your loved ones. It means that no

The Red Cross Emergency app will deliver accurate live data feeds.

matter where you are, you can rest easy that you’ll be alerted to any emergency that could affect people you care about. The app, as well as alerting you, will provide useful and practical information on what to do next.

Practical advice As well as alerts and practical advice, the app also has an ‘I’m safe’ feature that lets others know that you are OK, as well as a learn and test function where you can read about a range of emergencies and test your knowledge on how to respond. Working in partnership with the Met Office and the Environment Agency, the Red Cross Emergency app will deliver accurate live data feeds. This will enable users to have the information in one handy location, alongside Red Cross emergency preparedness advice.

Users will be able to set several locations for the app to monitor.

With the official launch of the app at The Emergency Services Show, the Red Cross will be speaking to emergency response professionals at the event, providing a ‘hot off the press’ first demo of the app’s functionality.

Communications hub Continuing with the communications and tech theme the Red Cross will also exhibit its Unimog vehicle. As the most capable and complex communications vehicle in its fleet, the Unimog’s capability allows the vehicle to operate in remote areas, acting as a communications hub for the Red Cross and its partners.

www.redcross.org.uk British Red Cross: Stand Z205 & OS29

The app will also provide clear, practical advice.

SP Services: for everything you need in an emergency SP Services is a leading UK based international supplier of medical, first aid, ambulance, paramedic and emergency rescue equipment. Supplying everything from a single pack of plasters to the latest life saving defibrillators, the company is fast becoming the preferred choice for medical solutions and equipment worldwide for both business clients and private customers. SP has a team of product experts that is able to design custom kits for small and large-scale events; previous customers have included the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, Tour De France, Ministry of Defence and the NHS. The company works closely with its suppliers and customers to source and deliver a wide range of products to meet the needs and expectations of its customers and, in doing so, the company has received consistent high praise for its quality and efficiency.

Relief efforts SP Services works closely with a number of large charities and NGOs on relief efforts. Since mid-2014, the company has been tasked to supply vital medical supplies and equipment to the brave men and women helping in the fight against Ebola in West Africa. The

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operations at Bastion House enable SP to work around the clock to process the stock requirements, ensuring delivery on time and in full to meet the growing demand as the impact of the virus becomes clear. In 2015, SP launched the new infection control friendly range of Parabag. A complete product update on the existing range, allowing for more ergonomic design, the latest fabrics and materials have been used to develop a robust and durable bag, designed by professionals for professionals. The Donway range of extraction devices has also evolved with the introduction of the vacuum mattress and vacuum splints.

seemingly every increasing it is vital that SP Services is able to supply emergency pre-hospital medical equipment in rapid response times and in the event of a crisis, which is why it has a 24-hour disaster telephone line for any of its customers to reach the team on in case of an emergency, available 24/7 to make emergency deliveries, provide support and supplies when it matters the most. Visit Stand R28 at The Emergency Services Show to discuss with a member of the team how SP Services can be your medical solutions provider for everything you need in an emergency.

Paving the way in modern medical equipment

www.spservices.co.uk SP Services: Stand R28

As the world changes so does SP Services, which is why over the years the company has developed to become fully digital. The e-commerce website operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for customers to browse, view the latest products, special offers and shop. The site includes a Live Chat function, which allows the SP team to answer customer questions and provide advice remotely and in real time, allowing them to communicate with customers around the world. In an age when natural and manmade disasters are

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Reflectivity on show as ORAFOL promotes ORALITE® brand On display from ORAFOL Europe GmbH will be the company’s full range of reflective materials, which are widely used for both PPE (personal protective equipment) and vehicles by emergency services worldwide. The company’s range of reflective livery films covers all grades from prismatic to engineer grades. ORALITE®

VC 612 Flexibright™, is ideal for application onto curved vehicle surfaces. ORALITE® 6910 Brilliant Grade Vehicle is a prismatic air backed reflective film, approved by the UK Home office CAST, and designed for high visibility applications onto emergency and Chapter 8 vehicles. All the livery films are available in a range of colours that are outstandingly bright and vivid, even in daytime. They provide long-term durability that will provide reflectivity and durability to last a vehicle’s service life. The engineer grades include ORALITE® 5650RA Fleet Engineer Grade, complemented by ORACAL® 7510RA Fluorescent Premium Cast. ORAFOL also offers other ancillary products, such as ORAGUARD® Stone Guard Films and ORAJET® Windows Graphics Films. For the PPE market, ORAFOL has a wide range of compliant tapes available for the special requirements found within the EMS market. ORALITE® tapes are the ideal tapes for emergency services personnel due to their smooth outer surface, which makes them easy to wipe clean.

Garment tapes

ORALITE® 6910 Brilliant Grade Vehicle.

Reflective high visibility garment tapes for emergency response personnel enables rapid identification of first responders at an emergency management scene. Instantaneous identification at an emergency scene is valuable to both the public and the first responders’ safety. Following the recent success in supplying Dublin Fire Services, ORAFOL will showcase the next generation of fire tapes at the show. Tapes in this range are compliant to EN 469:2005, EN ISO 20741:2013,

ORALITE® FTP 2000 and ORALITE® FTP 2100.

EN ISO 15614:2007 and ISO 16073:2011. Firefighter safety is improved with the use of these prismatic tapes, which create the necessary visual signature to make firefighters stand out against the emergency scene background. The fluorescent yellow enhances visibility in daytime as well as in any poor visibility conditions (smoke, wet conditions etc). Another feature at this year’s show for ORAFOL will be the recent brand change of all the reflective products. All the products, which used to be known in the market place as Reflexite® will going forward be branded as ORALITE® products. Andrew Bright, ORAFOL’s Business Development Manager, said, “Already back in January this year we switched the brand name for all our reflective films for vehicles from Reflexite® to ORALITE®, and 1 July the same change has taken place for all our garment tapes for the personal safety sector. We trust that the market will welcome this change.”

www.orafol.com

SMASH gives extrication The Edge Used by fire and rescue services across the UK and distributed in over 45 countries around the world, Packexe® SMASH is regarded by those who use it as an essential part of extrication kit. The time critical glass management product ensures that vehicle glass is managed while extrication is taking place. With the application of Packexe® SMASH, the glass is securely held, allowing emergency personnel to cut through vehicles without risk of injury from flying glass or dust and offers protection for any trapped patients inside the vehicle. Packexe’s® latest rescue innovation is SMASH – The Edge: a hand-held version of the SMASH roll and dispenser with all the existing benefits of SMASH, in a compact size. Perfect for rescuing in tight spaces, small storage

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spaces, working on small vehicles, or for those who need extra portability from their products. With a low initial cost and low-cost refill rolls, it is also ideal for teams on tighter budgets. Each roll is 50m and will cover around seven car windows. Rolls are quick and easy to replace, meaning that no time is lost even if the roll runs out. Small, adaptable, single-handed use: SMASH – The Edge can be used at any height, in any place.

Multi-agency use SMASH -The Edge is an indispensable product for any first responder. For the police service it is a simple addition to vehicle kit, ensuring that rapid window entry can be achieved safely and efficiently. In the UK, over the summer, there has been a high rate of dogs trapped in hot cars, and using The Edge would allow rapid entry without broken glass endangering the animal. For ambulance teams, SMASH – The Edge is

used to make an area safer faster when attending a medical emergency. If patients are trapped near building glass or in vehicles, The Edge can provide extra glass security while the team is in attendance. For fire and rescue services, the product can provide fast and safe protection when attending extrication situations. It can be used on full-size windows or on smaller vehicles, or awkwardly shaped windows, when attending to patients trapped in vehicles.

Sharps protection Packexe® is also seeing continuing popularity with Sharpswrap, for rapid sharps protection. This simple, portable and easy to apply product can be applied to any sharps in any emergency situations to make them safer for both staff and patients. Packexe Ltd is a UK-based company specialising in protection films for the trade, safety, health and consumer markets. Established in 1989, Packexe exports to markets worldwide including Europe, Japan and South Africa.

www.packexe.co.uk Packexe Ltd: Stand A3

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JESIP – one year on... The new JESIP team is looking forward to welcoming visitors to the NEC for The Emergency Services Show 2015, which takes place from 23-24 September. It has been a busy time since the first phase of the programme, which concluded in September 2014, so we have lots to tell people. Words: Joy Flanagan, JESIP Communications & Engagement Manager.

Joy Flanagan, JESIP Communications & Engagement Manager.

With the final piece of the JESIP jigsaw puzzle – Joint Organisational Learning – launched this year and now live, we truly have completed the key objectives JESIP set out to do, which were: • To establish joint interoperability principles and ways of working • To develop greater understanding of roles, responsibilities and capabilities among tri-service responders • To improve communication, information sharing and mobilisation procedures between services, including their control rooms • To implement a training strategy for all levels of command • To implement a joint testing and exercising strategy for all levels of command to ensure lessons identified progress into learning and procedural change With the Joint Doctrine: the interoperability framework proving the foundation for JESIP; the joint training courses for commanders and control rooms; a range of awareness products for all audiences; and finally, using JOL to capture learning from incidents and exercises – we have truly achieved something many did not think possible! While a lot has been completed, there is more to do and the team has four key areas of work supported by proactive communications and engagement:

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Time to review the Joint Doctrine

Not forgetting Joint Organisational Learning

The training of thousands of commanders in the classroom has provided a range of feedback to consider and the first review of the Joint Doctrine has begun. The fundamentals of the Joint Doctrine will not change but the areas below are being considered: • Development of Joint Doctrine for control rooms • Joint risk assessment • Location of tactical commanders • Standard for a Common Operating Picture • Separate annexes for devolved administrations, military and wider responders • Joint decision log (a minimum data set) • Use of METHANE outside of major incidents • Use of Interop Talk-Groups prior to co-location • Use of plain English. Consultation on the revised version will take place later in the year with the proposed publishing date for the new version in early 2016.

We spent many weeks travelling the country launching the Joint Organisational Learning (JOL) process and App this year. The App is hosted on ResilienceDirect and is a simple online tool that provides a nationally consistent method for any learning affecting interoperability to be logged. (You can learn more about ResilienceDirect from the Cabinet Office team who are exhibiting on Stand P17). The JESIP team regularly monitors what is received and carries out analysis to ensure any issues of national significance are acted upon. We are also tracking trends of common problems occurring frequently or in multiple locations. Brian Welsh, the Senior User leading on JOL, says, “JOL cannot solve all issues but aims to address the challenge of learning lessons from multi agency incidents, training, testing and exercising, which impact on emergency services interoperability. In particular, we are looking to capture learning, which is related to the Joint Doctrine; primarily the five core principles, the use of METHANE and the use of the JDM. Since the launch we have already seen some excellent inputs from services and LRFs.”

“We are now relying on services to embed and integrate JESIP locally so that use of JESIP by staff becomes second nature.” Training In addition to this work, we will be looking at the JESIP training products and revising where necessary. However, we will need to see what the Joint Doctrine review produces as this may affect our training packages. We will also consider what services have told us they need too from the recent JESIP Self-Assessment Survey.

Multi-agency testing and exercising We are working with colleagues in the Civil Contingencies Secretariat (CCS) to bring to fruition a national multi-agency exercise calendar. The intention here is to collate details of where exercises are taking place with contact details; nothing sensitive will be shared! If other areas or partners can potentially get involved or collaborate we can make exercising more effective and efficient for all. We know that many services wanted to use the format of the JESIP validation exercises as a great way to give numbers of commanders the chance to apply JESIP in a live-play environment with multi-agency partners. We have recently released the JESIP Exercise Assurance Framework for that purpose. This framework also includes templates for both umpire evaluation and multi-agency de-briefs. By using these tools it should be easier for services to collate any ‘Lessons Identified’ and then upload them onto the JOL application.

Training Theatre workshop Brian will be running a JOL training workshop on both days of the show in the Training Theatre. You can get the details here – www.emergencyuk.com/Content/ Day-One-Wednesday-23-Sep – but in these sessions Brian will provide an overview of what JOL is and will demonstrate the application. If you can’t make the conference sessions then please visit the JESIP stand where one of the team can go through the basics with you.

