Page 1

CMYK

I’M A RETIRED TWIN CITIES I’d never seen NURSE, and such great care. My husband Gerald and I were visiting the Brainerd area when he experienced gastrointestinal bleeding. He was brought by ambulance to the intensive care unit at St. Joseph’s Medical Center. We were amazed by the care and attention he was given—I was a nurse for 33 years, and I never saw anything like it.

Compassionate Care We didn’t know at the time that St. Joseph’s is the Lakes area’s largest hospital, with 100 specialists, backed by over

1,000 nurses, technicians and support staff. What we did know was that we were in capable and compassionate hands. Gerald was checked on frequently, and the doctors and nurses were polite, knowledgeable and informative. They always told him what was happening next, and made sure he understood everything. They were upbeat and full of good humor. Everyone at the hospital treated him as though he was a friend.

Off the couch Preventing childhood obesity

Peace of Mind We’re moving to the Brainerd area this summer, and are eager to be part of a community with such natural beauty and high quality of life. It’s comforting to know that St. Joseph’s is there to look after the most important thing of all, our health.

Kim Rosencrantz Retired nurse

Summer health risks

Prevention and treatment for nature’s nuisances

No more seizures

Anti-seizure implant changes Staples woman’s life

Where patients come first. www.sjmcmn.org • Brainerd, MN

July 2005

28


When You Think of a Medical Supply Company What Do You Think Of?

CMYK

Beds? Canes? Oxygen? Wheelchairs? Scooters? Commode's? Yes - We Carry a Full Line of Medical Equipment, But Did You Know We Also Carry: • Foot Support Products • Support Stockings • Lights For Seasonal Affective Disorder • Support Pillows • Lumbar Supports For Cars and Office Chairs • Braces and Supports • Gluten Free Food • Magnifying Glasses

• Massagers Including Bath and Chair Massagers • Exercise Balls • First Aid Supplies • Scales • Bath Mats • Jar Openers • Medication Dispensers • Diabetic Supplies

And Much More!!! North Central Medical Supply Is Your Full Service Medical Supply Store!!! We Bill Medicare - Medical Assistance and Most Private Insurance

Brainerd 314 Charles Street 218-825-7331 1-888-577-7331

2

2 Locations to Serve You

Crosslake 36066 Cty Rd. 66 218-692-5331 1-888-595-5331

H ow do w e attractsom e ofthe nation’sfinestsurgeons?By approaching m edicine asm eticulously asthe surgeons them selves.So ifyou find yourselfin need ofsurgicalprocedure,restassured. You’ve gotthe bestteam w orking w ith you to bring you back to health.

D r.RossB.Bengtson D r.Jam esJ.D ehen D r.Troy M .D uininck G EN ERA L SU RG ERY

218.855.5477 | 800.277.8262 www.brainerdclinic.com | 2024 South Sixth Street

27


CMYK

Continued from Page 21 work. In other words, circuit training is a good approach for people who do a lot of meetings, whether with agents or daycare teachers. Multi-Joint, Multi-Muscle Exercises — Do a half-squat against a wall while curling a pair of dumbbells. Then press them overhead. That’s a multi-joint exercise, and it’ll work your thighs, shoulders, arms and gut. It will vaporize calories and make your heart do the rumba. Sit on a bench and perform dumbbell curls with one arm. That’s a single-joint exercise. It’ll puff up your biceps. It accomplishes only this one thing (though, to be fair, it does that one thing — encouraging growth of a targeted muscle — very well). Multi-joint, multi-muscle work boosts your heart rate, multiplying the cardio benefits of circuit training. It spreads the benefits around your body, so you don’t look distended in some spots and puny in others. And, since life, being three-dimensional and all, is pretty much a multi-joint affair, these workouts can actually prepare your body to do stuff, not just look like it can do stuff. This is called functional exercise. Whether you need to haul bags of topsoil from your hatchback or do six takes of a scene where you drag a corpse from a burning shed, having strong legs, shoulders and belly muscles will do you more good than biceps that look like trussed capons. Lower Weight — and Its Happy Sidekick, Less Pain — To do multi-joint exercises without tapping your health insurance, you can’t use a weight that’s heavier than the weakest muscle involved in the move can handle. (In the above example, you

might be able to curl only 10 pounds per arm, so you use the 10pound weight for the whole exercise, not the 15 you could use if doing simple standing presses.) As a result, you do more repetitions with lower weights. This tends to make you more lean, strong and flexible. It also flambes more calories and can keep your heart harrumphing. We hope you’re beginning to see a pattern here. Interval Workouts — These are exercises that mix brief bursts of higher-intensity work with longer periods of lower-intensity recovery. The opposite type is called steady-state training, where you sustain the same pace for an extended period. The great thing about intervals compared with steady-state workouts is that intervals — say it along with us now — save time, build your cardiovascular capacity more efficiently and microwave more calories, both while you’re working out and long afterward. A well-constructed strength circuit will essentially provide an interval workout, by alternating higher-intensity strength exercises that make your heart ka-pow with those that permit it to gather itself. Intervals work no matter what shape you’re in: If your “intense” intervals are walking at 4 mph for a minute and recovering for five minutes at 3 mph, that’s fine. Whatever gets your heart moving faster will help you. As you improve, you can gin up the intensity of your bursts or reduce the length of your recovery, or both.

WIDE OPEN - AIR YOU HAVE A CHOICE! • It’s easy to get to - The only OPEN MRI in Central Minnesota between Minneapolis and Duluth. • Wide Open - Air Design for comfort • Highly trained, friendly staff • New A IRIS II High Performance OPEN MRI System offers the latest technology for advanced diagnostic procedures and superb image quality • Ask your doctor about your choices MRI Studies interpreted by the medical doctors of Diagnostic Image Specialist, P.A. • Same day appointments often available • Medicare approved Independent Diagnostic Testing facility, accepting Blue Cross Blue Shield, Medica and most insurance plans.

When you need an MRI Exam, come to the place where we make your comfort and exam quality top priority.

2019 South 6th Street, Brainerd Across from Northern Orthopedics & Brainerd Medical Center 822-OPEN • 877-522-7222 www.lakesimagingcenter.com

26

3


Located in Baxter, the outpatient surgery center provides a comfortable environment for patients undergoing same day surgeries, including general surgeries, ophthalmology, ear nose and throat, orthopedics, podiatry, plastics and urology. In May the surgery center began offering pain procedures from radiologists at Lakes Imaging, a new offering. Administrator Sandy Berreth said the ambulatory surgery center averages about 60-70 patients per week. Most surgeries are elective procedures and planned for well patients, said Berreth. While there will always be patients who must have surgery at a hospital, the surgery center provides an option for all minimally invasive and outpatient surgical procedures. The facility has four operating rooms and one procedure room as well as 17 curtained patient rooms that allow for family members to wait with their loved ones as they prepare for surgery and recover while seated in large recliner chairs. Berreth, who moved to the Brainerd area from Bismarck, N.D., where she helped start an ambulatory surgery center five years ago, said the key to such a facility is its comfortable and anxiety-free environment combined with a group of medical professionals who work together each day as a team. The surgery cen-

From the editor

CMYK

Cover photo/Nels Norquist Josh Haberman, (left) 15, and Mike Gervenak, 14, played basketball at Baxter City Park. While television and video games are becoming more popular, keeping youth active during their summer vacation can be difficult.

Ah, summer. My favorite time of year. Spending warm evenings on area lakes or picnicking in the backyard, it’s just nice to be outdoors. As I write this, sunburned skin is flaking off my arm and faded red splotches of week-old swimmer’s itch can be seen. How attractive. During the warm summer months it’s important to take care of yourself. It’s people like me who always seem to forget sunblock or frequently find themselves standing in a patch of poison ivy that need to take note. Health care professionals gave their two-cents on common summer health risks, prevention and treatment in the article “Nature’s nuisances” in this

Table of contents 6 8 10 11 14 4

COVER STORY: Kids’ fitness NUTRITION: Keeping kids fit

QUOTABLES: How kids are vacationing

PROCEDURE: CyberKnife

DOCTOR’S ORDERS: Summer health risks

16 18 20 22 24

TREND: Home birthing TREATMENT: No more seizures

WORKOUT: Exercise books

REMODELING: St. Joseph’s ICU gets facelift

UPDATE: Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center

issue of HealthWatch. Another summertime issue that faces many parents is how to get children away from the TV. The risk of childhood obesity is on the rise in the United States and it seems video games are becoming more and more popular. Could there be a connection? Check out the story “Off the couch, on your feet” for ideas on how to keep your child active while school’s out. Be safe, stay active and enjoy the warm weather. After all, why do we live in Minnesota? That’s easy — June, July and August. Heidi Lake Editor

Who we are

Read HealthWatch online www.upnorthhealthwatch.com.

Q

Woodland Good Samaritan Senior Apartments

HealthWatch is a quarterly publication of the Brainerd Dispatch. at

For advertising opportunities call Tim Bogenschutz at (218) 855-5844. E-mail your comments to heidi.lake@brainerddispatch.com or write to: Heidi Lake Brainerd Dispatch PO Box 974 Brainerd, MN 56401

JODIE TWEED can be reached at jodie.tweed@brainerddispatch.com or 8555858.

The Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center, which opened in February, is an outpatient surgery center located at 13114 Isle Drive in Baxter behind the Wal-mart Supercenter in Baxter.

Now Available!

Publisher — Terry McCollough Advertising — Tim Bogenschutz Editor — Heidi Lake Graphic Desinger — Cindy Spilman

instead of health,” said Berreth. Berreth said another open house is planned in the fall. The Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center is located at 13114 Isle Drive, behind the Wal-mart Supercenter in Baxter.

ter has 25 employees. “I truly believe the team that works here is a team,” said Berreth. Berreth said many times a well patient feels more comfortable entering an ambulatory center than a hospital because they associate illness with a hospital environment. Subconsciously, a patient may be thinking, “I’m going to a hospital, I must be sick,” said Berreth. “The hospital is a place we think of illness

• Spacious & comfortable 1 and 2 bedroom units • Resident walking path • Woodsy setting near Brainerd Medical Center • Delicious meals • Transportation to Doctor appointments • Shopping services • Social and educational opportunities • Emergency Response System

R

C

O

G

E

L

N

U

A

L

I

T

Y

I

A

B

I

L

I

S

Y

I

E

S

T

V

E

R

T

N

Y

C

C

Y

D

Offering A Christian Continuum Of Care To Meet Your Health Care Needs Now... And In The Future! Call

829-9433 to schedule a tour.

Central Minnesota’s Best Selection of Quality Eye Wear

QUALITY, RELIABILITY & CONSISTENCY month Sign a 12 et the Lease - G ! th FREE 13th mon

Woodland Good Samaritan Village Brainerd, MN www.good-sambrainerdpineriver.com

have been the focus of all our products, decisions, and introductions. We have the largest frame selection and professional fitting which will always make you look and feel your best. We never forget how important you are to us. 2020 Located

South in

the

Sixth

Street

Nortern

Eye

829-1335

Center

Building

25


Surgery center atmosphere is comforting to patients CMYK

 ULIWKLV H G Q R  ,Z PSK    W D  WUROOV

6ZLQJLQ¡6XPPHU'HDO Cathy Feierabend, a registered nurse, prepared an operating room for a patient at Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center in Baxter.

)5((VZLQJWDEOH ZLWKSXUFKDVHRID 6WUHVVOHVVŠUHFOLQHU

Story/Jodie Tweed Photos/Nels Norquist

ZZZHNRUQHVFRP

Dr. Paul Rud (right), an orthopedic surgeon, with assistance by Surgical Technician Toni Brown, performed a procedure on a patient at the Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center in Baxter.

24

BAXTER — When an otherwise healthy patient has to undergo a surgical procedure, it may sometimes be intimidating to check into a hospital. But now Brainerd lakes area residents have another option when choosing where to have an outpatient surgical procedure performed. The Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center opened in February, a joint venture between 14 Brainerd area doctors and St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Brainerd.

