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Reveal noun | re·veal | /rəˈvēl/ : 1. make (previously unknown or secret information) known to others. 2. an explanation to others that brings previously unknown information to light in an effort to challenge the common description of the subject with a more thorough depiction. As designers, we are described in many ways: creative, collaborative, solitary, independent, intense, proud, energetic, mysterious. While these words define us, they also restrict us. We are constantly growing, moving forward, and challenging each other and ourselves. We are thinkers, makers, and doers. We are designers; therefore, we are learners. What we experience and how we reflect on our experiences redefine the way we learn. These interactions – however commonplace, ignored, or unthought of – highlight who we are as designers and become stepping-stones on our individual paths

...through our participation and interactions in studio.

...through our ability to empathize and work with others.

...through our means of resolving our own projects.

...through our ability to balance the various parts of life that shape our identities. We are a collective. Yet we are individuals. This is our

FULL DISCLOSURE 3


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CULTURE

EMPATHY

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Studio Spaces The 116th John Stewardson Winner The 116th John Stewardson Finalists C_ABE on Studio Culture Foundations Design I INTD Advanced Visualization ARCH Design IV Secret Society of Designers First Year Experiments INTD Design III and Visualization I The Alex Hogrefe Workshop

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Emotional Timeline Better Philadelphia Challenge INTD Design III ARCH Design X C_ABE on Empathy ARCH Design III LARCH Design III & V Witicisms ARCH Design III INTD Design IV Conceptual Hybrids

Contents 96 | Interview with Executive Dean Barbara Klinkhammer 98 | Spaceworkers 100 | Credits

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UNMASKED

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Means of Process The Glass Pavilion Competition ARCH Design V C_ABE on Process Design Build ARCH Design IX ARCH Design X ARCH & INTD Design VI Experimental Modeling

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Tools of Designer The HOK Competition The IIDA Competition C_ABE on Lifestyle ARCH Design IX LARCH Design VII Schedules ARCH Design IX INTD Design VII Liminality Axonometrics

Architecture and Design Center SEED CENTER SMITH HOUSE SEARCH STUDIOS

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Studio noun | stu·di·o | ˈst(y)oodēˌō/:

1. A room where an artist, photographer, sculptor, etc., works; 2. The work space where designers develop ideas, foster friendships, make mistakes, and disappear for hours;

3. The course structure of a design student’s education, whereby students work at individual stations in proximity to others, collaborating on and critiquing projects as they evolve from assignment to completion, often spending the duration of the college program with the same group of people. For some, C_ABE students are a mystery. Perhaps we are a bit elusive and intense, leaving many to guess who we really are. Even more unknown are the buildings and studios into which we disappear for hours on end. Occasionally, we band together and leave for food. There they go. They have emerged. There are many people on campus who haven’t set foot into the Architecture and Design Building, even though it sits in the center of campus. Nevertheless, this is where designers congregate. They never sleep. They might be crazy. Studio culture seems to become who we are. Even without knowing the term, we understand it. We become woven together through personal and professional relationships. We create experiences that become both life lessons and memories. We do this all in a space that is meant to foster our education but generates so much more. There are desks, chairs, and that one place where so-and-so spilled his coffee all over so-and-so’s project. In this place, we experience peace and tranquility and utter chaos within hours. Studio transforms from stark cleanliness to immense clutter. It is a place of ideas and emotion. But what really makes studios special are the people. The diverse personalities build each class into something extraordinary. Together we: Cry and laugh, stress and breathe, panic and persevere, disagree and argue, collaborate and compete, push and pull, risk and fail, succeed and celebrate. We entertain and distract, focus and produce. We work. Studio isn’t about how little we sleep or how much we get done; it is about how we did it. That’s what we want others to see and know. We are together. Perhaps a cult, but mostly a

CULTURE


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116TH JOHN STEWARDSON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP IN ARCHITECTURE 2017: first place winner mELANIE WHEDON | PHILAU ALUMNA ‘14

AInterview CHATbyWITH Melanie Whedon Stephanie Dudak How many times have you done the Stewardson? I was one of the finalists my senior year. Last year, I worked on the project for almost a week before realizing I wasn’t going to finish with a project that I felt comfortable submitting. I decided that there was no way I was going to be able to do it while working full time and I didn’t want to burn myself out to get it done. What made you submit this year? The timing was perfect this year, and after going through the process once, I figured why not get the brief and just read about it. I just had fun with the brief—it was a good exercise in pushing myself to think differently than I have been the past few years [while working]. What was different working on it this time? How did you balance it with view in gallery at reservoir other things in your life? This time, I did what I felt was interesting. In school, and even the second time when I didn’t submit, I was thinking of what the judge would want to see. In some ways, it was good that I had tried going through it [last year] and knew the difficulties. Because I had to work, I set up a pretty rigorous schedule. It was a lot of weekend effort and when I got home, I only worked until 10:00 p.m. so that I didn’t burn myself out. One other thing I did differently this time is while I was watching videos about Mt. Lemmon, I was sketching out ideas for a building type.

view in observa

Did you experience any drawbacks or was the process consistent the whole way through as you were working? It definitely wasn’t consistent and I kept questioning myself. But if I didn’t have that idea of that moment in the section, then I could have swapped back and forth between ideas so much. Because I had that one idea, I just kept relentlessly sketching different ways to achieve that. Originally I placed it on a totally different area than the designated site. The last minute I moved it and classroom rotated it 180°. Even though I wasn’t

gallery

earth

the summit, the down into a which is carved Although we he ground every fully understand the earth. The gned to emphasize re, while also king connection

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sure if that was going to work—but it didn’t change the intent of the project. polaris

32.4434 N 110.7881 W

Do you think it’s important to participate in competitions? Wholeheartedly. I think it is so important for designers to push themselves and to think outside of the box. A competition is a good forum to push yourself in a new direction, even if it’s just exploratory. It’s also a good way to geto b sinvolved in something you’re ervatory interested in but might not necessarily have access to.

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into the stars

The narrow gallery opens up into the outdoor lookout, taking advantage of the scenic views of the Catalina Mountains. Here, the world is just within reach, but not quite tangible. This space is meant to have the user begin to reflect on our

Beyond the lookout, through a small tunnel, the user enters into the academic area housing the administration areas, classrooms, and the o b s e r v a t o r y i t s e l f. I t i s e s s e n t i a l t h a t t h e o b s e rvitory is the highest point, as it pokes out of the g r o u n d i n t h e g l a s s s h e l l . B e l o w, t h e u s e r l o o k s u p i n t o t h e o b s e r v a t o r y, d r a w n i n t o i t s b r i g h t ness. Here, the space is meant to bring the att e n t i o n t o t h e s k y. W i t h t h e a b i l i t y t o z o o m i n t o space, we begin to step out of our own minds


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Mount Lemmon As one of the highest mountains in the Sorona Desert, Mount Lemmon and the Catalina foothills are known for their extensive microclimates. The mountain attracts m a n y, f o r t h e 3 0 m i l e hike up the mountain has terrain spreading from Arizona to Canada.

