Page 1

|1


Digital Journal of Illustration |

|2


Are you interested in submitting to Brightness? If you’d like the chance of being published in one of issue , get in touch via this page. Please note that we receive many submissions each day and have limited space in each publication. So show us the work you’re most proud of or the work you specially enjoy creating. Submission Info Email your submission to Info@brightnessmag.com with “ART SUBMISSION” in the subject line. • Submit images as JPEGs or GIFs • Submit up to 5 images • Image sizes should be at least 600px wide and no more than 1000px wide Please be sure to include: 1. Your name 2. Your location 3. Your website, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr 4. Your bio (up to 100 words, NO LONGER!) 5. Up to 5 images of your art + a video or the process of your art. Please note: • Brightness cannot feature all art/artists • Brightness does not offer payment • By submitting you are granting (Brightness) the right to post your art on this website, on Brightness’s social media accounts, and in it’s Newsletter Join Our Mailing list! Join our mailing list if you are an illustrator, artist, curator, art director or just interested in art.

Info@Brightnessmag.com

|3


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Index

SPOTLIGHT | 16 Valentina Malgarise | I was born in 1985 in Verona. I studied illustration at the Scuola del Fumetto (School of Comics) in Milan

IF A STREET HAS A SPIRIT... | 20 Dan Ferrer was born 80’s in Hortaleza, a neighborhood of Madrid, Spain. When he was a kid, graffiti, skateboarding and comics filled their days.

IMAGE AS A TEXT | 28 THE WONDROUS WORLD OF FATINHA | 34 “I create from the heart. I want to touch people, to connect through emotive compositions, and if its possible, to contribute for a more beautiful and better world... “

CHEAP STREET POSTER ART | 42 AROUND THE WORLD | 44 Dàlia Adillon | Nuri Ann | Ana Suarez

BRIGHTNESS GALLERY | 46 For a more peaceful day, war is not the way

SHORT NEWS | 58

In This Issue of

Brigh |4


LET THOUGHTS FLOW NATURALLY I’m born and live in Rome, Italy. I started, still as an art student, working in the field of comics and later as a storyboard artist for major European advertising agencies (Saatchi & Saatchi, Publicis, TBWA, McCann-Erickson, Young & Rubicam, etc..) Profi table, but not very artistic ! I searched for new roads, won some illustration awards and finally I started working in publishing, newspapers and magazines (Il Sole 24 Ore, La Repubblica, Hachette-Rusconi, Mondadori, etc.)

htness

Antonello Silverini

8

Art Director & Editor In Chief

Creative Director & Graphic Designer

Web Designer

Hasmik (Narjes Mohammadi)

Sadegh Amiri

Sahebe Arefimehr

International Contributor

Translator

Sales & Marketing

Ali Ghafele Bashi

Yassin Mohammadi

Brightness Studio info@brightnessmag.com

cover :

Special Thanks To

A ntonello S ilverini to

Mr.Keyvan Ghafele Bashi

a s k q u e s t i o n s a b o u t y o u r s u b s c r i p t i o n , p l e a s e e m a i l u s at: info@brightnessmag.com

|

w w w. b r i g h t n e s s m a g . c o m

Š All Rights Are Reserved.

|5


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Letter From The Editor

I am an

Illustrator FOR A MORE PEACEFUL DAY, WAR IS NOT THE WAY

Hasmik

(Narjes Mohammadi)

Independent Illustrator

Editor In Chief

I picked up my phone to see what was happening in the world, just as I did every morning after my cup of coffee. This morning, as I read the news I was provoked into deep thought -more so than usual. It was as if I had to spend hours just to find a piece of good news in the vast expanse of this earth. In every corner of the world the flame of war had been kindled. Politicians were at each other’s throats and flaunted their powers at one another. Amidst these conflicts homes are destroyed, fathers are deprived of their sons, wives are deprived of their husbands’ embraces, the merry laughs of children at play become inaudible, and the once colorful lives of people turn into sorrowful black and white existences. In such a world the only comfort we have is the warm embrace of art. It is as if with the help of art every bullet becomes a coloring pencil used by a child to draw a house with the scent of chocolate cake rising from it’s chimney. How wonderful it would be if instead of bombs airplanes showered cities with paint, so that the world would be a happier place. As you may know, the Brightness publications seek to introduce people to illustration art. If one wished to delve into the beginnings of this profession one need only look to the earliest cave paintings. As illustration artists we need to ask ourselves to what extent we have strived to perpetuate peace, security, and positive emotions to the people of the world. We ask our fellow illustration artists to send us their works on the theme of world peace, so that we may have the privilege of publishing them in this magazine and thereby together be the harbingers of peace. We ask our kind readers to send in their submissions to the following email address: info@brightnessmag.com We wish for a day when war becomes just a meaningless word.

|6


|7


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Antonello Silverini

Exclusive Interview with

Antonello Silverini

LET THOUGHTS

FLOW

NATURALLY I’m born and live in Rome, Italy. I started, still as an art student, working in the field of comics and later as a storyboard artist for major European advertising agencies (Saatchi & Saatchi, Publicis, TBWA, McCann-Erickson, Young & Rubicam, etc..) Profi table, but not very artistic ! I searched for new roads, won some illustration awards and finally I started working in publishing, newspapers and magazines (Il Sole 24 Ore, La Repubblica, Hachette-Rusconi, Mondadori, etc.) in which I found great satisfactions and especially the opportunity to grow. Decisive in this sense, the encounter with the publisher Fanucci, which - by commissioning the bookcovers for Philip K Dick, Doris Lessing, Neil Gaiman etc. - gave me the chance to explore a language visionary and cultural at the same time. From a few years, I have a contract with Venice Design Art Gallery, for which I produce works on canvas, also large painting.