7KHKHDGUHVWDGMXVWV DXWRPDWLFDOO\VR\RX FDQUHDGDQGZDWFK 79HYHQLQWKHUHFOLQ LQJSRVLWLRQ

7KH3OXVŠV\VWHP DGMXVWVWKHORZHU EDFNVXSSRUWVLPXO WDQHRXVO\ZLWKWKH KHDGUHVW

&&(

8QLTXHJOLGHV\V WHPDGMXVWV6WUHVV OHVVŠWR\RXUERG\ ZHLJKWWRVXSSRUW \RXFRPIRUWDEO\

1

7KHQDPHVD\VLWDOO6WUHVV O H V V Š   ( Y H U \  V T X D U H  L Q F K  L V  GHVLJQHGWRSURYLGHVRRWKLQJ VXSSRUWIRUDQ\RQH

ZZZĂ€IWKDYHQXHIXUQLWXUHFRP

+28560RQ)UL²

6DW²

6XQ²

0,/(61257+2)+:<6723/,*+76%5$,1(5'

5


CMYK

CHILDREN’S HEALTH

to update charts electronically The original ICU was built in and transfer records to other hos1984. With ever-changing techpitals when needed. nology the smaller patient “All the information is available rooms made it difficult to use from their bed side,” Monroe the equipment. said. “It’s less hassle.” “It was very tight. We had to Patient rooms include sofa keep manipulating the equipbeds for family members wanting ment to make it easier to get to to sleep in the rooms. Monroe the patient,” Monroe said. “The said before being remodeled, larger rooms give you the capalack of space made it difficult for bility to do more.” family members to stay in the Monroe used her seven years patient rooms. experience as a nurse manager Monroe said 20 years ago famiat St. Joe’s in helping to plan and ly members were only allowed design the ICU. She also visited inside ICU patient rooms for 10 St. Cloud Hospital’s newly minutes every two hours. Today, remodeled ICU and took advice family members are invited to from her staff. stay overnight in the room. Location of utility rooms, equipment placement and office Patient rooms in the newly remodeled intensive care unit at St. Joseph’s Monroe said research has proven space for doctors were on the Medical Center are larger, making room for medical equipment to be brought patients do better when family is by their side. top of Monroe’s to-change list. in when needed. “Families want to become “We identified what the prob“As the threat of bioterrorism increases, we lems were and how to correct them,” she said. have to increase our respiratory care,” more active,” Monroe said. “They’re very worried about their loved one. They want the best Two patient rooms include negative pres- Monroe said. sure isolation rooms for respiratory patients. ICU patients generally require more care care possible and that’s what we’re here to The isolation rooms allow air to be filtered than other patients. On average, eight patients do.” outside, preventing others from breathing the are in the department at one time. The ICU same air and any organisms that may be lin- increased from eight to 10 patient rooms. Each HEIDI LAKE can be reached at 855-5879 or gering. room has a computer, allowing medical staff heidi.lake@brainerddispatch.com.

LOSE WEIGHT & FEEL GREAT FOR SUMMER! Team members from the Little Sluggers Brewers practiced catching fly balls at Baxter Park. Keeping children active while they’re on summer vacation can be a difficult task for parents.

Off the couch, on your feet Story/Jennifer Stockinger Photo/Nels Norquist

6

Is your child sitting in front of the computer screen playing video games or watching too much TV this summer? If that’s the case throw away the television and the video games or at least limit the usage and get your children outside, says Bonnie Muzik, recreation coordinator for Brainerd Parks and Recreation. Muzik said there are too many children who do not get enough exercise and are obese.

The staff at Service Drug will help you with Diet Supplements that are “SAFE” & effective for you! Ask About:

´<HDUVRIH[SHULHQFHWRVHUYH\RXEHWWHUµ

• Hoodia Capsules & Tea • Trim Spa • Estrolean & Estrin D • Xenadrine

Service Drug 218 West Washington • 829-3664 (Tyrol Hills Shopping Center) Mon.-Fri, 9 am - 5:30 pm, Sat. 9 am -1 pm

23


CMYK

St. Joe’s updates ICU

Heidi Strus (right) and Karen Ruona work as registered nurses in the intensive care unit and St. Joseph’s Medical Center.

Childhood obesity is becoming an epidemic among America’s youths and the federal government has addressed this health crisis for a few years by investing more than $16 billion annually in child nutrition programs. Statistics have shown that childhood obesity has doubled in preschool-age children and has tripled in children age 6-11, when compared with children 30 years ago. Muzik said the children in their programs are more obese than the children 10 years ago. She said they never had to order extra large shirts until a few years ago. Muzik said children today don’t know how to play outside. She also said parents are also more restrictive on children’s play outside because of the crime rate. “Kids will never know the joy of being outside with nature and being with friends,” said Muzik. “They isolate themselves too much because of all the meth problems out there and the crazies on the streets. It’s hard to continue to watch our nation go down with drugs.” Despite the safety factor, Muzik said there are programs in the Brainerd lakes area that are supervised and safe for children. Brainerd Parks and Recreation offers several supervised activities for children of all ages, such as baseball and softball. And this year it added kick ball. Brainerd Parks and Recreation also offers different activities for children, such as fishing and biking clinics. In the winter, pond hockey, ice skating, basketball and volleyball are available. Muzik said the most popular activities they offer children in the summer are baseball and softball and in the winter hockey is a favorite.

Skateboarding is also popular, and Muzik said the upcoming popular activity will be dodge ball. Muzik said it is tougher today for parents to monitor their children’s activities because they are busier and many work full time. However, she said finding time to encourage exercise is important for their children’s health. To help parents get their children outside, Muzik said they should set a time limit on watching television and playing video games. Parents should also limit junk food. “Exercise is very important,” said Muzik. “Kids need exercise to build stronger bones and muscles to run, jump, climb and to do other activities.” Brainerd and Baxter’s parks and recreation programs are not the only supervised programs in the Brainerd lakes area. The Lakes Area Youth Soccer Association, the Brainerd Lakes YMCA and Brainerd Community Education also offer youth programs or camps. Lisa Stawarski, Brainerd School District youth program coordinator, said Brainerd’s youth programs are geared for life-long learning experiences for children in grades K-12 that are age appropriate. The Brainerd youth programs in the summer are open from 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Washington Educational Services Building. Children participate in various activities, including arts and crafts, board and computer games and physical activities in the gymnasium. There are between 95 to 105 students who participate daily at Washington and another 35-40 students who participate in the pro-

$27 million hospital expansion to be finished in October

Story/Heidi Lake Photos/Nels Norquist

22

St. Joseph’s Medical Center’s $27 million expansion project is nearing completion. The massive undertaking was started in July 2003 and is expected to be finished in October. Pediatrics and the family birthplace, bariatric rooms, cardiac rehabilitation and inpatient occupational and physical therapy departments are still under construction. The hospital is opening each unit as it is completed. Most recently, the intensive care unit was remodeled, bringing it up to date visually and technologically. “It’s a new age,” said Terri Monroe, ICU nurse manager. “We’re getting up to date.”

“Kids will never know the joy of being outside with nature and being with friends. They isolate themselves too much because of all the meth problems out there and the crazies on the streets. It’s hard to continue to watch our nation go down with drugs.” —Bonnie Muzik Recreation coordinator, Brainerd Parks and Recreation

grams at Nisswa school. Stawarski said the youth programs keep the students’ minds and bodies busy. She said students can watch television and play video games, but their time on these activities are limited. “We want the kids to feel this is their vacation,” said Stawarski. “They get a chance to explore their interests and talents here.” The youth development/youth service programs offered to students are Fun ‘N’ Friends, Senior Leadership program and Youth Trax. The high school-age children can volunteer to help the younger children or can enroll in a program to work on job skills, communication and accountability. In these programs, there are clubs for children for science, gardening, woodworking and arts and crafts. There also are field trips, such as a trip to the skating rink. Stawarski said when the children play in the gymnasium they play non-competitive games. She said the students learn teamwork, sportsmanship and have fun. There are several rooms at Washington where children participate in different activities, including an arts and crafts room, a game room for puzzles or board games and a movie/television room. Stawarski said a few of the popular activities for the children are the arts and crafts, science projects and the gymnasium games. She said the younger children like to build things and work with Legos. JENNIFER STOCKINGER can be reached at jennifer.stockinger@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5851.

Household activities for children, age 3-5 ➤ Wipe table tops.

➤ Peel oranges or hard

cooked eggs. ➤ Scrub and rinse fruit and

vegetables. ➤ Wash and tear lettuce.

➤ Set a table. ➤ Cut parsley or green onion

with child-safe scissors. ➤ Bring ingredients from one

place to another. ➤ Put things in the trash.

➤ Measure ingredients. ➤ Use and egg beater or

whisk. ➤ Shake liquids in a covered

container.

Source: Centers of Disease Control and Prevention

7


Obesity becoming common for children

CMYK

Story/Jennifer Stockinger No regular soda pop. No juice. And no beverages with calories in them besides milk. These are things your children can eliminate to have a healthier lifestyle, an area nutritionist says. Kelly Coughlin, a registered dietitian at Lakewood Health System in Staples, is concerned with the growing number of children who are obese today. She said in our culture families eat too much fast food and have other unhealthy habits, like drinking regular pop and eating too much junk food, and then allowing children too much TV time is leading to more overweight children. Recent data suggests that one in three children living in the United States today is overweight and one in six are seriously overweight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is important because overweight children are more likely to become overweight adults, increasing the risk for diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers and joint problems,â&#x20AC;?

said Coughlin, who also is a certified diabetes educator at Lakewood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There also is an issue of a lower self esteem and depression is more common.â&#x20AC;? Coughlin said today there are children who are being diagnosed with type two diabetes, a disease that used to be an adult onset diabetes, because of obesity. She said children are showing risk factors for chronic disease and higher blood pressure, blood sugars and cholesterol at lower ages. Coughlin said parents must get involved to help get their children off the couch and engaged in a physical activity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parents need to set an example and exercise and encourage their kids to be active,â&#x20AC;? said Coughlin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You need to start getting kids involved when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re young.â&#x20AC;? Coughlin recommends parents start a family routine for staying active, such as taking a walk after supper or playing basketball. Coughlin said the possibilities are endless on

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy to be on vacation, but feeling a little under the

what type of activities a family can do. She said parents just need to make the activities fun to keep the children interested. Household chores also burn calories. Coughlin said getting children involved with these chores, such as vacuuming or weeding the garden, also would be helpful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was young I had a friend who had an exercise bike that worked the TV,â&#x20AC;? said Coughlin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every family needs to find something that works for them and then start slow and work themselves up.â&#x20AC;? Children who watch five hours of television a day are eight times more likely to be obese, Coughlin said. The five hours a day includes time children spend playing video and computer games. Parents are encouraged to limit childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s screen time. Coughlin said parents could give their children a time limit per day or per week and the children may use their hours as they please. She said another suggestion would be

I know this only because, to spare you the embarrassment, cost and pain, I have spent the last couple of months reading these books and performing some of the workouts that appear in them. First, let me say the books can be wildly uneven and impractical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ultimate New York Body Planâ&#x20AC;? presents a nuttily difficult program that, if followed as written, would become a part-time job. Most other workouts donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realistically fit into their alleged time limits. Some of the photos show stuff being done in scary-bad form. (Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yank your head up on those crunches!) Most include some sort of eating plan that dances around the sad, simple truth that you have to eat less garbage, replace it with healthier food and burn off more calories than you take in. All that said, the A-listersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; workout routines for the most part fit E-listers well, largely because we have at least some things in common with celebrities: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really busy and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to spend much time working out but would like to see some results, oh, this calendar quarter. We want to have enough energy to enjoy our nightlife, even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing more tabloid-worthy than spraying the houseplants. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to be trim and limber enough to do some of our own stunts, but we know we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to look like one of those body builders or weight lifters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who, to tell you the truth, sort of gross us out. Most A-list trainer books Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve checked out embrace, to various degrees, the following concepts that serve civilians well. They also happen to represent some of the key trends that are currently blowing around the fitnosphere. Circuit Training â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In circuit workouts, you perform a sequence of three to 10 different exercises with little or no rest in between, then repeat the circuit two or three times. (Curves, that ubiquitous chain of E-list fitness centers, employs a form of circuit training.) In standard strength training, by contrast, you do one set of an exercise, recover by flipping through an old copy of People, do a second set, recover while pacing around surreptitiously evaluating other patronsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gymwear, do a third set, and finally move on to the next exercise. Circuit training is very time-efficient, delivering simultaneously the benefits of a cardio session with those of strength training. And by keeping you working without rest, it torches more calories than conventional weight

60

)5((9$/8( SLHFH),567$,'.,7 ZLWKDQ\QHZRUWUDQVIHUUHGSUHVFULSWLRQ

)5((

3LHFH )LUVW$LG.LW

:LWKD1HZRU 7UDQVIHUUHG3UHVFULSWLRQ 9DOXH 9DOLGIRULQVWRUHXVHRQO\1RWYDOLGZLWKVWDWHRUIHGHUDOO\ IXQGHGSUHVFULSWLRQSODQVRUZLWKDQ\RWKHURIIHUFRSD\RUGH GXFWLEOH/LPLWRQHFRXSRQSHUFXVWRPHU1RFDVKUHIXQG6WDWH DQGORFDOUHVWULFWLRQVDSSO\$WSDUWLFLSDWLQJ0HGLFLQH6KRSSHÂ&#x160; 3KDUPDFLHVRQO\1RWYDOLGLQ$5,$/$0(1-1<DQG3$ ([SLUHV &

2

8

3

2

unexpected healthcare needs while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re away from home.

Longbella Drug, Inc.

As always, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll treat you like a guest.