SkyCenter

summit: new SkyCenter

The University of Arizona Sky Center takes advantage of Mount Lemmon’s summit for their multiple sky observitories. Sky Center’s mission is not only to engage in the scientific explorations of our universe, but to foster a deeper understanding of our Earth and our place in the universe.

preserve the summit The Summit at Mount

L e m m o n i s a so d e s t ipurely nation, “It was an interesting experience this time because it was the first time that I had designed bringing people of all biker and car ages to its peak. In order entrance in section. I had never gone through that exercise, so this was a great experiment for me to design in to preserve the natural beauty of the summit, the new SkyCenter that way.” program is buried into hiker entrance

campus utilities lookout

the earth, allowing the landscape to continue to its altitude.

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116TH JOHN STEWARDSON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP IN ARCHITECTURE 2017: Honorable mention Brian wise, shelby Miller, clara lattimore, stephanie hoffmeier The Stewardson Competition is a 10-day sprint project, in the state of Pennsylvania, where students and recent graduates receive a prompt and are challenged with designing a complete project based on thorough research and specific goals. This year’s project involved designing an observatory for the University of Arizona’s SkyCenter at Mt. Lemmon in Tucson, Arizona. Students had to address issues such as a limited and steep site, light pollution and climate, as well as accommodating public access to the Shulman Telescope. The main objective of the project was to engage the public in space exploration and provide an educational environment. Displayed are the finalists from Philadelphia University.

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Faculty Carol Hermann Professor | Architecture “How do we accommodate diversity of learning styles in studio culture? How do we make everyone feel like they are important?”

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Jordan Pabst 1st Year | Architecture “Always make sure that you know how much the concrete is going to weigh in the end, because I may or may not have built a 100 lb model for the last project.”

What does studio culture mean to you? “As a phrase, it’s been sort of defined for us. It isn’t necessarily the phrase I would use. I would use “studio life” perhaps. The word culture sort of does bring us to the idea that, we are acculturated to working a certain way and behaving a certain way. Sometimes those ways work really well for everybody and sometimes they work really well for some people and not others. They need to both follow that norm and breaking away from that norm is really valuable.”

“As long as you are able to balance your time and focus, the gains to be made from working with your peers are innumerable and irreplaceable.”

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Julia Lee 2nd Year | Interior Design

“Studio environment is a great place to meet people, especially students in a different class. Many upperclassmen have given me valuable advice that I wouldn’t have been able to receive if there weren’t a studio. “

“It means you have to be respectful of other people, bouncing ideas off each other, and not being afraid to go up to someone and ask them to explain why they are doing what they’re doing and expecting the same to happen to you.”

“Studio culture, to me, is how the students interact in the space. Respecting each other’s work and encouraging each other to improve and become better designers.”

“It’s really awesome! I came from a school where everyone just left each other alone, and now we are all on top of each other and telling each other things. I think that is really helpful so I don’t think there’s anything I would change.”

“I would like the students to follow the rules more. Every time I go to studio, I walk into a messy studio space.”

How do you think the studio

“We will just sit there and talk, and bounce ideas off of each other. In the end we’ll come up with an idea that’s way better than I could have gotten on my own.”

C_ABE on Studio Culture

“The studio environment effects how productive I am in my work. When studio is noisy and busy, I get easily get distracted and tend to do less work than I could have.”


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Kai Ulysse 3rd Year | Interior Design

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Hakeem Wilson 4th Year | Landscape Architecture

Brian Malley 5th Year | Architecture

“A positive component of studio culture is realizing you are not alone! Knowing there are people who are sharing a similar experience builds bonds and a family-like mentality. You can’t get something like that sitting in a lecture hall.”

“One component to a positive studio culture is having people who are passionate about their work because that can be infectious.”

“Craft, simplicity, boldness, richness are my values as a designer.”

“It means going to a place or meeting a group of people who enjoy collaborative projects, merging of ideas, and are all in the same boat...putting hours into studio and projects.”

“To me, studio culture is an unspoken code of conduct between peers which governs how people interact with one another and how work is accomplished.”

“Studio culture extends beyond the studio walls to friendships and connections inside and outside of studio.”

What aspect of studio culture at PhilaU, would you change? “Allowing longer studio hours. I can’t say how many times a group of us are motivated to pull long hours together to get huge assignments done; but studio closes at 2:00 a.m., so we are unable to do the work together. Staying together to get work done is always easier than being alone.”

“One thing I would change about the studio culture at PhilaU is to make a greater effort in collaborating with different disciplines. Maybe there is a monthly one-day charrette with all the disciplines on projects within our campus?”

“Selfishness needs to go away. Do you really need to hog a plotter cap? I understand the need to close studio at 2:00 a.m., but sometimes one really needs to run with their inspiration and motivation, no matter what the clock says.”

environment has an effect on studio work?

“I push out my best work when I’m in studio, allowing for others to critique and make suggestions to my work, compared to sitting in my room and struggling on my own.”

“Studio environment sets the tone for the level of complexity I want to put into a project.”

“SEED is a great work environment; it feels like your living room when it comes to comfort. A&D however is distracting sometimes with multiple studios going on at once.”

Interview conducted with faculty and students by: Jason Jiang, Clara Lattimore, & Jason Trutner


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Foundations Design I : Dennis mcweeney, Ryan mcmahon, Salvatore Armetta, ariana rosario, sarina baki, jordan pabst The Design I Foundation Studios are C_ABE student’s first exposure to design education. These studios challenge students to develop tangible skillsets of drafting, model-making, and oral presentation, while also asking students to explore abstract thought through a variety of projects. The Mondrian project (left page) challenges students to take a two-dimensional painting and imagine it in threedimensional space. The Illumination project (right page) is the final project of the course and becomes an opportunity for students to test all of the skills they have developed throughout the semester.

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INTD ADVANCED VIS: Christine Migliore, Taijsha Bailey, Terence Coston, Rachel Robarge, Emelia Risner, Chela Humber, Marissa Frey, Shamus Mcvicar The Advanced Visualization for interiors is an elective for third and fourth year interior design students. This class teaches advanced modeling and rendering skills in Revit, SketchUp, and 3DS Max. The projects shown are from the first project of the fall semester, “The Loft�. Students were given a CAD plan of a loft that they were to model and customize in SketchUp. The second part of the project was to export the model into 3DS Max and apply realistic materials and finishes to bring the space to life. The projects shown are 4th year lofts that demonstrate use of materiality in rendering.

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ARCH DESIGN IV: Nicholas Juliano, Anthony Elia, Thomas Marzella, Derek Sibinga, Drake Schaefer The Design IV Architecture students created playscapes in the Blue Bell Park in Philadelphia. Working with the site, students developed interventions to engage the visitor and create various experiences that would provide accessibility. Schemes ranged from entwining paths, open elevated nets, elevated towers, and labyrinths to explore. The schemes often incorporated a procession of paths or routes with various AA destination points of interaction.

