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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Index

SPOTLIGHT | 20 Nicoletta pagano

Helen Oxenbury and John Burningham win top books honour | 24 The couple, whose children’s books include We’re Going on a Bear Hunt and Borka, receive BookTrust’s first ever joint lifetime achievement award.

LEARNING NEVER ENDS | 28 Gudrun Makelberge is a Belgium illustrator working on both personal projects and commercial work for a wide range of newspapers and national magazines.

AROUND THE WORLD | 36

THE FEELING SOMTHING INSIDE | 40 Exclusive Interview with Dani Torrent

CREATIVE SPACE | 48 BRIGHTNESS GALLERY | 50 #iamanillustrator

In This Issue of

Brigh |4


ILLUSION MAKER! Armando Veve (b. 1989) is an artist and illustrator working in Philadelphia. His drawings have been recognized by American Illustration, Communication Arts, Spectrum, and awarded two gold medals from the Society of Illustrators. He was named an ADC Young Gun by The One Club for Creativity and selected to the Forbes 2018 30 under 30 list.

htness 10

Armando Veve

Art Director & Editor In Chief

Creative Director & Graphic Designer

Web Designer

Hasmik (Narjes Mohammadi)

Sadegh Amiri

Sahebe Arefimehr

International Contributor

Translator

Sales & Marketing

Ali Ghafele Bashi

Darya Ghafele Bashi

Brightness Studio info@brightnessmag.com

cover :I llustration by

Special Thanks To

to

A rmando V eve

Mr.Keyvan Ghafele Bashi

a s k q u e s t i o n s a b o u t y o u r s u b s c r i p t i o n , p l e a s e e m a i l u s at: sub@brightnessmag.com

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“BEFORE YOU CAN HAVE A SHARE OF MARKET, YOU MUST HAVE A SHARE OF MIND.” LEO BURNETT

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Letter From The Editor

Art Can

stop a bullet?

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,,

“The point is, art never stopped a war and never got anybody a job. That was never its function. Art cannot change events. But it can change people. It can affect people so that they are changed...because people are changed by art - enriched, ennobled, encouraged - they then act in a way that may affect the course of events...by the way they vote, they behave, the way they think.� -Leonard #Bernstein

,,

(John Gruen interview in Los Angeles Times, December 31, 1972)

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Armando Veve


Exclusive Interview

Illusion

Maker ! EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH ARMANDO VEVE

Armando Veve (b. 1989) is an artist and illustrator working in Philadelphia. His drawings have been recognized by American Illustration, Communication Arts, Spectrum, and awarded two gold medals from the Society of Illustrators. He was named an ADC Young Gun by The One Club for Creativity and selected to the Forbes 2018 30 under 30 list.

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Armando Veve

Hi Armando ! Tell me a bit about you and your background: where are you from/ where did you study? I grew up in South Burlington, Vermont and studied illustration at the Rhode Island School of Design. I moved to Philadelphia shortly after graduating RISD in 2011. Have you always wanted to be an illustrator? When did you start working ‘professionally’? I have been drawing since my earliest memories. My first encounter with illustration as a career choice was during RISD’s pre-college program. This experience solidified my decision to study illustration at RISD. Upon graduation, it took me about two years before I was able to obtain my first illustration assignment. I worked several odd jobs during that time to support my art including positions as a cake decorator and telemarketer. I am grateful I had that time between graduation and my first job because I was able to experiment and grow outside the environment of a rigorous arts program and pressure of a deadline. I was able to find myself on my own time. My first assignment led to a second and it snowballed from there. Can you remember some of your earliest influences? Some of my early influences include “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” Tim Burton’s early animations, The Sims video games, illustrated maps, and

,,

How do you define your illustrations? Good illustration is a delicate balance between concept, execution, and point of view.

Behind every image there is a lot of visual research and sketching that ultimately becomes the basis for the final art. The process is still very mysterious.