And finally…MTFA Some people will be aware that a new role was established last year, which also sits within the JESIP Team. Donna Hay is the National MTFA Programme Coordinator and, in liaison with the senior leads from the three services, she has a programme of work Donna Hay, MTFA Programme planned, which includes Coordinator. the review and refresh of both the MTFA National Strategic Guidance and JOPs. So, while a lot of hard work has been completed, we cannot stop there. We are now relying on services to embed and integrate JESIP locally so that use of JESIP by staff comes as second nature. To learn about all aspects of JESIP, please come along to the show and visit us on stand Z108. See you there!

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Continued expansion at Ballyclare As one of the UK's leading providers of protective clothing and equipment to the emergency services, military, transport and construction industries, 2015 has seen further growth and expansion for Ballyclare Limited. New customers, new staff and a new, modern headquarters in Stockport all form a great base for the company’s exciting future expansion. Since relaunching as a private company in 2013 the business has gone from strength to strength, underpinned by the core values of trust, protection and integrity. The purchase of the Lion firefighter business in

Ballyclare is one of the main suppliers of structural fire fighting and rescue kit to the UK fire and rescue service. Photo: Eddie Howland

2014 from LHD Group signalled the company’s intention to remain a major force in the development and supply of PPE. The amalgamation of Lion’s existing facilities also added two more care and maintenance centres, in Uxbridge and Livingston, to Ballyclare’s existing operations in Stockport and Barnsley, providing further resources to service major contracts across all its core markets.

Uniforms and stationwear Further restructuring in July 2014 saw the Ballyclare business joined by Simon Jersey, a leading manufacturer of corporate wear, and Logistik Unicorp. This has added a new dimension to the company’s offering in the emergency services sector, particularly for the supply of uniforms and station wear. This year has seen Ballyclare launch its range of ambulance safetywear: a full range of ambulance uniforms and workwear for paramedics and emergency workers. The range is part of a layering system, which means they are versatile, functional and durable. High visibility jackets and vests, shirts, fleeces and trousers provide a uniform range that keeps employees safe and protected at work and enables them to present a consistent image. Ballyclare supplies the Ministry of Defence with highly complex aircrew flying suits, the Ministry of Justice with public order suits for the prison service and the police with a range of technical PPE, clothing, hi-vis flameretardant vests and public order garments. It also supplies hi-vis technical clothing to the rail, aggregates and highways sectors and is one of the main suppliers of structural fire fighting and rescue kit to the UK fire and rescue service. In the South East and Eastern fire regions the framework agreement awarded in 2010 is going from strength to strength, attracting additional fire and rescue services up and down the country. At the heart of this agreement is the option to choose Ballyclare’s fully managed service – a turnkey solution that takes safety to a new level. Ballyclare will take on the responsibility for

This year has seen Ballyclare launch its range of ambulance safetywear.

laundering and maintaining the garments and making sure they are fit for purpose and comply with health and safety standards. It will also maintain the exacting quality control and product management procedures that allow every garment to be tracked and traced and finally decommissioned. This is helping fire and rescue services to cut costs and improve efficiencies by taking advantage of a complete support package that covers testing, sizing, fitting, supply and personnel management.

Products and developments At The Emergency Services Show this year, Ballyclare has increased the size of its stand (J11) and visitors will be able to see a number of exciting products and developments covering the fire, police, ambulance and military sectors. You will also get the chance to discuss the company’s managed services offering, encompassing garment supply, leasing, repair and laundering, as specialist partner Berendsen will be on hand to explain the process in detail.

www.ballyclarelimited.com Ballyclare Limited: Stand J11

NCEC to support national hazmat guidance for firefighters The Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) has selected NCEC’s Head of Emergency Response, Dan Haggarty, to help produce new national guidance for firefighters responding to incidents involving hazardous materials. The work forms part of CFOA and the Local Government Association’s National Operational Guidance Programme, which provides local fire authorities with the evidence and advice needed to develop local emergency policies (see page 31).

How to respond Dan Haggarty will join CFOA’s project board and will draw on his experience working for Ricardo-AEA’s National Chemical Emergency Centre (NCEC) to fulfil a

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governance role in preparation of in-depth advice on the risks associated with hazardous materials and how to respond to them during an emergency. The work builds on the 24/7 emergency telephone advice that the NCEC provides to its clients around the world, enabling organisations to safely respond to chemical incidents and provide accurate information to emergency services. Dan Haggarty said, “I’m very happy to be joining the project board for the National Operational Guidance Programme. NCEC is in a unique position to support the development of this advice thanks to our experience operating the UK’s chemical emergency centre for over 40 years and our work globally, advising business and industry on chemical emergencies.”

CFOA’s hazardous materials guidance is expected to be added to its National Operational Guidance Programme during 2016.

Advice and data Dan and other members of the NCEC team will be available on Stand R14 at The Emergency Services Show 2015, providing information on Chemsafe, the 24/7/365 national advice service freely available to the emergency services in dealing with chemical incidents, and Chemdata, the industry leading hazardous chemical database.

http://the-ncec.com/emergency-response NCEC (Part of Ricardo): Stand R14

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Intelligent preparation for CBRN terrorism The Police National CBRN Centre will once again be exhibiting at The Emergency Services Show this September. The centre’s strapline ‘Intelligent preparation for CBRN terrorism’ has never been more relevant than it is today. These are tough times for all UK emergency services and things are no different for national agencies as the ever-changing terrorism landscape, coupled with austerity and capacity challenges mean we as a centre, like our colleagues, are striving to enhance national capability to enable the UK police forces, and our partners, to continue to provide a proportionate, effective response to meet the threat from CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear) terrorism. Words: Ian Stubbs, Inspector – Capabilities, Police National CBRN Centre. The Police National CBRN Centre has been established since the late 1990s, originally co-located on a military site, with the Defence CBRN Centre, at Winterbourne Gunner, close to Porton Down in Wiltshire, a vital element of the UK defence science establishment. From its outset the centre has been ‘multi-agency’, working very closely in its early days to learn from the military. More importantly, although the Police National CBRN Centre was established as a police centre, expertise from the fire and rescue service and ambulance service were embedded from day one, in recognition that the response to CBRN terrorism required joined-up thinking and multi-agency working together principles.

“The response to CBRN terrorism requires joined-up thinking and multi-agency working together principles.” As the understanding of the threat changed, the programmes of work flexed to match. The centre grew, from humble beginnings with a dozen or so staff, up to a peak of over 80 staff including police officers, firefighters, paramedics, business support and subject matter specialists from outside the blue light services. Mid 2006, the centre moved its principle operations up to Ryton, a more central location near Coventry, onto a Police College site, where it remains. For a couple of years, Winterbourne Gunner was retained as a training venue. A satellite project office opened in Edinburgh, providing UK policing with a wider coverage and capacity while a significant capability expansion programme was being delivered. By 2009 all off-site assets were consolidated onto the Ryton site.

Building UK police capability and capacity From 2006 to 2010, the centre focused its efforts on supporting and building UK police capability and capacity, a multi-million pound programme of work, which included: • Designing and delivering command and specialist CBRN training across the UK to thousands of officers • Procurement of specialist CBRN detection, identification and monitoring technology • Working closely with science and industry to develop and procure cutting edge CBRN protective clothing and respirators for the UK police service • Developing and rolling out bespoke tactics and operating procedures • In addition to developing a 24/7 Operations Centre to provide advice and support to the UK emergency services. The Police National CBRN Centre also played a key role in supporting a Home Office programme to enhance local CBRN multi-agency response plans and in ensuring the Olympic Security Directorate delivered effective CBRN plans for London 2012.

New focus for 2015 In 2015, the changes to the policing landscape and indeed the challenges for all emergency services over recent years, prompted the centre, under the leadership of the Head of Centre Superintendent Ian Womersley, to review its focus. There will be new training, new tactics and new guidance. There will be a new, and more responsive, UK capability, all building on the products the centre and our partners have supported over the last few years. Over the last year or so, working closely with the Home Office and partners from across the policy, response and coordination spectrum, the centre is in the midst of reviewing and rolling out ways of working that are more scalable, responsive and agile, which crucially bring CBRN response closer to other policing disciplines in terms of language, landscape and structure.

Unique and complex challenges CBRN has historically been regarded as a bit of a dark art, a complex area of policing and emergency planning, an area too daunting and complicated to be part of the mainstream of emergency services response. The Police National CBRN Centre is working hard with its partners to throw some more light into the dark room, which CBRN has traditionally inhabited, to reduce that uncertainty.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

While CBRN does have some unique and complex challenges, it also throws up challenges which are common across the response to a wide variety of significant or major incidents: the priority will still be saving life and there will still be a need to establish a multi-agency command and control structure up and down the command chain, from on-the-ground operations up to (and very probably beyond) Chief Officer level. The inevitable post-incident examination will present the senior investigating officer with many of the same issues as any other large-scale inquiry. The closer you can bring CBRN response into line with tried, tested and existing plans and procedures, the more effective the response will be; the ‘muscle memory’ and decision making capability instilled in all emergency services commanders day-in, day-out, will stand them in good stead. Building the response and refining capability in this way, empowers front line officers from police, fire and rescue and ambulance services to take rapid action, which will make a real difference and save more lives in the unlikely event they are faced with a CBRN event.

www.college.police.uk Police National CBRN Centre: Stand R62

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AES highlights benefits of improved fleet management AES Fleet and Auto Electrical Services offers comprehensive fleet management solutions – using detailed analysis and process building AES is able to tailor a system to meet all organisation wide requirements. With high fuel costs and driver shortages, it’s now more important than ever to improve the management of your fleet so you are able to lower operational costs, improve fleet visibility, driver satisfaction, while complying with regulatory requirements and protecting your clients. AES Fleet offers a solution for every business, delivering reliable, recognised and accredited results consistently – streamlining and safeguarding your mobile workforce and assets. Auto Electrical Services was founded in the 1950s in Bedfordshire, and the company has bolstered the foundations of modern auto electrical engineering, taking a vintage work ethic and marrying it to current, up-to-date efficiency. Through understanding exactly how you manage your fleet, AES can ensure a seamless integration with existing business systems and processes. Whether you run a fleet of five or 5000, AES will provide you with the very best in fleet management software, service and installation, with a flexible range of supporting services to match your specific fleet requirements.

assisting your team to spend more time responding to your clients and less time on the road. AES also offers a comprehensive service desk and offers a full spectrum of auto electrical engineering, specialising in heating, air-conditioning, diagnostics and light fits; as well as employing a team of highly skilled and specialised engineers. Auto Electrical Services is an accredited member of the Freight Transport Association’s Van Excellence programme, and now sits on the Van Excellence governance group, which is made up of major van fleet operators that meet to discuss and agree any changes to Van Excellence. Auto Electrical Services is, as a result, able to introduce Van Excellence to its customers, cementing the company’s background in safety and corporate compliance, on and off the road. Auto Electrical Services has most recently achieved prestigious TomTom Business Solutions Platinum Partner status, owing to its consultative, grass roots approach and focus on all areas of commercial fleet safety, plus numerous successful end-to-end fleet investigations, installations, on-going support and customer account handling. Having huge success in the corporate, small-to-medium and start-up arenas, in an expansive client portfolio.

Safety and corporate compliance Visit AES at The Emergency Services Show, to speak to one of the company’s experts about a fleet healthcheck, process optimisation, real-time scheduling and reporting, smarter navigation and traffic information,

Build on success Richard Stansfield, Director of Business Development at AES, said, “We are greatly looking forward to bringing to The Emergency Services Show some fresh new fleet products from some of the industry leaders in telematics, paperless solutions and fleet compliance. We are excited to be able to demo all the products in real time on Stand L48b so please visit us and see how we can deliver benefits to your operations. With some of the major emergency services already in our client list we believe our systems will grow from strength to strength.”

www.aes2.co.uk Auto Electrical Services: Stand L48b

Multi-agency expertise from Dräger Leading manufacturer in safety solutions, Dräger, will be at this year’s Emergency Services Show, and invites visitors to discover more about its innovative products and services dedicated to keeping professionals safe. A trusted and loyal partner to the fire and rescue, law enforcement and ambulance services, Dräger will be showcasing its expertise across the emergency services industry, with specialists on hand to discuss product features, service, training and maintenance options. Visitors to Stand R37 can look forward to seeing technologies that ensure firefighters are protected and prepared for every situation in which they find themselves. Among the technology on display will be

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the new fireground communications range of products, the Dräger FPS-COM 5000, FPS-COM 7000, HPS 7000 firefighters‘ helmet and the new HPS 3500 tactical rescue helmet.