w w w. a n t o n e l l o s i l v e r i n i - i l l u s t r a t o r. c o m

|8


Exclusive Interview

|9


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Antonello Silverini

Could you give us a bit of background on your work and education? When did you start working as an illustrator? My education was traditional. I graduated from Artistic High School and then graduated with an illustration degree from the European Design Institute. As a student I started making covers for comic magazines after which I got into advertising; for about ten years I worked as a storyboard artist for a major advertising agency. Tired of being “invisible” and working at the behest of others, I started participating in contests (winning at times) and putting my works on illustrator sites. From that point on people started contacting me to offer me work, which in turn led to further success. Your work is deeply personal: a sort of record of your emotions, thoughts and experiences. Could you explain a bit about the process and concepts involved in your work? I do not have a certain process for creating an image. At least I’m not aware of the process I use to create an illustration. Surely, the quality of the work I produce is the result of years of experience, work, study, and what we could call “inspiration” for the sake of convenience. In creating an illustration, there is a kind of analytical and emotional study of the subject involved, after which I just let the images flow through my imagination. Let’s say that the ideal way of creating an image - as far as I’m concerned - is thinking directly in terms of images. When creating

| 10

an illustration it’s a good idea to let thoughts flow naturally because then the image will crystalize and result in a more authentic work. I believe that ideally one’s work should naturally be born from an initial spark to crystallize into a definitive image, because even if the initial idea is complicated and full of subtexts the image will not be too rigid or complex. How do your ideas originate and how do they transform into books? Reading is fundamental to an illustrator. Great attention and care are needed to translate the words written on the page into another language (i.e. the “language” of illustration), which is why l read, study, research, and look for documentations... I lay the necessary groundwork to adhere to the texts in my illustrations without depicting a simple reiteration of the words on the page. How do you decide what to include and what not to include in the book? Even here, throughout my creative process, there is no established rule. In my illustrations I certainly try to avoid communicating the same information present in the texts. Instead, I look for a new narration, something that may reduce the reader’s sense of security or transport him/her into an imaginary world that does not belong to him. Often, illustrations console the public (i.e. they pander to the demands of society), but I do not consider the ethical role of the artist to be as such.


Exclusive Interview

© Klaas Verplancke / July 2017 | 11


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Antonello Silverini

Which technique are you more comfortable with? Do you prefer handmade techniques or digital ones? Please tell us about that. I do not have a preference. [The choice of a technique] depends on your needs. The technique should enable you to be expressive yet practical. I usually try not to make a choice (any choice) just because it is more convenient. I prefer decisions to be dictated solely by creative needs. The traditional and digital techniques complement one another in that each uses a part of the other. My work starts from an initial sketch, which does not have to be perfect, but must have fluid movements and signs in addition to capturing an equilibrium in the medium in which I work. I then proceed to constructing the image by using portions of photographic materials, which are first processed digitally and then with acrylic paint. I conclude my work by putting the finishing touches on the computer. Sometimes the whole process is completed digitally through Painter and Photoshop. How important is technique? Technique is important because it represents my language, my voice. To better express what I mean, I need to know all the rules of the language I speak, such as the grammatical and vocabulary nuances. Technique is important even if you choose an iconographic language (i.e. style) outside an academic environment. I see you have done many illustrations for adults as well as for children. Which one do you prefer? I do not restrict myself in expressing my creativity, however, it seems that the world of childhood illustrations is a little “blocked” for me. I find the world of adult illustrations more welcoming due to the presence of complex narratives and intriguing language structures. My illustrations are not easily interpreted and are often not reassuring, so publishers base their decisions on industry conventions to asses which of my illustrations get published. Fortunately, I have many people who are fascinated by my poetry. It’s always very satisfying for me when my works achieve great success.

| 12

What special characteristics do adult illustrations have? I do not know. I do not make any special considerations in drawing illustrations for adults. Of course, as I have said before, the world of the adult illustrations belongs mostly to me because I express myself artistically using more sophisticated imagery ... but inevitable I have to be faithful to my poetry when creating illustrations. What would you say is your strongest skill as an illustrator? Sometimes it seems to me that it is an important skill to be able to produce conventional images and to respond to the demands of those who look at them. It almost seems that mediocrity is a rewarding trait. Thankfully such is not always the case, however, because there are many artists who enlighten their audience’s eyes and mind. For me it is an ethical question. I am still convinced that those who create art must enrich the imagination of the public, not comfort them or reassure them with what they already know. What are some trends or visual styles you appreciate in contemporary illustrations? I do not particularly appreciate any current trends. I appreciate the quality of work of individual artists. There is a tendency to conform to what the market requires, which causes artists to become victims of the market and it’s demands. Such conditions never create freedom but instead subjugate the artists and drive art to extinction. I remain mostly interested in the illustrator/author when it comes to the industry. Which factors should illustrators keep in mind when trying to find ways to improve their work? The process of studying, searching, and translating into images all that which nourishes the imagination of an illustrator. It is useless to reproduce the fruits of other people’s imagination just because it is exciting to do so or because such works become fashionable. Really try to be yourself even though it may be a risk. Do away with your sense of security and conventions. Follow these principles all time.


Exclusive Interview

| 13


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 14

Antonello Silverini


Exclusive Interview

| 15


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Spotlight

I was born in 1985 in Verona. I studied illustration at the Scuola del Fumetto (School of Comics) in Milan, where later I received a Master’s in book illustration. I work as freelance illustrator and professor of drawing and watercolour techniques. In the last year I worked on two picture books (“La vuelta al mundo”, “Para abrazar EL mar”), which will be published in Spain and in Italy this autumn, thanks to Ediciones La Fragatina. Both books are extremely poetic, they tell about the freedom and joy of discover, with wise and precious words. The illustrations are realised with graphite, watercolour and some digital intervention. I’m really excited, in a particular way, for the publication of “Para abrazar EL mar”, born from the collaboration with the author Chiara Lorenzoni. It’s a project that we have built together on a very close topic to me and I’m really happy about its realisation. I frequently treat the water’s topic on my illustrations, I like to use shade of blue, to draw swimmers and moving figures. But what I love most is to draw animals, above all anthropomorphic ones. I’m now working on a new book, illustrating a german classic novel for educational publishing.