My design u ability to tra when appro the thumb does not st

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Towards the down the s foliage. My a height wh giving them

South Elevation 0’

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MASTER PLAN

CONNECTION OF MAJOR TREES

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This project aims to encourage climbing and exploration by creating areas of active and passive play for children to explore. This is generated by a process of operations derived from site conditions. My site is located on the human-made path of the Master Plan proposal for the previous project. It is located on a south facing slope, a relatively flat area of Blue Bell Park. Slightly facing south downgrade, this grants sun exposure throughout the day which is where the concept began. In the wooded area of Blue Bell, there is an opening in the canopy to the south of the site which lets light through to the space. Also, there are main sturdy trees on my site that were determining factors of the design. I wanted my project to flow easily through the canopy having minimal effect on the large existing trees. This informed me on how to attach my project to seemingly float in mid-air as well as the height of my project determined by height of the tree’s canopy. I chose prominent existing trees I wanted to highlight in my design by either tethering around them or protruding through the array of geometries. Large poles hold up the tensioned rope which is connected to the arrayed geometries. These outlook points where a user can experience the view while up next to a tree up in the air. The user can explore through the three layers by climbing through openings, laying in netting where geometries are absent, walking up where geometries have been peeled or exploring underneath all the canopies in the carve beneath. Sustainable strategies such as minimally impacting the surrounding trees have been taken to enhance the experience of the user. Wooden panels would make the arrayed shapes and a tensioned rope netting would be implemented for areas of rest. Compression rods hold up an Invisinet safety precaution to give a sense of implied danger while up in the air.

Just as the look down fr below vision identify that the design s

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rage climbing and exploration and passive play for children ed by a process of operations ns. My site is located on the Master Plan proposal for the ated on a south facing slope, lue Bell Park. Slightly facing nts sun exposure throughout concept began. In the wooded n opening in the canopy to the ts light through to the space. dy trees on my site that were design. I wanted my project canopy having minimal effect . This informed me on how to ingly float in mid-air as well t determined by height of the nent existing trees I wanted to either tethering around them e array of geometries. Large ed rope which is connected to These outlook points where a ew while up next to a tree up plore through the three layers ings, laying in netting where alking up where geometries ng underneath all the canopies ustainable strategies such as surrounding trees have been perience of the user. Wooden rayed shapes and a tensioned mplemented for areas of rest. an Invisinet safety precaution d danger while up in the air.

HIGH LAYER PERSPECTICE

CENTRAL LAYER PERSPECTICE

EXPLODED AXON

PEEL OPERATION

HAND HOLD EXTRUSIONS

SAFETY NETTING

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Gehry Donald Above Above Shady

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I avoid black because it makes me look bloated.

Slim

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I don’t drink coffee anymore cause I’m on a cleanse.

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I find my Interior Designers on the IKEA showroom floors.

4201 Henry Avenue Delirious Philadelphia United States of America


0004 Secret Society of Designers Delirious New York, NY 00004 February 6, 2017 Mr./Mrs. Person 4201 Henry Avenue Radiant City, Pennsylvania 19144 Dear Human, Thank you for your interest in the Secret Society of Architects and Interior Designers. In consideration of your application, we did not find your experience, skills and overall personality suitable for our organization. Due to the overwhelming number of applications that we receive, we cannot respond individually to further correspondence about our selection process. However, I would like to remind you of the requirements to join our exclusive organization. Qualifications: • Excellent organizational mess skills. • Year round black apparel. • Proficiency in speaking for long durations without actually saying anything. • 21+ Years of experience with bottling up your emotions. • Strong poker face. To increase your odds of admission into our organization, we recommend you look the part. Dress in all black, speak like you know everything, grab a nice pair of overpriced round glasses. Again, understand that this profession requires the use of a face mask because we can’t have your personality, human touch and emotions contaminate the design. Our clients and colleagues would have none of that; that is beneath us. Sincerely yours, Designer


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First year experiments: Callie collins, hunter dyson, scott cousens, dorshan wilson, Michael Griffith Throughout the first year studios and supporting foundation classes, students are challenged to develop a diverse array of skills. This development begins with drawing, drafting, and model making. Further emphasis is placed on media exploration in order to challenge students to find new forms of representation. The continued exploration of materials and media also allows students to derive new ways of designing. Supporting foundation classes ask students to develop photography and photo editing skills through various projects. The projects in supporting classes directly correlate to the design studio course projects in order to allow the skills to seamlessly translate between classes. A

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INtD DESIGN III & VISUALIZATION I: Daniela Cintron, Hunter Faddis The Interior Design III studio had the opportunity to design a modern loft and restaurant for a hypothetical client from another country. These designs take inspiration from culturally rich countries including Japan (left page) and Brazil (right page). Students were also challenged with working within the constraints of tight spaces. Also included is Visualization I work, exploring graphic rendering techniques and digital material representation.

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DIGITAL DEMOS: Alexander Haba, Brittany ewing, Christopher Murnin, Derek sibinga, Ben Manarski, theresa chiarenza, Julie carbone h

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Andrew sauers, Dylan beckwith, Matthew shafran, Katherine meier, Molly pace, Rachel updegrove, Stephanie dudak

THE ALEX HOGREFE WORKSHOP SUBMISSIONS: “LESS IS A BORE”

DigitalDEMOS are student driven workshops that demonstrate multimedia and design techniques. As a requirement for one of the workshops by Design Distill’s Alex Hogrefe at Philadelphia University, students were asked to respond to Robert Venturi’s famous saying, “Less is a Bore” on an 8”x8” JPEG. With no limitations, students had an opportunity to showcase their digital skills, thoughts and humor to the college.

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Perspective noun | per·spec·tive | /perpərˈspektiv/:

1. The art of drawing solid objects on a two-dimensional surface so as to give the right impression of their height, width, depth, and position in relation to each other when viewed from a particular point;

2. A particular attitude toward or way of regarding something;

3. The means of giving and receiving criticism and relating one’s emotions to their growth as a designer.

We strive to understand the perspectives of users, communities, and critics. We must balance our reactions to charged emotions, whether positive or negative, to enhance, develop and humanize our projects. Being aware of our emotions through the process of design, not only allows us to grow as designers, but also strengthens our contribution to the built environment. The honest discussions in which we engage, the milestone presentations in which we meet our potential clients, and the expressive and competitive studio atmosphere create high emotional investments for an aspiring designer. But one’s empathy can turn even the most intense dialogues into beneficial evaluations of self and society. One of the major lessons learned while designing is the ability to accept and give constructive criticism without destroying the emotional balance of another. Empathy is not agreeing with another person or sacrificing your own values, but rather challenging your view by respecting another’s perspective. The most fundamental humanistic skill, empathy is the feeling by which we grow emotionally and develop as designers. While starting on the individual level, it can escalate into a collective movement that brings about fundamental change. Both how we give and how we receive these critical words of wisdom, advice, and opinion can determine the trajectory for one’s emotional journey, and how we express

empathy


“Ooh! Cute little concept models! I can do anything!” -Hardi Shah

“BLIND EXCITEMENT & CREATIVITY” - Alison Eberhardt

Emotional Timeline

“Week 2: The sudden realization that you have no idea what to do.”

