Brightness Magazine No 20 - Digital Journal of Illustration

Scroll for more

Page 1

|1


Digital Journal of Illustration |

|2


www.brightnessaward.com |3


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Index

SPOTLIGHT | 18 WENDY DENISSEN

WELCOME TO THE ZOO | 22 Exclusive Interview with ALISON JAY

WATER ELEMENT | 30 Author: GLORIA RUIZ BLANCO | Illustrator: ANA SALGUERO

PEOPLE NEED ART | 36 Exclusive Interview with JENNY KROIK

AROUND THE WORLD | 42

SCRAPBOOK | 44

with SVENJA STRAUCH

MY MEXICAN ROOTS | 48 Exclusive Interview with GUILLERMO FLORES

CREATIVE SPACE | 58 BRIGHTNESS GALLERY | 60 #FREINDSHIP

In This Issue of

cover : illustration by

To

Davide B onazzi

a s k q u e s t i o n s a b o u t y o u r s u b s c r i p t i o n , p l e a s e e m a i l u s at: sub@brightnessmag.com

|

w w w. b r i g h t n e s s m a g . c o m

© All Rights Are Reserved.

|4


TRY TO DO BETTER EVERY DAY Davide Bonazzi

8 Art Director & Editor In Chief

Creative Director & Graphic Designer

Web Design

Hasmik (Narjes Mohammadi)

Sadegh Amiri

STUDIO BRIGHTNESS

International Contributors

Translator

Sales & Marketing

Concha Pasamar | Ana Rodriguez Ali Ghafele Bashi | Jen Yoon | MarĂ­a Wright

Darya Ghafele Bashi

Brightness Studio info@brightnessmag.com

|5


Digital Journal of Illustration |

ABOUT US

PLEASE VISIT OUR WESITE: WWW.BRIGHTNESSMAG.COM EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS . EXHIBITION NEWS . ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES

ABOUT BRIGHTNESS Brightness magazine was founded by Narjes Mohammadi (Hasmik) and Sadegh Amiri in 2016 as a digital magazine to present exclusive interviews with experienced illustrators, whose wisdom and knowledge are treasure troves for young artists. We aim to promote the current works of popular as well as up and coming artists, so that people can be inspired by the beauty and effectiveness of illustration in expressing powerful ideas. For those who want to dive deeper into the wonderful world of illustration we present articles that give valuable insights into the creative minds of the world. We hope you enjoy reading our publications as much as we enjoy publishing them.

|6


We want to change the world with art and love...

BRIGHTNESS FOUNDERS

SADEGH AMIRI HANZAKI

NARJES MOHAMMADI HASMIK

PHOTOGRAPHER & ART DIRECTOR

ILLUSTRATOR

FOUNDER AND CEO

FOUNDER AND EDITOR IN CHIEF

Are you interested in submitting to Brightness? If you’d like the chance of being published in one of issue, get in touch via this page. Please note that we receive many submissions each day and have limited space in each publication. So please show us the work you’re most proud of or the work you especially enjoy creating.

Submission Info Email your submission to sub@brightnessmag.com with “ART SUBMISSION” in the subject line. • Submit images as JPEGs or GIFs • Submit up to 5 images • Image sizes should be at least 600px wide and no more than 1000px wide

EMAIL ADDRESS: sub@Brightnessmag.com |7


Digital Journal of Illustration |

|8

Davide Bonazzi


Exclusive Interview

TRY TO DO

BETTER

EVERY DAY EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH DAVIDE BONAZZI

Davide Bonazzi has been working as freelance illustrator for major publishers, advertisers and institutions including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Science, GQ, Variety, Gatorade, Nike, UNESCO, Roche, Emergency and over 200 others worldwide. Born and raised in Bologna, Italy, first earning a degree at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Bologna, he also studied Illustration in Milan at IED - European Institute of Design and at the Academy of Fine Arts of Bologna. Davide aims to create clever visual solutions to represent complex topics, as well as narrative, witty images. His style combines digital media with textures of scanned found objects, in order to give his illustrations a warm and evocative atmosphere.

w w w. d a v i d e b o n a z z i . c o m In st ag r am: davidebonazzi24 |9


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Davide Bonazzi

1. Tell us about you and when did you decide to be an illustrator? I’ve always had an interest in drawing and in visual arts. My education is based mainly on literature and liberal-arts, and I attended some illustration courses only later. After, I came to know what illustration exactly is, and I met several great teachers and artists who have really inspired me. So I decided I wanted to become an illustrator for publishing and advertising rather than an author of picture books, a graphic novelist or another kind of visual artist. 2. How was life like after university? How did you become an editorial illustrator? Life after university was full of promise and excitement, but also full of frustrations due to the lack of jobs. At that time I used to send my portfolio to art directors of Italian magazines and creative agencies almost

| 10

every day. In that way, I got the first significant collaborations with magazines and institutions that encouraged me a lot to keep moving in that direction, but soon I realized I couldn’t support myself financially by working only for the Italian market. Then I put all my efforts to work with American publishers and companies. I sent my portfolio to art directors, I met an agent and then I slowly started working for the editorial market, and later for advertising. Now I feel happy and grateful for what I’m doing in my life. 3. How do you define your illustrations? I’d say my illustrations are straightforward, often conceptual and sometimes surreal and ironic. 4. Do you personally find the process of working within self-imposed constraints or rules helpful to your work? I think self-imposed rules are necessary, but it’s also

important to break the rules form time to time in order to explore new directions and let creativity wander. It’s not easy to find a balance. 5. Who are some of the artists who have influenced your work? There are many of course, such as Guy Billout, Brad Holland, Beppe Giacobbe, Guido Scarabottolo, Tatsuro Kiuchi, Brian Stauffer, Emiliano Ponzi and many others. I should mention also Adelchi Galloni, a great illustrator during ‘60s-’90s who’s been my teacher at the Academy of Fine Arts in Bologna. His style was unique, eclectic, experimental, and at that time it used to influence mine a lot.