| 16

Valentina Malgarise

I l l u st r a t o r www.valentinamalgarise.tumblr.com


| 17


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 18

The Creative Space Spotlight


| 19


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Dan Ferrer

IF Dan

Exclusive Interview With

Ferrer

A STREET HAS A SPIRIT... PHOTO BY ALBERTO ROSA

Dan Ferrer was born 80’s in Hortaleza, a neighborhood of Madrid, Spain. When he was a kid, graffiti, skateboarding and comics filled their days. Because of these influences now he run his own creative studio (collaborating with international advertising agencies and brands) and development his personal work, both in the street and on the studio, on large format murals and canvases (his art has been seen in cities like New York, Rome, Milan, London, Frankfurt, Budapest, Madrid, Biarritz (France) or Durango (Mexico), among others). About his style: “Currently I develop a style with which I seek the visual balance between realistic and studied resources, mixed with others improvised. As for the content of the works, I’m thinking a lot until I find an idea that really motivates me. With each work I want to express a powerful message, but that any person can feel as his, because they are feelings common in all people. I like to work with allegories, propose symbols, like fear, love, time, justice, and endow them with a graphic representation”. He likes to think of his style as “Allegorical Jazz”: “I relate these words in this way, “Allegorical” by the symbols I represent in images, and “Jazz” referring to a very technical style that can have much of improvised”.

www.danferrer.es

| 20


Exclusive Interview

| 21


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Dan Ferrer

When did you start to dedicate to the world of illustration? We are all imaginative and resolute people when we are children, but as we grow, only a few We keeping to live in that creative world. So creating drawings and paintings since always, but professionally it was for Hip Hop Nation magazine that I did my first published works. It was an innocent and incredible sensation to feel that the drawings in the end it had become my job. How do you define your illustrations? Technically I like the contrast. That’s why I like to mix more detailed areas, with others more improvised and organic ones. A very detailed realistic face that

| 22

has a brushstroke of white paint done without much care trimming the profile, is what I like. As for the content I like the synthesis. I take a very complex abstraction of the human being, like “time”, “death” or “justice” and I represent it in an image, in a theatrical way, almost as a mime, without many characters, without atrezzo ... direct, that at a glance you understand and instantly have a sensation. How do you decide what to include and what not? On the shelf of your house you probably have a book that you like to have around to look at it from time to time, some figure or a photo that gives you a positive memory ...


Exclusive Interview

Surely you do not need to have a 30 volume encyclopedia, which you don’t go never to looking, neither a collection of ornaments and figures that mean nothing to you. With my creations I use the same concept, I try to leave out everything that does not contribute anything expressive or aesthetic. On the other hand, I am guided by my personal feelings. If I create a general composition or some poses in the characters, which seem typical to me, that remind me of what other people have already done, at that moment I know I have to keep thinking. Tell the same but in another way. I do not like to fall into clichés or aesthetic or expressive, I try to create a language of my own.

What is the special difference between doing illustration on huge walls and small papers ( in comparison with the special materials and spaces in your projects.) The main difference is that in the small format, your body remains almost immobile and it is your hand that operates. In the large format you use the whole body. You go up to the scaffold or the lifting platform, you get down and away to see the progress, you stoop to pick up paint, you get up, you make a mixture with a 10-liter cube of paint that suddenly spills on your feet ... it’s a succession of things that bring to your mind a different experience in creation. By having so much physical activity you feel the different process also in your mind.

| 23


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Dan Ferrer

As I know , most of your illustrations are done on walls . Are they? If it is, could you explain why do you prefer that except of doing illustrations for books and magazines as many other illustrators ? My beginnings were as an editorial illustrator. In my studio I have worked for 10 years for international brands in advertising and events. I’ve done storyboards for TV spots, bodypainting on fashion runways, and custom clothing for Levis, Tommy Hilfiger or Calvin Klein. I have approached the audiovisual field by shooting my own shortfilms, also I have made animation pieces ... As you see I have touched many disciplines. I have already felt that incredible sensation of getting off a train in another city and suddenly seeing the cover of a magazine illustrated by me in the front row. So today I feel that I have to be focused on another things, on telling my own stories in my works, whether on wall, canvas or paper. What is the special feature of doing illustration on huge size? A special quality is that the process of small format is a secret for others, it germinates in your studio until you finally see the light in a book, a garment, a gallery ... but the large format makes the viewer participate in the process. What’s more, when I’m in a country for 3 or 4 days doing a work, people of all ages come to talk to me, ask me questions, give me their personal reading about my work, they telling me about their lives ... it’s very interesting . Once finished the work, no one needs to buy a book or pay admission to a museum, that work is for the enjoyment of anyone who walks in front of it. Urban art has a very human character, both in the process and in the completion of the work. It’s magic. | 24


Exclusive Interview

| 25


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 26

Dan Ferrer


Exclusive Interview

Do you personally find the process of working within self-imposed constraints or rules helpful to your work? I firmly believe in balance in any aspect of life. For example, Don’t just work for money. Neither work just for love. But to work with love to get money, so as not to die and to continue working with love, may be a good idea. There are many very useful rules all of them. But if you stick to that, the result is inert works. Perhaps technically perfect, perhaps with the right color ... but dead, that don’t arouse feelings in other people. On the other hand you can skip all the rules, which can lead to a disjointed and malformed work, when perhaps that is not what you are looking for. Picasso said: “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.” I think balance and intuition are the key. I personally use academic resources and my creative freedom, both the one and the other when I need them in every moment of the process of a work.

translate otherwise because they do not work in the same painting as in the photo ... I really enjoy every part of the process, it’s magic.