Highway 10 â&#x20AC;˘ Staples, MN 218-894-2242 Store Hours: M-F 9-6 â&#x20AC;˘ Sat 9-3

Longbella Drug - Motley Hwy 10 South â&#x20AC;˘ Motley, MN 218-352-6337 Store Hours: M,T,TH,F 9:30-5

Longbella Drug - Pillager Hwy 210 West â&#x20AC;˘ Pillager, MN 218-746-4321 Store Hours: M-F 9:30-5

218.828.5478 | 800.277.8262

Visit us @ www.valurite.com

www.brainerdclinic.com | 2024 South Sixth Street

Owned By: Lani Longbella Roberts & Chad Longbella

1

2OG :DWHU 7RZHU

Continued on Page 26

weather - give us a call. We make ourselves available for those

8

&DULQJEH\RQGSUHVFULSWLRQV

6WK6WUHHW

CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HEALTH

)URQW6W

+RXUV0)DPSP6DWDP1RRQ 6RXWKWK6WUHHW%UDLQHUG MXVWVRXWKRIWKHKLVWRULFZDWHUWRZHU 9LVLWRXU:HEVLWHDWZZZPHGLFLQHVKRSSHFRP

    )UHHORFDO'HOLYHU\a)UHH0DLO6HUYLFH

21


Exercise books by trainers of the stars fit the rest of us pretty well

CMYK

Story/Craig Stoltz Photo/Julia Ewan The Washington Post

Exercise books by trainers of the stars fit everybody else pretty well. You’re not going to look like Halle Berry by following Harley Pasternak’s book, but it offers a time-efficient, research-based workout.

The trouble with books written by fitness trainers to the stars isn’t that people read them. It’s that they read them for the wrong reasons. No book by an A-list Hollywood trainer can make you look like Halle Berry in a cat suit (or, for that matter, Christian Slater in boxers). And whatever they can deliver will take a lot longer than the improbably few weeks hyped on the cover. But — who’d have thought? — the programs subject to these pumped-up claims offer some value for those of us who aren’t celebrities at all, people I proudly think of as members of the “Elist,” as in Everybody Else.

to give children tokens and each token would be worth one hour of screen time. Besides staying active children also need to eat healthier foods. Coughlin said many parents will say their children do not want to eat vegetables or other healthy foods. Coughlin said parents should not ask their children if they want to eat something healthy, but rather offer the healthy choices. “Or if that doesn’t work say I’ll split an apple with you,” said Coughlin. “Modeling healthy eating is very important. If they see you eating healthy they will too.” To help entice children to healthy eating, Coughlin suggests having children help in the preparation of the food. Coughlin said then as the parents and children prepare the food they can talk about the health benefits in age-appropriate language. Coughlin said parents also should use low-fat cooking methods. Coughlin said parents have control over what foods their children eat

because they are the ones doing the shopping. She said parents should try to buy foods that are healthy. An easy, healthy meal for parents who have no time to cook is to have a taco event, with whole wheat tortillas, low-fat cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and chicken. To help children eat their fruits they can blend low-fat yogurt with frozen fruit and milk to make a shake. “We need to make time to eat healthy and exercise,” said Coughlin. “If the trends do not change in society we will continue to see the dangers of high blood pressure and cholesterol, type two diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers and chronic diseases.” Coughlin said research shows that if things don’t change one out of every three children will have diabetes. To find more information on how to eat healthy go to www.mypyramid.gov.

Portion sizes for children age 2-6 ➤ One-third to a half cup of frozen vegetables.

➤ One or two little cooked broccoli spears. ➤ Five to seven cooked baby carrots. ➤ One-third to a half cup of melon. ➤ Five to seven strawberries. ➤ A half cup of apple sauce. ➤ One-third to a half-cup of frozen or fresh berries. ➤ One cup of low-fat yogurt or nonfat milk. ➤ One-third to a half cup of macaroni and cheese, rice, pasta or mashed potatoes. ➤ Two ounces of hamburger. ➤ One-fourth cup of ground meat, such as turkey or pork.

JENNIFER STOCKINGER can be reached at jennifer.stockinger@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5851.

➤ One or two drumsticks. Source: Centers of Disease Control and Prevention

Excelsior Place... A Healthy Lifestyle That Will Grow on You!

Our pediatricians have one thing on their minds: your little ones. So when your children need the finest care, trust it to the biggest, brightest and best team of physicians the lakes area has to offer.

Where caring makes the difference! Troy C outure,M .D . K aren O pp,P.N .P. M ichaelSeverson,M .D . Jane W inter,M .D . P E D IA TR IC S & A D O LE S C E N T M E D IC IN E

218.855.5472 | 800.277.8262 www.brainerdclinic.com | 2024 South Sixth Street

20

It’s about care-free living and piece of mind knowing we’re never alone. At Excelsior Place quality care and a loving environment makes assisted living more like home. For a personal introduction to our community and to learn about why more people are calling Excelsior Place Home, call us today! Excelsior Place is professionally managed by Welcome Home Health Care

14211 Firewood Dr. Baxter

9


CHILDREN’S HEALTH

Bored?

CMYK

Here’s what area children had to say about how they are spending their summer vacation Story/Jennifer Stockinger

Smile Design Orthodontics Dr. Jill Bailey, DDS Certified by the Academy of Gp Orthodontics, General Dentist, Certified Invisalign® Doctor, ADA/MDA Member

in our area.

The place for braces and

Start smiling more • FLEXIBLE PAYMENT OPTIONS • FREE WHITENING KIT WITH FULL TREATMENT ($275 VALUE)

10

Call today for your COMPLIMENTARY initial exam.

218-895-7878

226 4th St. NE, Staples

Summer is here, children are out of school and free to do fun activities. Students of all ages who were at Washington Educational Services Building recently for Fun ‘N’ Friends discussed their favorite summer activities. Brandon Kersting, 12, Merrifield, and his friend, Steven Coffman, 12, Brainerd, are addicted to playing with their magic cards. They said they can play with the cards for days. They said they do not play video games and they only watch television if they are really bored. Kersting said he likes to hang out with friends and wrestle with his brother. He also likes playing make-up games and he likes to go skateboarding. Coffman said he’d go outside more often if he wouldn’t be teased by other children. Kersting said he’d go outside more often if the bugs would stop biting. Even though the boys do not do as much physical activity as they should, they said they eat healthy. Coffman said his favorite food is bananas and he likes fresh-cut pineapple. Kersting said his family banned junk food from their house. He said they only get to eat junk food on special occasions. He also said he and his siblings can only watch two hours of television a day. Meghan Sullivan, 15, Garrison, and Nick Mangan, 17, Baxter, said they both like go to the beach and spend time with friends when they are not in school. Mangan said his friends also like to play sports, including baseball, basketball and soccer. Sullivan and Mangan volunteer in the Brainerd School District with the youth programs, spending time and playing games with children. They said the fifth- through eighthgrade boys like to play video games and skateboard. Marissa Bjerkness, 10, Brainerd, said she somewhat likes to skateboard. Her favorite things to do are working with arts and crafts and talking. Heather Bowman, 10, Baxter, also likes to do arts and crafts. She and her friends each made a paper fortune teller that kept them busy. She said she also likes to play basketball and volleyball. Bowman said she can only watch one hour of television a day. She said if one day she watches more then she can’t watch any television the next day. Colin Sullivan, 13, Garrison, said he likes to swim, play football and basketball and lift weights. He also likes to read and write short stories. Devin Selk, 6, Brainerd, said he likes to play with trucks and help his dad at the concession stands at events. Kaitlin Burch, 7, Brainerd, likes to go bike riding and play with her dog, three cats and two fish. She also likes listening to music. She said she watches about one to two hours of television, depending on when she gets her chores done. JENNIFER STOCKINGER can be reached jennifer.stockinger@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5851.

at

Marden suggested Vagus Nerve Stimulation Therapy, something that at the time was only approved by the Food and Drug Administration for one type of epilepsy. VNS Therapy is described as a pacemaker for the brain. The device, about the size of a pocketwatch, is implanted under the skin in the chest. Wires connected to the implant are coiled around the vagus nerve on the left side of the neck. Electric signals are sent through the wires, stimulating the vagus nerve and activating parts of the brain, reducing the risk of seizures. At the time, surgeons in Brainerd were not trained in implanting the VNS device. Marden brought it upon herself to bring VNS to Brainerd, coordinating a program between local doctors and representatives of Cyberonics, the VNS parent company. “Rochelle was my kick in the butt,” Marden said of bringing VNS to Brainerd. “Nothing else seemed to work.” Endres was implanted with the VNS last July 19. The outpatient surgery was done at St. Joseph’s Medical Center and cost about $25,000. Endres said her insurance company covered the procedure. Doctors programmed the device in August, adjusting the timing and amount of stimulation her brain receives. Endres took her last anti-seizure pill in September. It’s been one year since Endres has had a seizure. Before getting the VNS, she seized

about once a week. “It’s nice to know I’m OK. I don’t have to wake up in the morning and wonder what’s gong to happen to me that day,” Endres said. Endres used to prepare many of her friends and co-workers on what to do if she seized while she’s with them. She instructed them to take her jewelry off, take her dentures out, and if she makes choking sounds, put a metal spoon in her mouth and hold down her tongue. “Then just wait. When I snap out of it, I’ll be tired and irritable, then just let me sleep,” she said. To give her more control of her seizures, VNS allows Endres to swipe a magnet across the implant in her chest when she feels symptomatic. By using the magnet, Endres can stimulate the implant to send out electric signals, potentially aborting or decreasing the severity of the seizure. Endres said she has used the magnet 23 times since she was implanted in August. “I swipe the magnet and 10 minutes later I feel 50 to 70 percent better,” she said. Marden said because VNS Therapy is fairly new, data regarding the long-term effects of VNS only goes back eight to 10 years. She is confident in saying VNS is less risky than taking seizure medicines. Endres calls VNS Therapy a “miracle,” but she has some concern her body will become immune to it, like it did with all the anti-

seizure medications. “The body can get immune to anything. I’m getting electrical stimuli every day, 24/7. I hope and pray it won’t stop,” she said. Now that Endres can somewhat control her seizures, she’s able to work full time at Bang Printing in Brainerd. She owns her own house and plans to pursue a graphic design degree at Central Lakes College in January, a feat she attempted in the past but had to quit because of health issues. Endres said her struggles with epilepsy have affected her life both positively and negatively. “This has taught me responsibility and patience,” she said. “I treat people with more respect and a sense of compassion. I have sympathy for other people (with uncontrolled epilepsy) because I know what they’re going through.” Endres recently spoke publicly in Brainerd about her experience with VNS Therapy. She also talks with other patients who are struggling with epilepsy. “I let them know there is someone here who understands them. It’s a comfort,” Endres said. Marden said two other patients have received VNS Therapy in Brainerd since Endres was implanted. HEIDI LAKE can be reached at 855-5879 or heidi.lake@brainerddispatch.com.

Rochelle Endres, Staples, carries a special magnet with her at all times. By swiping the magnet across the Vagus Nerve Stimulation implant, Endres can stop a seizure when she feels symptomatic. Right: VNS Therapy is described as a pacemaker for the brain. The device is implanted under the skin in the chest, and wires connected to the implant are coiled around the vagus nerve in the neck. Electric signals are sent through the wires, stimulating the vagus nerve and activating parts of the brain, reducing the risk of seizures.

19


‘Miracle’ magnet VNS Therapy stops Staples woman’s seizures, changes her life

CMYK

Story/Heidi Lake Photos/Steve Kohls

Rochelle Endres, 21, was the first person to receive Vagus Nerve Stimulation Therapy in Brainerd. VNS is described as a pacemaker for the brain that helps control epilepsy. The outpatient procedure involved small incisions in her neck and chest, where the device was implanted.

18

STAPLES — Rochelle Endres wasn’t able to drive. She couldn’t get a job. She barely graduated from high school because she missed so many days of class. Endres was diagnosed with epilepsy when she was 8. Since then the disease has affected her entire life. At one point, the now 21-year-old Staples woman was taking 217 pills each week — and was still having uncontrollable seizures. Endres described herself as a “walking zombie” when she was taking so many medications. “I couldn’t think clearly,” she said. Side effects from taking so many medications eventually caught up with Endres. She has had cancer, three miscarriages, and suffers from osteoporosis, depression, ulcers and migraines. Because of the osteoporosis, Endres’ teeth have rotted and she now wears dentures. Doctors prescribed different drugs to keep her seizures under control, but after months of using the medications her body would become immune and the drugs wouldn’t work. This happened over and over again, and the seizures kept coming. She was diagnosed with treatment resistant epilepsy. Endres describes her “small” seizures as getting fluttery eyes and not being able to comprehend things. She is aware of what’s going on around her and can still talk. When she starts feeling her eyes get fluttery she can sometimes prevent the seizure from coming on by sleeping or eating. It’s the “big ones,” as Endres calls them, or grand mal seizures, that can’t be stopped. She goes unconscious, her body jerks, her jaw clenches and she loses control of her bodily functions. “When I feel one of those coming on, all I can do is sit back and wait for it,” Endres said. Endres’ shortest seizures last about 30 minutes. The longest lasted two weeks, she said. After years of failed medication combinations, Endres was running out of treatment options. In March 2004 Dr. Linda Marden, neurologist, joined the Brainerd Medical Center staff. After visiting numerous specialists in the Twin Cities and Brainerd, Endres was willing to visit yet another doctor.

Nisswa man is CyberKnife pioneer Story/Jodie Tweed PINE RIVER — Bob McLean of Nisswa had been volunteering for The Salvation Army’s fund-raising red kettle drive just before Christmas of 2002 when he started feeling slightly off balance and dizzy. Initially, it appeared McLean, who is general manager for Hunt Utilities Group LLC in Pine River, was suffering from a nasty ear infection in his left ear. He had been deaf in that ear for 30 years after doctors then believed he had caught a virus.