Exclusive Interview

6. What would you say is your strongest skill? I really don’t know. Maybe my dedication to this job. 7. What is the difference between editorial illustration and other ones? Editorial work usually implies quick turnarounds, it’s a short but intensive process. The subjects are generally quite interesting because they’re about current events. Working for advertising campaigns or institutional projects is totally different, it involves more steps and generally, the whole process lasts longer. Advertising illustration often aims to reach a broader audience, not only cultured, well-informed readers, like editorial generally does. Images should be more direct and somehow simpler. I

enjoy doing both. 8. What is the Best / Worst part of being an editorial illustrator? The best part is having to deal with issues of contemporary society. This really makes me feel connected with the society we live in, as if I had an active role – although very small. The worst part is related to some aspects of the freelance job, such as the difficulty in planning my agenda from week to week, but one gets used to it. 9. What challenges do you expect in this job? So far this job brought me huge satisfaction and got me to realize that things are doing great but I’m conscious that things could change, and suddenly. Working as a freelancer for mass media today implies great opportunities and precariousness

| 11


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 12

Davide Bonazzi


,,

Exclusive Interview

I’d just try to understand better what the client is looking for and why the drafts have been rejected, in order to find another direction quickly.

at the same time, you need to make up your mind to roll with uncertainty. I don’t know what to expect from the future of this profession, though I’m quite optimistic by nature I know I cannot rely on anything and I have to be in the position to make my own destiny. 10. What would you do if a client kept rejecting all the drafts you presented them? I guess this is the nightmare of every illustrator! I’d just try to understand better what the client is looking for and why the drafts have been rejected, in order to find another direction quickly. It happens sometimes an illustrator has to do several rounds of drafts before convincing the client, but it is actually quite unrealistic that a client keeps rejecting them indefinitely without giving any reasons. Clients usually have a deadline that forces everyone to make a decision in one way or another. Contrary to what most people think, deadlines are a lifesaver. Also, we generally agree with a certain number of drafts with the client, after that we have to review our original agreement – that’s why it’s always better to avoid handshake deals. If a client ends up being not happy with the drafts, or if the story got cancelled for some reason, the solution is a kill fee. 11. Describe a time when you worked hard on a project but you received negative feedback from your manager or client. What did you do? A few years ago I was working on a very exciting pilot project for a large mass media company that, for some reason, it has not been published. It’s been disappointing, especially because it could have brought a lot more work with them, but I had to understand that even if my work was quite good, and they said they were happy with that, this kind of companies may change plans quickly and there’s little one can do. Actually, that wasn’t negative feedback since the job has been approved and billed, but for me, it’s been frustrating anyway. Moreover, this experience turned out to be a further

incentive for me to improve my artistic skills and try to do better every day. 12. How has your work contributed to brand development? In recent years I’ve been contributing to the brand development of companies, institutions and publishers. It’s hard to believe how illustrations could be so important for a brand, especially in the American market. Working on this kind of projects means giving shape to abstract concepts like companies’ identity and vision, and it might be harder than doing editorial. It requires more time and there are lots of rules to be followed, but the result is often very rewarding for me. 13. What are you currently fascinated by and how is it feeding into your work? I’m currently fascinated by colours and atmospheres from the 80s and 90s, and also by modernist and brutalist architecture, though it’s not easy to incorporate these subjects into my work. 14. Do you have side projects you work on? Yes, I’m working on some personal projects that might become illustrated books. Though I have very little time for them, I keep working on them in my spare time. 15. What is your best piece of advice for young artists who are getting started as an editorial illustrator? I’d tell them to keep pursuing their dreams and career goals with all their strength and keep finding pleasure while doing art. Find a personal style that allows you to have fun while you work, otherwise, this job will crush your creativity and enthusiasm. Do illustrations for yourself before you do for a hypothetical client, and you’ll find your way. Don’t be discouraged if people ignore you at the beginning, but ask yourself every day if your portfolio is good enough to be shown to someone. Young artist, you’re the future: have fun and surprise us!

| 13


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 14

Davide Bonazzi


Exclusive Interview

| 15


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 16

Davide Bonazzi


| 17


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Spotlight

I am Wendy Denissen, an illustrator based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. I had a quiet childhood on my parent’s farm, where I was raised with my five siblings. We mostly played outside together and we got our first computer when I was 15. Sometimes we were allowed to watch TV, which was an old one with only five channels. With eight people we gathered around the small TV, and it was then when I first dreamt about the world outside the farm and the small village where it was located. With a ball pen and a notebook, I would draw women in detailed dressed and little clothing shops all day. The first time I saw a fashion show on TV, I decided it was my destiny to become a successful clothing designer. However, I realised early enough that it is inconvenient when you’re scared of the sewing machine. Instead, I decided to study illustration, which turned out to be a much less dangerous profession. In my late twenties, I finally made the decision to trade in the quiet and rural south for the big city. I love the dynamics of the city and I feel inspired by it every day. A little bit of travelling here and there also helps. In my work, I like to zoom in on the hardships and joy of the everyday life. I can’t get enough of creating new characters (including lots of self-portraits), but I also love drawing food, plants, house objects and - of course - clothing. Being surrounded by animals in my childhood, they seem to reappear in most of my drawings as well. My favourite animal is the cat, I love how they don’t seem to care about anything but food and scratching their back. In my illustrations, I combine patterns with graphic shapes with bold colours. I work mostly in ProCreate and with Posca markers.

| 18

W E N DY D E N IS S E N Illustrator and painter www.wendydenissen.nl Instagram: @wendydenissen


| 19


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 20

The Creative Space Spotlight


| 21


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 22

ALISON JAY


Exclusive Interview

WELCOME

TO THE

ZOO

Alison Jay was born in Hertfordshire, grew up in Derbyshire and studied graphic design in London where she now lives. After graduating she worked in animation for a short while but gradually started to get commissions in illustration. She works in Alkyd a quick drying oil paint on paper and sometimes adds a crackle varnish to give the work an aged appearance. She has worked in all areas of illustration including advertising ,packaging, editorial and design. Her commission’s include a 48 sheet poster for B.T, a TV commercial for Kellogg’s corn flakes and has recently illustrated the new baby range of products for Crabtree and Evelyn. She has also illustrated lots of children’s books including ‘Picture This’, ‘William and the night train’,’The Race’, ‘I took the moon for a walk’, ‘The Emperors new clothes, If Kisses were colours, ‘ABC Alphabet’.an unabridged fully illustrated version of ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’,Listen Listen’ ,Welcome to the Zoo ‘, A Child’s first Counting Book’ ‘Today is the Birthday of the World’ and ‘Nursery Rhyme Rainbow’. She recently worked with Aardman Animation on the development of a feature film and is currently working on a version of ‘ The Nutcracker’. Her book ‘ Welcome to the Zoo’ which is a wordless visit to a cage less ‘ animal hotel’ has been selected as one of New York’s Bank Street’s 2009 best books of the year.