Universal helmet The Dräger HPS 3500 is a lightweight, multifunctional and universal helmet used by tactical rescue, mountain rescue, and wildland fire fighting. It is the first helmet in its class to hold approvals for all of these applications. Its internal four-point harness and padding give great comfort for wearers, while the adjusting wheel is easy to use while wearing gloves, and is easily adapted to individual head sizes without the need to remove it. Visitors will also be able to see the SCBA integrated PSS safety belt for use when working at height to position or tether the wearer securely preventing the chance of a fall, PSS 7000 breathing apparatus with telemetry and Merlin entry control board system, along with the innovative PC Merlin entry control system. Dräger will also be launching new FPS-COM 5000 and 7000 at the show, these products represent the next level of fire ground communications between wearers, including features such as Teamtalk, which

enables firefighters to communicate with each other, hands free, by using a voice activated full duplex communications system. Combined with direct Bluetooth wireless connectivity to fireground radios and automatic relaying of inbound radio communications, this means that everyone gets the message – first hand, loud and clear. There will also be the chance to get hands-on with Dräger’s products during the two-day event. Martyn Lamb, Fire Service Marketing Manager for Draeger Safety UK, said, “We are delighted to be attending this year’s Emergency Services Show and look forward to welcoming visitors to our stand to show them our diverse product range. “At Dräger, we have years of experience in safety and are dedicated to protecting lives, which is why we never stop innovating, improving and advancing our product portfolio. We know that every mission is different and therefore you can rely on us to be there for all training, incident and maintenance solutions that optimally fit your individual needs.”

www.draeger.com Dräger: Stand R37

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Great successes in export and tenders: TEXPORT® further expands its market share TEXPORT, the Salzburg-based manufacturer of protective clothing, has added another chapter to its success story as it sets further milestones, scoring great successes in tenders and exports. Having won major tenders in Europe – the supply of fire fighting clothing for the BF Madrid and the Berlin fire brigade – TEXPORT® has recently gained additional reputable customers. Since late 2013, the company has won prestigious tenders, such as the IBZ tender for fire fighting clothing of the Belgian fire brigade and its first major success in Britain, the tender for Dublin Fire Brigade.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Belgian fire brigades wearing TEXPORT® At the end of an already very successful 2014, TEXPORT® celebrated another great success, winning the tender for all Belgian fire brigades. In a tender and decision process lasting several years and including a large amount of development work and high investments into the infrastructure, TEXPORT eventually won the largest European tender to date for fire and rescue service protective clothing, the framework contract runs over four years and has a scope of approximately 16,000 suits for both voluntary and professional fire brigades. In several years of preparation and a subsequent strict tender process, TEXPORT® prevailed over strong local and international competitors with an adapted version of the Fire Drag Rescue model in its Body Language Version. As with the model in Rotterdam, the Drag System permits the rescue of collegues in dangerous situations. The patented X-TREME® (jacket) and X-TREME® light (trousers) compositions were chosen. This means, Belgian firefighters are ensured best protection with the highest level of

wearer comfort. For the Fire Drag Rescue Belgium model PBI® NEO®, the outer fabric, is made from PBI®. Other special features of the Belgian model include the Body Language stripe markings as well as the additional application of reflective arrows on the sides of the suit. This guarantees higher visibility of the body contour in any working situation a firefighter may encounter. Currently, sizing is ongoing as the first step in supplying the Belgian firefighters, followed by first deliveries during the fourth quarter of 2015.

Dublin Fire Brigade as first big tender win in UK As the first major success in the United Kingdom TEXPORT® was able to convince Dublin Fire Brigade of the quality of its products. With suits for Dublin now being delivered, TEXPORT® is looking to expand its influence in the British market for fire fighting clothing.

www.texport.at

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Scott Safety demonstrates fire fighting innovation among host of new technology Scott Safety, a global leader in the design, manufacture and supply of respiratory protective equipment, gas detection and thermal imaging technology, will be on Stand H32 at this year’s Emergency Services Show, demonstrating how its products meet the needs of the firefighter both today and tomorrow. Over one million firefighters across the world have trust in Scott Safety’s products. The company has developed a portfolio of innovative and reliable products that will reduce user burden and incorporate real-time telemetry, situational intelligence and communications in hazardous environments. The technologies can be fixed or portable to provide intelligence on the specific make-up of the fire and highest risk factors.

Telemetry system launch New from Scott Safety, the CODFM Transmitter, the first ever telemetry system to attach to a thermal imaging camera, will be introduced at the exhibition. Until now, this technology has only been used on perimeter cameras outside a fire scene. For the first time ever, firefighters will be able to view images of the inside of a burning building. This new technology enables fire officers to predict hazards more accurately, providing a deeper insight into the individual risks presented at a scene.

Recent acquisitions In order to lead, an organisation must be innovative. The recent acquisitions of thermal imaging company ISG and gas detection specialist IST Group brings added design, technology and product creation capabilities that both complement and enhance Scott’s existing gas detection product range. An exciting new range of portable gas detection products from GMI and Oldham (part of the IST Group) will be featured, providing firefighters with greater accuracy, portability and adaptability in hazardous environments. The popular Protégé and Protégé ZM portable multi gas detectors from Scott Safety are demonstrating a feature-rich product on the stand, ergonomically built to be easy-to-use and light-weight for everyday use while solid enough for harsh, dangerous environments.

Unequalled performance The Scott Safety 379bar cylinder.

Also on the Scott stand, demonstrations of the Propak Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) range, the ProPak-f and ProPak-fx will take place. Both products

offer an unequalled level of performance and user comfort with the ProPak-fx featuring an adjustable backplate on a rigid backframe construction for durability and performance.

Additional launches Scott Safety will be introducing some additional highly anticipated new products to the show, such as the innovative 379bar cylinder and the X380N thermal imager. The cylinder provides its users with 25 percent additional air capacity in situations when you need it most – without increasing the weight or size of the cylinder. The X380N thermal imager with ISG technology is the world’s only camera with hot spot and cold-spot tracking, enabling firefighters to obtain better situational awareness at or in a fire. Effective communication is essential for today’s first responders, who in an emergency face life-threatening situations. The Scott team will be showcasing the EPIC 3 communication system including the EPIC 3 Voice Amplifier; a robust, simple-to-use voice projection device for strong and clear voice communications to nearby respirator users. Visitors will also see the EPIC 3 Radio Interface Communications System for both near field and remote communications. The EPIC 3 RI system utilises Bluetooth® technology for wireless connectivity between the face-piece voice amplifier, lapel speaker microphone and mobile field radio to ensure clear, understandable two-way voice communications.

www.scottsafety.com Scott Safety: Stand H32

TVS broadens equipment offering TVS Ltd (Tactical Ventilation Solutions) is a small UK based public safety company founded in 2012 by Simon Hilton. Simon has an engineering background and 25 years’ experience in the UK fire and rescue service. The company has invented, patented and is currently developing a new product for fire and rescue service tactical ventilation operations worldwide. TVS is a UK distributor for fire fighting equipment, means of entry and rescue equipment and offers tailored training, maintenance and servicing for all products it supplies.

TVS is the new UK distributor for POK fire fighting nozzles, monitors and its full equipment range.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

TVS Ltd is a Unifire/Univent emergency service chainsaw specialist supplying Europe and the UK, and is the new UK distributor for POK fire fighting nozzles, monitors and its full equipment range; these are robust, high quality units well worth consideration.

International range of products Key products and services include: • Roof Buster – a UK innovation under development for tactical ventilation operations at larger structure fires to cut exhaust vents in roofing materials by remote control with the aim of reducing risks to firefighters • Tactical ventilation chainsaws for fire and rescue services from Unifire (USA) • Rescue chainsaws with diamond and specialist carbide chains from Unifire (USA) • Means of entry/forced entry chainsaws for police, prison, security services, military • Servicing, maintenance, repairs and sharpening service for its specialist chainsaws • POK nozzles, monitors and full fire fighting equipment range (France)

• Factory-based training available for TVS customers’ staff to maintain POK nozzles ‘in house’ if required • Training packages for all TVS equipment tailored to customer needs • Aspen fuels and oils, petrol and diesel alternatives with major advantages for all emergency service power units. TVS guarantees a straightforward and reliable service for its customers. The company is friendly, helpful and will be working hard to build up the business and its customer base over the next few years.

www.tacticalventilationsolutions.com TVS Ltd: Stand OS450

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Emergency response driver and instructor training

Emergency Response Driver Training Ltd (ERDT) provides emergency response blue light driver and instructor training and support and resilience services to over 37 emergency services across the UK and worldwide. The company is the first such organisation to be accredited by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) as a training body for emergency response driver and train the trainer, and the first to offer a National Diploma in Emergency Response Driving Instruction accredited by RoSPA. The emergency response driver and instructor training courses are based on individual competencies in accordance with the High Speed Driver Training (HSDT) codes of practice and Section 19 of the UK Road Safety Act 2006. ERDT provides a free online study facility, which assists the candidate’s pre-course learning and reduces course duration and costs. All of the company’s trainers are highly qualified and experienced ex-emergency service personnel with many years’ experience delivering emergency response driver training. The company’s mission is: to provide competency based emergency response blue light driver and instructor training at your location to meet your needs to keep you safe, legal and progressive.

www.emergencyresponsedrivertraining.co.uk Emergency Response Driver Training Ltd: Stand L70

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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Satellite-enabled trackers help mountain rescue efforts

Tragically two people died on Sunday 5 July as a result of two separate lightning strikes on two separate peaks in the Brecon Beacons. On the same day the Brecon Mountain Rescue Team were on a training exercise in the rugged mountainous area of the Brecon Beacons, searching for a number of practice casualties, who happened on this occasion to be medical students. The various search parties were being tracked using SPOT Gen3 GPS messengers from Globalstar as part of normal operations with the team.

Lightning strikes! At approximately 12:00 noon a large thunderstorm suddenly engulfed the skies over the mountains, with lightning, thunder and lashing heavy rain. Over the radio, rescue team members on the hill conferred with incident control and decided to stand

down from the exercise for safety reasons and to retreat to the safety of the control area. But due to the severity of the storm, within minutes, the team were no longer in an aborted training exercise – it became apparent that other walkers on the mountain suffered injuries and needed rescuing for real. At 12:05pm local police contacted Brecon Mountain Rescue Team’s control vehicle to request mountain rescue assistance as they had received a number of calls from the public about people struck by lightning on the summit of Pen-y-Fan. Rescuers at base were faced with the double challenge of needing to rescue members of the public as well as ensuring the ‘practice’ casualties were escorted safely off the hill. With the aid of their SPOT satellite tracking devices, integrated with the Mapyx MX Sarman search and rescue management systems, rescuers could locate the team members and advise them to evacuate from the hill, swiftly. Meanwhile other team members needed to provide help to public climbers in peril. To do this efficiently, rescue coordinators relied on SPOT technology to accurately track the rescuers’ progress in this mission. Soon the rescue team’s incident control team began receiving messages that the exercise casualties were being evacuated to safety. The pre-programming capability within the SPOT devices meant that search and rescue personnel on the mountain were able to notify the incident control centre by simply pressing a single button, thus conserving valuable radio air time

and allowing the team members on the hill to efficiently carry on treating the casualties within the exercise. Dave Coombs, Deputy Team Leader Brecon Mountain Rescue Team and incident controller, said, “Using SPOT satellite trackers enabled the incident control team to dispatch the team doctor and other team members towards Corn du with medical equipment very quickly to treat the casualties struck by lightning. Other team members were then dispatched to rendezvous with the team Land Rover to collect further medical equipment and proceed to the casualty site. “But just as importantly the SPOT Gen3s enabled us to monitor the positions of all team members to ensure their safety in challenging conditions.” With the help of SPOT, which relies on the Globalstar fleet of satellites traversing the planet in Low Earth Orbit, the team doctor and colleagues swiftly pinpointed the location of and reached the first casualty, high on a remote hill, within just 35 minutes of the first SOS calls from the police. Shortly after reaching the first casualty, an RAF rescue helicopter arrived on scene and picked up two casualties from Cribyn before landing on Corn du, picking up the other injured casualty, the team doctor and another team member who were treating the casualty, and evacuating them all to a nearby hospital.