,,

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hidden picture books. I read a lot of comics and children’s books too, which laid the groundwork for my interest in telling stories through pictures. A collection of Matt Groening’s “Life in Hell” comics inspired a search for other artists making “underground” comics, who told stories that critiqued and existed outside the manicured environment I grew up in. As someone who was growing up in a Puerto Rican, bilingual household in Vermont (the 2nd least diverse state in the U.S.), I could relate to the weirdness and sense of “otherness” in these drawings. I also watched a lot of TV as a child. The humor and absurdist narratives of 90’s cartoons have definitely played a role in the growth of my personal imagination and sense of humor.


Exclusive Interview

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Armando Veve

Your works are really unique and definitely based on strong concepts? Do you want to talk about the basis behind your illustrations? Behind every image there is a lot of visual research and sketching that ultimately becomes the basis for the final art. The process is still very mysterious. I like it that way. Which of your projects has been most important to develop your personal style? I have learned, and continue to evolve, with each new project. If I were to give credit to a single assignment, I would probably choose my first published work for the New York Times op-ed. This opened my eyes to what I could accomplish under the pressure of an editorial deadline. And creatively, I learned that I had a lot of freedom to interpret the assignments in my own way. This gave me confidence to pursue more illustration work which has slowly evolved into what I continue to do today. We’ve talked about your background and the way that you have developed as an illustrator, what about clients or publishers! How do you connect with them, do you

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work with just some special publishing houses or not? I got my first jobs by cold emailing art directors on my dream client list. This began with art directors at the New York Times op-ed. I felt that a daily section would be more open to taking a risk with me. Over time, I have developed some great relationships with art directors who continue to hire me. We are all growing together and it’s exciting to see art directors become better too. I would not be here without their trust in my work. In most cases, young artists can’t present their project , do you have any advice for them ? Don’t wait. There will never be a perfect opportunity to show your work. Get it out there and be persistent. Just make sure that the body of work you present feels cohesive and is distinctly yours. What factors should illustrators keep in mind when finding ways to improve their work? I think it’s important to understand that there is no right or wrong way to approach your work. However, I think the best way to become more confident in your process is to show up everyday and confront your studio prac-


Exclusive Interview

tice. Build your relationship to the world around you. Stay current with what is being published so you better understand how you fit into the larger conversation. Continue to seek inspiration outside of illustration and network - you can learn a lot from those around you. If you work hard, you will find that a lot of things will naturally fall into place. And finally, what do you think about social media platforms? Do you use, and do you feel social media is very important to your practice? We are very lucky to live in a time that enables us to connect with others and share our work so easily. Instagram has proven to be a really powerful tool. Take advantage of it! What do you have planned for the future? I hope to continue what I am doing but in a new environment. I will be moving studios for the first time in 6 years in the next month. I am a strong believer that a simple change in location can inspire new thinking.

www.armandoveve.com

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Armando Veve


Exclusive Interview

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Armando Veve


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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Spotlight

Born and raised in Rome I’m currently living in beautiful Tuscan hills. Since I was a child I’ve been in love with any kind of art and crafting, but I took the long way to make my dreams come true. After completing classical studies, I graduated with an illustration degree from the Istituto Europeo di Design in Rome and started working in advertising field as an art director. It’s been a great experience that put me in touch with anything happening behind a communication project, and still help me a lot in my current illustrators career. Very soon I realized making images was my true calling and came back to illustration keeping working in advertising at first, then with children books and magazine publishing. Starting from traditionally painted works, acrylics and watercolors, I met the mayor digital softwares, and since then my illustrations have become more and more digital. And personal. Digital technique allow me to “witness” the making of an image, I look at it growing up, and I just help it to come out as it really is, step by step, overlaying different media and textures.

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Nicoletta Pagano

I l l u st r a t o r www.nicolettapagano.com www.behance.net/nicolettapagano


I’m currently working either for publishing and communication and design: I love to make patterns for textiles, stationery and tableware, licensing my original drawings to leading global manufacturers. I like to change constantly the work context, style and technique, as illustration allows you to do, and I avail myself of this opportunity by putting to the test in many different areas, enjoying and learning from each one of them. My works have been selected, among others, at Bologna Children Book Fair and for Italian Illustrators Society Annual. Alice in Wonderland is a pattern made for Kartos - Toscana Carte Pregiate, part of a big project including the fairy tale subjects as The Wizard of Oz and Peter Pan (and other upcoming beautiful stories!) brought to life as wrapping paper and stationery range, printed in gold powder. It was a challenging and amazing project, where I could put together my classical background, vintage style and my own characters, trying to tell the story thought the making of repeated subjects. The designs were selected for the Annual 2018 promoted by Italian Illustrators Society, and awarded with bronze in design category.