But an MRI revealed that McLean had a slow-growing benign tumor in his middle ear. The tumor, a glomus jugulare tumor, was being nourished by the rich blood supply from his jugular vein and shared intimate space with four cranial nerves, making it complicated to remove. Doctors believe McLean had the tumor for at least 30 years, which caused the deafness in his left ear, and now as it grew, it was putting pressure on his nerves, causing the dizziness.

The CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery System at St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul utilizes X-ray image cameras and computer technology similar to that used for cruise missile guidance. The CyberKnife delivers concentrated beams of radiation to the tumor from multiple positions and angles without damaging healthy surrounding tissue.

At St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul, McLean went through extensive tests in preparation for the intensive and delicate surgery to remove the tumor that was scheduled for the following week at a different medical facility. The surgery would have taken 14 hours, three days to fully wake up from the surgery, along with weeks of recovery. Just before leaving the hospital, a nurse handed McLean a copy of the hospital newsletter which contained a story about the CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery System, which would become available at the hospital in six months. There are only about a dozen medical facilities in the United States that offer CyberKnife services and McLean became one of St. Joseph’s Hospital’s first CyberKnife patients. He worked with St. Joseph’s medical team to discover whether he was a good candidate for CyberKnife and went under the virtual knife in October of 2003. Using X-ray image cameras and computer technology similar to that used for cruise missile guidance, the CyberKnife can locate a tumor in a body and deliver concentrated beams of radiation to the tumor from multiple positions and angles without damaging healthy surrounding tissue. The CyberKnife, which uses 150 or more beams of radiation, can reach tumors that in some cases would have been inoperable, according to information provided by the hospital. The CyberKnife project is led by a team of physicians that includes co-directors Dr. Leslie Nussbaum, a neurosurgeon, and Dr. Ellen Bellairs, a radiation oncologist, along with neurosurgeons Dr. Eric Nussbaum and Dr. Terry Hood and surgeon Dr. Andrew Fink. CyberKnife developers at Stanford University also consulted with the St. Paul doctors on McLean’s case. “I literally had the world’s best team looking at my case and that was great,” said McLean. McLean himself put together a risk analysis of his treatment options to determine whether he should undergo the CyberKnife procedure or conventional surgery. There was a substantial risk that McLean could experience permanent facial paralysis, speaking difficulties and other complications during conventional surgery, not to mention the long

11


CMYK

Bob McLean, general manager for Hunt Utilities Group LLC in Pine River, went under the virtual knife, or CyberKnife, at St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul in order to remove the benign slow-growing tumor in his left ear in 2003. Photo/Nels Norquist

recovery period he would need to endure. CyberKnife, said McLean, seemed to be the perfect option. “Something about it seemed so right,” said McLean. “In my situation, I saw very little in the way of risk for the CyberKnife.” The first treatment, which was painless and didn’t involve any medications or anesthesia, lasted an hour. McLean then drove himself to a meeting that afternoon. The second day he received another one-hour treatment, listening to music and relaxing under the large robotic arm of the machine. Afterward, he drove himself to a convention and out for dinner with friends. After the third treatment the following day, McLean drove himself home to Nisswa. McLean didn’t miss a day of work as a result of the procedure. The dying tumor continues to shrink and will eventually become absorbed by his body. “It’s been wonderfully uneventful,” said McLean. “The CyberKnife was a marvelous option for me.” McLean said he hasn’t regained his hearing in his left ear but has regained sensation now that the tumor is shrinking.

McLean is thankful for the support of his wife, Terri, their four sons, family and friends, as well as the Brainerd area medical professionals who got him on the path to looking into the issue in the first place. “This support, as much as anything, contributed to my level of confidence that this was the right thing to do,” said McLean. A year ago McLean spoke at a HealthEast Foundation president’s dinner about his experience. While CyberKnife may not be suitable for everyone, McLean said it was the best treatment option for him. St. Joseph’s Hospital uses CyberKnife to treat a variety of tumors including those in the head, neck and spine, as well as tumors of the lung, pancreas, liver, kidney and pelvis and other tumors in the body, if appropriate. For more information about the CyberKnife Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital, visit the HealthEast Care System Web site at www.healtheast.org. JODIE TWEED can be reached at jodie.tweed@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5858.

Quality Healthcare Appointment Line 320.632.2301 Business Line 320.632.6611

811 SE Second St., Suite A Little Falls, MN 56345

Quality Healthcare right here at

HOME

$

00

1199

FREE DELIVERY FREE SET-UP FREE REMOVAL

Queen 2pc.Set

FAMILY MEDICINE

Patients of all Ages • General Health Exams • Obstetrics • Bone Densitrometry • Outpatient Surgery • Acute and Chronic Disease Management

INTERNAL MEDICINE

General Health Exams • Chronic Health Management • Pacer Maker Placement • Peripheral Vascular Disease Evaluations • Stress Testing • Nerve Conduction Studies • Cardiac Outpatient Monitoring

OB/GYN

Cancer Screening • Menopause Management • Infertility • Obstetric Care, Including High Risk Pregnancy Care • Minimally-Invasive Gynecologic Surgery • Vaginal Restoration Surgery

PEDIATRICS

General Pediatrics • Care of Premature Infants • Behavioral Pediatrics including ADHD • Asthma Treatment for Children & Teens • Chronic Disease Management • Immediate and Long-term Follow-up

FAMILY MEDICINE • INTERNAL MEDICINE • OB/GYN • PEDIATRICS

12

HealthSmart Zipoff Pillowtop

Simmons® Beautyrest® “DRESDAN” Firm or Plush Queen Set Twin Set Full Set King Set

699 $ 599 $649 $995 $

“DRESDAN” Pillowtop Queen Set Twin Set Full Set King Set

699 $599 $649 $ 995 $

Simmons® Deep Sleep® “SHELBURNE Queen Set Twin Set Full Set King Set

399 269 $329 $599 $ $

“GOLDEN VALUE” Queen Set Twin Set Full Set King Set

599 499 $549 $899 $ $

CR 3 & 11, Next to Roach's Lawn & Marine Crosslake, MN • 218-765-4082 Monday-Friday 10-5 • Saturday 10-4

17


Study shows midwife-assisted home births are safe Story/January W. Payne The Washington Post

CMYK

Planned home births using certified professional midwives are safe for women at low risk for complications, reports the largest study to date on the subject. Thousands of women who underwent home births using midwives had lower rates of medical interventions such as epidural pain relief, forceps delivery and Caesarean section than similar women who give birth in hospitals. And babies born at home with the assistance of these midwives had no higher risk of death during delivery and after birth than low-risk, hospital-born babies. The findings are consistent with past research. Safety First â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The study, published in the British Medical Journal, followed 5,418 women expecting to deliver at home in 2000 with the aid of midwives certified by the North American Registry of Midwives. About 12 percent of the women were transferred to a hospital during labor because of complications. After delivery, 1.3 percent of the mothers and 0.7 percent of newborns were sent to a hospital, mostly for maternal

hemorrhage, respiratory problems in the baby and retained placenta. No mothers died. There were 1.7 infant deaths per 1,000, a rate â&#x20AC;&#x153;similar to risks in other studies of low-risk home and hospital births in North America,â&#x20AC;? the study reports. Legal Notes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nurse-midwifery is legal in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, according to the American College of NurseMidwives (ACNM). In Maryland and the District of Columbia, midwives must have a nursing degree to attend births. In Virginia midwives without a nursing degree will be permitted to attend births, starting in July. The ACNM recommends that women seeking midwives look for people with degrees from accredited midwifery educational programs tied to higher educational institutions. All ACNM certified midwives have at least a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree; more than 70 percent have at least a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree, reports the ACNM. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists opposes home births, citing safety concerns.

ss! â&#x20AC;˘ summer fitness! â&#x20AC;˘ summ er fitn er fitne summ ess!

â&#x20AC;˘ su mm er f itn

1 WE E K FR â&#x20AC;˘ ! S S E N E T ANT FROM TH E EX PE RT W I U E F O Y S S R LT W U ! S E H E R O M E M H C T SU AR G ET E!

ess !

People come in all shapes, sizes, ages, and abilities. Our friendly atmosphere eliminates â&#x20AC;&#x153;new exerciserâ&#x20AC;? anxiety. You progress at your own pace - not someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. So, leave your health club stereotypes at the door and prepare to have FUN and achieve your goals!

Fitness For All Ages!

Look & Feel Your Best!

We are a participating Health Club for The BluePrint for HealthÂŽ ďŹ tness discounts program CALL FOR DETAILS!

16

â&#x20AC;˘ NEW Cardio Equipment â&#x20AC;˘ 17 Strength Training Station â&#x20AC;˘ Free Weight Area â&#x20AC;˘ CertiďŹ ed Personal Trainers â&#x20AC;˘ Pilates â&#x20AC;˘ Power Yoga CALL â&#x20AC;˘ Water Aerobics NOW! â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Pools ASK US ABOUT â&#x20AC;˘ Waterslide OUR NO ENROLLMENT â&#x20AC;˘ Sauna OPTIONS â&#x20AC;˘ Kids Room â&#x20AC;˘ Swim Lessons

+DYH\RXFKHFNHG \RXUFDUHLQVWUXFWLRQVODWHO\" 470 8th St. NE, Crosby

218-546-2616

Summer Fitness Special! Offer ends August 31, 2005 1 Week Fitness Pass! DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T DELAY See Hallett Center Service Desk for Free Pass. Must Be 18 Years And Older & A Local Area Resident

$URXWLQHFKHFNXSDW/DNHZRRG+HDOWK6\VWHP WDNHVDERXWDVORQJDVDORDGRIODXQGU\ÂłDQG LWFDQVDYH\RXUOLIH :KHQLWFRPHVWR\RXUKHDOWKSURSHU PDLQWHQDQFHLVWKHNH\ 6FKHGXOH\RXUJHQHUDOKHDOWKFKHFNDW /DNHZRRG+HDOWK6\VWHPWRGD\

/$.(:22'&/,1,&672//)5(( 67$3/(6Â&#x2021;027/(<Â&#x2021;3,//$*(5Â&#x2021;($*/(%(1'Â&#x2021;%52:(59,//( ZZZODNHZRRGKHDOWKV\VWHPFRP 

13


CMYK

Summer in Minnesota is like an invitation to get outside and enjoy the elements. Especially in the tourist-driven Brainerd lakes area, people flock to lakes, basking in the sun and playing in the water. While enjoying the warm weather, it’s important to know risks the great outdoors pose to the unprepared. Dr. Robert Westin of the Cuyuna Regional Medical Center in Crosby and registered nurse Carla Zupko of the Family Medical Center in Little Falls shared treatment and prevention options on some the season’s most common nuisances. Poison ivy Prevention: Avoid exposure if possible. If you come in contact with poison ivy, shower using regular soap to remove all the resin from the poison ivy plant. Be sure to launder clothing as well. There are over the counter products, Ivy Block and Stoko Quarel, that can be applied before exposure to the plant. Treatment: Over the counter antihistamine, such as Benadryl, Calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream may also be used.

14

Swimmer’s itch Swimmer’s itch, also known as chiggers, is a skin rash caused by an allergic reaction to infection with certain parasites of birds and mammals. These microscopic parasites are released from infected snails to swim in fresh and salt water, such as lakes, ponds and oceans. Symptoms: Within minutes to days after swimming in contaminated water, a person may experience tingling, burning or itching of the skin. Small reddish pimples appear within 12 hours. Pimples may develop into small blisters. Itching may last up to a week or more, but will gradually go away. Because swimmer’s itch is caused by an allergic reaction to infection, the more often you swim or wade in contaminated water, the more likely you are to develop more serious symptoms. The greater number of exposures to contaminated water, the more intense and immediate symptoms of swimmer’s itch will be. Prevention: Avoid swimming in areas where swimmer’s itch is a

known problem or where signs have been posted warning of unsafe water. Avoid swimming near or wading in marshy areas where snails are commonly found. Towel dry or shower immediately after leaving the water. Do not attract birds by feeding them in areas where people are swimming. Treatment: Over the counter antihistamine, Calamine lotion or Colloidal oatmeal baths, such as Aveeno, will help with the itching. Cool compresses, bathing in baking soda or applying baking soda paste to the rash might also help to relieve itching. Try not to scratch. Scratching may cause the rash to become infected. Sun burn Prevention: Avoid overexposure. The worst time to be in the sun is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Use sun block of SPF 15 or higher and reapply it frequently, especially when swimming or excessively sweating. The use of hats or other physical barriers to exposure are best. Treatment: Apply a cool compress and apply aloe vera cream two to three times per day. Use ibuprofen (200-600 mg) every four to six hours as needed for pain relief. See a doctor if blisters are present, your body temperature is 101 or higher, or if suffering from delirium, vomiting, diarrhea, pain or fever for longer than 48 hours. Bee stings If you have a known allergy to bee stings, keep an EpiPen with you at all times. If you have any difficulty swallowing or breathing after getting stung, call 911.