www.findmespot.eu www.mapyx.com Globalstar Europe Satellite Services Ltd: Stand N26

Rapid ascent for descent specialists Join ISC at Stand M45 where you’ll have the opportunity to view the latest range of ISC Fire & Rescue products, including the D4 Work/Rescue Descender, the D2 Emergency Escape Descender (available with Technora Heat Resistant 8mm rope) and the range of Progress Capture pulleys. D4 is an evolutionary development in the world of rescue descenders. Two years of comprehensive trialling and evaluation with rope rescue and rope access users around the world has resulted in the D4 being the highest spec rescue descender in the world; it is compliant with CE, ANSI, NFPA and the stringent BCCTR test with 240kg, making it perhaps the most durable, high performance work/rescue descender on the planet! The D4 offers a 240kg (500lb) Working Load Limit (WLL), which means it is suitable for two-man rescue on ropes of 10.5mm-11.5mm (7/16 in) and it features a unique and innovative progressive cam action, which R-ALF rescue kits offers precise control at slow or fast can be speeds. used for

out device as a result of lack of choice for that user group of devices with anti-panic brakes. Due to the heights from which it can be used (120m) and the availability of (fire resistant) Technora rope, however, it is quickly gaining ground as the escape kit of choice for the wind turbine industry. The fact that it uses 8mm diameter rope (polyester or Technora) means that it can be packed into a small kit, which is much more convenient than the big bulky kits that are the norm with 11mm devices or even controlled rate descenders. There will also be the chance to try the R-ALF twoway locking pulley hauler system (with 5:1 mechanical advantage). The R-ALF’s over-speed brake locks on quickly when the control rope is released, offering safe hauling/lowering for rescue applications (WLL 250kg). R-ALF rescue kits can be used for rescue, hauling and confined space. The R-ALF kit offers features such as an auto-locking overspeed brake, flexibility of rigging (from 2:1 up to 5:1), a 35m maximum height of lift and an incredible WLL of 250kg standard unit or 350kg for a new bariatric unit under development, in partnership with Outreach Rescue.

rescue, hauling and confined space.

The mighty Arachnipod Total Edge Management will also be on display, configured as a 2m Rescue Bridge System (only one of its eight possible configurations).

Wind turbine escape kit D2 was originally designed as a bail

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Versatile modular system

The Arachnipod is an incredibly versatile, modular system, which can be configured to suit a huge range of edge management and access challenges, including bariatric and confined space applications. ISC offers both standard and bespoke Arachnipod kits, so please do drop by to discuss options for your specific edge management requirements. The company will also have the new RAD Rope Adjustment Device on show. The RAD is ideal for use as an EN358 Work Positioning device and can also be used in descent applications.

www.iscwales.com ISC Ltd: Stand M45

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Diverse range on show from Beechwood Beechwood Equipment is a UK distributor of optical sights, electro optics, including night vision and thermal vision systems, tactical and rescue equipment. The company is an approved MoD supplier (NCAGE:KOF83), a member of the Defence Trade Cooperation Treaty, and a supplier to the national police network and search and rescue organisations.

The company’s equipment product range features: FLIR thermal imaging cameras FLIR's thermal imaging cameras need no light whatsoever to produce an image. They help you to see clearly at night, in practically all weather conditions. The user can switch the display between Black Hot, White Hot and InstAlert™ modes. InstAlert™ highlights specific temperature ranges with a red gradient colour to simplify detection of animals, people and objects. Beechwood can supply a wide range of FLIR cameras, including both commercial and government systems. The company can also demonstrate thermal imaging and provide train the trainer support for FLIR’s products.

Eickhorn Solingen Rescue Tools Eickhorn has developed a range of specially designed rescue tools for the emergency services and search and rescue community, from pocket range to larger tools. Beechwood Equipment supplies the entire rescue tool range – ask at the show for full details.

425 INC The Guardian Angel represents the industry’s first wearable, portable, modular lightbar. The unit can be worn on uniform, attached to vehicles by magnetic mount and used with dogs using a specially designed harness. The Angel will run for up to 90 hours on a single charge.

Mechnix Gloves Mechanix Wear has built a reputation as a leader in high-performance hand protection. As a result of over 20 years of research, development, design and innovation, Mechanix Wear offers a diverse line of gloves delivering superior fit, feel and function to your hands.

Bespoke vehicle conversions Pickup Systems Limited has been successfully designing and manufacturing quality bespoke vehicles to customers’ specific requirements since 2007. The company has solutions for every vehicle application from fire and rescue through to utility vehicles for engineering support and maintenance, tippers for ground works applications plus ‘cherry pickers’ with working heights up to 4.5m. Pickup Systems designs and builds a flexible range of light fire appliances for UK and international markets. The smallest fire appliance in the range is the ‘JCB’ utility Rescuemax, which is equipped with 200-litres of water and the option of a low or high pressure misting system. This micro tender is ideal for small developments/theme parks and for wild fire applications.

Various configurations

Trijicon has a worldwide reputation for designing and manufacturing combat optics. The company now produces a range of binoculars and spotting scopes, which will be available to view on the Beechwood stand.

Bayco Nightstick

Recon Robotics Throwbot

FoxFury BT2 and BT3

Recon Robotics is a world leader in tactical microrobot and personal sensor systems. Worldwide, local law enforcement agencies and fire and rescue teams have deployed the company’s robots. The company’s mobile Recon Scout® and Throwbot® devices are used every day to protect their personnel, minimise collateral damage, and gain immediate reconnaissance within dangerous and hostile environments. Full demonstrations are available on request.

The FoxFury BT2 and BT3 are compact right-angle LED spotlights with maximum area illumination. The black BT3 utilises FoxFury SMO-KUT technology, which enables it to deliver an intense 600 lumen, three-degree beam that outperforms most box lights and high-powered flashlights. The BT3 provides a wider beam than the BT2.

The increasingly popular 4×4 RIV and BRV specification vehicles represent the mid-size of the range. These vehicles are offered in various configurations, which include the option of a one-piece polypropylene body with fully integrated water-foam tanks – carrying up to 700-litres of media plus high or low pressure pumps and upgraded rear suspension. The largest fire appliances currently in the range are the Mercedes Sprinter 4×2 TRV 5.0 and Toyota Hilux 6×6 conversions, which can carry up to 1200-litres of water and feature a PTO operated pump. The range also covers Civil Aviation Authority aerodrome category 1, 2 and 3 rapid intervention vehicles marketed through an agreement with Terberg DTS Fire & Rescue Limited. Pickup has this year also been named as a new franchisee for Arctic trucks in the UK vehicle conversion market. Pickup Systems is quality assured to BS EN ISO 9001 and moved to new purpose-built manufacturing facilities in September 2014.

www.beechwoodequipment.com

http://pickup-systems.com

Beechwood Equipment Limited: Stand Q19

Pickup Systems Limited: Stand D74

Trijicon

The Nightstick brand of professional light solutions are precision engineered for professionals utilising their feedback and input to develop real-world, leading edge solutions that exceed user requirements.

WMFS leads the way on R&D West Midlands Fire Service (WMFS) welcomes visitors to Stand P57 where the service will showcase its work in the field of research and development (R&D). 999eye is a multi-platform web-based emergency services link – smartphones used to stream audio and visual data from the initial scene of incidents to controls and responders to help resource incidents and confirm its exact location (GPS). The WMFS stand will also feature the Smoke Eye

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Conceptual prototype helmet-mounted thermal image camera with visor-mounted display screen. The system has been built in conjunction with Techno Centre, Serious Games Institute, Coventry. ISIS, West Midlands Fire Service’s aerial drone, relays live images from the scene of operations to command points to inform a dynamic response. Future developments include an air sampling capability to identify hazards within the smoke plume.

JESIP (Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Principles) joint working with the West Midlands Police and West Midlands Ambulance Service has resulted in the development of the MASAT (Multi-Agency Specialist Assessment Team) vehicle, which will also be on display on the WMFS stand.

www.wmfs.net West Midlands Fire Service: Stand P57

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Bennett to launch new range of fire fighting gloves The Blazemaster® DuoFlex™ with OutDry® technology, launching at this year’s Emergency Services Show, represents a truly innovative range of fire fighting gloves from Bennett Safetywear Ltd, the long established Liverpool-based manufacturer of high performance hand protection.

The BLAZEMASTER® DuoFlex™ with OutDry® technology is suitable for both technical work and structural fire fighting.

Certified to BS EN 659:2003 + A1:2008, the Blazemaster® DuoFlex™ with OutDry® technology utilises a patented lamination process that creates a waterproof breathable barrier bonded directly to the outer layer of the glove, leaving no seams or gaps and avoiding the drawbacks of conventional waterproof insert systems. The resulting dexterity makes this glove suitable for both technical work and structural fire fighting. With an exterior manufactured from supple high quality goatskin with superior water, heat and oil-resistance and a comfortable three-dimensional aramid composite lining, the new range provides outstanding convective and radiant heat performance, combined with exceptional contact heat performance (up to 500°C on certain models) and level 5 cutresistance to BS EN 3888:2003 on reinforced areas. In addition to offering unparalleled levels of comfort, fit and dexterity, the bonded OutDry® membrane provides a waterproof, chemical and pathogen-resistant barrier, which blocks water on the outside resulting in shorter drying time and superior breathability. The bonding also ensures excellent membrane and liner retention for ease of repeated donning and doffing.

The Ajax™ Guardian™ public order glove will also be on display.

A range of styles offering end-users a choice of constructions and reinforcements to respond to their specific operational requirements is available, together with a wide size range (XXS-XXXL) and a competitive pricing structure. The Blazemaster® DuoFlex™ provides an exciting addition to Bennett Safetywear’s other popular ranges of gloves for the emergency services, including its Blazemaster™ Pro-Fit structural fire glove range (itself extended by the development of the new enhanced MKV1), Extricator® technical rescue gloves and latest Ajax™ Guardian™ public order glove.

www.bennettsafetywear.co.uk Bennett Safetywear: Stand N47

Holmatro Engineered performance cutters and for professionals spreaders Professional user support

Come and see the new range of Holmatro 5000 Series cutters and spreaders at The Emergency Services Show 2015. Designed for more ergonomic cutting high and low on the car, the Inclined Cutter, with its inclined jaw, eliminates the need to lift the tool high up for a roof cut or to bend over deeply to cut the rocker panel. Working with the Inclined Cutter also means there’s more space for the tool to move towards the car when you cut a pillar from the side. The CU 5050 i tool has been tested extensively on the latest vehicles. The most important factor in the development of the new 5000 Series spreaders series was weight reduction, without compromising spreading force and spreading distance. This has been achieved through a combination of new materials, component integration and innovative design. The result is five new spreaders with an outstanding performance-to-weight ratio, which significantly reduces the physical burden on the operator. All models are available with Greenline battery technology for increased freedom of movement.

www.holmatro.com Holmatro: Stand M62

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

YMUK’s New Business Division has been specifically set up to provide Yamaha based solutions for military, blue light and first responders. In-house specialists work on special projects right from concept to final product to ensure the Yamaha machine supplied fully meets product and through life support requirements. Yamaha’s commitment is total and does not stop with supplying the best tool for the job, but continues with excellent back up by its team of dedicated professionals to allow users to buy with confidence, as many fleet operators will now testify.