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The Creative Space Spotlight


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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Article

Helen Oxenbury and John Burningham win top books honour

The couple, whose children’s books include We’re Going on a Bear Hunt and Borka, receive BookTrust’s first ever joint lifetime achievement award.

By Alison Flood | 24

www.theguardian.com


‘Titans’ of children’s literature … John Burningham and Helen Oxenbury. Composite: The Guardian Two giants of children’s books, Helen Oxenbury and John Burningham, are to be honoured with the first ever double BookTrust lifetime achievement award. The couple, who were married in 1964, are behind some of the most iconic picture books of the last half-century, leading to the unprecedented decision to celebrate them both for their outstanding contribution to children’s literature. BookTrust chief executive Diana Gerald described them as “titans of industry”, adding that the charity had decided to honour them together because choosing between them proved near impossible “and [we] felt that the brilliance of both should be recognised”. Oxenbury is best known for illustrating titles including We’re Going on a Bear Hunt, Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes, and The Three Little Wolves, while Burningham is acclaimed for writing and drawing titles including Borka, Husherbye, Avocado Baby and Granpa. Oxenbury trained in theatre design and tried her hand at children’s books only after seeing her husband’s success with Borka. Michael Morpurgo, author and president of BookTrust, said: “For hundreds of thousands of children over several decades, the first books they ever fell in love with were by one or both of these wondrous storymakers. To turn the pages of their books is to travel into other worlds, to discover and marvel, and to want to return again and again for another visit.” He praised in particular Burningham’s Oi Get Off My Train, and Oxenbury’s illustrations for We’re Going on a Bear Hunt. “They are works of two great artist/ storytellers. They make books you never forget, that you hold in your head and heart, as enjoyable for the grownup child often reading them out aloud, and the

smaller child, listening and looking, lost in words and pictures.” Rosen, who wrote the text for Bear Hunt, said that Oxenbury had reinvented the picture book for the very youngest children, adding: “[She] turned my adaptation of a folk chant into a great existential quest.” Judith Kerr, the author of The Tiger Who Came to Tea and winner of the BookTrust award in 2016, said that Burningham’s Humbert, about a working horse who pulls the Lord Mayor’s coach, had inspired her to become an illustrator. “More than 50 years later it is still one of the best picture books ever produced for children,” she said.

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Article

Burningham said he was “incredibly grateful” to win the prize: “I’m so very flattered when I hear people now say they love my books and that something I did 50 years ago still works and is enjoyed by their family.” Oxenbury said it was “particularly lovely” to win the prize jointly. Asked what they believe it is in their books that has managed to appeal to children over the decades, Burningham said: “I would say that they know one’s on their side. Children are not less intelligent, they’re just less experienced, and there is this rather silly attitude that can be adopted, that ‘Oh it’s for children, it’s got to be pink coloured cakes or lots of pattern everywhere, that’s what they’ll like’, and they’re bored. And if they don’t like it they simply won’t look at it.” Oxenbury said: “It’s very much the same as us reading an adult book; it’s the same requirement. You’ve got to grab them very quickly or else – you know children – they just chuck it away. They want to instantly be involved. They’re horribly honest. They used to think that little tiny children couldn’t get anything out of a picture book, but they now know that there’s an amazing amount they get out of it. They’re like sponges, they just suck up information, even at the age of four months, six months.”