| 23


Digital Journal of Illustration |

ALISON JAY

1. Tell me a bit about you and your background: where are you from/ where did you study? I was born in Hertfordshire and grew up in Derbyshire ,we lived a short walk to the countryside .My brother, sister and I loved to play in the nearby fields, we went sledging when it snowed ,picked blackberries in the autumn and played in the brook in summer. We all loved drawing ,painting and making things .When I left school I took a degree course in graphic design at The LCP ,now called the London college of communication where I specialised in illustration. 2. How do you define your illustrations? That is a difficult question really, I think trying to define illustration or any art form imposes boundaries and could be very restricting ,having said that I think possibly as with all art in its broadest sense is about communication and with illustration visual communication. 3. How do you start a project? When do you know it is finished? If I am starting to illustrate a book I usually start by working out how the main characters will look,I try a few different versions of that character until I and the publisher are happy with them .Next I very roughly scribble out the whole book in tiny thumbnail ideas of how the illustrations could work with the text. I then draw the whole book out in vey small scale, drawing a whole spread at a small scale seems to help me to see the composition easier .I then e mail those rough drawings to the publisher for comments.After the rough drawings have been approved I enlarge the sketches and trace them out onto large sheets of thick paper before painting.I find it quite difficult to know when a piece is finished ,I always seem to want to add more details ,a looming deadline usually makes me decide to finish a picture. 4. What resources and techniques do you use? With what technique are you more comfortable ? I am very old school I still draw with pencil and paper and still paint with brushes and Alkyd paint (a quick drying oil paint).When I was at art college I experimented with lots of different techniques ,I used to make pictures out of 3D paper models ,which was great fun but at the time I was told they were not commercial and it would be difficult to reproduce in print.I also worked with pen and ink a lot in my early days as an illustrator. 5. Which one do you prefer: trying different materials and techniques or sticking to one? Why ? I have worked with paint on paper now for many years ,I love painting and stick to that way of working mainly because when a publisher

| 24


Exclusive Interview

| 25


Digital Journal of Illustration |

ALISON JAY

commissions a book they need to have an idea of how the finished illustrations will look. I would love one day to experiment again with my 3D work and love to do more print making especially etching. 6. Color seems to have such a special place in your illustrations. How do you choose the colors for each illustration? Yes I love using colour , I think more recently I have tried to use a more subtle palette ,often colours are changed slightly in the printing process which can be quite disappointing if they come out too garish, printing has become much better though over the years that I have been illustrating . I choose colours depending on the subject matter ,I love painting the different seasons with cool blues and greens in winter, warm oranges and reds in Autumn and fresh greens ,pinks and yellows in spring and summer. 7. Your illustrations are mainly focused on animals? Why? What is the story behind that? Did you always love drawing animals? What is it about animal characters that you like illustrating? Yes I think painting animals and the natural world is definitely my favourite subject matter. I have always loved animals since I was a child, we had lots of different pets from stick insects to a pony and lots of others in-between . I think I I am fascinated by all the amazing shapes ,sizes and colours of animals ,the different ways they move and live.I along with hopefully most people in the world am incredibly worried about the our terrible impact humans are having on the natural world ,the distressingly long list of endangered species ,the deforestation and destruction of habitats ,global warming all so heartbreaking.I just hope we can all wake up to the impending disaster in time. 8. Is there any special character that you like more than others? No not really although I have a soft spot for bees ,I wrote a wordless picture book called Bee and Me ,it is an environmental story and the bee grows to man sized proportions which was fun to paint and just recently I finished a book by Hayley Barrett called the Tiny Baker ,the baker was a also a bee with other insects as her clientele ,I loved illustrating all those insects but then I enjoy painting all animals . 9. Your illustrations remind me classic paintings, with special effect and color pallet. What do you hope children take away from your drawings? I don’t always add the crackle varnish effect,Bee and Me was not varnished but I guess I love the intrigue of old paintings ,it feels like peering into the past through a veil of cracks so I think I like the varnish to help try to replicate that intrigue. I hope children find my illustrations interesting .I like to add tiny details in the backgrounds ,I remember enjoying details in picture books when I was a child so I hope they can find new details every time they look through my books. 10. Tell us about your first experiences as an author and illustrator? How did you deal with challenges? The first book I illustrated where I was in control of the narrative was “Welcome To the Zoo’ ,Dial books asked me to illustrate a visit to the zoo as a wordless book so the brief was wonderfully

| 26


Exclusive Interview

open. I am not a fan of animals in cages but I thinks zoos do have their place in animal conservation. I made my zoo a sort of hotel for animals and I loved thinking of all the visual jokes. I do find it very difficult to write a story and easier to tell a narrative through pictures so I have illustrated three wordless books so far . 11. What do you think about studying masterpieces paintings and illustrations? Is it helpful to improve our proficiency? Yes I think studying all art can only help improve someones proficiency ,also to study the natural world or architecture or anything that you are interested in or inspires you is the only way to improve. I like the idea of having lots of different influences ,art, music ,dance,anything all coming together in someones creative brain as a new interesting piece . 12 Do you have a favorite place outside of your workspace that you like to go to sketch? I would like to go sketching in the countryside more regularly but as I live in London it is not possible very often, I usually take a small sketch book and a pencil with me everywhere and before the coronavirus pandemic I would sketch people ,and things around me either in a coffee shop ,on the bus ,I even drew in a hospital a few yers ago when I was waiting for a small operation, drawing and painting always takes my mind off worrying times so I painted lots of pictures in the past few months. 13.How long did it take you to create the book? It usually takes me about six to eight months to illustrate a book from start to finish depending on the number of pages, most picture books have 14 double page interior spreads ,then a cover front and back ,a title page a dedication page and some time endpapers ,so there is a lot of work in a picture book. 14.How do you find thinking about the book as a whole – the text, illustration, design – in comparison with illustrating someone else’s text? That is a very good question,I like both really . I have lots little ideas for possible stories but most of them just remain initial thoughts ,the stories I have written came to me quite quickly as a complete idea with a beginning, middle and end ,then I try to shape the story to improve it and a publisher will tweak bits to help the narrative further. It is great to have the control of writing and illustrating a whole book ,the sky is the limit but also I find it quite difficult to pluck interesting stories out of thin air . To illustrate someone else text is also very exciting ,I can visualise the possible illustrations as soon as I read a manuscript ,I have been very lucky to illustrate some amazing authors texts. 15.What can you tell me about your publications or books? What are the latest? I have recently finished a book called The Tiny Baker ,written by Hayley Barrett,it is a lovely story of about good friendships but using insects as the characters,I loved the manuscript it was so quirky and fun ,a great opportunity to paint ants in top hats and ball gowns. The book I have just started is called “ Pitch Perfect and Persistent written by Robin DeLems .The book is a true story about Amy Beach an American child musical prodigy and later composer and pianist who lived from 1867- 1944 .She had a lot