“This is way too many ideas...but fun!” - Shannon McLain

- Tom Loerch

“Alright I need to stop dilly dallying and push the design further.” - Ashley Cummins


“The best moments are when you first get a new project brief, and your head is filled with incredible, impossible ideas.” - Breanna Sheeler

“I’m so proud of this project, it’s my baby!” - Hardi Shah

“My ‘Spike of Rebellion’ I’m doing what I want and making myself happy!” -Alison Eberhardt

“It certainly has been a rollercoaster”

“How am I actually going to finish this?!”

- Tom Loerch

- Shannon McLain

“Maybe I should be a starving artist with my alpaca farm in New Zealand” - Ashley Cummins


2017 BETTER PHILADELPHIA CHALLENGE: THIRD PLACE WINNERS STEPHANIE DUDAK, JASON TRUTNER, eliza fredette, michael koerner The Better Philadelphia Challenge is an annual, international, design competition held by the Philadelphia Center for Architecture and Design. This year’s challenge asked students, “Taking into consideration the three-mile vision for the park, what design interventions could improve access to, pedestrian and bicycle transit through, lighting in, and programming for the Rail Park Tunnel, making this covered section a useful, fun, and safe public space for all?” Connect Philly, an interdisciplinary team from PhilaU, Drexel, and MedStudio@JEFF, were awarded third place.

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IntD Design III: Bridget Sax, Julia Strange, Aubrey Coughlin The third year interior design students were assigned an old shop in Manayunk, Philadelphia to transform into a modern retail space. This an introduction to retail design that pushes the students to consider human interaction while the user moves throughout the space. This was an opportunity to promote student exploration of unique spaces that utilize sustainable methods and materials. Students also had the chance to consider branding of the retailer and its influence in Manayunk. Considering existing retailers in the area, they were encouraged to visualize a retail space that would best serve the neighboring community. A

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ARCH DESIGN X: Jennifer McElroy, Taylor Woods, Abbie Gall, Mina Bellare, Brian Wise The Design 10 ‘Rethinking the Hospital’ studio, led by Professor Kihong Ku, allowed collaboration between 5th year Architecture and Second year Medical students with Dr. Bon Ku, at Thomas Jefferson University. Initial reseach into hospital systems led to project proposals which improve health and wellness for both the patients, staff, and community members. Projects varied from reworking work flow in the ER, interactive patient walls, a modular infusion bay screen and mobile healthcare units. A

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Faculty Lisa Phillips Professor | Interior Design “I am highly in tune with my emotions and I definitely think this makes me a better designer. I like to put myself in the shoes of the people I am designing for and understand their needs.”

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Abigail Kern 1st Year | Interior Design “They call me the mom friend. *laughter* So there’s a lot of support going around.”

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Rachel Meier 2nd Year | Landscape Architecture “I have been so lucky to interact with community members on all of my studio projects this year. It assures me that I am in the right program when I talk to those who my designs could potentially reach.”

What are special instances when you “Definitely crit time; that’s a good and bad spectrum. It’s super rewarding to be in there once everyone’s wrapping up their projects and we’re about to go to crit, but it’s also very stressful time for all of us. You can walk into the room and feel everybody’s rushing to finish.”

“Studio is mentally and physically draining when you are coming close to a deadline. Those are the times I become the most stressed out and exhausted, or I will question myself and my path in life. However, being in studio has created some of the best emotions and memories.”

“I don’t tend to come right out and say I don’t like something unless a student is just not changing it for several crits, then I will be quite blunt. Up until that point I say “I don’t love this entry sequence,” or “I don’t feel that this area is supporting your concept as much as it could.”

“I try to give criticism, but it’s more of the ‘what if’. It’s more like ideas going back and forth just to explore more things. Even if you are stuck on an idea that you want to use, if you expand your mind and bounce ideas off of each other, it could eventually get you to push yourself to another place.”

“I am coming from a place of encouragement because I want to help them succeed. I don’t get offended if someone doesn’t follow my advice because I might just think differently than them and that’s perfectly fine.”

Design led me to learning more about research in human behavior and I think that this area is so closely related to psychology that it indeed connects to empathy for me.”

“I think being able to empathize creates a totally different environment. It really helps your relationship with people through the design work you are doing.”

“I find myself to be increasingly positive and optimistic when other people in studio are upset because I know what it feels like to be down or struggling and I want to do my best to help them.”

“I experience extreme emotions when I see disrespect or experience disappointment. When a student has a breakthrough we celebrate. I am rarely formal because honestly, my studio is way too much work to consider it anything but serious.”

How has design process fostered your empathy for others?

C_ABE on Empathy


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Zachary Robertson 3rd Year | Landscape Architecture

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Dan Bachelder 4th Year | Architecture

Ashley Cummins 5th Year | Architecture

“I really truly strive to be a listener. Sometimes people just want to be heard, so I am always happy to just listen.”

“Especially in Landscape Architecture since it’s so tiny, we are all just friends with one another, we really talk to one another if we need something. We all just connect with one another.”

“In the end sharing emotions with my friends in studio will be one of my fondest memories.”

“A lot of times it’s just anxiety because of the amount of work you have to produce and the time you’re expected to have it done. [However] it’s great validation, when critics say that the hard work you’ve been doing for the entire semester is really good.”

“I always start out extremely excited and ambitious. Somewhere between the transitions from concept to actually making your idea come to life I tend to doubt myself. That moment when I actually figure it out, I regain confidence and excitement and it drives me until crit week.”

“The instances in which I have experienced the most extreme amount of stress is when I am dealing with external family matters while also having to work on a project deadline. Here I am running like a mouse on a wheel to meet a project deadline and the rest of the world is passing me by.”

“I think at the beginning I was a lot more defensive of my work, but now I listen a lot more. Usually your critics are there to help you and not ruin your project. Sometimes if they are saying things that aren’t relevant to what’s happening in my project. I just brush it off.”

“If someone does something that might not work I will tell them, but I will make sure to tell them what they did right as well. I have learned to see the positive side of negative criticism. Never harp on the bad, it never does any good for you.”

“Why absorb negative criticism if it’s not going to lead you anywhere? Take it with a grain of salt; analyze it, flip it into positive criticism and take what you will out of that.”

“You really have to understand what a community needs. Now that I’m doing landscape architecture I think about the impact on the user?”

“Understanding people and their emotions and how they think is so important when designing. In the end you’re designing for the people not for yourself.”

“The design process has made me very empathetic. Each human being is so unique, special and amazing. We as designers need to understand their wants and needs to really make a great design.”

experience extreme emotion, good or bad?

How do you give criticism and respond to critique?