Treatment: If the stinger is still present, remove it gently by scraping the site until the stinger is removed. Wash the area with soap and water and apply ice for the first 24 to 48 hours. Use an over the counter pain reliever and antihistamine to reduce the allergic reaction. See a doctor if fever, swollen glands, a spreading red streak or joint pain result after 24 hours. Tick bites To remove an embedded tick, use tweezers and apply steady upward traction until the tick releases its grip. Be patient. Avoid crushing the tick. This increases the risk for transmission of disease. Wash the area with soap and water and apply a triple antibiotic cream. If bit by a deer tick, keep it for positive identification. The Center for Disease Control does not recommend treat-

ment for every deer tick bite. The deer tick has to be attached for 24 hours to transmit disease. The Lyme disease incubation period is seven to 21 days. See a doctor if you develop fatigue, malaise, lethargy, fever, chills, body aches, muscle pain, low grade fever, headache, stiff neck or joint pain after this time period. A target or bulls-eye rash is seen in two-thirds of the patients. Insect or spider bites If you are short of breath, choking, coughing, wheezing, or notice lip swelling or hives all over your body, call 911 immediately. If a black widow or brown recluse spider is suspected, try to collect it in a jar and take it

NEW LOCATION! Opening July 25 7870 Excelsior Rd., Baxter

• Treatment of eye infections, injuries & glaucoma • Consultations for laser and cataract surgery • Eye exams • Contact lenses • Eye Wear Dr. Jackie McCall

EYE CENTER

Dr. Anna Malikowski

Brainerd Office 218.828.9545 • 877.338.3957 Staples Office 218.894.5480 • 866-894-5455

with you for proper identification. Treatment for non-emergent bites: Wash the area with soap and water and apply ice for 20 minutes several times a day for the first 24 hours. Use over the counter antihistamine for itching or hives, and an over the counter pain reliever for discomfort. Seek medical attention immediately if hives, rash, muscle stiffness, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or restlessness develop. Heat exhaustion Symptoms: Feeling dizzy or light headed, clammy and have excessive sweating. Treatment: Get out of the heat, take a cool bath or wrap with watered down sheets and drink water. Heat stroke Symptoms: No sweating, temperature of 100.5 or higher. If you have these symptoms, seek medical attention immediately. Prevention: Avoid prolonged exposure to hot temperatures, wear light, loose fitting clothing and drink plenty of water. Don’t wait until you are thirsty.

Physician’s

LaserCenter Helping you look your best... Physician’s Laser Center offers a modern approach to skin rejuvenation. Dr. Leighanne Holmes Mary McCollough Whether we are treating you Physician Skin Care Specialist for acne, rosacea, wrinkles, skin discoloration, leg or facial veins, or unwanted hair, our patients are treated like family and will feel comfortable and at ease in our medical spa. We believe in offering the best services possible at an affordable price. Patients will appreciate our clinic’s warm environment and staff professionalism and honesty. PLC offers multiple laser services for a variety of skin conditions using our state-of-the-art YAG and V-beamlaser systems. Microdermabrasion, lunch time chemical peels, SkinCeuticals skin care products, and mineral powder makeup are also available

Call for your FREE consultations today!

218.824.6666 Hours: Tues - Fri, 11am-4pm, or by Appt. Located in the Grizzly Center. Hwy 371. Baxter

15


CMYK

Summer in Minnesota is like an invitation to get outside and enjoy the elements. Especially in the tourist-driven Brainerd lakes area, people flock to lakes, basking in the sun and playing in the water. While enjoying the warm weather, it’s important to know risks the great outdoors pose to the unprepared. Dr. Robert Westin of the Cuyuna Regional Medical Center in Crosby and registered nurse Carla Zupko of the Family Medical Center in Little Falls shared treatment and prevention options on some the season’s most common nuisances. Poison ivy Prevention: Avoid exposure if possible. If you come in contact with poison ivy, shower using regular soap to remove all the resin from the poison ivy plant. Be sure to launder clothing as well. There are over the counter products, Ivy Block and Stoko Quarel, that can be applied before exposure to the plant. Treatment: Over the counter antihistamine, such as Benadryl, Calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream may also be used.

14

Swimmer’s itch Swimmer’s itch, also known as chiggers, is a skin rash caused by an allergic reaction to infection with certain parasites of birds and mammals. These microscopic parasites are released from infected snails to swim in fresh and salt water, such as lakes, ponds and oceans. Symptoms: Within minutes to days after swimming in contaminated water, a person may experience tingling, burning or itching of the skin. Small reddish pimples appear within 12 hours. Pimples may develop into small blisters. Itching may last up to a week or more, but will gradually go away. Because swimmer’s itch is caused by an allergic reaction to infection, the more often you swim or wade in contaminated water, the more likely you are to develop more serious symptoms. The greater number of exposures to contaminated water, the more intense and immediate symptoms of swimmer’s itch will be. Prevention: Avoid swimming in areas where swimmer’s itch is a

known problem or where signs have been posted warning of unsafe water. Avoid swimming near or wading in marshy areas where snails are commonly found. Towel dry or shower immediately after leaving the water. Do not attract birds by feeding them in areas where people are swimming. Treatment: Over the counter antihistamine, Calamine lotion or Colloidal oatmeal baths, such as Aveeno, will help with the itching. Cool compresses, bathing in baking soda or applying baking soda paste to the rash might also help to relieve itching. Try not to scratch. Scratching may cause the rash to become infected. Sun burn Prevention: Avoid overexposure. The worst time to be in the sun is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Use sun block of SPF 15 or higher and reapply it frequently, especially when swimming or excessively sweating. The use of hats or other physical barriers to exposure are best. Treatment: Apply a cool compress and apply aloe vera cream two to three times per day. Use ibuprofen (200-600 mg) every four to six hours as needed for pain relief. See a doctor if blisters are present, your body temperature is 101 or higher, or if suffering from delirium, vomiting, diarrhea, pain or fever for longer than 48 hours. Bee stings If you have a known allergy to bee stings, keep an EpiPen with you at all times. If you have any difficulty swallowing or breathing after getting stung, call 911.

Treatment: If the stinger is still present, remove it gently by scraping the site until the stinger is removed. Wash the area with soap and water and apply ice for the first 24 to 48 hours. Use an over the counter pain reliever and antihistamine to reduce the allergic reaction. See a doctor if fever, swollen glands, a spreading red streak or joint pain result after 24 hours. Tick bites To remove an embedded tick, use tweezers and apply steady upward traction until the tick releases its grip. Be patient. Avoid crushing the tick. This increases the risk for transmission of disease. Wash the area with soap and water and apply a triple antibiotic cream. If bit by a deer tick, keep it for positive identification. The Center for Disease Control does not recommend treat-

ment for every deer tick bite. The deer tick has to be attached for 24 hours to transmit disease. The Lyme disease incubation period is seven to 21 days. See a doctor if you develop fatigue, malaise, lethargy, fever, chills, body aches, muscle pain, low grade fever, headache, stiff neck or joint pain after this time period. A target or bulls-eye rash is seen in two-thirds of the patients. Insect or spider bites If you are short of breath, choking, coughing, wheezing, or notice lip swelling or hives all over your body, call 911 immediately. If a black widow or brown recluse spider is suspected, try to collect it in a jar and take it

NEW LOCATION! Opening July 25 7870 Excelsior Rd., Baxter

• Treatment of eye infections, injuries & glaucoma • Consultations for laser and cataract surgery • Eye exams • Contact lenses • Eye Wear Dr. Jackie McCall

EYE CENTER

Dr. Anna Malikowski

Brainerd Office 218.828.9545 • 877.338.3957 Staples Office 218.894.5480 • 866-894-5455

with you for proper identification. Treatment for non-emergent bites: Wash the area with soap and water and apply ice for 20 minutes several times a day for the first 24 hours. Use over the counter antihistamine for itching or hives, and an over the counter pain reliever for discomfort. Seek medical attention immediately if hives, rash, muscle stiffness, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or restlessness develop. Heat exhaustion Symptoms: Feeling dizzy or light headed, clammy and have excessive sweating. Treatment: Get out of the heat, take a cool bath or wrap with watered down sheets and drink water. Heat stroke Symptoms: No sweating, temperature of 100.5 or higher. If you have these symptoms, seek medical attention immediately. Prevention: Avoid prolonged exposure to hot temperatures, wear light, loose fitting clothing and drink plenty of water. Don’t wait until you are thirsty.

Physician’s

LaserCenter Helping you look your best... Physician’s Laser Center offers a modern approach to skin rejuvenation. Dr. Leighanne Holmes Mary McCollough Whether we are treating you Physician Skin Care Specialist for acne, rosacea, wrinkles, skin discoloration, leg or facial veins, or unwanted hair, our patients are treated like family and will feel comfortable and at ease in our medical spa. We believe in offering the best services possible at an affordable price. Patients will appreciate our clinic’s warm environment and staff professionalism and honesty. PLC offers multiple laser services for a variety of skin conditions using our state-of-the-art YAG and V-beamlaser systems. Microdermabrasion, lunch time chemical peels, SkinCeuticals skin care products, and mineral powder makeup are also available

Call for your FREE consultations today!

218.824.6666 Hours: Tues - Fri, 11am-4pm, or by Appt. Located in the Grizzly Center. Hwy 371. Baxter

15


Study shows midwife-assisted home births are safe Story/January W. Payne The Washington Post

CMYK

Planned home births using certified professional midwives are safe for women at low risk for complications, reports the largest study to date on the subject. Thousands of women who underwent home births using midwives had lower rates of medical interventions such as epidural pain relief, forceps delivery and Caesarean section than similar women who give birth in hospitals. And babies born at home with the assistance of these midwives had no higher risk of death during delivery and after birth than low-risk, hospital-born babies. The findings are consistent with past research. Safety First â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The study, published in the British Medical Journal, followed 5,418 women expecting to deliver at home in 2000 with the aid of midwives certified by the North American Registry of Midwives. About 12 percent of the women were transferred to a hospital during labor because of complications. After delivery, 1.3 percent of the mothers and 0.7 percent of newborns were sent to a hospital, mostly for maternal

hemorrhage, respiratory problems in the baby and retained placenta. No mothers died. There were 1.7 infant deaths per 1,000, a rate â&#x20AC;&#x153;similar to risks in other studies of low-risk home and hospital births in North America,â&#x20AC;? the study reports. Legal Notes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nurse-midwifery is legal in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, according to the American College of NurseMidwives (ACNM). In Maryland and the District of Columbia, midwives must have a nursing degree to attend births. In Virginia midwives without a nursing degree will be permitted to attend births, starting in July. The ACNM recommends that women seeking midwives look for people with degrees from accredited midwifery educational programs tied to higher educational institutions. All ACNM certified midwives have at least a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree; more than 70 percent have at least a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree, reports the ACNM. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists opposes home births, citing safety concerns.

ss! â&#x20AC;˘ summer fitness! â&#x20AC;˘ summ er fitn er fitne summ ess!

â&#x20AC;˘ su mm er f itn

1 WE E K FR â&#x20AC;˘ ! S S E N E T ANT FROM TH E EX PE RT W I U E F O Y S S R LT W U ! S E H E R O M E M H C T SU AR G ET E!

ess !

People come in all shapes, sizes, ages, and abilities. Our friendly atmosphere eliminates â&#x20AC;&#x153;new exerciserâ&#x20AC;? anxiety. You progress at your own pace - not someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. So, leave your health club stereotypes at the door and prepare to have FUN and achieve your goals!

Fitness For All Ages!

Look & Feel Your Best!

We are a participating Health Club for The BluePrint for HealthÂŽ ďŹ tness discounts program CALL FOR DETAILS!

16

â&#x20AC;˘ NEW Cardio Equipment â&#x20AC;˘ 17 Strength Training Station â&#x20AC;˘ Free Weight Area â&#x20AC;˘ CertiďŹ ed Personal Trainers â&#x20AC;˘ Pilates â&#x20AC;˘ Power Yoga CALL â&#x20AC;˘ Water Aerobics NOW! â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Pools ASK US ABOUT â&#x20AC;˘ Waterslide OUR NO ENROLLMENT â&#x20AC;˘ Sauna OPTIONS â&#x20AC;˘ Kids Room â&#x20AC;˘ Swim Lessons

+DYH\RXFKHFNHG \RXUFDUHLQVWUXFWLRQVODWHO\" 470 8th St. NE, Crosby

218-546-2616

Summer Fitness Special! Offer ends August 31, 2005 1 Week Fitness Pass! DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T DELAY See Hallett Center Service Desk for Free Pass. Must Be 18 Years And Older & A Local Area Resident

$URXWLQHFKHFNXSDW/DNHZRRG+HDOWK6\VWHP WDNHVDERXWDVORQJDVDORDGRIODXQGU\ÂłDQG LWFDQVDYH\RXUOLIH :KHQLWFRPHVWR\RXUKHDOWKSURSHU PDLQWHQDQFHLVWKHNH\ 6FKHGXOH\RXUJHQHUDOKHDOWKFKHFNDW /DNHZRRG+HDOWK6\VWHPWRGD\

/$.(:22'&/,1,&672//)5(( 67$3/(6Â&#x2021;027/(<Â&#x2021;3,//$*(5Â&#x2021;($*/(%(1'Â&#x2021;%52:(59,//( ZZZODNHZRRGKHDOWKV\VWHPFRP 

13


CMYK

Bob McLean, general manager for Hunt Utilities Group LLC in Pine River, went under the virtual knife, or CyberKnife, at St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul in order to remove the benign slow-growing tumor in his left ear in 2003. Photo/Nels Norquist

recovery period he would need to endure. CyberKnife, said McLean, seemed to be the perfect option. “Something about it seemed so right,” said McLean. “In my situation, I saw very little in the way of risk for the CyberKnife.” The first treatment, which was painless and didn’t involve any medications or anesthesia, lasted an hour. McLean then drove himself to a meeting that afternoon. The second day he received another one-hour treatment, listening to music and relaxing under the large robotic arm of the machine. Afterward, he drove himself to a convention and out for dinner with friends. After the third treatment the following day, McLean drove himself home to Nisswa. McLean didn’t miss a day of work as a result of the procedure. The dying tumor continues to shrink and will eventually become absorbed by his body. “It’s been wonderfully uneventful,” said McLean. “The CyberKnife was a marvelous option for me.” McLean said he hasn’t regained his hearing in his left ear but has regained sensation now that the tumor is shrinking.