| 27


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 28

ALISON JAY


Exclusive Interview

of struggles in the beginning of her life as was not considered acceptable by middle class society for women have a careers and certainly not to perform on stage. The story is very interesting and I always find it so refreshing to illustrate new subject matter, only a few weeks ago I was painting bees and cakes and now I will be painting pianos and musical notes. 16. What are some trends or visual styles you appreciate in contemporary illustration? I love that there are lots of different styles around at the moment ,I really like the naive slightly child like illustrations ,I have always loved folk and primitive art ,I try to get that folk art style into my work. I don’t really think anyone should follow trends as it will make everyones work look the same, It can be difficult not to change your style depending on the fashions if you are not getting the commissions but always best to plough you own furrow regardless as eventually trends change again. 17. What are some of the most important considerations in creating an illustration today? If you mean for a children’s book then I guess to make a picture that compliments and adds to the text ,or if there is no text as in wordless books to tell the story through pictures .If the text or story has emotion then the illustration should try to depict that emotion.I try to get interesting angles of perspective into some of my illustrations and some movement ,it all helps to make an interesting picture. 18.Where do you see illustration going in the next few years? I hope there will be more illustration in the next few years not only for myself but for all emerging and working illustrators .There are more digital illustrators now than ever now and I can only see that way of working getting more popular, there are some brilliant illustrators around now who work digitally ,I have seen some very interesting illustrations produced on computer, it is a tool after all like paint and paper, I think it is the creative mind behind the tool that is important. I sometimes wish I could work digitally ,I would keep my clothes cleaner but for now I will stick to my old school way of working .

| 29


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Article

WATER ELEMENT MYTHOLOGICAL DEITIES OF WATER

Author: Gloria Ruiz Blanco Illustrator: Ana Salguero Water is the essential element for life and a key pillar of all human cultures. In almost all cultures, water is perceived as a female element and this gender key is shared with our planet Earth, the only known one covered mostly with water. In most of the world’s creation myths, water represents the source of life, energy and divine fertility of the earth and living beings. It also charges water with great significance within the various religions as they use it in initiation or baptismal rites. Within this context, it encompasses the meanings of purification, renewal, fertility, liberation and abundance. The human being projects into the water the realization of his fears, but also of his hopes, the promise of life and the threat of death. We are going to undertake a journey through the continents and their seven seas to get to know the different deities and myths that arise around water. America We start with the Caribbean Sea and its goddess of the sea, the moon and fertility called Atabey. The Tainos, an extinct people of Arawak origin who lived in the Antilles, worshipped Atabey. It represented the goddess as a frog. From the Caribbean Sea we travelled to the Pacific Ocean to meet Yacuruna, the spirit of the Amazon. This deity can control all the animals in the water. Shamans and healers invoke him to do good and evil. Legend has it he travels at night along the Amazon River riding a black crocodile. He wears a coiled boa as a necklace and can become an attractive man for kidnapping maidens. | 30


Exclusive Article

| 31


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Article

In Peru, Amaru is an enormous snake and a Quechua deity. It represents him as a hybrid of a snake body, eagle wings and llama head. They link it to the waters that irrigated the lands of the ancient Peruvian crops. Mamacocha in Quechua is the mother of the waters. This Inca deity represents everything feminine and gives balance to the world. Adored in Peru, Ecuador, South Colombia, North Chile. In the Aztec mythology the goddess Chalchiuhtlicue is the one who protects the seas, the lakes, the rivers, the storms and the baptisms. Next to her is the salt goddess Huixtocihualt. To these two female deities, it adds two male gods. On one side there is Opochtli, the god of fishing and on the other Tlaloc, god of storms, rain and earthquakes. The aborigines in North America venerated the goddess Sedna, who was to protect the sea and every living being that inhabited it. Hawaiian mythology has Kanaloa or Tangaroa, the god of the sea and the underworld. They shape it like a cephalopod. Kamohoalii is the shark god. Finally, there is Namaka, goddess of the sea. Europe From the Pacific Ocean, we slide through the marine currents, and we arrive at the Atlantic Ocean. Airon | 32

is the god of the ancient Hispania and was related to the underground waters, wells and lagoons. It also considered him a god of the underworld who has an ambivalent character. By controlling the water he created life, but he also represented death because it trapped the souls of the dead in the depths. In Spain in the Cantabrian Sea in the Basque Country you can find the Arrainandere, the mermaids that with the body of a fish and the feet of a duck attracted the sailors. In Asturias, the myth of Serena tells how a young girl who ate a lot of fish one day while bathing became a mermaid. Serena sang for joy and the sailors venerated her. In the North Sea, the Celtic goddess Coventia is the goddess of the waters, fertility and abundance. Her cult spread through the south of France, the province of Lugo (Spain) and the north of England. She had the ability to heal, purify and fertilise with the spring water she protected. In Carrawburgh (United Kingdom) there is a temple in his honour. The Celtic mythology is one of the richest in terms of water deities. The goddess Coventia is joined to the goddess Acionna, also queen of the waters. The goddess Belisama was to protect the lakes and rivers.