Interview conducted with faculty and students by: Abbie Gall, Iryna Gulin, & Breanna Sheeler


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ARCH DESIGN III: elia frost, Helen phan, kyle chang, olivia deagro, derek sibinga The Design III studio explored diversity by focusing part of the semester on designing an international cultural center in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia. The project focused on a response to the ongoing worldwide refugee crisis and the lack of urban infrastructure, which could support people who are seeking a better life and opportunity. The international cultural center serves as a community center, providing counseling, job placement, health services, and educational programs. The challenge of the project is creating a welcoming home for refugees while at the same time preserving the rich Philadelphia urban fabric. A

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LARCH DESIGN V: Evan McNaught, Zachary Robertson Partnered in a vertical studio, second and third year landscape students worked to design the Mill Creeks Arts and Innovation Center, located in West Philadelphia. Students met with community partners to further explore the site’s history and needs. Their proposed schemes are community centered, helping the area to grow, prosper and become a cultural hub. Sites were manipulated in order to manage storm-water, incorporate native species to increase biodiversity and encourage pedestrian traffic throughout.

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ARCH DESIGN III: adonis hughes, kyle chang, thomas marzella, adonis hughes, rachel shahin The Urban studio, explored residential design during a part of the semester. The rowhouse project allowed students to indulge into their own definitions of what a contemporary Philadelphia rowhouse is. Students were challenged by having to consider the surrounding context, honor the existing zoning, height, setback, and open space regulations, while still proposing a spatially compelling design. The project called for maximizing daylight while also satisfying interior spatial constraints.

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INTD DESIGN IV: Daniela Cintron, Autumn Stuart, Hannah Brokos The Interior Design IV students were tasked with designing either an opthalmology, dental or audiology medical office for two physicians. The requirements for this space required a calm and comfortable environment that expressed modern aesthetic and technical expertise. Their process began with extensive research on a lobby and tenant space located on 707-715 North 2nd St. in Northern Liberties, Philadelphia. Students then chose one tenant space to design. Historical building restraints required that existing structural columns stay in their locations and shared walls could not be cut through. B

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ARCH design II: Charlie Euginio, Felix Warren, Norman Engel, Alexxa Inggalls, Apostolos Karnavas, Zayda Shavkatova, Reese Pembleton, Alan Davidson

CONCEPTUAL HYBRIDS Design 2 students are asked to produce beautiful, 2’x2’ multi-media models and drawings based on their own critical analysis of the 20th century house they have been studying. Through this critical reading, students individually explore concepts that not only focus on materiality and color, but act as an architectural reflection on the house. This exercise asks students to think about major design concepts of the original house and how they will relate to their own ideas. The intention is that students will use the concepts formed and explored throughout these drawings and models to inform the development of a visitor center as they move forward in the semester. a

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Process noun | proc·ess | /’prä,ses,’prō,ses/: 1. A series of actions or steps taken in order to achieve a particular end; 2. The use of necessary distractions to find inspiration to work through a problem. The design process is not always linear, and there is not a single right way to conduct it. Composed of a series of necessary distractions, inspirations, and creative developments, the process presents a different experience to everyone. The full experience is essential to developing a successful project. Being open to the possibilities of what a project can become, fuels the success of resolving a design problem. Restricting the growth of ideas by holding onto your initial perspective, limits the opportunity for new discovery and realization of a project. We know this process exists, but pieces that are integral to the project’s development get hidden away or forgotten for sake of a strong final image. What is deemed unworthy of the final enhances the narrative of both the design and the designer, and provides a deeper understanding of a project. The learning process in design involves building arsenals of ways that work, and ways that don’t work. Once we have failed enough times to have fully learned a process, we move on to failing and learning the next process. So we celebrate the idea that the work that got us to the final image is just as meaningful as the resulting project. The process is more than a means to an end, it’s the story of how both the design and the designer progressed. The many hours spent working, the crumpled up pages, the endless iterations, the moments of confusion, and the final moments of elation tell a story that needs to be noticed. The beautiful work that appears to have been a walk in the park was anything but

effortless


Brian Malley ‘17, Jason Trutner ‘17


Study Abroad - Arthur Loree ‘18


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THE GLASS PAVILION COMPETITION: RYAN MANN, MADI MENARD, ANDREW SAUERS, SAM HOROCHOWSKI, TYLER ROTA The third year architecture students sought to balance innovative design with practical construction in this competition in the Glass Pavilion Competition. The Finishing Trades Institute of the Mid-Atlantic Region challenged the competitors to explore new applications of glass as a building material. The students took every opportunity to develop new tectonic languages, shown in carefully considered details, various methods of connection, and assembly. The winning design (shown right) will have a lasting impact on Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University. Standing as a symbol of their unification through the ongoing integration, a pavilion will take residence in a prominent location on each campus. During the summer of 2017, a design-build studio will further refine the proposal, culminating in a showcase of the built pavilions at Design Philadelphia. A

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ARCH DESIGN V: HARDI SHAH, ANDREW SAUERS, HARDI SHAH, BEN MENARSKI, ANTHONY RUPP As the final project of Design V, these designs are the culmination of an entire semester of research. Every student became familiar with Logan Square in Philadelphia, learning the existing conditions and needs of the community. Each section collectively determined a specific program such as gap-year education, art therapy, and youth athletics. The students were tasked with exploring facade iterations that will respond to the surrounding context. These centers would fulfill a present need identified by the students, and respond acutely to the changing culture of the neighborhood. Students considered the design from the scale of grand formal gestures down to the smallest of functional details. The narrowness of the site inherently demanded vertical solutions, resulting in thorough sectional studies.

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Faculty Andrew Hart Professor | Architecture “If all you do is one thing, it’s really hard to appreciate that one thing. You need to have something else to appreciate the other.”

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Ryan McMahon 1st Year | Architecture “I’d say that you can make the project whatever you really want it to be. The project is what you make of it.”

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Jorge Mora 2nd Year | Architecture “The experience is so important to me, and that’s what makes me motivated—because that’s what people look for in a building the experience.”

How would you describe your individual design process? “Slow and painful. . . If you know what it’s going to look like, then you’re not going to learn anything. If you’re not really sure what it’s going to look like, but you leave yourself open to ideas of what it could be, then when those unexpected opportunities come up, you can kung fu them into possibility.”

“Iterative. Everyone has an iterative process. Don’t get caught up on something. Move on if it’s not working.”

“Iterative. Parti models and further sketches and further development. Out of art, you can get any concept. That’s always in the back of my mind. The project we just finished, we made collages. Out of that, you think of what the meaning and message is and how you can interpret it through a building.”

“My very first portfolio and every portfolio since then has been named “Process”. . . It’s all part of the continuum of learning how to do it better.”

“It IS the project. Your process explains where you got your ideas from. If you don’t have any process, people aren’t going to understand what you’re trying to do. “

“100% really important. It doesn’t matter where you start from, it always points to an end.”

What inspires you during the project process?

“The thing that I like most about teaching is I get to explore something 10, 16, 24 different ways, and ways that I would never even consider. So finding inspiration is not the thing that I think is challenging. The thing that is challenging is saying ‘Okay now I’m going to choose this.’”

“I pride myself in my work. So having good work is part of it, but learning as much as I can from the project is what motivates me to do more.”

C_ABE on Process

“Taking the role of the user and what I expect from the experience from myself and as someone else. It’s more about the user experience. Picturing yourself in the building and how it affects your mood and well-being.”