What is your opinion about the importance of environmental art and wall painting. I think when you go out on the street and what surrounds you are disastrous facades, worn bricks, shattered sidewalks and rubbish-filled cubes, all that influences your emotional state. But if when you go out to the street you see smiling people, music that comes out of the windows of houses and easy access to culture and art, all influences on your emotional state, also. When I leave a museum, a theater or a concert, I feel a fullness, a joy, an energy, a positive confidence that the human being is doing something good. Thanks to the work of many artists we can leave the house and receive a positive charge for a creation that is in the street, that comes to us in an instantaneous, shocking and free. I firmly believe that art on Would you explain more about the process the street helps people better emotional health. of your work? It all starts like this. I do my normal life. What is your best piece of advice for young Suddenly, perhaps while I’m playing with my artists who are getting started as creators kids, a concept runs through my mind like of children`s books? lightning. It can be anything simple “we do not Something that helped me a lot in my way was have much time to enjoy our loved ones,” for first “demonstrate” and then “require”. example. When the feeling is strong I have the You installed Whatsapp on your phone because need to tell it in a art work. it was free. Then you paid a euro / dollar a year The next step is the most laborious because because you were already connected to all I look for a way to represent that thought, so your friends. If next year Whatsapp asks you complex that I would have to write a book about for 5 euros / dollars a year, you probably pay it, but I have to synthesize it into a single image. them because you can not live without their In this part of the process I am very demanding service. with myself. Now imagine that from the first day Whatsapp The next part is to make sketches, look for the would have asked 5 euros / dollars a year. best composition, expressions, poses of the Quickly you would have installed another free characters, elements ... similar application. We as self-employed have When I have decided the initial image I to think like a company. We must accept at what do a photo shoot with models. Here I find exact point we are in our career and where we contradictions and twists in my idea. Suddenly want to go. Know what our clients need and I see that pose that I imagined does not work in learn how to offer it to them. the real world, or I decide to stay with another So my best advice is to prepare yourself all the expression. It’s a magical moment because at time, never cease to evolve and demonstrate, the beginning I never know what the final result at any opportunity you can. Sometimes you will be. Then I working with a digitally retouch will be able to demonstrate and in return you the photo to have a more accurate reference, will receive a lot of money, other times you will both color and adjusting certain things (like charge little, and sometimes, you will agree to staying with one body and placing a head from work, even without charging, just for having the another photo). opportunity to demonstrate. But that should With the sketch in hand, I translate that not worry you, every time you will have to reference into a work with my own language. demonstrate less and you can require more. My style, my color palette ... the process while That is the way, start from 0 but go walking I making painting is another mystery, because towards 100, giving the best of you in every I improvisations arise, parts that I have to moment.

| 27


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Article

MASOUD MOJAVERI AGAH

PhD candidate of Art philosophy & member of faculty (Islamic Azad University/Tehran/Iran) masoudmojaveriagah@gmail.com

IMAGE AS A TEXT The contemporary applied art of illustration, with post-modernistic approach, will create image products in the form of book as graphic novels. These books are a self-representative of writer/illustrator’s identity and they carry some narrations which are organized by a set of signs and text layers. These signs or iconic signs and local narrations facilitate the writer/ illustrator to materialize his self-being in the world and this, as an existentialistic choice, is an unequivocal expression which leads to create a new world. This is a complicated and multi-layered process in creating an image which is the result of individualistic approach of writer/illustrator and apart from some issues such as order and writer; it will organize a world in which his individual identity will have the utmost priority. This identity includes paying attention to the artist’s preoccupations and facts cre-

ated and illustrated by him, and it also involves some post-modern elements such as denial of absolute truth, beauty, intellectualism, originality and also belief in self-multiplicity, self-contradictory and identity fluidity. It also results in organizing the works which should be read and perceived on their own. The graphic novels which are going to be discussed in the following are, the books that each whose special visual features can create joy and contribution simultaneously with local narrations and they surprise the viewer due to providing different experimental situations and senses even far from what they can imagine. This surprise roots in the creator’s or writer/illustrator’s specific viewpoints and perceptions to themselves. The impressive specifications of these illustrations are filled with local narrations unique and exclusive which are not necessarily pursuing any visual formulas.

keywords: graphic novel, post-modernism, identity, illustrator/writer

| 28


| 29


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Article

Graphic novels are, in fact, the result of today’s world approaches to thoughts and the philosophy which the contemporary human has achieved through prioritizing the visual sensation and narration; This approach enables the presentation of what can’t be presented through discourse and words or textual (Lyotard,1979) frameworks. Therefore; graphic novels are the resources replete with their creator’s attentions to ideas and complexities regarding different subjects and issues which can be presented using local narrations not the modern discourse frameworks, but they can be presented through the interaction between words and image in the form of book as a medium. In this way, they are regarded as the product of practical art of visualization taken from philosophicalthought approaches belonging to the post modernism. It is a thought that questions the metanarrations to give new ones, the ones that are made by the artist`s ideas and they are presented to the audience through some local narration or metanarrative signs (Prince,1982). In this respect, the role and importance of the work or narration creator can emerge in a new way. It is a narration that mentions their presence and existence in the world and it recites the narration. I believe that such revolutions are owed to devotion to visual sensations or reactional causation and narration in visual form and verbalization. In the meantime, visual signs are the main players in this place which present a narration in time and place framework when they are considered out of usual ad popular interpretations and they adapt themselves with specific place images. Images or iconic signs are looked at as a text and each is considered as a means to comprehend the concepts and a presentable discourse; when words can’t convey what is transferred by images. A term such a postmodernism might be able to state some parts of the illustrator/writer’s viewpoints. He passes verbal communication and relies on conceptual images or iconic signs and views his addressee as the world knowledge holder who can move to local narration; based on what they know or

| 30

may not. The graphic novels which are going to be discussed in the following are, in fact, the books that each whose special visual features can create joy and contribution simultaneously with local narrations and they can surprise the viewer due to providing different experimental situations and senses even far from what they can imagine. This surprise roots in the creator’s or writer/illustrator’s specific viewpoints and perceptions to themselves. The impressive specifications of these illustrations are filled with local narrations unique and exclusive which are not necessarily pursuing any visual formulas. What is taken to the addressee is the meeting point of his thoughts which are turned into concepts through illustrations. It is a multifarious path along with philosophy, history, and existence comprehension. These are the graphic novels which are designed and decided by one person from the beginning to the end. On this line, I intend to analyze some graphic novels revolutions resulted from attention to image as a discourse through investigating some local narrations in the form of individualistic display of illustrator/writer. post-modernism shows interests in the return and criticism of “metanarrations’ to “local narrations; to some short narrations with some limited circles which prefer the adventures of domestic thoughts to the ideologies as big as the world or universal thoughts”. “metanarrations” related to post-modernism are not usually trapped by situations; they are temporary, anxious, and occasional and they never claim to be universal, factual or stable reason (Klages,1384). Based on this, it can be claimed that each graphic novel is a local narration which enjoys some more locals inside. The graphic novel “The three pigs” by David Wiesner has these features; these three pigs offer a new narration by leaving traditional and common narrations and they don’t carry the stories which are made and narrated for them during these years. In fact, this departure is creating local narrations which are made when these