Exclusive Article

In Ireland there is the goddess of the Boyne river called Boann, the goddess of the waters Li Ban and the god of the sea Lir. The river Shannon has its own goddess called Sinnan. In the Finnish mythology, three gods dominate the waters. The god Ahti of the depths and the fish. His wife Vellamo, goddess of the sea, lakes and storms and the goddess Vedenemo of the water. In the Nordic mythology Aegir was the personification of the sea that together with his daughters and wife Ran (goddess of the sea of the death, the one that gathers the drowned ones) controls the waters and their fresh waves. The Nordic people were great boat travellers, which is why they also worshipped the god of navigation, Njord. Nehalennia was the goddess of the North Sea and Frey the god of rain, sun, fertility, life and summer. Europe was home to two great civilizations, the Greek and the Roman. In Roman mythology, the god Fontus was the god of springs and wells. Juturna goddess of wells, fountains and springs. The god of the sea was Neptune and the goddess of the salt water and wife of Neptune was Salacia. Multiple deities and nymphs composed the Greek mythology. Aegaeon was the god of storms and violent seas. He is also an ally of the titans. Poseidon is the god of the sea and the god of all sea creatures and deities. Amphitrite is the goddess of the sea and wife of Poseidon. Her daughter Cimopolea is the goddess of the giant waves. Brizo is the goddess of the sailors and Ceto, goddess of the dangers of the ocean and the sea monsters. Leucothea and Palaemon are gods who help sailors in distress. Africa South of the Atlantic Ocean in Nigeria in the heat of the African continent is Yemayรก. Yemayรก is the Orisha of fertility in the Yoruba religion. They associate it with rivers, the sea and anybody that is composed of water. Its worship came to the American continent at the time of the African slave trade. In Uruguay

The human being projects into the water the realization of his fears, but also of his hopes, the promise of life and the threat of death.

| 33


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Article

and Brazil she adopted the name of Lemanjá and is the virgin of the seas. Today, they still make offerings to her on 2 February. In Egypt, the goddess Anuket was the protector of the Nile River and of watering the fields. Hapi and Satet are the gods of the flooding of the Nile, and Khnum is the god of the Nile. The goddess of rivers, death, mourning and night is Nephthys. obek is the god of the Nile river, represented as a crocodile or a man with the head of a crocodile. Tefnut is the goddess of water, fertility and humidity. Asia The ocean currents take us to the Indian and Pacific Ocean and to the Asian continent. In the Assyrian mythology (Mesopotamia) we find the goddess Derceto. To they consecrated her the seas and the fishes. It represents her in the form of a fish, with arms, breasts and a woman’s head. Her worship penetrated Greek and Roman culture. Within Mesopotamian mythology, the god of fresh water is Abzu. The god of the channels and rivers is Enbilulu. Marduk is another god associated with waters, nature, judgment and magic. The river Tigris has its own god called Enki. Nammu was the goddess of the primitive sea and next to her is Nanshe, goddess of the Persian Gulf, fertility, social justice and fishing. Sirsir is the god of sailors and the goddess Tiamat is the queen of salt water and chaos. In Armenia, the goddesses Astghik and Tsovinar were worshipped. Astghik was the goddess of waters and Tsovinar, the goddess of storms. To these we can add Anahita, the goddess of the waters associated with fertility and healing. We travel to India and meet Varuna, god of the Ocean. He moves through a crocodile. In the Ramayana text, Varuna was the owner of Saumanasa, the elephant of the west, one of the four pachyderms that sustain the universe. In Hinduism, the god of fresh water is Apam Napat. Danu is the goddess of the primordial waters and the goddess of the river Ganges is Ganga. In Indonesian mythology, Dewi Danu is the goddess of water. The goddess of the North Sea is Dewi Lanjar, and the goddess of the Indian Ocean is Nyai Roro Kidul. From Indonesia, sailing through the Pacific, we reach China. In the Chinese mythology, it classifies the water deities in three groups. On the one hand, there are the

gods, on the other the honourable and immortal kings of the water and finally the dragon kings of the four seas. In the group of the gods the first one is Gonggong, redheaded dragon with the head of a man god. He is responsible for the great floods. Mazu is the goddess of the sea and protector of the sailors. Hebo is the god of the Yellow River. Longmu, Ehuang and Nuying are the goddesses of the Xijiang River in the Lingnan area. Tam Kung is the deity worshipped in the Hong Kong and Macau sea. The honourable kings of the water immortals are Yu the Great (master of the great Chinese flood), Qu Yuan, Wu Zixu, Xiang Yu and Lu Ban. The dragon kings of the four seas are Ao Kuang (East Sea), Ao Qin (South Sea), Ao (West Sea) and Ao Shun (North Sea). And we ended our journey through Asia in Japan. It loads Japanese mythology with many legendary creatures. Ameonna in Japanese mythology, Yokai is a female spirit capable of attracting rain just by licking her hands. In the morning, she takes the form of a cloud and at night she turns into rain. Ebisu is the sea god of fortune and fishing. Hanzaki Daimyojin is a giant Japanese salamander and lord of the water. The Japanese dragons Mizuchi, Ryujin and Watatsumi are gods of the sea and ocean. The god of storms is Susanoo. Oceania Oceania is surrounded by the Indian Ocean on the left, the Pacific Ocean on the right, and the Southern Ocean by the Southern Ocean Glacier. Within the water deities that extend over this continent, we first highlight the mythology of the Fiji Islands, where there are two water gods. Daucinia god of navigation and the shark god of Dakuwaqa. In New Zealand, in the South Pacific Ocean, we find the Maoris. They base their mythology on animal deities and myths that helped build New Zealand. Within this mythology we find Ikatere, fish god father of all marine creatures including the mermaids. Rongomai is a whale god and Tangaroa is a sea god. Related to the myths with the animals is the whale Tohora who saved the legendary hero Paikea from drowning. By bringing him ashore he built New Zealand. And so much for our exciting journey across the seven seas. Water, a precious commodity through time and different cultures.