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Evan McNaught 3rd Year | Landscape Architecture

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Caitlin Powell 4th Year | Interior Design

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Katie Parent 5th Year | Architecture

“Design is intimidating. If you just start somewhere, it helps to get past that wall, and that initial design block.”

“Every person’s process is different. How one person gets to the end of a project can be completely different than another.”

“I think that the best way I’ve found to get motivated is to just collaborate with my peers; we all motivate each other.”

“Chaotic. It always changes and every time I think I’ve got a hold on a step by step process there’s always a curveball that gets thrown in and everything goes out of whack and you have to rethink and try to get back on track.”

“My design process includes a lot of concept work. I first come up with two or a few different ideas that I favor. Then I decide which one fits better within the space, and continue designing it from there.”

“You have to hurry up and get it wrong so that you can know how to do it right.” I have learned to accept that fact that my first idea is not always my best idea, and it is important to make those mistakes or find those issues with a project sooner rather than later in the process.”

How important is process work to the success of a project?

“It’s absolutely crucial. I don’t think you can design a finished project, initially. Even when you don’t think you are designing, it always ends up coming back and leading to a final project that is much more significant.”

“Process work is very important. For a design to flow properly and be successful there has to be a lot of thought that goes into it.”

“Very! I truly believe the success of a project lies in a designer’s ability to filter through an immense amount of iterations through multiple media. It takes a lot of patience and persistence but it’s definitely worth time and effort in the end.”

“I find most of my motivation in Silence, actually. I have a really hard time getting inspiration from being in studio. Having time to get away from the design process then coming back to it, helps dramatically.”

“Being able to implement an idea that was once so small in your head, into an entire design of a space. That space can affect users in so many ways. Seeing all that come to life through so much hard work, [makes it] all worth it in the end.”

“Hearing and seeing people who are currently in the design profession talk about how much they love what they do inspires me. They all inspire me to really get involved and invested into my own projects.”

Interview conducted with faculty and students by: Stephanie Dudak & Emelia Risner


Design VII: mathew lombardo, marisa mines, christopher murnin, peter nagel, matthew zepp Green Allies and Upper Pottsgrove Township approached the students of David Kratzer’s Design Build class with a request to create a wilderness shelter and bird blind for the Althouse Arboretum. The class was challenged to not only design the project but also to fabricate and assemble the structure. The objective of the project was to provide a space where visitors could observe and visually interact with the wildlife without disturbing the animals. The students sought a design that “focused on viewing, understanding and respecting the environment.”

Ground Connection Detail

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ARCH DESIGN IX: Taylor Woods, Jason jiang, Iryna gulin The Design IX Campus Master Planning Design studio led by Professor Alesa Rubendall focused on proposing a master plan revision for four college campuses in the Philadelphia area: Thomas Jefferson University, West Chester University, Gwynedd Mercy University, and Saint Josephs University. During the first half of the semester, students worked in groups to develop three master plan proposals. During the second half of the semester, students worked on individual building proposals within the team’s final master plan and presented their final design to their respective college campus’ architects and facility managers.

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ARCH DESIGN X: IRYNA GULIN, Stephanie dudak, tevin williams, Stephanie Hoffmeier, tsahai pettiford, joe kasztelan, Ryland kepner

NOLLI EXERCISE

The fundamental goal of this urban exercise is to explore the numerous possibilities of how urban infrastructure can change the pedestrian experience. One of the many topics discussed through this exercise was whether or not new urban proposals should continue the existing grid or entirely differentiate itself from the urban geometries that have been there for ages. The result is a variety of relationships created between landmarks, nodes and pathways that ultimately create a complex network of an urban experience. C

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ARCH & INTD DESIGN VI: Shannon Mclain, giana castelli, andrew sauers, sam horochowski, Osvaldo solano-tavera, sam ringer Architecture and Interior Design VI students collaborated in teams to create the Smart Cities project, which is compiled of living and working design proposals located in Brooklyn and Manhattan, New York City. Each team chose a neighborhood to research and from this research, identified a key issue of the community’s health that influenced the design of the installation. One project focused on the mental health of at-risk youth, while another explored the impact of hydroponics on family nutrition. There was a emphasis on integrative technologies in the design the transitions are made from old to new.

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experimental modeling: abbie gall, jennifer mcelroy, taylor woods, stefan zych, katherine meier, dylan beckwith

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The Experimental Modeling course, led by Professor Kihong Ku, combines theory and technology to explore form and structure. Through their study in biomimetics, students translated plant and animal systems to architectural components. Using the framework of parametric design, students utilized numerical or measurable factors to define and drive their design intent into a formal architectural exploration and response. Rhino [a 3d modeling program] and Grasshopper [a graphic scripting/coding program] was used to adjust outputs of form and structure based on inputs. Voronoi patterns, L-systems, python scripting, and plug-ins (LunchBox, Kangaroo) were used in order to explore design opportunities.

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Identity noun | i·den·ti·ty | īˈden(t)ədē/:

1. The fact of being whom or what a person or thing is;

2. The balance between personal and career-oriented passions and ambitions. Today we are anything but traditional. We have grown into a collection of unique individuals with different talents, tastes, and interests. An old stereotype of always wearing black and doing nothing but living and breathing architecture has dissolved. We are a new generation of designers. We are equally as passionate as those who came before us, but we are eager to be and do more. It is hard to pin a general definition on us. How can one define such a diverse group? Perhaps it is the new skills we bring to the table, or the innovation we offer, or the ability to experiment with what we have learned. We are ready to push the boundaries of our profession. What is most important is that we are people. We may be flattered by the general assumptions that we are extra creative or extremely astute, but we don’t want to simply be labeled by our majors. When each designer is unmasked the person beneath is revealed – shaping design through personal passions. Our work may hang on the same size sheets on the walls or be generated from the same software, but our identities give our work its differences. Each of us has our quirks and habits, hobbies and goals that guide us through each day. They influence our projects and relationships, and they are critical to finding necessary balance in our lives. The label of designer conceals who we are. We have our own personalities and aspirations, and we might be more inclined to reveal ourselves as humanists, creators, motivators, or problem solvers. What are we?

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THE HOK COMPETITION: FIRST PLACE ARCHITECTURE ENTRY ANNA AYIK and SHANNON MCLAIN Anna Ayik and Shannon McLain, winners of the 2017 HOK Future Design Challenge created a tower for live/work in order to have functional spaces. The towers run parallel to the viaduct that cuts diagonally through the site, then twist together to mimic the convergence of the viaduct in the form of an embrace. The live/ work tower overlaps above the viaduct, creating a set of community spaces. This building is intended for artists and entrepreneurs to have a creative environment without outside judgment. It was necessary to instill collaborative open spaces for people to work together and share their ideas. vertical circulation

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THE IIDA DESIGN COMPETITION: SECOND PLACE WINNER Christine Migliore, THIRD PLACE WINNER Dominique Waldrup, HONORABLE MENTION Taijsha Bailey The IIDA Student Design Competition is a competition open to all Interior Design students in the Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware area. Entrants were required to submit an already completed project from a design studio of the same year. Judging was based on concept, space planning, presentation and overall design. Three Interior Design students from Philadelphia University placed with top awards in this year’s competition. Christine Migliore was awarded second place, Dominique Waldrup was awarded third place, and Taijsha Bailey received honorable mention.