Figure1, The Three Pigs by David Wiesner

pigs are in dangerous situations. When these pigs are in a colorless/ white, infinite and suspended space resembles a situation which doesn’t impose any identity or role, but it is like a local narration, in the middle of the departure of these pigs, which imposes some other conceptual local narrations to the addressees. Their presence in this section is important since their gender and body tissues are changed into some realistic ones. They enter some other stories in the middle of their own one and their body changes to the structure of the new story in which they are located and when they leave that environment and enter a vacuity, they change to their realistic feature. The internal structures of each narration can be an interior layer of a text involving some concepts and stories which change the viewer’s interpretation at the time. This visual change in the body feature of these pigs and their presence in different locations results in forming various stories inside the place of the image so that an image is a presentable discourse in different visual situations and it discuss about different subjects and it makes some offers, but judgments and interpretations are done by the reader. Such a discourse has no claims to prove anything like facts or logic and it origins in the philosophy-thinking approaches of the creator and it ultimately illustrates the presence and existence of the creator in the world. (figure 1) Hamid Reza Shairi states that any image carries a discipline and method of speech and this image discuss from the viewpoint of the speaker (Shairi,1393). In fact, any image represents the role and existence of its creator, narrator or illustrator/writer in the process of creating meaning. These narrations and concepts signify through iconic sign systems and they show the presence of the creator directly or indirectly. In “Willy the dreamer” by Anthony Browne, the dreams of the baby champ (Willy), accepting the roles, identity, professions, and nationalities and also different locations which all bring different and contrastive situations to the addressee are all some local narrations which represent

Figure 2, Willy the Dreamer by Anthony Browne

the viewpoints of the narrator (Browne) through visual discussion. In one part of the story, Willy assumes to be a movie star (text) and the reader sees Willy in multi-roles as movie stars or characters. The reader asks himself who is Willy? King Kong or Charlie? Mary Puppins or Tarzan? The invisible man or Dwarfs? Which of these characters or local narrations can represent the real Willy? At this point, star`s roles, capabilities, and moral and behavioral and even their historical-social statues can bring different returns to the addressee. Each of them is a local narrations which is collected together and they show another visual local narration; floating of identity and its multi-faced features, the pieced personality and belief and the idea of achieving identity throughout history and its relation with others. In fact, the main purpose of these images is not to show real Willy. That is the reader who chooses the real Willy. Willy can be imagined as all of those roles and show his capabilities in all. Browne or illustrator/ writer just shows his own personal ideas and identity at this point through some visual local narrations and decision-making is left to the reader. This graphic novel by Browne is a tangible sample representing oneself, awareness and existence. Jean-Philip Deranty has mentioned that any awareness or existence is a narrator, but it is rarely new. Most often the narrations are the repetitions of the inside meaning , it is like an automatic narration. Great artists only show the power of speech by purity, freshness and coherence. Creating a new virtual world can show the complexity of the real world which is just “miraculous” (Philip Deranty, 1393). A new world using local narrations and iconic signs to represent the illustrator/writer’s ideas and to invite the reader to make some contributions in creating meaning and decision making for the visual discourse. (figure 2)

| 31


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Article

Figure 3, The Red Tree by Shaun Tan “The red tree” by Shaun Tan is another graphic novel; its local narrations include the presence of the main character (the girl) and the red leaf in complicated, various and contrast situations which are strange to the viewer visually, but they look familiar to the reader experimentally. In fact, in each frame of this work, what narrates the story is the reader’s comprehension from the relationships of the girl and the leaf with their surrounding and this understanding is taken from the visual discourse that exists involving a set of situations and different situational and time relationships from the narrator’s thinking procedure in this framework. and according to Barthes, the ideal text would privilege neither as its... networks are many and interact, without any one of them being able to surpass the rest; this text is a galaxy of signifiers, not a structure of signifieds; it has no beginning; it is reversible; we gain access to it by several entrances, none of which can be authoritatively declared to be the main one; the codes it mobilizes extend as far as eye can reach, they are indeterminable...; the systems of meaning can take over this absolutely plural text, but their number is never closed, based as it is the infinity of language. In one of these frames, the girl is illustrated from behind at the beginning of a road with one big dice in hand. The presence of some elements such as a gigantic monster, a sand clock, wind navigator, and the suspended leaf along with partly-cloudy sky and some shadows darkening some parts show some layers of understanding in the visual system of discourse. When they are all collected and put together, an understanding form the writer/illustrator’s viewpoint has been made in the addressee (figure 3). At this point, the addressee needs to distinguish which conceptual meaning layer is of greater importance so as to make a decision for the reading. This is what considers as a stabilized anchor to prevent the float of signs (Barthes, 1977). Since the reader doesn’t follow a systematic pattern in reading a narration and he is free to read the narration form any parts that he wishes, the presence and individualistic features of the writer/illustrator can be seen as a stabilized anchor at the time of reading different layers of this graphic novel; a subject that the reader considers when reading a narration and might not forget is the creator’s viewpoints and suggestions and in this regard, the reader should make the decision. Regarding the role of the writer, Foucault believes that the writer limits

works cited 1. Barthes, Roland. S/Z. Trans. Richard Miller. New York: Hill, 1974. print. 2. Barthes, Roland. Image-Music-Text. London:Fontana, 1977. Print. 3. Deranty, Jean-Philippe. Existentialist Aesthetic The Stanford. Trans. Hoda Nedaee Far. Tehran: Ghoghnous.1393. print. 4. Foucault, Michael. “What is an Author?”. Trans. Afshin Jahan dideh. Tehran: markaz, 1374. print. 5. Goldstone, Bette.”The Paradox of Space in Postmodern Picturebooks”, Postmodern Picturebooks, Play, Parody, and Self-Referentiality. by Routledge: Taylor & Francis, 2008. 117-129. 6. Lyotard, Jean-Francois. The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge. Trans. Hossein | 32