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Despite being married for more than 50 years, the pair have collaborated on only one book – 2010’s There’s Going to Be a Baby. “It’s much easier if we don’t really,” said Burningham, who works on the ground floor of their home, while Oxenbury has an outside studio. They do show each other drawings that they aren’t quite happy with. “I’ll say to John, ‘What do you think of this?’ And it’ll be something that has proved to be very difficult and I’ve spent a long time over it, and all he says is, ‘Absolutely no good.’ It’s terribly depressing and you have to start again. And I do the same for him.” “Absolutely, yes,” said Burningham. “We can take it in small doses, but if we worked in the same studio it would be dreadful.” “Feathers would fly,” said Oxenbury. As leading figures in the children’s book world came out to praise Burningham and Oxenbury (“What I think they have in common is a tremendous warmth of style and reassuring, gentle humour,” said Cressida Cowell), the pair said that winning a lifetime achievement award did not mean they would be hanging up their paintbrushes. “I am horrible, aren’t I, John, if I’m not working?” said Oxenbury. “Dreadful,” said Burningham. “So I have to carry on,” said Oxenbury. Burningham said he wanted “to die in the saddle”. “I’ve never wanted to stop working on something. I’m very fortunate that I’ve got good eyesight and I haven’t got a trembly hand, so I shall get on with it.” The pair were chosen to receive the BookTrust award by a panel including Waterstones children’s laureate Lauren Child, the author and television presenter Floella Benjamin, and the author and illustrator Anthony Browne.

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Gudrun Makelberge

LEARNING NEVER ENDS EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH GUDRUN MAKELBERGE

Gudrun Makelberge is a Belgium illustrator working on both personal projects and commercial work for a wide range of newspapers and national magazines. Could you give us a bit of background about your work and education, and how did you start working as an illustrator? Growing up, drawing was a hobby of mine . I began to take it more seriously when I was around 18, and studied Graphic Design at an art school. After several years working in advertising agencies as a Graphic Designer and part time art teacher, I realized that illustration was my calling due to the personal freedom it has. So in 2014 I became fully committed to illustration. What is a normal day at the office for you ? Does it start with a cup of coffee? What is my daily routine? I’m not good at keeping one. I get up, have breakfast, brew some coffee, browse the internet. Then, I start to work on whatever project I have at hand. One of the nice things about being self-employed is the ability to schedule your time based on your own needs and wants. Depending on the amount of work I have, I usually stop after eating dinner and take some time for myself. I enjoy leisurely walks, going out, and catching up on my readings. Again, it all depends on the deadlines.

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Exclusive Interview

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Gudrun Makelberge

What do you feel was the best lesson you have learnt while studying? Is there anything that still sticks with you or do you feel you’ve thrown out a lot of advice from tutors as your practice developed? Every artist is self-taught, always, school/learning never ends. I read a lot which helps me expand my general knowledge and I’m always looking for new interesting things to illustrate and try out. It’s really easy to get caught in the pitfall of trying to illustrate what is “trendy” but those trends eventually end and you are left changing again. I mostly try to work hard and honestly. Also, it’s important to stay relevant. My style has changed over the years. At the start of my career, I tried out many styles, mediums, and materials. Also, the work of different illustrators was very inspiring. Due to my dedication, my perseverance and desire to do better each day, it’s eventually and inevitably that one day you arrive at a point where some people can recognize your work as being by your hand. How would you describe your approach? It depends whether we are talking about commercial work or personal projects. Personal projects are very important because you’re not restricted to specific requirements; you get to be a bit more free and develop new styles. In free work, I allow myself to make mistakes without the fear of an incoming deadline. These are the projects that allow me to learn more and investigate new ways of illustrating which brings about breakthroughs. Having time to create what you want with no expectations is extremely liberating and essential. Recently, I made some risographs and screenprints. I’ve always been interested in printmaking. I really love the tactile way of printmaking. To me, it’s an immediately satisfying process. You create an image by hand then you start to print. Seeing colours go down and the overlays build up gives an extraordinary feeling of joy. On the topic of commercial work, around 80% of my illustrations are commissioned. I work in many industries that require illustration - magazines, papers, audiovisual, advertising, packaging and publishing. Editorial illustrations are more conceptual; it’s thinking of situations in a different way and looking at them from another point of view. Here a personal style can be very important because when I get approached by clients, they already have expectations and it is important to be able to live up to them. Sometimes, a style is weak on its own if it is not backed by a strong idea. A good idea really helps the illustration to be distinguish and stand on a different platform than the rest. Ideas rise above technique since it is, after all, about storytelling through visual communication. The best images stimulate your imagination and change your way of thought. Editorial illustrations with tight deadlines force me to develop a quicker style; in essence, more time doesn’t give rise to better results. Quite the opposite, if I have too much time, I have a tendency to overwork it.