Bibliography Bettelheim, B (1994). Psychoanalysis of fairy tales. Barcelona: Drakontos. Casar, S (2006). Los estereotipos y los prejuicios. Cambios de

Author Gloria Ruiz Blanco

Illustrator Ana Salguero

w w w.b rig htnessma g.co m w w w.brightnessnews.com | 34

actitud en el aula de I2. Revista Dialnet, 6, 135-150. Paredes, J (2014). El tejido de la rebeldía ¿Qué es el feminismo comunitario? Bases para despatrialización. La Paz. ASDI y RFSU. Pedrosa, JM. Símbolo del cuento y complementos básicos del vestido: del zapato de cristal a la caperuza roja. Actas del curso Folclore, Literatura e Indumentaria


| 35


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 36

JENNY KROIK


Exclusive Interview

PEOPLE NEED ART Exclusive Interview with Jenny Kroik Jenny Kroik is a New York City-based painter and illustrator. She finds much of her inspiration in the city and its people. Jenny has a BFA in illustration from the Art Institute of Boston, and an MFA in painting from the Uni versity of Oregon. Kroik has created 3 covers for the New Yorker Magazine. Her other clients include the Washington Post, The LA times, Random House Publishing Group and more. Jenny also teaches art at various universities and art centers around the city.

| 37


Digital Journal of Illustration |

JENNY KROIK

,,

1) What led you to become an illustrator? I love drawing and telling stories. I wasn’t sure what “illustration” was when I was young, and when I was picking my major in college I looked at the student work at the illustration department, and felt a connection. I also studied fine art, and I see connections between all art forms. What I love about illustration is to have my work reproduced and have it serve a purpose, like accompanying a text etc.

I am inspired by people who

2) What challenges did you have in this job? It’s an ever-changing field, so the biggest challenge is figuring out where the work is. Illustrators are constantly searching to see where illustration is going, and there are many times where it’s hard to know what to do next!

they use for art-making.

3) What art do you most identify with? I love many kinds of art. I guess I am most drawn to portrait/figurative artists like Kerry James Marshall and Alice Neel, but I love all sorts of art! 4) What themes do you pursue? I love telling stories of people, so I end up doing a ton of portraits. I love using art to communicate and learn about someone’s life. 5) Do you have a childhood memory relating to art? I remember that since I was little, kids in school were always asking me to draw things for them. I knew then that art can be a powerful tool, something that people need. 6) Who or What is your biggest inspiration? Describe a real-life situation that inspired you? I am inspired by people who create art under difficult circumstances, when there are no possibility of any physical rewards to the art created, and there a very little resources that they use for art-making. This reminds me the power of art and that it’s worth pursuing. 7) Do you have a method for dealing with the feeling of having no ideas? That’s a big issue for artists! I have a lot of methods. Some of the things I do: research- read about artists, look at art, talk to other artists and get their advice, ask questions. Clean my work desk- mix colors, organize. Have regular schedule- even if you can’t get anything done. Or- sometimes it’s good to take a break and do something totally unrelated to art! Watch a nature show, for examples. Taking a walk is really important to me, too. Being outside, if possible.

| 38

create art under difficult circumstances, when there are no possibility of any physical rewards to the art created, and there a very little resources that

8) You are in a connection with many people around the world. What role doe artists have in the current period? Artists can frame a situation that is hard to see from the inside. They can think abstractly about current events and step out of the flow of words. They can also inform about social justice fights, and raise awareness of actions people can take (most recently- the Black Lives Matter movement had a lot of great art surrounding it) . They can also relive stress and show a more optimistic point of view through imagination. 9) What do you like about your work? What do you dislike about that? I’m not sure! Some days I like my work some days I hate it, haha! Recently, I try to do more experimentation. I used to have a very inconsistent style, and I did a lot of random stuff, I miss that sometimes. But back then, I always wanted a consistent style. It’s hard to be satisfied when it’s your own work, it’s always changing like your moods! :) 10) What is your dream project? I loved working on the New Yorker cover! I love working on magazine covers and book covers in general. I’ve actually had some really fun projects in the last year- for Time magazine, and other editorial work, that I really enjoyed. I enjoy most projects that I get, it’s cool to have a challenge, it gets the juices flowing. :) 11) What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A lot of artists have told me to just do the work that I enjoy, and I have to remind myself that too. When you have joy in your work, it shows, and people want to look at it. If you spend a lot of time trying to make work that you think others will like, you lose yourself a little, and the work starts to look a little dry as well.


Exclusive Interview

| 39


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 40

JENNY KROIK


Exclusive Interview

| 41


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Around The World

Diana Mayo w w w. d i a n a m ay o. c o m Snow Ghost The Most Heartwarming Picture Book of the Year From the publisher, Bloomsbury “Snow Ghost came whispering out of the air” The process of illustrating #SnowGhost (written by the fabulous Tony Mitton) for Bloomsbury publishing, began over three and a half years ago. Like many picture book projects, there was far more that went on behind the scenes than a reader may realise! The beautiful, lyrical text, scribed by the author, was penned some years before I received a copy, so it is with great joy that we both finally see it out in the world this coming Winter for young (and older) readers to enjoy. Having initially read the manuscript, my first job was to think about the main character of the Snow Ghost and also to sketch down initial thoughts for wintery imagery as thumbnail-size spreads, to make up the 32-page book. Snow Ghost’s personal has evolved and changed since the original conversations had with the editors and art directors at Bloomsbury, but I am really happy with how she now appears, I hope as both ethereal and graceful, but also warm and friendly. | 42


Yael Frankel www.tapiocastories.com | Translation by Kit Maude

“Every trip changes us, even a trip on the elevator.” A girl and her dog begin their afternoon walk. But before they can get outside to the street, they must take the elevator in their apartment building. She presses the button to go down, but the elevator goes up. Who called it? Is it broken? As the reader turns the page, the girl arrives at different floors, where new friendships are made, old stories are told, and a surprise is revealed. Beautiful human connections filled with kindness and empathy happen in this elevator in what would usually be a routine encounter. Playful book design and illustrations created with drawing, collage, and photography, this is the debut publication in the US of Argentinian author and illustrator Yael Frankel, who transforms simple everyday moments into whimsical stories. The Elevator, it’s Yael Frankel’s debut here in the USA, and one of the first two titles that Tapioca Stories is publishing.