McLean is thankful for the support of his wife, Terri, their four sons, family and friends, as well as the Brainerd area medical professionals who got him on the path to looking into the issue in the first place. “This support, as much as anything, contributed to my level of confidence that this was the right thing to do,” said McLean. A year ago McLean spoke at a HealthEast Foundation president’s dinner about his experience. While CyberKnife may not be suitable for everyone, McLean said it was the best treatment option for him. St. Joseph’s Hospital uses CyberKnife to treat a variety of tumors including those in the head, neck and spine, as well as tumors of the lung, pancreas, liver, kidney and pelvis and other tumors in the body, if appropriate. For more information about the CyberKnife Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital, visit the HealthEast Care System Web site at www.healtheast.org. JODIE TWEED can be reached at jodie.tweed@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5858.

Quality Healthcare Appointment Line 320.632.2301 Business Line 320.632.6611

811 SE Second St., Suite A Little Falls, MN 56345

Quality Healthcare right here at

HOME

$

00

1199

FREE DELIVERY FREE SET-UP FREE REMOVAL

Queen 2pc.Set

FAMILY MEDICINE

Patients of all Ages • General Health Exams • Obstetrics • Bone Densitrometry • Outpatient Surgery • Acute and Chronic Disease Management

INTERNAL MEDICINE

General Health Exams • Chronic Health Management • Pacer Maker Placement • Peripheral Vascular Disease Evaluations • Stress Testing • Nerve Conduction Studies • Cardiac Outpatient Monitoring

OB/GYN

Cancer Screening • Menopause Management • Infertility • Obstetric Care, Including High Risk Pregnancy Care • Minimally-Invasive Gynecologic Surgery • Vaginal Restoration Surgery

PEDIATRICS

General Pediatrics • Care of Premature Infants • Behavioral Pediatrics including ADHD • Asthma Treatment for Children & Teens • Chronic Disease Management • Immediate and Long-term Follow-up

FAMILY MEDICINE • INTERNAL MEDICINE • OB/GYN • PEDIATRICS

12

HealthSmart Zipoff Pillowtop

Simmons® Beautyrest® “DRESDAN” Firm or Plush Queen Set Twin Set Full Set King Set

699 $ 599 $649 $995 $

“DRESDAN” Pillowtop Queen Set Twin Set Full Set King Set

699 $599 $649 $ 995 $

Simmons® Deep Sleep® “SHELBURNE Queen Set Twin Set Full Set King Set

399 269 $329 $599 $ $

“GOLDEN VALUE” Queen Set Twin Set Full Set King Set

599 499 $549 $899 $ $

CR 3 & 11, Next to Roach's Lawn & Marine Crosslake, MN • 218-765-4082 Monday-Friday 10-5 • Saturday 10-4

17


‘Miracle’ magnet VNS Therapy stops Staples woman’s seizures, changes her life

CMYK

Story/Heidi Lake Photos/Steve Kohls

Rochelle Endres, 21, was the first person to receive Vagus Nerve Stimulation Therapy in Brainerd. VNS is described as a pacemaker for the brain that helps control epilepsy. The outpatient procedure involved small incisions in her neck and chest, where the device was implanted.

18

STAPLES — Rochelle Endres wasn’t able to drive. She couldn’t get a job. She barely graduated from high school because she missed so many days of class. Endres was diagnosed with epilepsy when she was 8. Since then the disease has affected her entire life. At one point, the now 21-year-old Staples woman was taking 217 pills each week — and was still having uncontrollable seizures. Endres described herself as a “walking zombie” when she was taking so many medications. “I couldn’t think clearly,” she said. Side effects from taking so many medications eventually caught up with Endres. She has had cancer, three miscarriages, and suffers from osteoporosis, depression, ulcers and migraines. Because of the osteoporosis, Endres’ teeth have rotted and she now wears dentures. Doctors prescribed different drugs to keep her seizures under control, but after months of using the medications her body would become immune and the drugs wouldn’t work. This happened over and over again, and the seizures kept coming. She was diagnosed with treatment resistant epilepsy. Endres describes her “small” seizures as getting fluttery eyes and not being able to comprehend things. She is aware of what’s going on around her and can still talk. When she starts feeling her eyes get fluttery she can sometimes prevent the seizure from coming on by sleeping or eating. It’s the “big ones,” as Endres calls them, or grand mal seizures, that can’t be stopped. She goes unconscious, her body jerks, her jaw clenches and she loses control of her bodily functions. “When I feel one of those coming on, all I can do is sit back and wait for it,” Endres said. Endres’ shortest seizures last about 30 minutes. The longest lasted two weeks, she said. After years of failed medication combinations, Endres was running out of treatment options. In March 2004 Dr. Linda Marden, neurologist, joined the Brainerd Medical Center staff. After visiting numerous specialists in the Twin Cities and Brainerd, Endres was willing to visit yet another doctor.

Nisswa man is CyberKnife pioneer Story/Jodie Tweed PINE RIVER — Bob McLean of Nisswa had been volunteering for The Salvation Army’s fund-raising red kettle drive just before Christmas of 2002 when he started feeling slightly off balance and dizzy. Initially, it appeared McLean, who is general manager for Hunt Utilities Group LLC in Pine River, was suffering from a nasty ear infection in his left ear. He had been deaf in that ear for 30 years after doctors then believed he had caught a virus.

But an MRI revealed that McLean had a slow-growing benign tumor in his middle ear. The tumor, a glomus jugulare tumor, was being nourished by the rich blood supply from his jugular vein and shared intimate space with four cranial nerves, making it complicated to remove. Doctors believe McLean had the tumor for at least 30 years, which caused the deafness in his left ear, and now as it grew, it was putting pressure on his nerves, causing the dizziness.

The CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery System at St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul utilizes X-ray image cameras and computer technology similar to that used for cruise missile guidance. The CyberKnife delivers concentrated beams of radiation to the tumor from multiple positions and angles without damaging healthy surrounding tissue.

At St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul, McLean went through extensive tests in preparation for the intensive and delicate surgery to remove the tumor that was scheduled for the following week at a different medical facility. The surgery would have taken 14 hours, three days to fully wake up from the surgery, along with weeks of recovery. Just before leaving the hospital, a nurse handed McLean a copy of the hospital newsletter which contained a story about the CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery System, which would become available at the hospital in six months. There are only about a dozen medical facilities in the United States that offer CyberKnife services and McLean became one of St. Joseph’s Hospital’s first CyberKnife patients. He worked with St. Joseph’s medical team to discover whether he was a good candidate for CyberKnife and went under the virtual knife in October of 2003. Using X-ray image cameras and computer technology similar to that used for cruise missile guidance, the CyberKnife can locate a tumor in a body and deliver concentrated beams of radiation to the tumor from multiple positions and angles without damaging healthy surrounding tissue. The CyberKnife, which uses 150 or more beams of radiation, can reach tumors that in some cases would have been inoperable, according to information provided by the hospital. The CyberKnife project is led by a team of physicians that includes co-directors Dr. Leslie Nussbaum, a neurosurgeon, and Dr. Ellen Bellairs, a radiation oncologist, along with neurosurgeons Dr. Eric Nussbaum and Dr. Terry Hood and surgeon Dr. Andrew Fink. CyberKnife developers at Stanford University also consulted with the St. Paul doctors on McLean’s case. “I literally had the world’s best team looking at my case and that was great,” said McLean. McLean himself put together a risk analysis of his treatment options to determine whether he should undergo the CyberKnife procedure or conventional surgery. There was a substantial risk that McLean could experience permanent facial paralysis, speaking difficulties and other complications during conventional surgery, not to mention the long

11


CHILDREN’S HEALTH

Bored?

CMYK

Here’s what area children had to say about how they are spending their summer vacation Story/Jennifer Stockinger

Smile Design Orthodontics Dr. Jill Bailey, DDS Certified by the Academy of Gp Orthodontics, General Dentist, Certified Invisalign® Doctor, ADA/MDA Member

in our area.

The place for braces and

Start smiling more • FLEXIBLE PAYMENT OPTIONS • FREE WHITENING KIT WITH FULL TREATMENT ($275 VALUE)

10

Call today for your COMPLIMENTARY initial exam.

218-895-7878

226 4th St. NE, Staples

Summer is here, children are out of school and free to do fun activities. Students of all ages who were at Washington Educational Services Building recently for Fun ‘N’ Friends discussed their favorite summer activities. Brandon Kersting, 12, Merrifield, and his friend, Steven Coffman, 12, Brainerd, are addicted to playing with their magic cards. They said they can play with the cards for days. They said they do not play video games and they only watch television if they are really bored. Kersting said he likes to hang out with friends and wrestle with his brother. He also likes playing make-up games and he likes to go skateboarding. Coffman said he’d go outside more often if he wouldn’t be teased by other children. Kersting said he’d go outside more often if the bugs would stop biting. Even though the boys do not do as much physical activity as they should, they said they eat healthy. Coffman said his favorite food is bananas and he likes fresh-cut pineapple. Kersting said his family banned junk food from their house. He said they only get to eat junk food on special occasions. He also said he and his siblings can only watch two hours of television a day. Meghan Sullivan, 15, Garrison, and Nick Mangan, 17, Baxter, said they both like go to the beach and spend time with friends when they are not in school. Mangan said his friends also like to play sports, including baseball, basketball and soccer. Sullivan and Mangan volunteer in the Brainerd School District with the youth programs, spending time and playing games with children. They said the fifth- through eighthgrade boys like to play video games and skateboard. Marissa Bjerkness, 10, Brainerd, said she somewhat likes to skateboard. Her favorite things to do are working with arts and crafts and talking. Heather Bowman, 10, Baxter, also likes to do arts and crafts. She and her friends each made a paper fortune teller that kept them busy. She said she also likes to play basketball and volleyball. Bowman said she can only watch one hour of television a day. She said if one day she watches more then she can’t watch any television the next day. Colin Sullivan, 13, Garrison, said he likes to swim, play football and basketball and lift weights. He also likes to read and write short stories. Devin Selk, 6, Brainerd, said he likes to play with trucks and help his dad at the concession stands at events. Kaitlin Burch, 7, Brainerd, likes to go bike riding and play with her dog, three cats and two fish. She also likes listening to music. She said she watches about one to two hours of television, depending on when she gets her chores done. JENNIFER STOCKINGER can be reached jennifer.stockinger@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5851.

at

Marden suggested Vagus Nerve Stimulation Therapy, something that at the time was only approved by the Food and Drug Administration for one type of epilepsy. VNS Therapy is described as a pacemaker for the brain. The device, about the size of a pocketwatch, is implanted under the skin in the chest. Wires connected to the implant are coiled around the vagus nerve on the left side of the neck. Electric signals are sent through the wires, stimulating the vagus nerve and activating parts of the brain, reducing the risk of seizures. At the time, surgeons in Brainerd were not trained in implanting the VNS device. Marden brought it upon herself to bring VNS to Brainerd, coordinating a program between local doctors and representatives of Cyberonics, the VNS parent company. “Rochelle was my kick in the butt,” Marden said of bringing VNS to Brainerd. “Nothing else seemed to work.” Endres was implanted with the VNS last July 19. The outpatient surgery was done at St. Joseph’s Medical Center and cost about $25,000. Endres said her insurance company covered the procedure. Doctors programmed the device in August, adjusting the timing and amount of stimulation her brain receives. Endres took her last anti-seizure pill in September. It’s been one year since Endres has had a seizure. Before getting the VNS, she seized

about once a week. “It’s nice to know I’m OK. I don’t have to wake up in the morning and wonder what’s gong to happen to me that day,” Endres said. Endres used to prepare many of her friends and co-workers on what to do if she seized while she’s with them. She instructed them to take her jewelry off, take her dentures out, and if she makes choking sounds, put a metal spoon in her mouth and hold down her tongue. “Then just wait. When I snap out of it, I’ll be tired and irritable, then just let me sleep,” she said. To give her more control of her seizures, VNS allows Endres to swipe a magnet across the implant in her chest when she feels symptomatic. By using the magnet, Endres can stimulate the implant to send out electric signals, potentially aborting or decreasing the severity of the seizure. Endres said she has used the magnet 23 times since she was implanted in August. “I swipe the magnet and 10 minutes later I feel 50 to 70 percent better,” she said. Marden said because VNS Therapy is fairly new, data regarding the long-term effects of VNS only goes back eight to 10 years. She is confident in saying VNS is less risky than taking seizure medicines. Endres calls VNS Therapy a “miracle,” but she has some concern her body will become immune to it, like it did with all the anti-

seizure medications. “The body can get immune to anything. I’m getting electrical stimuli every day, 24/7. I hope and pray it won’t stop,” she said. Now that Endres can somewhat control her seizures, she’s able to work full time at Bang Printing in Brainerd. She owns her own house and plans to pursue a graphic design degree at Central Lakes College in January, a feat she attempted in the past but had to quit because of health issues. Endres said her struggles with epilepsy have affected her life both positively and negatively. “This has taught me responsibility and patience,” she said. “I treat people with more respect and a sense of compassion. I have sympathy for other people (with uncontrolled epilepsy) because I know what they’re going through.” Endres recently spoke publicly in Brainerd about her experience with VNS Therapy. She also talks with other patients who are struggling with epilepsy. “I let them know there is someone here who understands them. It’s a comfort,” Endres said. Marden said two other patients have received VNS Therapy in Brainerd since Endres was implanted. HEIDI LAKE can be reached at 855-5879 or heidi.lake@brainerddispatch.com.