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What do you feel when you’re drawing? My passion is drawing and I’m rather satisfied with illustrating. The most pleasant part of my job is when I’m fulfilled with the result and when I’ve learned a lot from it.My favourite way to work is alone in my studio for it is a reflection of my personality, whether it is filled with the sound of music or with total silence. I try to live out my dream of doing the things I love. On average, how many times do you draw a character until you are satisfied? When are you satisfied with the appearances of your characters? The first stage of the creative process, the concepting phase, is the hardest and most difficult step. The final result depends on this phase. Once I’m satisfied with an idea, character, composition, colour, the process becomes more enjoyable. Taking the idea, sketches, design to final is the most revealing and enjoyable part for me. I start to experiment and get into a restful concentration.


Exclusive Interview

What factors should illustrators keep in mind when finding ways to improve their work? Practise a lot, be sure of every illustration you put into the world, don’t rush things, and have patience. You don’t need to share every illustration you create- every work the public sees should be well formed. There are no rules and do not compare yourself to other illustrators. Who or what has been the single biggest influence on your way of thinking? The people I spend most time with, those that elevate and motivate me by their positive mindset and their never-ending support of my journey as a person and a human being. Individuals whom I can learn from, or those committed to constant improvement. Surrounding myself with confident people who are the best that life has to offer paves a way for my personal growth, improves my viewpoint, and bring me success. | 31


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Gudrun Makelberge


Exclusive Interview

What materials do you enjoy working with the most? I use a combination of traditional and digital materials, but I usually start off with simples sketches, figuring out the characters, and its composition. What are you passionate about besides your work? Illustrations, paintings, photographs, architecture from different artists around the world are a visual stimulus and often the muses behind my work. Books, the art scene, mother nature, my loved ones, rest and silence propel me beyond the limits of my imagination. What social media platforms do you use? Do you feel social media is very important to your practice? I have a Facebook and Instagram in addition to my personal website. Also where can the people find out about you, see your work, buy your merchandise/ work, or receive invitations to upcoming workshops? I have a website with a shop of personal risographs and screenprints under the domain name www.gudrunmakelberge.be What are your plans for the future? To grow as a passionate person/artist/illustrator with a healthy mind and body. :-) | 33


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Gudrun Makelberge


Exclusive Interview

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Around The World

Anna Grimal

www.annagrimal.com

I am immersed in a story about autism, a writer from my town has sent me a text on the subject, with a poetic touch on how to know oneself. I am at that point to express through the text and my experience some images that match the text. I’m also about to get some very funny illustrated pins. and a project that I would like to do would be to make a personal project about my childhood.

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Antoine Doré www.antoinedore.com

I’m currently working on a series of illustrations in three colors on the theme of exploration. This one was commissioned by a magazine called Carbone at the occasion of the release of their first printed issue. It was used as screen prints in various sizes offered to the subscribers and sold at the events they organize. The theme of this issue is the treasure maps and I was asked to let my imagination run wild. I had a lot of fun drawing this one so I decided to make a whole series of screen print-like illustrations related to exploration and maps with an archaic and metaphysical touch.

Lilly Panholzer www.lillypanholzer.com | www.alldsgn.com

One of the latest projects I created was for the Austrian online newspaper “Addendum”, based in Vienna. The article was about the ORF - the Austrian Broadcasting Corporation - questioning what constitutes broadcasting in Austria and what supply must be delivered by law. For this article I created 5 icons depicting 5 topics: terrestrial reception, sports program, nine radio programs (for the nine states in Austria), culture program and television. For the icons I used limited colours and repetitive elements depicting radio waves and sound, with a human figure and a main object always in the center. The idea was to grab the attention of the reader with the playful style for a rather dry topic.

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Around The World

Mariella Cusumano My latest projects are two different books, the first one talks about the period of Belle Époque and the other one is about the magic travel of the pregnancy. Now I’m working to a diary, that the reader can write, based on the illustration that I made for the contest “Bookshop in bloom”, promoted by the magazine “Illustrati”. For this project I’m searching for a publisher. Recently I published a book concern an Urban Safari in my city.