Renata Krawczyk www.behance.net/renaillustration

The illustration was created in cooperation with the polish brand Spadiora. Spadiora designs silk scarfs which touch upon important social issues, particularly for female - they are sort of manifesto. The illustration Thoughts Unbrashed shows everyday worries and joys, which accompany female in their daily life. Worries, joys, recollections and dreams were depicted in form of drawers as an allegory of thoughts placed in our minds. The thoughts are floating freely on female character’s hair and hence the title thoughts unbrashed. The sketch was made with the use of ink and technical pen. Following, the illustration was collored with computer programs Procreate and Adobe Photoshop.

| 43


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Scrapbook

SCRAPBOOK

| 44


SVENJA

STRAUCH Sometimes I get self conscious when I hear other artists say “oh, I loved drawing even as a child, couldn’t get enough of it!”, because that’s not exactly how it was for me. I was in my early twenties when I picked up the pencil after years and years of not drawing in an attempt to distract myself from a super depressing job I had at the time. On a whim I decided to put together a portfolio and apply to the Münster School of Design to study illustration. I was elated and a little bewildered when I was actually accepted! I realized quickly that what I wanted to do most was paint, I had just one small problem: I knew absolutely nothing about painting. So I spent the next few years doing university assignments while simultaneously painting one horrible picture after another (sometimes I would combine these two things to save time). After a while the pictures started to be less horrible, some were even kind of decent. In the summer of 2019 I finally graduated (the pictures had turned from decent to actually rather good now) and since then I’m trying to make it as a freelancer. I have loved captivating stories since I was a child and since I’m not much of a writer (yet, who knows?), painting is my way to give life to the stories in my head. I love characters that are wild, fun, flawed - maybe a little sad - and I feel proud when I manage to capture a character or a scene in a way that touches something in me and maybe in some other people too. When I get an idea for a painting I would like to do I tend to let it sit in my brain for a while. I imagine different versions of whatever it is I want to do, look at other artists work and just ruminate. I then lay down a rough first sketch and some basic colors. If I like the sketch I will think about how to improve the composition of the picture, how to make it interesting and dynamic, which is often quite the task. If I realize that the sketch doesn’t work or I don’t love it as much as I thought I would I scrap it and try again until a satisfying composition presents itself. The actual painting doesn’t command as much brain power but requires a lot of stamina - some pictures are tough nuts! I always try to wrap my brain around that magical moment when the last brush stroke is made, but it kind of eludes me. I am painting (hopefully) happily away and suddenly… I’m done. I didn’t know it was going to happen in that exact moment but the picture is finished, there is nothing more needed. Magic!

Website: www.svenjastrauch.de

| 45


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 46

Scrapbook


| 47


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 48

Guillermo Flores


Exclusive Interview

MY

Guillermo Flores is an art director, graphic and web designer, specialized in digital retouching and digital illustration (collage) at Orbeh Studio based in the city of Guadalajara, Mexico. He graduated from the University of Valle de Atemajac (UNIVA) in 2004 with a specialization in animation and web design. He has worked in various advertising agencies developing projects for national and international companies.

MEXICAN ROOTS Exclusive Interview with

Guillermo Flores

He is also a multi instrumentalist and composer. Actively participates in ‘El Lázaro’, a Mexican electro pop project, which launches its first material edited in studio in 2017.

| 49


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 50

Guillermo Flores


Exclusive Interview

1. Hi Guillermo, let’s start about your background, where did you study? What did you study at university? I have a degree in Graphic Design. I am a graduate of UNIVA / Atemajac Valley University in Guadalajara – 2004 2. You are known as a professional collage artist. Why did you choose that as the main technique? I discovered the collage during my time at college, but I am sure it was almost by accident, I like to believe that the collage chose me. I think it is a very noble technique that allows me to express myself naturally. 3. what originally made you want to become an illustrator? When I was little we had many books on botany and nature, I spent hours watching those books. After that, during my time in college (almost at the end) I discovered photoshop and then I thought ... “this might be for me”. 4. who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking? Being born in the house of musicians and being surrounded by art has been the biggest influence to continue in this way. The passion with which everything was done in my house was very important for me. 5. Your artworks are full of bright and effective details. Do you usually have a pile of images and pick them randomly or select each of them one by one? With the passage of time I have been collecting images and each fragment and piece (large or small) has been planned. All my work is the result of research and selection of images. I leave nothing to chance or luck. 6. How did you face challenges as a collage artist? I think that when you really love something, no matter how adverse the challenges are, there is always a way out and a solution for everything. The collage allows you to create your own doors and opportunities 7. How do you get ideas for each piece of art? As I mentioned previously, all my work is based on research, there is nothing random, I carry out a creative process that involves reading, traveling, meeting new cultures, new people, etc. In addition many pieces are requested under an advertising brief, which facilitates my work

,,

I think that when you really love something, no matter how adverse the challenges are, there is always a way out and a solution for everything.

8. As an artist who have had valuable experiences in collage, what is the main difference between collage and other techniques? In 1974, Milton Glaser stated that while a design must carry a planned load of information (with the intention of being communicated clearly), the essential function of art is to “intensify perception of reality. “ This basically means that the design is utilitarian and art no. 9. Do you interact with the digital world/technology in your work? The technique I use is digital collage, so my work tool is my laptop and Adobe’s package (Photoshop mainly) 10. Your artworks are full of Mexican symbols, such as flowers, colors and so on, is there a particular message you intent to impart? The culture in Latin America is very enough in vegetation and botany, I really love the colors and the essence of my people, of music, of my Mexican roots. It is a celebration to Mexico. 11.What piece of your artwork would you like to be remembered for? I would like to be remembered by someone who bet and believed in art (collage) as the means to convey a message and impact others, I like the idea of carrying an advertising brief to solve a deeper need than just selling a product. I prefer to be remembered with love and affection for being a person who strived every day to be better. If my work is good and transcends then people will own that art and belong to everyone so that at some point they will decide which one is better than another. For me each piece is important because it reflects something of my life. 12. Has anything you have seen recently changed your views on art or design? Without a doubt, the vision of architect Olafur Eliasson about life and art has influenced me a lot. However, Bukowski is always present in my art and his particular way of valuing things. What is important to some is irrelevant to others. 13. What’s next for you in the future? I want to make residences while collaborating with other artists, in addition to further exploring music, sensitive experiences, emotions, cinema, etc.