Yamaha motorcycles, ATVs, utility vehicles, personal watercraft and marine engines are in service around the world. Designed to deliver the performance you need and built to the highest specification, Yamaha products have earned their enviable reputation for quality so you can rely on them in an emergency, no matter where you are or what the conditions.

www.yamaha-motor.eu Yamaha Motor UK Ltd: Stand OS402

At the show Yamaha Motors UK (YMUK) is exhibiting at The Emergency Services Show with its latest police specification FJR1300A motorcycle, the RNLI’s V1 WaveRunner rescue water craft and an array of ATVs, vehicles, generators and water pumps, all of which are used by the emergency services.

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Engineered solutions for Training auxiliary power and control and standby services

Antares TDC designs, implements, supplies and supports auxiliary electrical power and associated control/data systems within the professional vehicle and off-grid markets. The company is proud to have had its ASM3 power management system specified by London Ambulance Service again, ensuring that all vehicle batteries are in optimum condition for powering life-saving equipment and communications. In particular, the system is able to achieve this alongside the new, managed alternator systems that all OEM vehicle manufacturers are implementing to address European low carbon emission legislation.

By considering the ‘vehicle architecture’ approach, coupled with Antares TDC’s engineered solutions, the company can assist in creating the lowest total cost of ownership for your fleet. Using the engineered solution approach, customers can achieve immediate benefits by upgrading existing fleets ahead of new build benefits being realised. Join Antares on Stand D2 at The Emergency Services Show 2015 to learn more about Antares TDC’s capabilities and see the company’s work with the ambulance, fire and other professional vehicle and off-grid applications.

• CANBus control platform: can increase functionality within vehicle subsystems by saving space, reducing weight and expanding accessibility with multiple nodes, including IP66 rated daylight readable screens • Dynagen PTO driven power: adopted across Europe over the last decade for resilience purposes, perfect for exporting power on demand where no mains source is available at an incident • DC-DC and DC-AC conversion: using in-house developed platforms and partnerships with leading global suppliers, providing world-class conversion devices for DC to DC and pure sine wave inverters, all specifically designed to meet off-grid and automotive environments. The company’s technical sales team is looking forward to meeting you on Stand D2.

Emergency Fire & Safety Ltd, exhibiting in the outside area of the show on Stand OS25, specialises in the following areas: emergency standby services; medical teams; UAV aerial audits, rescue support and surveillance; off-road rescue; water rescue levels 1-4; IOSH confined space medium risk training; specialist rescue training; and rescue consultancy. The company’s clients are from the power generation, offshore (oil rigs), petrochemical and pharmaceutical industries, and many more. Emergency Fire & Safety Ltd covers standby rescue for the following clients: Harland Wolff, Dolphin Drilling, Scottrenwable Energies, AES Power Generation, Northern Ireland Electricity, Arco (Ireland & UK) ESB, Brenntag Europe and many more in specialist rescue, with full emergency rescue capability, land, sea, air, bike, off-road, drone capability 24/7. The company also provides consultancy and training to support this sector of the business.

www.antares.co.uk

www.emergencyfire.co.uk

Antares TDC: Stand D2

Emergency Fire & Safety Ltd: Stand OS25

Capabilities include:

RLSS launches flood safety and PPE modules As well as its highly popular Throwline Challenge, this year the Royal Life Saving Society (RLSS) is inviting Emergency Services Show visitors to take part in guessing the weight of a pair of water-filled waders and quickest time to don a lifejacket. Top training prizes and giveaways are available for successful participants. Will you go for Bronze – one challenge, Silver, two challenges or Gold, three challenges? This is light-hearted fun with a serious message – employees working on, in or around water need to have knowledge, skill and training in even the most basic areas of operation, because when operating in an emergency it’s often the basics that can catch you out. The society is also launching two new modules;

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

Flood Safety Awareness and PPE and Lifejackets, which both sit within the established National Water Safety Management Programme. These modules are designed for people working alongside and contributing to technical rescue rather than in the front line and are suitable for a wide range of job profiles. RLSS UK’s Water Safety Management team specialises in occupational water safety and offers the emergency services a range of advice, guidance and consultancy as well as ‘off the shelf’ or bespoke training products.

www.rlss.org.uk Royal Life Saving Society UK: Stand Z116

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Keela adds Microwave promotes knee its principals protection to rescue range Microwave Marketing has been in business for nearly 30 years, serving the high technology defence and commercial markets. The company offers a comprehensive range of standard and custom RF, microwave and optical components with the aim of providing a single source for your needs.

Globally renowned rescue and performance outdoor clothing specialists Keela International and Ilasco Limited will be on Stand J13 to display their comprehensive range of rescue and survival clothing and accessories. The company will also be using the exhibition to promote ‘Redbacks’, the world’s only non-foam, ‘leafspring’ kneepads, which have won the coveted SATRA award for the Best Innovation in Occupational PPE (personal protective equipment). Keela International and Ilasco Limited design and manufacture outer and mid/base layer wear, including thermals, performance fleeces and waterproof trousers, to protect against extreme weather conditions, as well as offering a wide choice of specialist clothing for most outdoor sports and pursuits.

Qualified engineering staff will facilitate the correct product choices for your applications, and provide support throughout design and implementation phases as required. Microwave Marketing will be showing products from several of its principals, including: • Will-Burt – vehicle-mounted and transportable telescopic towers and masts, particularly suited to temporary lighting installations and also for supporting radio communications antennas from HF through to microwave • Smiths Power – electrical surge and lightning protection devices from the well-recognised Transtector and PolyPhaser product lines for protecting AC and DC power circuits, data-lines, and HF to microwave radio communications antenna feeder cables • Senko – fibre-optic components and test/maintenance items, including harsh environment connectors, hybrid ‘power plus optical’ connectors, the Smart Probe for connector termination visual examination, and Smart Cleaners for cleaning the terminated fibre end • BSC Filters – RF filter products for the elimination of interference to radio circuits, combining multiple radios into single antennas and similar functions.

www.microwavemarketing.com Microwave Marketing: Stand OS9

Promote your safety campaign with Purple The Redbacks kneepads feature a soft and flexible TPE (Thermo Plastic Elastomer) leaf-spring set within a honeycomb matrix which distributes body weight evenly, elevating the knees to relieve back pain and reduce pressure on knee, leg, ankle and foot joints, while minimising the risk of possible injury from sharp or penetrating objects. Tony Taylor, Field Sales Manager for Keela, said, “Most of our lines are designed specifically for the rescue market, which includes Lowland/Mountain/Cave and Isar rescue teams throughout the UK as well as fire and rescue and HM Coastguard; but when we see other outstanding PPE products, such as Redbacks ,that can have an application within our market areas and which are in keeping with our own high standards of quality and performance, we are keen to become associated.”

www.keela.co.uk www.ilasco.co.uk www.redbackscushioning.com Keela International and Ilasco Limited: Stand J13

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

The Purple Company has been working alongside emergency service organisations for many years by providing printed promotional merchandise and clothing that delivers and enhances safety messages and campaigns. This has included supplying branded stationery, bags, lanyards, badges, logo bugs, key rings, stress products, mugs and a huge range of event clothing. However, the company has also worked in collaboration to deliver completely bespoke concepts and ideas that give safety campaigns impact and originality. Perhaps The Purple Company’s most successful project to date is the Goodpoint smoke alarm tester.

This simple, effective, eye catching and fun product is designed to practically support older people and those with mobility issues to safely test their smoke alarms. At the same time it acts as a potent tool in educating the public about the need to regularly test their smoke alarms. Similarly, within the home it provides a visual reminder to safe test on a weekly basis. Many fire and rescue services throughout the UK and Ireland have printed their own specific safety messages and contact details on the stem of the testers and used them both as a promotional tool at events and as part of their home safety visits and initiatives. By printing on two sides of the tester, separate organisations with a mutual interest in older people’s fire safety have joined forces (and funding) to encourage regular safe testing.

www.purplepromotions.co.uk The Purple Company: Stand B35

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Rapid Response to showcase impressive fleet Rapid Response Rescue Services is looking forward to showcasing its extensive capabilities at The Emergency Services Show 2015. Owned by the care provider, Cleeve Care Group and headquartered in Cheltenham, Rapid Response was set up in 2007 to support Cleeve Care Group’s home care teams – assuring that 100 percent of scheduled community visits were successfully made, even during severe weather. Rapid Response has since grown

The Alvis Stalwart will be part of the display at the show.

considerably, and in addition to providing ambulance and rescue services to its private clients, it now delivers emergency rescue assistance to the NHS and local authorities as well as conventional blue light and PTS services. The service is CQC regulated and approved by the BAA for airside and inter-country transfers throughout the UK. In addition, highly trained paramedics and ambulance technicians accompany all Rapid Response vehicles. Rapid Response has an impressive fleet of rescue and support vehicles, which include fully equipped 4x4 ambulances, Pinzgauer 6x6 ambulances, 8x8 Argocat and RIB rescue boats, as well as the newest addition, an amphibious six-wheeled drive Alvis Stalwart complete with 1.5-tonne hydraulic crane. The ex-military Stalwart will be part of the display at the show. To view some of the vehicles and hear more about Rapid Response and its services, please visit Stand OS454 in the outside area.

www.rapidresponseambulance.co.uk Rapid Response Rescue Services: Stand OS454

Rival arrives in the UK Those who’ve been to Russia tend not to come home raving about how smooth the roads are. So you’d think the off-road industry there ought to know a bit about underbody protection. Rival is a new name to the UK, but the Russian outfit has been growing fast since 2006. With 450 staff and four warehouses covering Europe and the USA, Rival isn’t a small outfit. For evidence of that, just take a look at the range of vehicles the company can armour up, which includes many softroaders and plenty of proper off-roaders too – and, depending on your vehicle model, plates to protect numerous different bits of its underside. If you have a JK Wrangler Rubicon, for example, there’s a full six-piece kit available at around £1300, which is decent value for that much metal.

company says it can have new fitments developed and ready for sale within a week, which is quite some going. This is a company that can armour an awful lot of vehicles for a sensible amount of money. Rival’s arrival in the UK is the work of Xtreme Sales.

www.xs4x4.parts Xtreme Sales: Stand OS5

The metal in question is usually aluminium rather than steel, so as well as being strong, Rival plates are light in weight and resistant to rusting. They’re stamped for rigidity and pre-drilled for easy installation, too, so attaching one to your vehicle ought to be a straightforward job with spanners. Rival’s range does tend to be influenced by its home market. But the

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RSG celebrates 30 years This year RSG Engineering transgresses the milestone of serving the UK emergency services for 30 years. The company originally started out as a garage maintenance business in Wolverhampton, migrating to supplying the utilities with hazard warning equipment for their vehicles and then on to the police, fire and rescue and ambulance services for their ‘blues and twos’. Today, RSG Engineering is one of the major suppliers to the emergency services for all their aftermarket hazard warning equipment, such as the lightbars, switch control systems and telematics. With this in mind, the company would like to take this opportunity to thank all its partners, both suppliers and customers, for their continued support and patronage. RSG is looking forward to welcoming visitors to its stand (C33) at The Emergency Services Show 2015, where it will be happy to discuss any future requirements you may have.

www.rsg-ontop.com RSG Engineering: Stand C33

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Transforming the delivery of local training for continuous career development Internationally accredited training PCS blends infrastructure development and equipment solutions with a suite of internationally accredited training products. Supported by a team of highly skilled sector experts who have amassed decades of operational expertise, this unique combination highlights one of the many benefits of working with PCS, enabling customers to gain the full benefit of local infrastructure facilities and essential training outcomes.

Sustainable and assured train the trainer programme PCS offers an optional ‘train the trainer’ development module to all training products. This additional feature supports clients to integrate a

sustainable and assured solution for localised training delivery and the ongoing development and skills of their instructors.

Encouraging lifelong learning Both professional and academic bodies verify PCS training products externally to provide quality assurance to clients and their communities as well as providing delegates and local instructors with valuable learning recognition. Through PCS internationally accredited standards of training, students are awarded recognised academic credits to support their lifelong learning journey and continuous career development.

www.pcs-ddd.co.uk PCS: Stand L76

Emergency responders operate in highly challenging and dynamic conditions and reliance on their professional expertise and preparedness is becoming ever more diverse. It is therefore essential they are well prepared and equipped with the very best resources and training to make the right response, first time and every time – get it wrong and the consequences will be catastrophic. Yet the ability to develop, maintain and continually improve training resources is becoming increasingly difficult for many organisations. Consequently, alternative solutions and innovative procurement routes are becoming significantly more important and this is where Practical Creative Solutions (PCS) is helping public and private sector companies both in the UK and overseas.