Marion Deuchars www.mariondeuchars.com BOB’S BLUE PERIOD LAWRENCE KING PUBLISHING MAY 2018 From Marion Deuchars comes this charming and funny follow-up to Bob the Artist, about feeling sad, expressing your emotions and ways to feel better.

Piret Raud www.piretraud.com

„The Story of the Little House Who Wanted to Be a Home” (L’histoire de la petite maison qui recherchait des habitants, Éditions du Rouergue, 2017) is a picture book about a lonely empty house who would dearly like to be someone’s home. One day she decides to find someone who would like to live in her. Who could it be? A dog? Or a fish? Or a bird? Or maybe even the homeless man Jim? Or will it be someone entirely different? On the last page of the book we come across an illuminated window: it turns out the little house’s quest hasn’t been in vain after all! To draw the pictures I used an old-fashioned pen, Indian ink and liquid watercolours. My technique is really time consuming – every dot and tiny line should be on a right place. The book is designed by wonderful Olivier Douzou, whose talent I truly admire. | 38


Sofia Moore www.sofiamooreart.com

I am a Ukrainian-American artist living in Las Vegas, Nevada USA. My favorite tools are colors, textures and worn out brushes. My favorite place to be is in my studio where my paints and papers are. You can also find me hiking in the Mojave desert, or in a book store flipping through a cookbook. At the moment I am working on illustrations for a children’s book about a Fox that looses lots of things, but finds new friends. You can read about my current projects on my Instagram and m website.

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Dani Torrent


Exclusive Interview

Tell me a bit about you and your background. Where are you from and where did you study? I was born in Barcelona in 1974, but I grew up in a small village on the north, not far from the French border. When I was 17, I went back to Barcelona to study Art History at a university there. Then, I studied filmmaking in a private academy, and I studied a Master in Fine arts at the University. Finally, I studied illustration at Llotja Arts and Crafts School. For a long time, I thought my career didn’t have a clear direction, but when I finally started to illustrate, I found that I had a great knowledge of aesthetic and design consciousness from art history, as well as visual narrative and composition skills from filmmaking. What originally made you want to become an illustrator / artist? I always liked to draw, but I didn’t see it as a way of making a living, so I pursued a more academic degree. It was during the months that I spent in bed, because of an illness, that I started to draw again. I felt at ease doing this, so I decided that I wanted to become an illustrator. How would you describe your approach to a new project? I try to convey complex or subtle feelings like mistery or melancholy rather than more obvious images. I like to create unique ambients; I find poetry in the ambiguity, in making the viewer suspect that there is something not told in the limits of the image. I also like to work with languages from the fast such as art nouveau or Italian mannerism. Someone said that my illustrations look more like the memory of a scene rather than the scene itself ,which I took as a compliment. I like to change my style from book to book, so that it fits well with the story, or just for the joy of finding a new means of expression. How do you start a project? When do you know it is finished? I always start with a feeling, something inside I want to express. When I write my own stories, they start with a situation that I find poetic enough to build a whole story around it: my grandfather drawing birds on the ground, soaking a broom in the pond after a storm, a real estate agent finds out that the house he has to sell is the one he used to live in as a child… If I have to illustrate someone else’s story, I always try to connect with the world I want to present by doing some “emotion research”. I know my work is finished when they publish it. Until then I always have the temptation to modify, change, or remake my illustrations. What is your favorite piece of work in your portfolio? Why did you make it? Normally my favorite piece of work is the last one I made, because it reflects how I feel now. In this case, that work is EL Santo (The Saint), which I am very fond of. On the other hand, I feel a special affection for my interpretation of The Little Mermaid which I made when I was still in school. I spent a lot of time working on it, during which I started developing my personality as an illustrator. Although, it was voted for the most in school and won some prizes, it has never been published. Fortunately, it is to be published next spring. The Little Mermaid really fascinated me when I read it as a child. When I heard Disney made a version of it, I was disappointed for it betrayed the spirit of the tale by adding a happy ending. Therefore, I decided to make my anti-Disney version.