‘‘

In fact, illustrator/ writer uses local narrations with different visual layers to make some suggestions to the viewer about his own beliefs

the multiplication of cancerous cells and dangerous reasons in the world that not only sources and wealth but also words and reasons are economized. The writer is main part of economizing in multiplication of meanings (Foucault, 1969). In this graphic novel, reads local narrations through Tan’s personal viewpoints which have more local narrations inside and this collection is presented by some signs and icons. These images put the reader in an environment which looks strange to the reader even though the creator’s iconic meanings have been revealed. Conclusion As illustrated before, local narrations in post-modernism don’t claim to be universal, prove facts and logic based. The graphic novels which have been discussed narrate some local narrations through image semantics. In “The three pigs”, when these pigs depart the story space and enter an infinite one, they have a local narrations which happens as they are put in danger and in the following as they are in other situations, their changes are presented to the reader visually, each of them is a local narrations which bring changes in the reader’s interpretations. Postmodern picturebook landscapes are filled with the commonplace but then spiked with startling maneuvers and strange conceptualizations. We as viewers and readers are welcomed into these landscapes; then the world is turned upside down, helter-skelter, pushing us to reconsider initial assumptions (goldstone, 2008). In “Willy the Dreamer”, Browne’s individualism and wordings are presented through some different iconic layers visually. Willy who is always dreaming emerges in different roles and identities which all impose different and contrastive returns to the reader. In this situation, a new local narrations appears from one local narrations which heavily depends on the comprehension of the reader. In “The Red tree”, the girl and the red leaf are in different locations and they are defined based on their environment and surroundings. These are all some local narrations which are used in one framework to organize one visual systematic narration.In fact, illustrator/writer uses local narrations with different visual layers to make some suggestions to the viewer about his own beliefs. And the reader, who needs to make some selections in these different layers, considers the illustrator/writer as a stabilized anchor which prevents the floats of signs and tries to makes some decisions regarding the text visually.

Nowzari. Tehran:1381. print. 7 Prince, Gerald. Narratology: the form and functioning of narrative. Trans. Dr. Muhammad Shahba. Tehran:Minoo-ye Kherad. 1391. print. 8. Shairi, Hamid Reza. Analysis of image semiotics. Tehran: Elm. 1393. Print. CHILDREN`S LITERATURE CITED Browne, Anthony. Willy the Dreamer. Candlewick Press: CambridgeMassachusetts.1997. Tan, Shaun. The Red Tree, Lothian Children Books:2001. Wiesner, David. The Three Pigs, Clarion Books:New York:2001.


| 33


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Fatinha Ramos

Exclusive Interview With Fatinha Ramos

THE WONDROUS

WORLD OF FATINHA Photographer : ©Ann Dewulf

“I create from the heart. I want to touch people, to connect through emotive compositions, and if its possible, to contribute for a more beautiful and better world... “ Fatinha Ramos is a Antwerp-based illustrator and visual artist originally from Portugal. After her graduation as a graphic designer in Porto, she moved to Belgium. Twelve years later after working in art direction and design, she made a switch on her career following the old dream of becoming a full-time illustrator, and to work on different artistic projects. Open-minded and full of creative somersaults, she tears down all the classic conventions avoiding the dangerous pitfalls of clichés. Instead, she takes us on a journey through her poetic imaginary world of singular textures and rich color pallet. Her strong conceptual illustrations and her surreal compositions create an emotive, fascinating and unique universe.

www.fatinha.com

| 34


Exclusive Interview

| 35


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 36

Fatinha Ramos


Exclusive Interview

Tell me a bit about you and your background.where are you from? where did you study? I am a Antwerp-based illustrator and visual artist originally from Portugal. After graduating in Porto as a graphic designer, I moved to Belgium. where I worked during twelve years in art direction and graphic design. Only four years ago I made a switch on my career following the old dream of becoming a full-time illustrator, and to work on different artistic projects. I illustrate mainly children´s books. My latest children’s book is “Sonia Delaunay. A life of Color” published by MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art new York. Have you always wanted to be an illustrator? When you started working ‘professionally’ work today? Like a lot of children of my age, I was drawing a lot, just a bit compulsively than normal. I thought drawing was as normal as eating, so I didn’t realised immediately that that was going to become my dream career. At first I wanted to be a dancer actually, but I realised fast that drawing made me so much happier, and there was maybe a reason for it. What is a day in the life of Fatinha Ramos like? Tell me about your daily routine. A day in my life can change every day. While I try to keep a routine, is sometimes hard to find the balance. It always depends of the project and the circumstances. Also, when I am in a flow, I forget often the routine. I try to follow as much as possible my biological clock. Two things I make sure to do is, to eat and to sleep. I wake up early and start immediately working after a wake-up shower, with a coffee in my hand. In case I am blocked, and nothing comes out, I go outside and visit an exhibition or have a coffee with a friend. In the ideal world, I would go often for some sport. When I need to concentrate, I put off my phone and internet - mainly in the beginning of my projects I really need silence. How did you connect your illustrators to clients? Do you have a portfolio of images that you quickly send? I didn´t… Do clients often come to you for a particular style, or a particular illustrator, or do you have to negotiate matching the right kind of illustrator to client? I do have a very particular style, so all the clients that come to me is because of it. If I have too much work, I always try to suggest other illustrator. What factors should illustrators keep in mind when finding ways to improve their work? By research, reading and and being open to experiment new things, and most of all, by doing it every day. Push yourself out of the box, to try new materials for to see it in a different way. Its by experimenting, making mistakes and accepting them that you learn and improve as an illustrator. Do you have any advice for someone looking to work as an illustrator? There is a lot of great illustrators out there, so much talent. As a beginner illustrator is maybe interesting to follow a style that resonates with you, in order to learn. But afterwards you should find you own visual inner voice, your own identity. Being the second best version of someone else wont bring you satisfaction in what you do on long terms. Stay yourself, and with time people will come to you for your own (distinctive) style. Instagram: @fatinharamos Twitter: @fatinhadesign Facebook: Fatinhaillustration | 37


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 38

Fatinha Ramos


Exclusive Interview

| 39


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 40

Fatinha Ramos


Exclusive Interview

| 41


Digital Journal of Illustration |

The Creative Space

CHEAP street poster art

CHEAP is an independent project promoting street art as a new tool for fueling urban renewal and investigating local geographies. Born in 2013 in Bologna (Italy) by the creative effort of 6 women, CHEAP is a yearly festival that involves an international open call and a selection of guests invited to carry out site-speci fic projects scattered throughout Bologna’s urban landscape and outskirts. CHEAP is a grassroots, nomadic entity cultivating the hybridization of expressive languages, supporting participatory pathways and working to collectively reappropriate spaces where creative energies can be unleashed. Beside the festival, CHEAP has developed a project called CHEAP on BOARD: unconventional street poster art and communication projects, public awareness campaigns, site-speci fic projects to raise awareness about social issues on the city government’s unused notice boards, several hundred boards scattered around downtown Bologna.