It’s not just about training courses… PCS, through its global experience and professional expertise in the field of fire and emergency response training, brings together people, technology, education and market solutions to design, deliver and develop sustainable solutions and opportunities for change that maximise resources and avoid the need for substantial capital investment.

Training infrastructure development In partnership with government organisations and individual companies worldwide, PCS leverages experience in creating sustainable and cost effective solution-based outcomes. Adopting a range of flexible and alternative procurement options, PCS works collaboratively to support clients to overcome economic and operational challenges. Since its formation PCS has already successfully established itself as a training design organisation, notably through its award of a contract to construct a fire training school in Portugal. The new fire training school will extend client fire training capability and includes a multiple training villa to deliver core specialist skills such as confined space operations, forced entry, search and rescue, and basement rescue procedures. The training school will also expand the PCS delivery capability footprint and features a new carbonaceous training facility with filtration unit and a multi-purpose drill tower.

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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Transforming emergency services in a smarter world By 2020, the Internet of Things (IoT) will connect more than 26 billion devices1 – a revolution that will transform the lives of millions around the world. One of the key priorities for governments will be the creation of smart, connected cities that offer a rich tapestry of innovative connected services – enriching healthcare and public services, lowering government cost structures, and making life simpler and safer for citizens. Semiconductors will play a big part in transforming emergency services and healthcare solutions in a simple, secure, safe and convenient way for a smarter world. Words: Lars Reger, CTO Automotive, NXP Semiconductors. Improving how effectively and efficiently vital services, such as medical care and emergency services, function and respond is a critical differentiator in the Smart City. In a city with an intelligently connected infrastructure, the function of vital care and emergency services is dramatically enhanced, giving citizens better access to seamless, efficient and effective services where and when they are needed. Medical care will be revolutionised as a proliferation of machine-to-machine (M2M) devices transform existing, and provide new services to patients in-hospital and at home. Response times for emergency services will be slashed thanks to Vehicle-to-X (V2X) communication. Police services will have enhanced access to, and capability to share, critical information thanks to NFC (near field communication). And all while new applications of connected technologies drive government savings that can be reinvested in programmes to better serve the community.

Accelerate emergency services The aim of all emergency response units, whether fire and rescue, police or medical, is to reach their destination as quickly as possible – every second counts for a critical injury or violent crime. In the UK, ambulances have a mandatory target of reaching the scene of an emergency within eight minutes in 75 percent of cases. However, currently emergency services frequently miss their targets as ambulances navigate roads where drivers are unable to see flashing lights or hear sirens, and fail to move to the side of the road. Lack of visibility, an inability to hear sirens, driver inattention and road space limitations can add precious minutes to time critical journeys – risking potentially devastating consequences for people requiring care.

“The ability of a Smart City to provide faster routes for emergency vehicles will revolutionise the emergency services.” In the future, emergency services vehicles will use V2X technology to communicate with their surrounding infrastructure, including traffic lights and other vehicles on the road. V2X will allow secure, real-time messages to be sent to traffic lights enroute, safely switching traffic lights to green and opening a clear route for the

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emergency services vehicle. The technology will also send a secure message to other cars enroute, notifying drivers of an approaching emergency services vehicle before they can physically hear a siren or see flashing lights. In future Smart Cities, emergency services vehicles will also have access to live data on traffic flow, allowing better route planning. Drivers will have visibility into road obstructions or areas of heavy traffic – enabling paramedics, firefighters and police officers to take alternative routes and avoid costly delays. Ultimately, the ability of a Smart City to provide faster routes for emergency vehicles will revolutionise the emergency services – contributing to faster care and ultimately saving lives.

Access vital information securely As well as minimising the time it takes for the emergency services to reach an incident, smart technology will also provide emergency service workers with instant access to vital information while on the road. The police car of the future will be fitted with full connectivity like V2X, telematics and NFC capabilities. Police will be able to quickly and easily transfer case data to and from their mobile device and access the data wherever and whenever they need. Police cars will be fitted with NFC readers, which will automatically authenticate the officer with his smartphone at the car and connect the phone to the police-server in the cloud. This eases quick download/upload of important case files and emails for officers while they work out of the office. At a crime scene, members of the police service will be able to immediately log important evidence, such as photographs or recorded statements, via their mobile device – maintaining a clear and secure chain of evidence. In the smarter world, mobile data can also be logged into the police vehicle and immediately backed up into the cloud – ensuring that evidence can never be misplaced due to a mobile device damaged in a foot pursuit or other incident. When it comes to upgrading public services, cost is a major issue. Perhaps surprisingly, implementing secure, smart systems into police vehicles isn’t costly or time consuming. There is no need to issue lots of newly developed devices to connect police officers to the digital world. They can use their existing smartphones and tablets with secure police apps running on the devices, which will connect via the securely connected police car to the office servers. To equip the police cars one doesn’t need to purchase fleets of new model vehicles equipped with new connectivity technology. Chips can be fitted retrospectively into existing police vehicle fleets, with

Lars Reger, CTO Automotive, NXP Semiconductors

simple and cost effective retrofits predicted to become a popular option as the number of Smart Cities around the world increases.

Smart healthcare – in and out of hospital The smarter world experience doesn’t stop inside the emergency vehicle; this technology can be applied to other scenarios both inside hospitals and when patients return home – creating a seamless experience from incident to treatment through recovery. In Smart Cities, hospitals are adopting wristbands fitted with smart, secure RFID chips that can securely connect to the hospital database with patients’ data. These wristbands can also be used to build an in-door hospital navigation – swiftly directing medical professionals, patients and visitors to the right location. Treatment often doesn’t end at the hospital, and a further period of recovery or recuperation is required at home. A wristband can help detecting the location of a person in a flat, so that a smart home can be programmed to automatically turn off the stove if a patient leaves the kitchen for too long, turn off the bath taps if the bathroom is left for more than five minutes, or monitor movement to identify a fall. It could even go one step further and notify family members if the person hasn’t woken (left bed) by a certain time – all providing reassurance to family members.

Smart Cities are the future Smart Cities are on the cusp of becoming the conventional norm, and connected technology will increasingly be the invisible thread weaving medical care and the emergency services seamlessly into our lives. Innovative applications like NFC and V2X technologies combined with highest level of crypto security will not only decrease the time it takes for emergency services to reach incidents, but they will also improve care in and out of hospital while driving cost efficiency and enabling reinvestment in improved services for citizens.

www.nxp.com Gartner, 2013 – http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2636073 1

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EMS organisation improves patient transport using advanced fleet management technology Based in Lakewood, New Jersey, Gem Ambulance is a private medical transportation company servicing more than 100 nursing homes and nursing facilities throughout New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania. Founded in 2007, Gem now has close to 300 employees and 100 vehicles, with five locations. Gem operates a modern fleet of state licensed ambulances, mobility assistance vehicles, specialty care transports, special bariatric transport units and wheelchair accessible buses making between 250 to 300 around-the-clock trips each day, seven days a week. Gem strives to deploy cutting edge communications technology, including computer-aided dispatch (CAD) systems and state-of-the-art global positioning systems, to ensure rapid and efficient dispatch of vehicles and crews. To improve fleet management, Gem originally employed a well-known third party dispatch tool, but soon found the solution’s features to be insufficient. In particular, the program did not provide Gem with a live data feed for tracking vehicle location. “We are a customer service company,” explained Alaine O’Brien, Operations Manager at Gem. “Our main job is to get there, and get there safely.” To improve the accuracy of their vehicle tracking data and dispatch capabilities, Gem Ambulance looked to implement a more comprehensive fleet management solution to upgrade its CAD, vehicle tracking and remote diagnostics.

said O’Brien. “Having notifications delivered to my Blackberry is so convenient; even when I am not in the office I can keep track of what is going on.” The FleetEyes application is fully integrated with Gem Ambulance’s current CAD system, while the AirLink devices provide the cellular and Wi-Fi connectivity for critical two-way data transfer of information, such as vehicle location and speed. By allowing centralised dispatch personnel to run transportation instructions through the AirLink devices, which in turn delivers the information to in-vehicle Garmin navigation devices, any data entry errors are corrected to eliminate the possibility of bad location information reaching drivers in the field. “At any moment we can see calls pending, vehicles on the road and who’s driving,” said O’Brien. “Dispatchers can improve efficiency by dispatching vehicles based on their location to incoming calls and locate vehicles on a map to provide directions if a driver is lost or uncertain of an address.”

Working with FleetEyes, provider of fleet management solutions to the healthcare and public safety industries, Gem Ambulance was introduced to an advanced front and back-end fleet management solution powered by Sierra Wireless AirLink® gateways. The FleetEyes fleet management solution for Gem Ambulance uses the AirLink gateway in fleet passenger vans with Wi-Fi hotspot for fleet ambulances. The gateway provides accurate GPS tracking and a reliable data connection, while the Wi-Fi allows for the operation of in-vehicle laptops and driver cameras. The rugged, intelligent AirLink gateways are ideal for mission critical applications requiring two-way data and location tracking. “Every morning I get a speed report delivered to my Blackberry so I can see who was going over the speed limit, which is a great tool to monitor driver behaviour,”

www.emergencyservicestimes.com

http://tinyurl.com/AirLinkgateways

Benefits • Secure, reliable connectivity for access to real-time vehicle tracking data • Simplified integration with third party applications • Streamlined data for ultra-efficient throughput • Unmatched product and partner support.

Results

Solution: Advanced Fleet Management Technology

“In the beginning, we were on a trial basis; we just wanted to see if the solution would work and if it would be beneficial,” explained O’Brien. “Now we rely on it so heavily, that in the rare case that the system is down because of internal issues, our dispatchers go crazy.”

“As a business you always want to keep your costs down. As we analysed our purchase decision, we weighed the up-front costs versus the total cost of ownership,” explained O’Brien of Gem Ambulance’s decision to go with the FleetEyes/Sierra Wireless solution. “With this solution, we could see the long-term benefit, and we knew we had found the product we were looking for.” Initially launched as a CAD service to improve dispatchers’ ability to track vehicles, Gem Ambulance has since integrated the FleetEyes/Sierra Wireless solution into all aspects of its operations, making features available to dispatchers, supervisors, operations and drivers.

LEARN MORE: why do paramedics need in-vehicle gateways? Gem Ambulance benefited greatly from deploying gateway solutions in its fleet for a number of functions. Download this whitepaper to learn more about: • The limitations of laptops and data card connectivity • The top 5 reasons to consider an in-vehicle gateway for your organisation.

Get the Whitepaper http://tinyurl.com/sierratop5

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Immersive training boosts realism for Essex FRS and partners Essex County Fire and Rescue Service’s headquarters boasts one of the most immersive training facilities available in its Operational Command Assessment and Training (OCAT) suite. Equipped with the latest Hydra Minerva Training Facility, the OCAT team at Essex is able to create a wide range of incidents with a level of realism that is second to none. Spread over nine multi-functional syndicate rooms, one large plenary room and featuring a realistic Incident Command Unit (ICU), the facility allows trainers to put officers through their paces by exposing them to challenging situations using highly realistic scenarios set against known and perceived risks located in Essex. The software enables personnel to experience the learning environment in real time, as well as utilising plenary sessions to further explore their decision making process. Video technology throughout the facility constantly updates to keep teams in each of the syndicate rooms fully immersed in the incident, while skilled operators in the control centre monitor and manipulate the images teams see and the injects they receive to build on the complexity of the incident being dealt with. Staged exercises facilitate the escalation of an incident to include the Command Support vehicle, utilising the correct protocols to ensure that each exercise is as close to reality as possible.

“The team are completely dedicated to creating the most realistic training and exercising scenarios imaginable.” As the incident grows it is divided into sectors; the action then spreads into the other pods, each of which has its own monitors showing images of a different side of the building. Each room represents a different part of the incident response so the action students see is limited to what they would see if this was a real incident. Communication between officers and crews in the different pods has to take place by radio, mirroring what would happen at a real incident. Communication between Main Control and crews wearing breathing apparatus is also simulated, to ensure the incident is as realistic as possible.