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Dani Torrent

What materials do you enjoy working with the most? I generally use traditional techniques, but I dislike very long processes. That being the reason why I have made many watercolour paintings. Lately, I have been working with the most basic tool of all: pencils. Who or what has been the single biggest influence on your way of thinking? I would say my mother. She is an artist too, so I grew up learning art from her. Up till now, art is still a frequent topic we discuss. How do you find inspiration for a story? I try to find what I have in common with each story, so I can connect with it on an emotional level. Then, I look for things that arouse the emotion I want to convey: an exhibition, a previous trip, a specific type of music, certain objects, shapes ,or colours with a symbolical connection to the theme. What would you say is your strongest skill? Drawing, maybe. Specifically, the expressive nature and fluidity that I bring to every day shapes. What are you passionate about besides your work? I am passionate about different forms of art. One example is music. I used to be part of a band and I play the piano. I also incorporate this passion into my work, in the sense that some of my books contain melodies that I have composed myself. Another one of my passions is moviemaking. I think my images have a floating and dynamic quality, and maybe this is because of a certain yearning for movement, that I try to express through forms, composition, etc., the pure emotion that only movement can give. In some ways I still have the mindset of a filmmaker. Describe a time when you worked hard on a project but you received negative feedback from your manager or client. How did you handle it? Yes, it happens from time to time and it is very frustrating. First of all, my experience has taught me to not answer the same day. When you get negative feedback, you may feel angry which is a natural human reaction, but it does cloud your judgment. Waiting a day or two can bring a new light to the situation. However, if I still feel confident about my work, I try to explain the reasoning behind it. For instance, why I used a specific colour, why an object is shaped the way it is, the logic behind a composition. Having said that, there were occurrences when a criticism brought a better understanding between you and your client, leading to a creation that satisfies both parties. Sometimes, the result is even better than your original work. What’s the best piece of advice you have heard? If you work as a professional artist, do not let your work be considered a hobby.

Dani Torrent w w w. d a n i t o r r e n t . c o m

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Exclusive Interview

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Dani Torrent


Exclusive Interview

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Dani Torrent


Exclusive Interview

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Creative Space

Rebelle 3 improves the realism of digital art with its state-of-the-art watercolor simulation Slovakia, 30th April 2018 - Is there anything that can beat the tactile feel of art materials? Escape Motions is back with a major update to their paint software Rebelle promising to be ever closer to that of traditional painting. The newly implemented true-to-life features turned out exceptionally well. Everyone working in the creative field strives to empower his creativity. Then there are people within the same field who create tools for artists to help them express their ideas. One of them is Escape Motions – a small team based in Slovakia who develop innovative painting software awarded all across the globe. No matter your art background or proficiency, their latest Rebelle 3 update should be on your radar. Based on months of studying the watercolors, brushes, testing hundreds of various papers, and working closely with art community, a new Rebelle 3 update unites tradition and technology with an original approach. Ultra-realistic papers, the imitations of real watercolor papers and canvases with both cut and deckled edges are not just a thing of material world any more. For now on, artists can use them digitally as well. Retaining the white of the paper or the underpainting color on your computer can be done exactly the same way as if you applied a masking fluid used for centuries solely by traditional artists. Digital painters can now take an advantage of this handy tool which adds the painting much needed contrast. The developer is also introducing “DropEngine” – a new simulation system that allows recreating the behavior of paint drips. Drips now respond realistically to paper structure, stencils and selections. An inventive concept of Ruler and Perspective tools is a great enhancement appreciated not only by starters but every artist looking for precision in his paintings. “We put art first. This new version comes again closer to blur the line between traditional and digital painting as it will give the artists an infinite range of expression possibilities packed in a simple interface.” says Escape Motions founder and a head behind Rebelle algorithm, Peter Blaskovic, “Rebelle 3 has made big strides in improving the realism of its world-class watercolor brushes, which can now accurately mimic all sorts of behavior on different paper surfaces.” The initial version of Rebelle has been introduced in May 2015. Since then Rebelle has become a sought-after paint tool dedicated to creating realistic wet and dry media artwork. Using real-world color blending, wet diffusion and drying, it convincingly mimics the way natural media interacts with the canvas and itself. Designed for both CG artists as well as for traditional painters, this tool is a must-have solution for everyone who wants to explore their artistic skills using digital technology. Availability and System Requirements The latest Rebelle 3 version is available for Windows and Mac OS for $89.99 from April 30th 2018 on Escape Motions website. It comes with unconditional 30-day money-back guarantee as well as more than 50 % discount for existing Rebelle users. Users who purchased Rebelle 2 after March 1st this year will get a free upgrade to version 3 on its release.