www.cheapfestival.it info@cheapfestival.it | 42


e Creativ Space THE

| 43


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Around The World

Dàlia Adillon

www.daliaadillon.com

I am currently working on a children’s book about “Amelia Earhart, Little Guides to great Lives” for Laurence King Publisher. I am very happy with the work done so far, and also I’m very excited because it will be my first book published in the UK. At the same time, I am illustrating the novel “Orgullo y prejuicio” of Jane Austen for the Editorial Alma of Barcelona.

| 44

Dàlia Adillon is an illustrator from Barcelona but currently based in Bristol, UK. She graduated in Fine Arts at the University of Barcelona. Subsequently, she specialised in illustration at the Escola Massana in Barcelona and following an education grant, moved to Italy to continue her training at the ISIA Urbino School to carry out her final illustration project. Recognized with various national and international awards, her work has been exhibited in Barcelona, London, Rome, Brussels, Mexico, United Arab Emirates and China.


Nuri Ann www.nuriann.com

Nuri Ann (Spain 1986) illustrator and digital artist. In September 2017 opens the exhibition Beautiful Sadness in the Espai22 of Girona, where you have been able to see the work done during the last 3 years. This exhibiton contained about 23 artworks of girls to which she denominates Peculiar Girls; female characters in disturbing situations, with a somewhat disturbing look. Dark portraits full of strength, wishes, dreams…

Ana Suarez www.anasuarez.es

The latest project I am working on is a children’s book named “El Cielo Imaginado” and it is going to be published by A Buen Paso publishing house, written by Pablo Alonso. It is a book that introduces the world of astronomy to the youngest ones, and explains how the ancient cultures interpreted the night sky. Inside this book, we may find stars that are actresses into a theater function,the Milky Way as the spine of a great animal, and the sky like a mirror reflecting earth.Also, I am currently working for NGOs projects, workshops and editorial illustration.

Roger Olmos www.facebook.com/pg/roger.olmos.5

Children have a natural love for the animals, an instinct of protection an affection to them Parents, try to reinforce giving them animal toys, children books where animals become their friends Bags to go school with the shape of a rabbit etc.... But, After all this effort, at lunch or dinner time, they give them in slices in a plate And they tell them that they have to eat their friends... I wanted show this problem ( let’s call it problem) with this story where a mother buy this book to her daughter, where she stars this amazing adventure with all this animals, and then is her mother who make her eat them.

| 45


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

Brightness

Gallery

This section is devoted to the works of some of the best illustrators from all around the world. As with any real gallery , ours too aims to introduce and present those creative and elegant artworks which are created by both of professional and enthusiastic young artists. However, as opposed to the real galleries, this one will not be restricted by physical barriers or geogeraphical borders, which implies that artists could easily connect to a wider range of audience worldwide.

| 46


For a more peaceful day, war is not the way We ask our fellow illustration artists to send us their works on the theme of world peace, so that we may have the privilege of publishing them in this magazine and thereby together be the harbingers of peace. We ask our kind readers to send in their submissions to the following email address: info@brightnessmag.com We wish for a day when war becomes just a meaningless word.

Sadegh Amiri & Hasmik

| 47


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

Dalia Adillon

| 48

Dalia Adillon


| 49


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

Dalia Del Bue

| 50


Giada Negri

| 51


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

Nuri Ann | 52


Nuri Ann | 53


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

Ana Suรกrez

| 54


Ana Suรกrez

| 55


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Brightness Gallery

RocĂ­o Alejandro

| 56


Concha Pasamar

Submit Your Illustration to: info@brightnessmag.com

| 57


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Short News

SH

O NEWS

RT

John Yeoman and Quentin Blake

50

Years of Children’s Books

Quentin Blake has created more books with John Yeoman than with any other author, including Roald Dahl. Friends since their schooldays, their first book together was a collection of stories based on folktales from around the world, and titled ‘A Drink of Water and Other Stories’. It was published by Faber & Faber in 1960 - and has been followed by more than 25 other titles, including: ‘The Boy Who Sprouted Antlers’ (1961 & 1976 - when the characters were re-drawn wearing long trousers); ‘The Bear’s Winter House’ (1969); ‘The Young Performing Horse’ (1977); ‘The Hermit and the Bear’ (1984), ‘Featherbrains’ (1993) and ‘The Fabulous Foskett Family Circus’ (2013 - based on a set of drawings Quentin produced for a London hospital.) The exhibition features work from twelve of their collaborations, written for audiences ranging in age from the very young (such as the counting book, Sixes and Sevens) to folktales for older readers (Amazing Animal Stories). Many of their older titles have been brought back into print by Andersen Press so they can be enjoyed by a new generation of readers. The exhbition opening also co-incides with the launch of their latest book, All the Year Round , published by Andersen Press, which guides the reader through the months of the year in verse and illustration. House of Illustration and publisher Thames & Hudson have produced a beautiful facsimile edition of A Drink of Water, also launched at the opening of the exhbition. The exhibition is on show at the Quentin Blake Gallery in House of Illustration, from 6 October 2017 - 4 February 2018. For details of opening hours and tickets, visit House of Illustration’s website.

| 58


SH

O NEWS

RT

The Book Illustration Competition 2018 is now open for entries The Book Illustration Competition is a unique partnership between House of Illustration and The Folio Society that seeks to identify and promote new talent in illustration. The annual international competition is open to illustrators over the age of 18, both student and professional, who have not been previously published by The Folio Society. Each year entrants are asked to submit three illustrations and a binding design for a book chosen by The Folio Society. The winner receives a highly sought-after commission, worth £5,000, to complete a total of nine illustrations and a binding design for the book, which is then published by The Folio Society. Five runners each receive £500 cash. This year we are asking entrants to submit three illustrations and a binding design for The Selected Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. The new edition, featuring illustrations by the winner, will be published by The Folio Society as part of its Christmas 2018 campaign. The Book Illustration Competition was launched in 2011 and has received thousands of entries from over 44 countries. For more information on past competition winners go to the Previous Winners website. Copies of the books illustrated by previous winners are available to purchase from The Folio Society. The deadline is Wednesday 17 January 2018.