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Faculty Li Hao Professor | Architecture

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“Part of my work doesn’t feel like work, it’s more of a hobby. It combines my work life with my social life to make a more balanced experience that expresses my passion.”

“I feel an equal balance between both [responsibilities and social life] is the healthiest way to prioritize them.”

“[I prioritize through] not procrastinating. Through planning things for weeks in advance, I can plan how much work I have and what I need to get done.”

“I became an observer, I see the relations. I feel like I see more, but I also feel that I’m not perfect in this sense, I always want to improve myself as if I’m improving my design.”

“One major change would have to be me being able to adjust to the situation at hand better.”

“I don’t do that very well, being in a stable relationship with a dog gave me equal responsibilities that balance my design.”

“A well balanced mix between friends, school work, and extracurricular activities.”

“Through allotting time for everything I do so I give myself more time for each thing I do, always planning ahead though knowing what work I have I can plan for it.”

“I want to leverage what I’ve learned about design. I want to attack challenges using design thinking outside of our profession. I also want to unlock the potential and growth in our profession. I want to find out how to stay relevant to this profession.”

“I hope to be able to see my work develop and be able to share my experience with others so that their work will get better as well.”

“I hope to get to know and become closer with my professors and hopefully become more involved in IIDA.”

“It’s evolving as we speak, currently as I stand, I want to be able to use design thinking, I want to use challenges outside of design.”

“That I should be proud of whatever I make no matter what, that I should always present my work strongly and full of pride.”

“Handwork and always pushing to be better at design, as a friend, and as an athlete.”

What is one fundamental change to your identity that has

“That I have become so responsible, from doing the bare minimum in high school and design school pushes me to do more, to become the best.”

What is one way you maintain work-life balance?

C_ABE on Lifestyle


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Andrew Sauers 3rd Year | Architecture “School comes first, classes, projects. Then soccer, and then a social life.”

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Penelope Segura 4th Year | Landscape “I’m also a Resident Manager. School usually ends up coming first, then RM, and then my social life.”

occurred as a result of design school?

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Jennifer McElroy 5th Year | Architecture

“[I prioritize] anything that involves a commitment, such as class, or dance company. Anything that is enjoyable and eventful comes secondary to those.”

“Being able to finally unleash creativity. I have always wanted to create, design and explore the process and design school has allowed me to do so.”

“I definitely have become more outspoken. I’ve had to get used to going up and presenting my ideas and I hate public speaking. So it’s definitely changed me in that way. I’ve also become thicker skinned.”

“I’ve learned to take things less seriously and understand them for what they are. Understanding the critique is about my work and not about me personally.”

“Honestly, just schedule yourself in a way that you find free time and you utilize it. When scheduling, you prioritize and conduct yourself in the most logical way.”

“I always watch Netflix or a movie while doing design, or I use it to take a break, and keep working on design while watching Netflix.”

“Lacking sleep and using my planner religiously; scheduling every minute of every day. Post-it notes are also my favorite.”

“I want to improve my presentation skills. I admire the way lecturers and professionals articulate their words and transcribe their work in a verbal manner.”

“I want to become more aware of the different projects in our field. I also want public speaking to come easier to me. I hope to be more comfortable with selling my projects and myself.”

How do you hope to grow in the next few years?

“I hope to begin developing my career, and trying to understand the path I want to take with architecture.”

What are your values as a student, designer and person?

“There’s value in hard work, and not making any excuses. There’s an excuse for everything these days, but I make it work.”

“Being honest to myself and... honest to others is important...as a designer and a person. I think it is important to do the best that I can within my limits.”

“Honesty, trustworthiness, and empathy. All three apply to all aspects of my life.”

Interview conducted with faculty and students by: Dylan Beckwith, Chela Humber, & Christine Migliore


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Arch Design IX: clara lattimore, jason trutner, stephanie dudak Design IX architecture students, under the direction of Chris Harnish, studied the country of Malawi in Africa and analyzed the need for medical care in the city of Blantyre. Harnish is a recent recipient of the Fullbright Scholarship and is currently residing in Blantyre, Malawi where he is working to make Malamulo Hospital a reality. Working in collaboration with 4th year landscape architecture students, the studio faced challenges with a sloped site, stormwater management collection strategies, and passive systems that had be integrated into the building. Additionally, students had to consider the impact of their design on the local culture and context.

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ARCH DESIGN IX: Zilda hijazin, Jiatai Wu, Crystal brown, jack rogers, Brittany Ewing, Nicholas Williamson The Design IX Textile Design and Material Strategies studio led by Professor Kihong Ku explored a variety of textile techniques and parametric design through their collaboration with practitioners at Stanev Potts Architects and Textile Design colleagues. These techniques were implemented into a parametric facade system which would be applied on to existing buildings within Philadelphia. The following images are the result of an intensive semester of research and prototyping of various applications from students. The final projects were showcased as part of Design Philadelphia 2016 and funded by NCARB as an initiative to promote practitioner and student collaboration.

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INTERIOR DESIGN VII: ALICIA LISTER , CAITLYN POWELL, Kaitlyn BECKHAM, MARISSA FREY, CHELA HUMBER, RACHEL THODE The objective for the Interior Design VII studio is to design the Germantown Friends Museum. The existing building that was selected for the museum is the Field House of Germantown Friends School, located in the heart of Germantown, Philadelphia on School House Lane and Greene Street. Each museum showcases the rich artistic work of rising artists. Visitors will experience, observe, and learn about the art made by young artists who are not currently well represented in the institutions and museums in the city of Philadelphia.

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ARCH DESIGN X: KATELYNN PARENT, BAILEY MILLER, BRIAN MALLEY, CLARA LATTIMORE, SHELBY MILLER, RAIDY ALVAREZ, CRYSTAL BROWN, MICHELE YODER

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The Design X “Betwixt and Between, Liminality in Philadelphia, PA” studio, led by Professor Trudy Watt, takes a theoretical approach to deriving architectural form and space. The start of the studio took a deep dive into studying liminality’s defintion and constraints. The project featured here asked students to create “beautiful axonometric” drawings that explore how some of the theoretical principles discussed in class can begin to take physical shape. Projects explored varying graphic and drawing conventions, such as line weight and color theory, as ways to contribute to the narrative of the drawing. Critical to the success of these drawings was the inclusion of the “user,” or a person(s) that might occupy the space. Conversations stemming from the creation of these axonometrics included experiential discussions about what it might be like to be in the space, and discussions about the theoretical principles by which elements of the drawings were conceived. While these drawings exist in the theoretical realm, principles explored in each are intended to inspire, influence, and/or help investigate, the final project of the studio.

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barbara KLINKHAMMER Executive Dean of C_ABE

Interview by Stephanie Dudak & Abbie Gall

and we tackle those together; we think about them together, to create the best possible education for our students.