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Exclusive Interview

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www.escapemotions.com info@escapemotions.com

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

Brightness

Gallery

This section is devoted to the works of some of the best illustrators from all around the world. As with any real gallery, ours too aims to introduce and present those creative and elegant artworks which are created by both of professional and enthusiastic young artists. However, as opposed to the real galleries, this one will not be restricted by physical barriers or geographical borders, which implies that artists could easily connect to a wider range of audience worldwide.

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“sweet spring is your time is my time is our time for springtime is lovetime and viva sweet love (all the merry little birds are flying in the floating in the very spirits singing in are winging in the blossoming) lovers go and lovers come awandering awondering but any two are perfectly alone there’s nobody else alive (such a sky and such a sun I never knew and neither did you and everybody never breathed quite so many kinds of yes) not a tree can count his leaves each herself by opening but shining who by thousands mean only one amazing thing (secretly adoring shyly tiny winging darting floating merry in the blossoming always joyful selves are singing) sweet spring is your time is my time is our time for springtime is lovetime and viva sweet love� E.E. Cummings

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

ANNA SOKOLOVA

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ANNA GRIMAL

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Brightness Gallery

ELENA SATSUTA

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ELENA SATSUTA

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

JARDIN VIVO

JUDE WISDOM

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HANIEH GHASHGHAEI

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Brightness Gallery

MARIA BRZOZOWSKA

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ANTONIE DORE

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Brightness Gallery

PILI AGUADO

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ROYA BIJANI

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Brightness Gallery

MERCEDES LAGUNAS

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MERCEDES LAGUNAS

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Brightness Gallery

ELI PIRET RAUD

FILOMENA GALVANI

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LEONARDO GAUNA

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Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Need You!

Need You! BECOME A VOLUNTEER

We’re looking to recruit volunteers to join our team. ( Brightness ) is an international digital magazine discussing and exploring the field of illustration. We are making an effort to improve the standing of illustration as an independent profession in the world. As another major objective, we feature outstanding and creative contemporary illustration projects in various fields.

So, we are looking for volunteers to help us in these areas: - French/Spanish to English translation (assistant needed). - Publishing and collecting illustration news from around the globe (illustrator or illustration student needed) Obviously, you’ll be part of our team and we will publish your name as one of our own colleagues.

Email us at: info@Brightnessmag.com

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Welcome Articles From Writers

Brightness welcome articles , researches and interviews from writers, activists, journalists and also from artists around the world, on topics that we deal with regularly or on topics that you think need a wider circulation in illustration subject. We are most likely to publish those articles which are well-written, concise, offer a unique progressive perspective and have appeal to national and international readers. Please keep submissions under 1000 words. Since we have a small editorial staff, we cannot spend much time editing submissions. Please send us final drafts of your work. We do not guarantee that we publish all the articles we receive. They will be published after a confirmation by twice of the managers. Please send all submissions as plain text within the body of an email - you can also attach the article, for the safer side. Please include your name, contact information. A short paragraph bio is a must. If you wish, you can also send a thumb size photo of the author. We’ll be glad to publish it along with the article. You can submit your articles to i n f o @ b r i g h t n e s s m a g . c o m One word of caution. When you are submitting articles use the word -submission- in the subject line. Finally, it is very important to respect copyright and write the names of artists who their arts are used by you in the caption.

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Profile for Brightness Magazine

Brightness magazine no8  

new issue Published! Exclusive interview with Armando Veve, Daniel Torrent, Gudrun Makelberge

Brightness magazine no8  

new issue Published! Exclusive interview with Armando Veve, Daniel Torrent, Gudrun Makelberge

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