Rochelle Endres, Staples, carries a special magnet with her at all times. By swiping the magnet across the Vagus Nerve Stimulation implant, Endres can stop a seizure when she feels symptomatic. Right: VNS Therapy is described as a pacemaker for the brain. The device is implanted under the skin in the chest, and wires connected to the implant are coiled around the vagus nerve in the neck. Electric signals are sent through the wires, stimulating the vagus nerve and activating parts of the brain, reducing the risk of seizures.

19


Exercise books by trainers of the stars fit the rest of us pretty well

CMYK

Story/Craig Stoltz Photo/Julia Ewan The Washington Post

Exercise books by trainers of the stars fit everybody else pretty well. You’re not going to look like Halle Berry by following Harley Pasternak’s book, but it offers a time-efficient, research-based workout.

The trouble with books written by fitness trainers to the stars isn’t that people read them. It’s that they read them for the wrong reasons. No book by an A-list Hollywood trainer can make you look like Halle Berry in a cat suit (or, for that matter, Christian Slater in boxers). And whatever they can deliver will take a lot longer than the improbably few weeks hyped on the cover. But — who’d have thought? — the programs subject to these pumped-up claims offer some value for those of us who aren’t celebrities at all, people I proudly think of as members of the “Elist,” as in Everybody Else.

to give children tokens and each token would be worth one hour of screen time. Besides staying active children also need to eat healthier foods. Coughlin said many parents will say their children do not want to eat vegetables or other healthy foods. Coughlin said parents should not ask their children if they want to eat something healthy, but rather offer the healthy choices. “Or if that doesn’t work say I’ll split an apple with you,” said Coughlin. “Modeling healthy eating is very important. If they see you eating healthy they will too.” To help entice children to healthy eating, Coughlin suggests having children help in the preparation of the food. Coughlin said then as the parents and children prepare the food they can talk about the health benefits in age-appropriate language. Coughlin said parents also should use low-fat cooking methods. Coughlin said parents have control over what foods their children eat

because they are the ones doing the shopping. She said parents should try to buy foods that are healthy. An easy, healthy meal for parents who have no time to cook is to have a taco event, with whole wheat tortillas, low-fat cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and chicken. To help children eat their fruits they can blend low-fat yogurt with frozen fruit and milk to make a shake. “We need to make time to eat healthy and exercise,” said Coughlin. “If the trends do not change in society we will continue to see the dangers of high blood pressure and cholesterol, type two diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers and chronic diseases.” Coughlin said research shows that if things don’t change one out of every three children will have diabetes. To find more information on how to eat healthy go to www.mypyramid.gov.

Portion sizes for children age 2-6 ➤ One-third to a half cup of frozen vegetables.

➤ One or two little cooked broccoli spears. ➤ Five to seven cooked baby carrots. ➤ One-third to a half cup of melon. ➤ Five to seven strawberries. ➤ A half cup of apple sauce. ➤ One-third to a half-cup of frozen or fresh berries. ➤ One cup of low-fat yogurt or nonfat milk. ➤ One-third to a half cup of macaroni and cheese, rice, pasta or mashed potatoes. ➤ Two ounces of hamburger. ➤ One-fourth cup of ground meat, such as turkey or pork.

JENNIFER STOCKINGER can be reached at jennifer.stockinger@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5851.

➤ One or two drumsticks. Source: Centers of Disease Control and Prevention

Excelsior Place... A Healthy Lifestyle That Will Grow on You!

Our pediatricians have one thing on their minds: your little ones. So when your children need the finest care, trust it to the biggest, brightest and best team of physicians the lakes area has to offer.

Where caring makes the difference! Troy C outure,M .D . K aren O pp,P.N .P. M ichaelSeverson,M .D . Jane W inter,M .D . P E D IA TR IC S & A D O LE S C E N T M E D IC IN E

218.855.5472 | 800.277.8262 www.brainerdclinic.com | 2024 South Sixth Street

20

It’s about care-free living and piece of mind knowing we’re never alone. At Excelsior Place quality care and a loving environment makes assisted living more like home. For a personal introduction to our community and to learn about why more people are calling Excelsior Place Home, call us today! Excelsior Place is professionally managed by Welcome Home Health Care

14211 Firewood Dr. Baxter

9


Obesity becoming common for children

CMYK

Story/Jennifer Stockinger No regular soda pop. No juice. And no beverages with calories in them besides milk. These are things your children can eliminate to have a healthier lifestyle, an area nutritionist says. Kelly Coughlin, a registered dietitian at Lakewood Health System in Staples, is concerned with the growing number of children who are obese today. She said in our culture families eat too much fast food and have other unhealthy habits, like drinking regular pop and eating too much junk food, and then allowing children too much TV time is leading to more overweight children. Recent data suggests that one in three children living in the United States today is overweight and one in six are seriously overweight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is important because overweight children are more likely to become overweight adults, increasing the risk for diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers and joint problems,â&#x20AC;?

said Coughlin, who also is a certified diabetes educator at Lakewood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There also is an issue of a lower self esteem and depression is more common.â&#x20AC;? Coughlin said today there are children who are being diagnosed with type two diabetes, a disease that used to be an adult onset diabetes, because of obesity. She said children are showing risk factors for chronic disease and higher blood pressure, blood sugars and cholesterol at lower ages. Coughlin said parents must get involved to help get their children off the couch and engaged in a physical activity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parents need to set an example and exercise and encourage their kids to be active,â&#x20AC;? said Coughlin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You need to start getting kids involved when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re young.â&#x20AC;? Coughlin recommends parents start a family routine for staying active, such as taking a walk after supper or playing basketball. Coughlin said the possibilities are endless on

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy to be on vacation, but feeling a little under the

what type of activities a family can do. She said parents just need to make the activities fun to keep the children interested. Household chores also burn calories. Coughlin said getting children involved with these chores, such as vacuuming or weeding the garden, also would be helpful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was young I had a friend who had an exercise bike that worked the TV,â&#x20AC;? said Coughlin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every family needs to find something that works for them and then start slow and work themselves up.â&#x20AC;? Children who watch five hours of television a day are eight times more likely to be obese, Coughlin said. The five hours a day includes time children spend playing video and computer games. Parents are encouraged to limit childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s screen time. Coughlin said parents could give their children a time limit per day or per week and the children may use their hours as they please. She said another suggestion would be

I know this only because, to spare you the embarrassment, cost and pain, I have spent the last couple of months reading these books and performing some of the workouts that appear in them. First, let me say the books can be wildly uneven and impractical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ultimate New York Body Planâ&#x20AC;? presents a nuttily difficult program that, if followed as written, would become a part-time job. Most other workouts donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realistically fit into their alleged time limits. Some of the photos show stuff being done in scary-bad form. (Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yank your head up on those crunches!) Most include some sort of eating plan that dances around the sad, simple truth that you have to eat less garbage, replace it with healthier food and burn off more calories than you take in. All that said, the A-listersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; workout routines for the most part fit E-listers well, largely because we have at least some things in common with celebrities: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really busy and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to spend much time working out but would like to see some results, oh, this calendar quarter. We want to have enough energy to enjoy our nightlife, even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing more tabloid-worthy than spraying the houseplants. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to be trim and limber enough to do some of our own stunts, but we know we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to look like one of those body builders or weight lifters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who, to tell you the truth, sort of gross us out. Most A-list trainer books Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve checked out embrace, to various degrees, the following concepts that serve civilians well. They also happen to represent some of the key trends that are currently blowing around the fitnosphere. Circuit Training â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In circuit workouts, you perform a sequence of three to 10 different exercises with little or no rest in between, then repeat the circuit two or three times. (Curves, that ubiquitous chain of E-list fitness centers, employs a form of circuit training.) In standard strength training, by contrast, you do one set of an exercise, recover by flipping through an old copy of People, do a second set, recover while pacing around surreptitiously evaluating other patronsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gymwear, do a third set, and finally move on to the next exercise. Circuit training is very time-efficient, delivering simultaneously the benefits of a cardio session with those of strength training. And by keeping you working without rest, it torches more calories than conventional weight

60

)5((9$/8( SLHFH),567$,'.,7 ZLWKDQ\QHZRUWUDQVIHUUHGSUHVFULSWLRQ

)5((

3LHFH )LUVW$LG.LW

:LWKD1HZRU 7UDQVIHUUHG3UHVFULSWLRQ 9DOXH 9DOLGIRULQVWRUHXVHRQO\1RWYDOLGZLWKVWDWHRUIHGHUDOO\ IXQGHGSUHVFULSWLRQSODQVRUZLWKDQ\RWKHURIIHUFRSD\RUGH GXFWLEOH/LPLWRQHFRXSRQSHUFXVWRPHU1RFDVKUHIXQG6WDWH DQGORFDOUHVWULFWLRQVDSSO\$WSDUWLFLSDWLQJ0HGLFLQH6KRSSHÂ&#x160; 3KDUPDFLHVRQO\1RWYDOLGLQ$5,$/$0(1-1<DQG3$ ([SLUHV &

2

8

3

2

unexpected healthcare needs while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re away from home.

Longbella Drug, Inc.

As always, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll treat you like a guest.

Highway 10 â&#x20AC;˘ Staples, MN 218-894-2242 Store Hours: M-F 9-6 â&#x20AC;˘ Sat 9-3

Longbella Drug - Motley Hwy 10 South â&#x20AC;˘ Motley, MN 218-352-6337 Store Hours: M,T,TH,F 9:30-5

Longbella Drug - Pillager Hwy 210 West â&#x20AC;˘ Pillager, MN 218-746-4321 Store Hours: M-F 9:30-5

218.828.5478 | 800.277.8262

Visit us @ www.valurite.com

www.brainerdclinic.com | 2024 South Sixth Street

Owned By: Lani Longbella Roberts & Chad Longbella

1

2OG :DWHU 7RZHU

Continued on Page 26

weather - give us a call. We make ourselves available for those

8

&DULQJEH\RQGSUHVFULSWLRQV

6WK6WUHHW

CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HEALTH

)URQW6W

+RXUV0)DPSP6DWDP1RRQ 6RXWKWK6WUHHW%UDLQHUG MXVWVRXWKRIWKHKLVWRULFZDWHUWRZHU 9LVLWRXU:HEVLWHDWZZZPHGLFLQHVKRSSHFRP

    )UHHORFDO'HOLYHU\a)UHH0DLO6HUYLFH

21


CMYK

St. Joe’s updates ICU

Heidi Strus (right) and Karen Ruona work as registered nurses in the intensive care unit and St. Joseph’s Medical Center.

Childhood obesity is becoming an epidemic among America’s youths and the federal government has addressed this health crisis for a few years by investing more than $16 billion annually in child nutrition programs. Statistics have shown that childhood obesity has doubled in preschool-age children and has tripled in children age 6-11, when compared with children 30 years ago. Muzik said the children in their programs are more obese than the children 10 years ago. She said they never had to order extra large shirts until a few years ago. Muzik said children today don’t know how to play outside. She also said parents are also more restrictive on children’s play outside because of the crime rate. “Kids will never know the joy of being outside with nature and being with friends,” said Muzik. “They isolate themselves too much because of all the meth problems out there and the crazies on the streets. It’s hard to continue to watch our nation go down with drugs.” Despite the safety factor, Muzik said there are programs in the Brainerd lakes area that are supervised and safe for children. Brainerd Parks and Recreation offers several supervised activities for children of all ages, such as baseball and softball. And this year it added kick ball. Brainerd Parks and Recreation also offers different activities for children, such as fishing and biking clinics. In the winter, pond hockey, ice skating, basketball and volleyball are available. Muzik said the most popular activities they offer children in the summer are baseball and softball and in the winter hockey is a favorite.