| 51


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 52

Guillermo Flores


Exclusive Interview

| 53


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 54

Guillermo Flores


Exclusive Interview

| 55


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 56

Guillermo Flores


Exclusive Interview

| 57


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Creative Space

Collateral Damage Studios was first founded back in 2007 as an anime doujin circle by a group of friends with the aim of working on art projects together, growing their strengths collectively and promoting Singaporean artists. As an informal art circle then, the group regularly took part in conventions within Singapore (and occasionally outside). The art group slowly grew in prominence and expanded the circle to include other artists and even non-artist members who specializes in sales or project management. The prominence also meant that the circle was regularly featured in news articles looking to cover the informal, indie art scene, approached to do commissions and even receive the occasional resume from professional artists. The circle took a step towards becoming a more formal, commercialized entity in 2013 when Microsoft Singapore approached the group regarding a well-received fan character they have designed representing Internet Explorer. That was when a couple of the members decided to take the leap of faith and set up the studio. Working closely with the IE Marketing Manager in Singapore, CDS brought together an animation team to produce the animated short. The animation went viral and the rest was history. Today, we mainly take up commercial projects involving character designs and key visuals. We regularly work with ad agencies, indie video game developers, board game designers, anime conventions and even health-related NGOs to create visuals and marketing campaigns. Some of the brands that they have worked with include Anime Expo, Aer Lingus, Nissin Cup Noodles and even Warhammer. Recently indie clothing labels, and YouTubers comprise a decent part of our clientele. they are looking to further challenge ourselves by working on projects outside of their

| 58

usual comfort zone of anime. They are keen to work on children’s books and scientific illustrations. Even though the original circle is now a professional illustration studio, the core philosophy of the team still retains. The professional team still maintains strong relations with the original doujin circle’s members who choose to pursue their individual careers outside of the formal studio. When the need comes, the studio taps into the talent pool of the Singapore doujin scene to find artists to work with the team. Although they are now a professional art studio, they still retain our original mission of promoting our Singaporean talents and working closely with their community. Due to the studio’s ‘doujin’ legacy, the studio regularly supports ground-led initiatives that help to promote local illustrations. CDS has provided their expertise, experience and influence to advise the organizers of Doujima, a mini art fair for the local doujin circles, Extravaganza, an art competition organized by students for students and Merfish Convention, an online art fair for Singapore-based artists.


e Creativ Space THE

www.collateralds.com

| 59


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

Brightness

Gallery

Brightness Gallery is an international competition held on a monthly basis to provide skilled artists with a chance to show their talents. Each month there will be a different judge assessing illustrations based on the current theme. 18 artworks will be chosen to be published in our magazine providing greater exposure to art directors from around the world.

www.brightnessaward.com

| 60


SUBJECT: FRIENDSHIP

GUEST CURATOR MY LINH MAC

My Linh Mac is a multimedia artist, award winner graphic designer and art educator based in Chicago. Mac is best known for her digital paintings, traditional oil paintings and her series of contemporary ‘galactic /no-brush’ paintings- Ranbu. As an accomplished painter, her works portray beauty in humble places with her signature style of deep and vibrant accent colors. While Mac’s paintings have varied genres, from conceptual, abstract, and figurative to contemporary, her digital and visual design works are commercial. As an artist, Mac discovered nontraditional techniques bring further variety to her paintings through the use of color manipulation and the manipulation of materials and presentation platforms. Her niche is the ability to produce art within one medium that looks as if it were created within a different medium. Each of Mac’s artworks “speak for itself”, her unique approach of combining elements and medium gives her the credibility of an inventive artist and visual designer. What makes her work stand out among young emerging artists is how she incorporates not only technical skills and knowledge from multiple creative fields of design, art, and technologies; but also, her personal experience and cultural exposure from different parts of the world as a traveler. As a professional graphic designer, Mac is very detail oriented with her works and passionate about helping artists and art organizations establish their creative business marketing brands. With her strong background in both digital and fine art combines, her work encompasses a range of emotional aesthetics, from conceptual with storytelling to commercial with high-end visual effects.

| 61


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 62

Brightness Gallery - Friendship


MILA GARCÍA S P A I N Mila García is an artis specialized in paper cut and papercraft. Her work is very versatile and maily focused on the publishing and advertising world. Also Teaches workshops, both for adults and children, related to this art. Their works also include window display projects and advertising videos created entirely on paper. Make from the creative idea to the design of scenarios and characters. She studied Information Sciences and combined his work in the world of communication on the Internet with her studies of painting and other techniques in Pamplona (Spain) and Florence, as well, stop motion animation in Carrara (Italy) and Valencia (Spain). Her passion for the art of paper cutting comes after discovering Japanese paper. She applied it for the first time in “Paraísos dreamed” a series of works she made to participate in the Fashion Week in Zurich (2011). At that time, the paper still had the canvas as support. From this project and the knowledge acquired in Florence, she began to research and experiment with different creation techniques with paper such as paper cut or papercraft until creating Similarte (www.similarte.com) his personal brand, where all these specialties converge and through which she thrills us with her stories with a paper soul. The meticulousness is another feature of their projects. Each of his works invites to recreate in the details that compose it, from the choice of the type of paper, the design of the costumes of his characters, his hairstyle and accessories; or to get lost, for example, among the miniature houses that reproduce a seaport and let the imagination fly: “I love designing miniature models and designing characters that will then come to life. Each detail is designed to create a certain atmosphere that leads the viewer to immerse themselves in that small world and, why not, to imagine their own history. This is one of the objectives that I also pursue when I do workshops for adults. Scissors, paper and pencil connect in a certain way with our childhood. And this seems like an interesting starting point to awaken creativity. “

| 63


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery - Friendship

CONCHA PASAMAR - SPAIN

| 64


ALEJANDRO SÁNCHEZ - SPAIN

| 65


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery - Friendship

ANA RODRĂ?GUEZ.SPAIN

| 66


BINGYU ZHOU.CHINA

| 67


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery - Friendship

CAMILA NOGUEIRA - PORTUGUESE

| 68


ELENA FONT VÁZQUEZ - SPANISH

| 69


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery - Friendship

MADISON LAROSE - USA

| 70


SALAR ESHRATKHAH - IRAN

| 71


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery - Friendship

VARYA YAKOVLEVA - RUSSIAN

| 72


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

SIMA REYHANI - IRAN

| 73


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery - Friendship

RUBIE CHEN - TAIWAN

| 74


SALIMEH BABAKHA - IRAN

| 75


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery - Friendship

PAULA VENTIMIGLIA - ARGENTINA

| 76


ROCÍO ALEJANDRO - ARGENTINA

| 77


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery - Friendship

RODRIGUES - PORTUGUESA

| 78


SUSANA FERREIRO SAL - SPAIN

| 79


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 80