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Extensive upgrade The training facility is in a custom build wing of Essex County Fire and Rescue Service’s Kelvedon Park headquarters, having moved over from its old base in Basildon last July. The new building offers an extensive upgrade on the previous facility. The new suite has brought with it all new technologies to assist in the safe learning environment that is Hydra, and enable the service to make the learning experience more immersive than in its previous exercises. The building was handed over to Essex County Fire and Rescue Service on the 4 July 2014, and the facilitators and the team from Hydra worked hard in collaboration to make this facility operational and ready for Hydra exercises. The facility features technologies, including monitoring systems controlled by iPads, CCTV systems with pan–tilt–zoom capabilities and microphones, which allow moderators to hear even the quietest of people. The team is using the facility to promote and encourage joint working and develop decision making skills. More locally the facility is available to support multi-agency working within purpose-built Hydra exercises, while opening the service’s doors to organisations that don’t have the benefits of such an advanced Hydra Suite, and introducing them into the world of Hydra. All with the overarching aim of saving lives. Since it first opened its doors the facility has hosted a wide variety of exercises and hosted partners not only from other fire and rescue services but from local authorities, police forces, the army and even from the world of rock n’ roll – the organisers of Chelmsford’s V

Festival used the facility to test what would happen in the event of a terrorist attack. So far exercises and scenarios in use at the facility include house fires, tanker fires, major urban search and rescue scenarios, multi vehicle road traffic collisions, rail crashes, fires in a high rise block, light aircraft in collision with a building and a chemical suicide.

Gold Command As well as providing an excellent training facility the suite of offices and rooms will also be used as Gold Command in the event of a real major incident in Essex. With multiple rooms, a large plenary room and superb media monitoring and broadcasting it is the ideal facility from which to command a county-wide incident. It also has the added benefit of familiarity with many of the people controlling that incident having previously used the facility to train and exercise in the past. Assistant Divisional Officer Costa Olymbios, OCAT Manager, said, “The team are completely dedicated to creating the most realistic training and exercising scenarios imaginable. The support and foresight of service managers and the fire authority has been pivotal. “We are extremely fortunate to have access to such an amazing facility, and we endeavour to create the most realistic and credible simulations based on real and perceived risks, it is not unusual for use to pre-empt incidents or events that occur nationally. We consistently look at what we are doing to challenge and develop our personnel in the command environment.”

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A 999 service for the digital age Readers will know from personal experience that communications has changed drastically since the world-leading UK ‘999’ service was designed in the late 1930s, particularly since the arrival of the smartphone less than a decade ago. According to Ofcom two thirds of households now have smartphones and they are now the preferred means of accessing the internet; even usage among over 65s is rapidly rising. Words: Prof Will Stewart, Chair, IET Communications Policy Panel. We are now ‘Digital by Default’ and data rather than voice may be preferred not only by young users but by any user in critical situations, such as in high ambient sound or when fearing being overheard. A new Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) report, ‘Contacting Emergency Services in the Digital Age’, calls for our emergency services to keep pace with this increasing move away from landlines to smartphones, and from voice to data. It argues that creating a new crossplatform, data-based emergency service with a standard interface for consumers should be a priority. Such a move may not only save lives but also enable calls and messages to be better triaged in order to receive more appropriate and faster responses, probably at lower cost.

“There is great potential for overall cost reduction and transformation during 2016 to 2018, if we start now.” Potential for transformation The modern smart mobile has extensive capabilities such as a camera, vibration monitor, GPS location, messaging and more, which can greatly improve triage and response; and these capabilities are not yet being utilised fully. If combined with ‘wearables’ vital life signs may also be accessible. Control centre systems are also being upgraded and these will now need to access smarter handsets. There is great potential for overall cost reduction and transformation during 2016 to 2018, if we start now.

A data-based emergency service would allow people to text alerts via any appropriate app on a chosen easyto-remember special number, such as 999 – and these alerts would then be passed to the human emergency operator. The main engineering challenge would be to set up priority routing of alerts to this special number in order to avoid delays at busy times. This needs to be arranged in consultation with the main mobile and appbased text providers. The concern is not that individual groups are not developing capabilities; there are systems for cars (eCall) and motorbikes, for older people in sheltered accommodation and for accessing (temporarily) local skilled medics. But there is no overall strategy or interface.

Ministerial leadership needed In pursuit of these concerns the IET called a meeting with the cooperation of the Cabinet Office, and other interested parties on 8 July at the Royal Society. The meeting was attended by 45 stakeholders from a wide range of groups including the emergency services, regulators, government departments and communications providers. The media response was huge and shows that the timing here may be right. At the meeting there was wide-felt frustration that the 999/112 service was not being sufficiently gripped within government. The service traverses so many government and industry ‘silos’ that it would benefit greatly from Ministerial leadership able to take a wider and longer term view in setting the vision, a move that could save funds and improve impact. There was universal agreement on the need for an overall cross-stakeholder strategy to provide an ‘umbrella’ within which the many, including existing, local efforts can fit. Effort will also be needed to involve new potential stakeholders such as mobile OS and handset makers, app developers, standards bodies like

The IET Contacting Emergency Services in the Digital Age report is available at http://goo.gl/naq5ux

BSI and others, and perhaps to get young people involved in developing new applications, for example at ‘appathons’. The meeting thought that action is urgent (meaning months rather than years), driven by a number of factors, including the speed of technical change and the danger that things (globally) could develop in ways that make some linkages difficult if a framework is not made available fast. The need to replace some existing obsolete systems may also be an opportunity that cannot be postponed too long.

Standards are vital Another key function where improvement is needed is in ‘joining up’ and making better use of information that already exists. For example, managing multiple calls referring to a single incident or connecting relevant information that users might be happy to share, for example, age, gender, medical history etc. Standards are vital, both for communications and data interfaces, a familiar and usually non-government matter in the industry and for emergency usage. This is a global exercise for many social and technical reasons – in addressing the UK need comparisons, perhaps specific studies, of what other nations and regions are doing is vital. The UK may have an opportunity to lead in some respects (as in 1937) but this cannot be done alone; indeed some nations have already moved more than we have in some respects.

www.theiet.org www.emergencyservicestimes.com

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Met Police announces winner of the National Uniform Managed Service (NUMS) contract On 31 July 2015 the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) announced that DHL Supply Chain Ltd had won the competition for the National Uniform Managed Service (NUMS). Paul Butcher, Procurement Director at the MPS, who has been responsible for the procurement, said, “We had a good level of interest from the market and DHL won in the face of some strong competition from the other bidders”. The contract is for up to 10 years and the service is intended to go live from April 2016. The National Uniform Managed Service (NUMS) is a national end-to-end supply chain and logistic solution, which will deliver to customers (both organisations and individuals) a consistent, uninterrupted and on time supply of uniform and equipment. Being an end-to-end service, DHL will not only be responsible for handling orders, returns, recycling and disposal but also the procurement of all uniform and equipment supplied under the NUMS contract as well as providing warehousing and logistic capabilities.

informed decisions regarding rationalisation of the uniform catalogue, which will ultimately drive further cost improvements,” says Paul Butcher. NUMS will reduce the cost of individual customers holding stock and will provide the opportunity for customers to review their corporate real estate footprint to make additional savings. NUMS also has the ability to act as a receptor contract where it represents best value for customers who may require supplementary warehousing and logistic services beyond those required for uniform and equipment items. MPS Assistant Commissioner Helen King, responsible for territorial policing and the MPS’s SRO for the project, said, “With the current financial pressures on policing budgets it is essential UK policing collaborates where appropriate to achieve the maximum value for money for the public and provide maximum protection to front line services. NUMS is the opportunity to do just that with uniform and equipment. It will act as an enabler to standardising specifications across the country and help us ensure that our officers and staff have uniform that is fit for purpose and meets the demands of modern policing.”

National solution While the MPS has led this project and will be the first adopters of the service, NUMS was developed through engagement with forces from England and Wales and has been designed as a national solution. Other customers will be able to on-board from middle of 2016 onwards and, beyond police forces, NUMS is open to law enforcement and other emergency services. Liz Church, the NUMS service lead for the MPS, said, “It has been a great team effort to get to this point but we can’t rest on our laurels as implementation for the MPS as the first adopter begins now, and we know that through DHL, other customers may be on-boarded early on in the contract.”

National strategy NUMS was jointly commissioned by ACPO, the Strategic Police Procurement Board and the Home Office. Three key outcomes were identified: • Simplified contracting landscape and re-alignment of support activities (ie storage and distribution) to reduce cost and improve efficiencies • Increase standardisation and economies of scale to improve affordability while increasing quality • Improving service efficiency and reduce the administration burden on front line officers to access and order uniform.

NUMS impact business rules, automating approvals in a controlled way to save management time,” says Liz Church. NUMS was also identified as a key recommendation within the Home Office’s Collaborative Law Enforcement Programme and will facilitate delivery of the Home Office’s intent for greater collaboration and value for money while being an enabler to standardise specifications, manage demand and providing a national approach to contract management.

Global logistics leader Paul Richardson, Managing Director – Specialist Services, DHL Supply Chain, said, “We are delighted to have been appointed to deliver the NUMS contract. As the global logistics leader, we look forward to providing both innovation and efficiencies in the provision of this exciting new service.”

“Significant opportunities will still exist for suppliers and manufacturers.”

Value for money

“This project is an important demonstration of collaborating successfully,” says Paul Butcher. “We are confident that NUMS and DHL will successfully deliver these benefits and more.” “The IT solution supports the self-service regime we currently operate but will also allow us to roll-out

In addition to the obvious financial benefits relating to reduced unit pricing and shared operating costs resulting from collaboration, NUMS will deliver additional benefits to the MPS and other on-boarded customers. “The management information we will receive will allow us to be an intelligent customer, helping us to effectively manage the demand and make

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NUMS will have an impact and will change how police forces and other potential customers will procure uniform and equipment; it will also have an impact on the market. While DHL has been appointed as the NUMS provider, significant opportunities will still exist for suppliers and manufacturers. Paul Butcher explains, “DHL are vendor neutral. As such they will engage with the appropriate market in a fair and transparent manner when sourcing. This will provide those suppliers who have previously supplied directly to policing with the opportunity to continue to provide product and support the service as a sub-contractor to DHL.”

http://content.met.police.uk

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Standardisation for firefighters PPE Since my retirement as National Health and Safety Officer for the Fire Brigades Union (FBU), there has been no UK representation on many EU (CEN) and International (ISO) PPE Committees. I can now report the excellent news that the Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) is in the process of nominating officers to sit on BSI, CEN and ISO Standards committees. CFO Peter Dartford, the CFOA President, has played a major role in making this happen. Words: Dave Matthews FIIRSM RSP DipSM OSHCR GIOSH, Chair BSI PH/3 Protective Clothing & Convener CEN TC 162 WG2, CEN JWG FF PPE, ISO SC13 WG2, ISO SC14 WG1 & WG2. EN 469 – which version? My CEN Committee, TC 162 WG2 Heat and Flame Protective Clothing, has spent the past few years revising EN 469:2005, taking into account innovation in technology and ensuring we reference the most up to date and appropriate test methods. The 2014 edition of EN 469 contained errors, which I identified to CEN prior to publication. They insisted on publishing and there was an outcry, led by the UK BSI committee, which resulted in this version being withdrawn. A CEN Unique Acceptance Procedure (UAP) ballot is now being conducted (July-September 2015) on a revised 469, with the corrected content as per UK demands contained.

Fire Sector Federation (FSF) The new workstream for standards, including PPE, has been endorsed, and we now await progress reports as to the actual mechanics of this workstream, which, we understand, is to be led by Brian Hansford (CFRAU).

BSI PH/14 Firefighters PPE This is the mirror committee to ISO SC14 Firefighters PPE and we met on 18 March 2015 at BSI, Chiswick. Whole of life costs of garments, including cleaning and maintenance, is a fundamental consideration that those procuring PPE needs to address.