Gerald Scarfe:

Stage & Screen A fascinating exhibition of Gerald Scarfe’s work on stage and on screen at the House of Illustration, King’s Cross in London. “I always want to bring my creations to life – to bring them off the page and give them flesh and blood, movement and drama.” A rare opportunity to explore extensive but little-known production designs by celebrated political cartoonist Gerald Scarfe, with storyboards, costumes and props from Pink Floyd’s The Wall, Disney’s Hercules and English National Ballet’s The Nutcracker. Discover an imagination that is acerbic, explosive and unmistakable, both on and off the page. Exhibition dates: 22nd September-21st January 2018, 10.00am-6.00pm Location: House of Illustration, Granary Square, King’s Cross, London N1C 4BH. For tickets please contact House of Illustration.

| 59


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Short News

SH

O NEWS

RT

ILLUMANATOMY BY KATE DAVIES & CARNOVSKY (WIDE EYED)

The second in this series, ‘Illumanatomy‘ is an utterly engaging and mesmerising piece of non-fiction. Nonfiction can be as equally beguiling as fiction and this book is testament to that. ‘Illuminatomy‘ takes a closer look at the layers that make up human body in a range of captivating psychedelic spreads coupled with clear, concise text. Discover the secrets of the human body in a kaleidoscope of colour, using a magic three-colour lens to x-ray the body from head to toe. The red lens enables you to see the skeleton in

more detail. Use the blue lens to find out about the organs that keep you alive and take the green lens to examine the muscles.Together, Kate Davies and Carovsky have produced a phenomenal science lesson and one with the most stylish and edgy design. With an alluring interactive element and succinct, accurate factual information, ‘Illumanatomy‘ won’t fail to appeal to budding biologists and those who have an appetite for learning. Such an informative and engaging format for young learners, we can’t wait to share this far and wide.

ILLUMANATOMY BY KATE AVIES & CARNOVSKY (WIDE EYED) Derwent, renowned pencil manufacturers, are proud to announce the fourth instalment of The Derwent Art Prize. Its aim is to reward excellence by showcasing the very best artworks created with any pencil (including water-soluble, pastel, graphite, charcoal or colouring pencils) by British and International artists. Artists are invited to submit up to 6 images. The works entered must be created in pencil. The work must not exceed 182cms in its greatest dimension. There is no minimum size limit. The Prize is open to both 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional works. All entered work must have been completed within the last 3 years. The work selected for exhibition must be available from 1st September 2018 – 31st January 2019. This year’s entries will be judged by a distinguished panel of selectors including a gallery curator, a leading artist and an art critic. Copyright of all works remains the property of the artist There is an entry fee of 15 GBP (approx. 20 USD) for the first work and 5 | 60

GBP (approx. 6.50 USD) per additional works. Eligibility Open to all living British and International artists over the age of 18 years old on 1st June 2018. Prize A total prize fund of 12,250 GBP (approx. 16,256 USD) will be awarded at the Private View at Mall Galleries, London in 2018 and will be divided as follows: • First Prize: 6,000 GBP • Second Prize: 3,500 GBP • Third Prize: 1,000 GBP • People’s Choice Award (Exhibition): 750 GBP • Young Artist Award (For artists under 25 years): 500 GBP • Coloured Pencil Award for Excellence: 500 GBP All artists selected for exhibition will be invited to the Private View and Prize Giving on Tuesday 18th September 2018. Works selected for exhibition may be offered for sale.


SH

O NEWS

RT

2018 Illustration Competition

Deadline: January 05, 2018 Introduce your work to the world. Enter the most prestigious competition for creativity in illustration, the Communication Arts Illustration Competition. Any illustration first published or produced from January 2017 through January 2018 is eligible. Selected by a nationally representative jury of distinguished designers, art directors and illustrators, the winning entries will be distributed worldwide in the Communication Arts Illustration Annual, in print and digital editions, and on commarts.com, assuring important exposure to the creators of this outstanding work. As a service to art directors, designers and art buyers, a comprehensive index will carry contact information of the illustrators represented. Each winning entrant will receive a personalized Award of Excellence, milled from solid aluminum, and award certificates issued for firms, individuals and clients. CA’s Award of Excellence is one of the mostcoveted awards in the industry. If chosen, winning places you in the highest ranks of your profession. What to Enter: Information on eligibility, categories and fees. How to Enter: Information on preparation of entries and forms. Illustration Competition FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions about applications and file formats. Student Category FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions about submitting student entries. Tips for Success: Seven things you should remember when entering our competitions. | 61


Digital Journal of Illustration |

Need You! BECOME A VOLUNTEER

We’re looking to recruit volunteers to join our team. ( Brightness ) is an international digital magazine discussing and exploring the field of illustration. We are making an effort to improve the standing of illustration as an independent profession in the world. As another major objective, we feature outstanding and creative contemporary illustration projects in various fields.

So, we are looking for volunteers to help us in these areas: - French/Spanish to English translation (assistant needed). - Publishing and collecting illustration news from around the globe (illustrator or illustration student needed) Obviously, you’ll be part of our team and we will publish your name as one of our own colleagues.

Email us at: info@Brightnessmag.com

| 62


Welcome Articles From Writers

Brightness welcome articles , researches and interviews from writers, activists, journalists and also from artists around the world, on topics that we deal with regularly or on topics that you think need a wider circulation in illustration subject. We are most likely to publish those articles which are well-written, concise, offer a unique progressive perspective and have appeal to national and international readers. Please keep submissions under 1000 words. Since we have a small editorial staff, we cannot spend much time editing submissions. Please send us final drafts of your work. We do not guarantee that we publish all the articles we receive. They will be published after a confirmation by twice of the managers. Please send all submissions as plain text within the body of an email - you can also attach the article, for the safer side. Please include your name, contact information. A short paragraph bio is a must. If you wish, you can also send a thumb size photo of the author. We’ll be glad to publish it along with the article. You can submit your articles to i n f o @ b r i g h t n e s s m a g . c o m One word of caution. When you are submitting articles use the word -submission- in the subject line. Finally, it is very important to respect copyright and write the names of artists who their arts are used by you in the caption.

| 63


Digital Journal of Illustration |

| 64

Brightness Magazine no.5  

Digital Journal of Illustration Exclusive interviews with : Antonello Silverini | Dan Ferrer | Fatinha Ramos

Advertisement