SD: How have you seen the college grow and change since you’ve been here? What do you hope we’ll improve upon? BK: Visually, we have changed very much. We’ve renovated all the studio environments and created a professional environment where students get prepared for the profession. When I started five years ago, I found a robust college with robust programs, excellent faculty, and excellent students, but it was the best-kept secret in Philadelphia. We moved it to a different level and identified this niche for us where we offer specialized degrees. Offering a breadth of different programs within the field of the built environment prepares students in a way for the profession like no other university. It gives you opportunities to go outside of your own discipline, adding onto AG: How would you describe C_ABE the value of the degree that you culture? receive here from PhilaU. BK: We are a C_ABE family. We have an exceptional relationship AG: How will the future generation of between students and faculty that designers change the culture of the very few schools have. We offer a profession? very student-centered education; BK: Students coming out of PhilaU are we treat our students as design breathing and living interdisciplinary professionals, and that really helps collaboration, and it’s the reason so them develop skills and knowledge many offices that we work with rave to succeed in the profession later about how [our students] have the on. There’s an appreciation for the ability to come into an office, ready to different disciplines here in C_ABE, work and to be part of a larger team. It which you don’t typically find in really changes an office culture; you’re other architecture schools, creating bringing something that can have a an atmosphere where students are very positive change on a place. This respectful of each other and how millennial generation also changes they interact. how offices are structured and how collegial relationships are defined. It’s not 8-to-5 anymore for a lot of We have an incredibly millennials; it’s more of ‘I can start at positive working environment 7 in the morning, end at 9, and then and I think we all benefit do something else.’ This generation is from that. There’s a mutual changing the ways we work and live.

support [between faculty and students]. I come in every day to work and I just love it.

AG: How does empathy play into your own process and the way you run C_ ABE? BK: I deeply care for people. I want Every day has new challenges, new to make sure that, whether it’s a opportunities. I meet my colleagues student, faculty, or staff member,

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everybody has a place and is valued for what they contribute to the mission of our college and what they contribute to the education of our students. Empathy is a very important factor in how we interact and allow individuals to thrive and to reach their best potential. It creates a working environment and living environment that nurtures everybody’s potential. I am very empathetic of the struggle of our students in the sense that I really want them to be successful in creating their own educational careers here that benefits their lives later.

AG: Given this, how do you offer critique and respond to criticism? BK: I am usually spontaneous when I react to things. But I am also somebody who likes to listen when people come to me with their criticisms, suggestions, and recommendations. I try to listen so that I fully understand. I know how difficult it is when you own a design or idea and somebody else comes in and takes it apart and you have to put the pieces back together. It’s a balance that is often not easy, and you will face that both as a student and as a professional designer.

There’s always value in revisiting your own project under a different perspective. You have to be able to separate both your ownership of the idea and the idea itself so that you can take criticism in a positive way and have your design guided by the new perspectives that somebody else brings to the project.


SD: You mentioned that students have the opportunity here to design their education. Do you think this helps with their growth as professionals? BK: Absolutely. Spacework is a really good example. It [is] an incredible educational opportunity for our students to be part of this and to be the decision-makers about what goes in. Students are a big factor in how we drive and develop our programs and courses. DigitalDEMOS [student centric workshops about design techniques] is a great example of peer-led education that is noncredited, totally student-driven, and has furthered the education of the students in a voluntary way. It’s not forced or graded – it’s something that people show up to because they want to learn. We’re one of the schools that allows not only student participation, but also students can actively shape their education.

SD: What is something you want people to know about you? BK: One is that I became an architect in a family of seven architects, and my daughter right now is starting architecture, so she’s the eighth: three generations of architects, and we all work in different areas of the profession. A whole spectrum of what you can do in the field is represented in our family. The other thing is two years ago I started to run, and I now run half marathons and am preparing for a marathon [currently]. I’ve changed my life from where I was a total couch potato to where I exercise every day.

That is something very attractive to me, to do things that I previously didn’t know that I would actually be able to do.

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Donald Dunham Professor | Architecture

Abbie Gall 5th Year | Architecture

Breanna Sheeler 3rd Year | Architecture

... .--. .- -.-. . .-- Emilia Risner 4th Year | Interior Design

Jason Jiang 5th Year | Architecture

Clara Lattimore 5th Year | Architecture


Dylan Beckwith 4th Year | Architecture

Christine Migliore 4th Year | Interior Design

Chela Humber 4th Year | Interior Design

- --- .-. -.- . .-. ... Stephanie Dudak 5th Year | Architecture

Jason Trutner 5th Year | Architecture

Iryna Gulin 5th Year | Architecture


CREDITS

SPACEWORK

SPACEWORK is a publication produced by the College of Architecture and the Built Environment, Philadelphia University. www.Philau.edu/architectureandthebuiltenvironment

P U B L I C AT I O N E D I TO R S

ISBN 978-0-9903292-3-7

Jason Jiang Chela Humber Dylan Beckwith

©2017 by CABE PRESS College of Architecture and the Built Environment, Philadelphia University, 4201 Henry Avenue, Philadelphia University, PA, 19144. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior permission of CABE PRESS. All images of student projects appear courtesy of students enrolled in the College of Architecture and the Built Environment, Philadelphia University, copyright, CABE PRESS, Philadelphia University, unless otherwise noted. Every effort has been made to trace copyright holders where applicable, but if any have been inadvertently overlooked, the necessary arrangements will be made at the first opportunity.

PRINTING Printed by Paradigm Printing, Southampton, Pennsylvania, USA

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The editorial staff would like to thank Executive Dean Barbara Klinkhammer and Architecture Director James Doerfler for their enthusiastic support for a student initiated and produced annual College of Architecture and the Built Environment publication. The publication would not have been possible without the additional support of the C_ABE Advancement Council. Lastly, we would like to specially thank Professor Donald Dunham for his continual guidance.

CABE PRESS Barbara Klinkhammer, Dipl.-Ing. Executive Dean and Professor James Doerfler, AIA Professor of Architecture Director of Architecture Programs Ground Control Donald Dunham, AIA Assistant Professor, Architecture Associate Director, Master of Architecture Programs Major Tom

Stephanie Dudak Abbie Gall

DESIGNERS

PHOTOGRAPHER & MEDIA DESIGNER Jason Trutner

S E C T I O N E D I TO R S Clara Lattimore Christine Migliore Iryna Gulin Breanna Sheeler Emelia Risner

FAC U L T Y E D I TO R Donald Dunham

CO N S U L T I N G E D I TO R Amanda Gibney Weko

AGW Communications C_ABE Advancement Council member

EXECUTIVE DEAN’S OFFICE Terry Ryan Lynda Irwin Sarah Miller


Profile for Breanna Sheeler

SPACEWORK 04  

JEFFERSON | COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT | SPACEWORK 04 Every year the College of Architecture and the Built Environmen...

SPACEWORK 04  

JEFFERSON | COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT | SPACEWORK 04 Every year the College of Architecture and the Built Environmen...

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