Europe (CEN) Developments The EU PPE Directive 686 has been under revision for 10 years and a new draft has been published. It is

anticipated that the revised document will become Regulation as opposed to a Directive. This means that all EU Member States will have to transpose the new document into National Law exactly, with no changes allowed.

CEN TC 162 WG2 Heat and Flame Protective Clothing The workload of WG2 continues to grow, with a number of revisions under consideration, also the development of a new EN for Technical Rescue Clothing for Firefighters. • prEN 13911 Firefighters Firehoods • prEN 16689 Firefighters Technical Rescue Suit • prEN 14560 – Selection, Use, Care and Maintenance for Heat and Flame Protective Clothing.

CEN Joint Working Group Firefighters PPE (JWG1 FFPPE) This committee is intended for Users and we are constantly searching for more Users to sit on this committee. The most recent meeting took place on 8 September 2015 in Berlin, hosted by the German Footwear Association.

International (ISO) Developments The ISO Committees addressing standards for firefighters’ PPE are ISO SC13 WG2 Heat and Flame Protective Clothing and ISO SC14 Firefighters PPE Ensembles. SC13 met in Valencia, Spain from 23-27 March 2015 and held a full week of Working Group meetings. A key work item is the revision of ISO 13506 Manikin Test. We

have already agreed to split 13506 into Parts 1 and 2. It is intended to introduce Part 1 into Europe as an EN standard. An ambitious further Round Robin trial will now be conducted.

“I genuinely believe there is a lack of knowledge within the fire and rescue service on these important (and legally required) aspects of PPE.” SC14 Firefighters PPE Ensembles The last meeting was held in Munich from 13-19 June 2015, with more than 50 delegates attending. The five Working Groups are: • WG1 General Requirements – Convener Dave Matthews • WG2 Structural Firefighting PPE – Convener Dave Matthews • WG3 Wildland – Convener Rick Swann (USA) • WG4 Hazmat – Convener Ulf Nystrom (Sweden) • WG5 Rescue – Convener Japan

Conclusions As can be seen, there are major developments taking place within the UK (BSI), Europe (CEN) and Internationally (ISO) all of which require UK User input. The news that CFOA has identified funds and is presently nominating officers is excellent and should ensure that the UK Users are fully represented and influence the outcomes. Just a cautionary note, if a firefighters’ PPE Standard is being developed under the Vienna Agreement (VA), between Europe (CEN) and Internationally (ISO), this means appointed personnel will be attending meetings as far afield as Brazil, New Zealand, Japan and Australia! I look forward to working with CFOA members as I genuinely believe there is a lack of knowledge within the fire and rescue service on these important (and legally required) aspects of PPE. I continue to deliver training for manufacturers, organisations and end users on all aspects of PPE Standards and also run an Independent Standards Office, which keeps clients abreast of all new, revised and developments on PPE Directives, Standards etc.

www.fippe.co.uk www.emergencyservicestimes.com

October2015


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October2015


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October2015


94 | ESTPRODUCTS

1

The New EasyCab – EasyCabin

www.easycabin.co.uk The EasyCab from Luton based manufacturer EasyCabin is a genuinely mobile, complete welfare unit, totally compliant with the Health and Safety at Work Act for Welfare regulations, providing all the necessary welfare facilities for either seven or eight individuals. The EasyCab is also fully N1 ECWTA (seven seats) and M1 ECWTA (eight seats) Type Approved. Built into the latest Mercedes Sprinter van, the EasyCab features a roomy, fully flushing, easy clean WC with an isolated, easy to empty, cassette tank. Comfort is guaranteed from an Eberspächer blown air heating and safe lighting is provided via LED light with PIR. There are on-board washing and microwave cooking facilities, with an ample storage area. The unit is fitted with energy saving external LED spotlights, with an easy-to-operate control panel for managing the lighting, heating, water usage and microwave. Any person qualified to drive a vehicle up to 3500kg can drive an EasyCab and all users will appreciate the easy access to the welfare facilities.

2

RESCUE 300 – Le Maitre

www.lemaitreltd.com The RESCUE 300 is Le Maitre’s high-powered smoke generator specifically for the emergency services. It retains all the great features of Le Maitre’s flagship smoke generator, the G300, while simplifying all operational controls and further increasing reliability. With a simple on/off control, smoke output control, an optional remote control and simple LED status indicators, the RESCUE 300 is designed to perform in the most demanding of applications. The unit can be used with Le Maitre’s own Industrial Smoke Fluid. As with all Le Maitre smoke generators, the RESCUE 300 uses a patented ‘layered block system’ called Genesis. Along with this they use a short heating pipe of just 1m, which allows the smoke generators to be powered by much smaller wattage heaters than competitive models, but still give immense power.Furthermore, Le Maitre’s heater blocks can be dismantled and serviced or replaced, while competitive a cast blocks cannot.

4

The PATeye – Solarbright Limited

www.solarbright.co.nz The PATeye is a self-contained solar-powered reflective marker and warning system that is triggered when ground temperature and moisture levels indicate the very high likelihood of ice formation, illuminating the road/ pavement and drawing attention to hidden patches of ‘black ice’. Once triggered the onboard LEDs flash blue and provide an active, real-time warning, alerting to the high probability of surface ice.

5

3

The Zoll AED Plus defibrillator.

Automated defibrillators – Bull Products

www.bullproducts.co.uk Bull Products has expanded its range of quality AED equipment with the addition of the Life Point Pro and the Zoll AED Plus defibrillators. The Life Point Pro AED is designed to keep SCA victims alive by directing the user with voice commands. The unit automatically analyses the ECG signal of the patient and decides whether or not defibrillation is required. Coming in a neat protective carry case, the Life Point Pro can be quickly deployed in the event of an SCA, with a simple three-step operation of simply turning the device on, unpacking the pads and attaching them to the patient’s chest, followed by defibrillation by pressing the shock button. The Zoll AED Plus defibrillator is a full rescue AED that provides real CPR help for rate and depth of chest compressions. The unit also comes in an attractive and visible carry case for quick deployment. Both the Life Point Pro and the Zoll AED Plus have a five-year warranty and replacement pads and batteries are readily available. The Life Bull Products also offers rental Point Pro AED. packages for its AEDs for those who prefer this option. The rental also provides initial training and annual refresher courses.

Observa™ radiation area monitoring system – Tracerco

5

www.tracerco.com www.matthey.com

Observa™ measures radiation dose rates and helps ensure radiation safety and source security. Combining several unique technological features, including the wall-mounted alarm unit, Observa™ is ideal for use by the oil and gas industry, the nuclear industry, hospital x-ray facilities and in non-destructive testing environments. Plug and play probes allow for simple installation, while the large, clear interface and sub menus make the device easy to set up and use. Observa™ gives live radiation dose rate readings from multiple detectors simultaneously, making it the perfect system for use in larger sites. The Observa™ system can be accessed remotely, making it particularly suited to off-site monitoring. It also provides recent radiation data history, giving the operator clear evidence of safe working environments in the event of any incidents requiring investigation.

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October2015


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October2015


96 | ESTLAST WORDS

Common causes of BA failure Breathing Apparatus (BA) is often the only line of defence against the many toxic fumes and smoke faced by frontline firefighters. The basic concept of the BA has not changed over the last 20 years but the demands of the job are continually evolving. Can the current BA technology live up to the demands made on it by the modern day firefighter and what are the common causes of BA failure? Words: Nick Baxter, Breathing apparatus specialist, HSL. A common misconception is that BA will provide the wearer with 100 percent protection from the surrounding contamination. However, BA only provides a ‘buffer’, and if this fails, the consequences can potentially be fatal. So what lessons can we learn when BA does fail, to reduce the likelihood of it happening again? Careful independent investigation of the root cause of BA failure is one of the many services that the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) can provide to the fire fighting community, as well as recommendations on how to improve work procedures and maintenance regimes. Recent investigations carried out by HSL for the fire and rescue service have included cylinder valve failures, BA hose kinking, burst BA hoses and BA moisture ingress. HSL is also involved in HSE investigated firefighter fatalities.

Water, water everywhere In one investigation, it was reported that a BA failed to supply air to the wearer. On examination almost a cup full of water was found inside the cylinder and the water content of the cylinder air was more than four times above the maximum limit specified in the European air quality standard. As a result of the high levels of water present in the BA many internal components were heavily corroded. The presence of the water and the corrosion disrupted the air supply to the wearer. Another common issue HSL has found with BA has been internal freezing of the pneumatics leading to inconsistent pressure gauge readings and also failure to supply air to the wearer. In some cases the cause has been linked to moisture inside the BA freezing under the cold temperatures created in the pressure reducer during use.

“Recent investigations carried out by HSL for the fire and rescue service have included cylinder valve failures, BA hose kinking, burst BA hoses and BA moisture ingress.” Both of the above examples relate to excessive moisture levels inside the BA – but how the moisture gets inside the BA is not always clear. In some cases, this can simply be attributed to poor compressor maintenance leading to increased moisture content

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within the air and in other cases it can be down to poor BA cleaning / drying procedures. However, in other cases, these factors have been discounted and there has been no obvious explanation. A number of hypotheses have been drawn and funding for further research to get to the root cause is being explored.

“HSL will be holding a fire and rescue services open day on 17 November 2015.” There’s a hole in my BA set! HSL has investigated BA cylinder valves, which were leaking air through the hand wheel mechanism both while in a static position and while being operated. On examination of a number of cylinder valves, the leaks were attributed to irregularities in the dimensions and quality of the internal sealing O-rings. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of reports of BA failing to supply air to the wearer due to kinking of the pneumatic hoses. In the most severe cases, hoses have actually burst. Detailed examination found weakness and degradation of the internal fibre matrix leading to reduced integrity, with the hose becoming susceptible to kinking. Irregularities and bumps were also evident beneath the surface of the hose where kinking easily occurs.

BA incident investigation HSL’s Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) team provides a number of services specifically relating to the use of BA. These include the independent testing of BA as part of incident investigations, air quality analysis, performance testing against British and European standards, and advice on maintenance, fault finding and storage of BA and associated components. Through incident investigations undertaken on behalf of the Health Safety Executive (HSE), and directly for the fire and rescue service, HSL has developed extensive knowledge and experience of all the major BA manufacturers, cylinders, cylinder valves, compressors, and air quality requirements. Our laboratory facilities include a cutting edge breathing simulator capable of performance testing to BS EN 137, across the full suite of European Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) Standards and also in accordance with the developing International ISO performance standards. In addition, the breathing simulator can be programmed to measure BA performance when subjected to the breathing patterns of real wearers.

The breathing simulator’s unique ‘breath by breath’ analysis of CO2, O2, breathing resistance and temperature allows for detailed dynamic incident analysis and research capabilities. The performance testing capabilities of the breathing simulator ranges from simple filtering respirators through self-contained BA to closed circuit BA where the breathing simulator can replicate the human breathing conditions of 37°C and humid exhaled air.

Technical specialists At HSL we can draw upon a vast range of technical disciplines to support any investigation. Recent investigations have utilised experts within HSL’s Visual Presentation Service (VPS) to provide high resolution photographs and thermal imaging of incident material, analytical scientists with a vast array of detection techniques at hand to identify contamination, materials experts analysing material degradation, and noise specialists to measure the effectiveness of alarms and communications equipment. The PPE team has an in-depth knowledge of all the current European RPE Standards and the developing International ISO performance standards for respiratory protective devices. The team is heavily involved in HSE research and guidance, including the development of fit testing guidance and the Fit2Fit accreditation scheme. The team has an extensive knowledge and contacts base within the UK, European and International RPE arena, including users, suppliers, manufacturers, Notified Bodies and accredited test houses. HSL will be holding a fire and rescue services open day on 17 November 2015, to find out more information about the open day and about HSL and its capabilities visit www.hsl.gov.uk or contact me directly at nicholas.baxter@hsl.gsi.gov.uk.

www.hsl.gov.uk This article describes findings from investigations carried out for the fire and rescue service and for the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its contents, including any opinions and/or conclusions expressed, are those of the author alone and do not necessarily reflect HSE policy.

October2015


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