Skateboarding is also popular, and Muzik said the upcoming popular activity will be dodge ball. Muzik said it is tougher today for parents to monitor their children’s activities because they are busier and many work full time. However, she said finding time to encourage exercise is important for their children’s health. To help parents get their children outside, Muzik said they should set a time limit on watching television and playing video games. Parents should also limit junk food. “Exercise is very important,” said Muzik. “Kids need exercise to build stronger bones and muscles to run, jump, climb and to do other activities.” Brainerd and Baxter’s parks and recreation programs are not the only supervised programs in the Brainerd lakes area. The Lakes Area Youth Soccer Association, the Brainerd Lakes YMCA and Brainerd Community Education also offer youth programs or camps. Lisa Stawarski, Brainerd School District youth program coordinator, said Brainerd’s youth programs are geared for life-long learning experiences for children in grades K-12 that are age appropriate. The Brainerd youth programs in the summer are open from 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Washington Educational Services Building. Children participate in various activities, including arts and crafts, board and computer games and physical activities in the gymnasium. There are between 95 to 105 students who participate daily at Washington and another 35-40 students who participate in the pro-

$27 million hospital expansion to be finished in October

Story/Heidi Lake Photos/Nels Norquist

22

St. Joseph’s Medical Center’s $27 million expansion project is nearing completion. The massive undertaking was started in July 2003 and is expected to be finished in October. Pediatrics and the family birthplace, bariatric rooms, cardiac rehabilitation and inpatient occupational and physical therapy departments are still under construction. The hospital is opening each unit as it is completed. Most recently, the intensive care unit was remodeled, bringing it up to date visually and technologically. “It’s a new age,” said Terri Monroe, ICU nurse manager. “We’re getting up to date.”

“Kids will never know the joy of being outside with nature and being with friends. They isolate themselves too much because of all the meth problems out there and the crazies on the streets. It’s hard to continue to watch our nation go down with drugs.” —Bonnie Muzik Recreation coordinator, Brainerd Parks and Recreation

grams at Nisswa school. Stawarski said the youth programs keep the students’ minds and bodies busy. She said students can watch television and play video games, but their time on these activities are limited. “We want the kids to feel this is their vacation,” said Stawarski. “They get a chance to explore their interests and talents here.” The youth development/youth service programs offered to students are Fun ‘N’ Friends, Senior Leadership program and Youth Trax. The high school-age children can volunteer to help the younger children or can enroll in a program to work on job skills, communication and accountability. In these programs, there are clubs for children for science, gardening, woodworking and arts and crafts. There also are field trips, such as a trip to the skating rink. Stawarski said when the children play in the gymnasium they play non-competitive games. She said the students learn teamwork, sportsmanship and have fun. There are several rooms at Washington where children participate in different activities, including an arts and crafts room, a game room for puzzles or board games and a movie/television room. Stawarski said a few of the popular activities for the children are the arts and crafts, science projects and the gymnasium games. She said the younger children like to build things and work with Legos. JENNIFER STOCKINGER can be reached at jennifer.stockinger@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5851.

Household activities for children, age 3-5 ➤ Wipe table tops.

➤ Peel oranges or hard

cooked eggs. ➤ Scrub and rinse fruit and

vegetables. ➤ Wash and tear lettuce.

➤ Set a table. ➤ Cut parsley or green onion

with child-safe scissors. ➤ Bring ingredients from one

place to another. ➤ Put things in the trash.

➤ Measure ingredients. ➤ Use and egg beater or

whisk. ➤ Shake liquids in a covered

container.

Source: Centers of Disease Control and Prevention

7


CMYK

CHILDREN’S HEALTH

to update charts electronically The original ICU was built in and transfer records to other hos1984. With ever-changing techpitals when needed. nology the smaller patient “All the information is available rooms made it difficult to use from their bed side,” Monroe the equipment. said. “It’s less hassle.” “It was very tight. We had to Patient rooms include sofa keep manipulating the equipbeds for family members wanting ment to make it easier to get to to sleep in the rooms. Monroe the patient,” Monroe said. “The said before being remodeled, larger rooms give you the capalack of space made it difficult for bility to do more.” family members to stay in the Monroe used her seven years patient rooms. experience as a nurse manager Monroe said 20 years ago famiat St. Joe’s in helping to plan and ly members were only allowed design the ICU. She also visited inside ICU patient rooms for 10 St. Cloud Hospital’s newly minutes every two hours. Today, remodeled ICU and took advice family members are invited to from her staff. stay overnight in the room. Location of utility rooms, equipment placement and office Patient rooms in the newly remodeled intensive care unit at St. Joseph’s Monroe said research has proven space for doctors were on the Medical Center are larger, making room for medical equipment to be brought patients do better when family is by their side. top of Monroe’s to-change list. in when needed. “Families want to become “We identified what the prob“As the threat of bioterrorism increases, we lems were and how to correct them,” she said. have to increase our respiratory care,” more active,” Monroe said. “They’re very worried about their loved one. They want the best Two patient rooms include negative pres- Monroe said. sure isolation rooms for respiratory patients. ICU patients generally require more care care possible and that’s what we’re here to The isolation rooms allow air to be filtered than other patients. On average, eight patients do.” outside, preventing others from breathing the are in the department at one time. The ICU same air and any organisms that may be lin- increased from eight to 10 patient rooms. Each HEIDI LAKE can be reached at 855-5879 or gering. room has a computer, allowing medical staff heidi.lake@brainerddispatch.com.

LOSE WEIGHT & FEEL GREAT FOR SUMMER! Team members from the Little Sluggers Brewers practiced catching fly balls at Baxter Park. Keeping children active while they’re on summer vacation can be a difficult task for parents.

Off the couch, on your feet Story/Jennifer Stockinger Photo/Nels Norquist

6

Is your child sitting in front of the computer screen playing video games or watching too much TV this summer? If that’s the case throw away the television and the video games or at least limit the usage and get your children outside, says Bonnie Muzik, recreation coordinator for Brainerd Parks and Recreation. Muzik said there are too many children who do not get enough exercise and are obese.

The staff at Service Drug will help you with Diet Supplements that are “SAFE” & effective for you! Ask About:

´<HDUVRIH[SHULHQFHWRVHUYH\RXEHWWHUµ

• Hoodia Capsules & Tea • Trim Spa • Estrolean & Estrin D • Xenadrine

Service Drug 218 West Washington • 829-3664 (Tyrol Hills Shopping Center) Mon.-Fri, 9 am - 5:30 pm, Sat. 9 am -1 pm

23


Surgery center atmosphere is comforting to patients CMYK

 ULIWKLV H G Q R  ,Z PSK    W D  WUROOV

6ZLQJLQ¡6XPPHU'HDO Cathy Feierabend, a registered nurse, prepared an operating room for a patient at Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center in Baxter.

)5((VZLQJWDEOH ZLWKSXUFKDVHRID 6WUHVVOHVVÂ&#x160;UHFOLQHU

Story/Jodie Tweed Photos/Nels Norquist

ZZZHNRUQHVFRP

Dr. Paul Rud (right), an orthopedic surgeon, with assistance by Surgical Technician Toni Brown, performed a procedure on a patient at the Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center in Baxter.

24

BAXTER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; When an otherwise healthy patient has to undergo a surgical procedure, it may sometimes be intimidating to check into a hospital. But now Brainerd lakes area residents have another option when choosing where to have an outpatient surgical procedure performed. The Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center opened in February, a joint venture between 14 Brainerd area doctors and St. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Medical Center in Brainerd.

7KHKHDGUHVWDGMXVWV DXWRPDWLFDOO\VR\RX FDQUHDGDQGZDWFK 79HYHQLQWKHUHFOLQ LQJSRVLWLRQ

7KH3OXVÂ&#x160;V\VWHP DGMXVWVWKHORZHU EDFNVXSSRUWVLPXO WDQHRXVO\ZLWKWKH KHDGUHVW

&&(

8QLTXHJOLGHV\V WHPDGMXVWV6WUHVV OHVVÂ&#x160;WR\RXUERG\ ZHLJKWWRVXSSRUW \RXFRPIRUWDEO\

1

7KHQDPHVD\VLWDOO6WUHVV O H V V Â&#x160;   ( Y H U \  V T X D U H  L Q F K  L V  GHVLJQHGWRSURYLGHVRRWKLQJ VXSSRUWIRUDQ\RQH

ZZZĂ&#x20AC;IWKDYHQXHIXUQLWXUHFRP

+28560RQ)UL²

6DW²

6XQ²

0,/(61257+2)+:<6723/,*+76%5$,1(5'

5


Located in Baxter, the outpatient surgery center provides a comfortable environment for patients undergoing same day surgeries, including general surgeries, ophthalmology, ear nose and throat, orthopedics, podiatry, plastics and urology. In May the surgery center began offering pain procedures from radiologists at Lakes Imaging, a new offering. Administrator Sandy Berreth said the ambulatory surgery center averages about 60-70 patients per week. Most surgeries are elective procedures and planned for well patients, said Berreth. While there will always be patients who must have surgery at a hospital, the surgery center provides an option for all minimally invasive and outpatient surgical procedures. The facility has four operating rooms and one procedure room as well as 17 curtained patient rooms that allow for family members to wait with their loved ones as they prepare for surgery and recover while seated in large recliner chairs. Berreth, who moved to the Brainerd area from Bismarck, N.D., where she helped start an ambulatory surgery center five years ago, said the key to such a facility is its comfortable and anxiety-free environment combined with a group of medical professionals who work together each day as a team. The surgery cen-

From the editor

CMYK

Cover photo/Nels Norquist Josh Haberman, (left) 15, and Mike Gervenak, 14, played basketball at Baxter City Park. While television and video games are becoming more popular, keeping youth active during their summer vacation can be difficult.

Ah, summer. My favorite time of year. Spending warm evenings on area lakes or picnicking in the backyard, it’s just nice to be outdoors. As I write this, sunburned skin is flaking off my arm and faded red splotches of week-old swimmer’s itch can be seen. How attractive. During the warm summer months it’s important to take care of yourself. It’s people like me who always seem to forget sunblock or frequently find themselves standing in a patch of poison ivy that need to take note. Health care professionals gave their two-cents on common summer health risks, prevention and treatment in the article “Nature’s nuisances” in this

Table of contents 6 8 10 11 14 4

COVER STORY: Kids’ fitness NUTRITION: Keeping kids fit

QUOTABLES: How kids are vacationing

PROCEDURE: CyberKnife

DOCTOR’S ORDERS: Summer health risks

16 18 20 22 24

TREND: Home birthing TREATMENT: No more seizures

WORKOUT: Exercise books

REMODELING: St. Joseph’s ICU gets facelift

UPDATE: Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center

issue of HealthWatch. Another summertime issue that faces many parents is how to get children away from the TV. The risk of childhood obesity is on the rise in the United States and it seems video games are becoming more and more popular. Could there be a connection? Check out the story “Off the couch, on your feet” for ideas on how to keep your child active while school’s out. Be safe, stay active and enjoy the warm weather. After all, why do we live in Minnesota? That’s easy — June, July and August. Heidi Lake Editor

Who we are

Read HealthWatch online www.upnorthhealthwatch.com.

Q

Woodland Good Samaritan Senior Apartments

HealthWatch is a quarterly publication of the Brainerd Dispatch. at

For advertising opportunities call Tim Bogenschutz at (218) 855-5844. E-mail your comments to heidi.lake@brainerddispatch.com or write to: Heidi Lake Brainerd Dispatch PO Box 974 Brainerd, MN 56401

JODIE TWEED can be reached at jodie.tweed@brainerddispatch.com or 8555858.

The Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center, which opened in February, is an outpatient surgery center located at 13114 Isle Drive in Baxter behind the Wal-mart Supercenter in Baxter.

Now Available!

Publisher — Terry McCollough Advertising — Tim Bogenschutz Editor — Heidi Lake Graphic Desinger — Cindy Spilman

instead of health,” said Berreth. Berreth said another open house is planned in the fall. The Brainerd Lakes Surgery Center is located at 13114 Isle Drive, behind the Wal-mart Supercenter in Baxter.

ter has 25 employees. “I truly believe the team that works here is a team,” said Berreth. Berreth said many times a well patient feels more comfortable entering an ambulatory center than a hospital because they associate illness with a hospital environment. Subconsciously, a patient may be thinking, “I’m going to a hospital, I must be sick,” said Berreth. “The hospital is a place we think of illness

• Spacious & comfortable 1 and 2 bedroom units • Resident walking path • Woodsy setting near Brainerd Medical Center • Delicious meals • Transportation to Doctor appointments • Shopping services • Social and educational opportunities • Emergency Response System

R

C

O

G

E

L

N

U

A

L

I

T

Y

I

A

B

I

L

I

S

Y

I

E

S

T

V

E

R

T

N

Y

C

C

Y

D

Offering A Christian Continuum Of Care To Meet Your Health Care Needs Now... And In The Future! Call

829-9433 to schedule a tour.

Central Minnesota’s Best Selection of Quality Eye Wear

QUALITY, RELIABILITY & CONSISTENCY month Sign a 12 et the Lease - G ! th FREE 13th mon

Woodland Good Samaritan Village Brainerd, MN www.good-sambrainerdpineriver.com

have been the focus of all our products, decisions, and introductions. We have the largest frame selection and professional fitting which will always make you look and feel your best. We never forget how important you are to us. 2020 Located

South in

the

Sixth

Street

Nortern

Eye

829-1335

Center

Building

25


CMYK

Continued from Page 21 work. In other words, circuit training is a good approach for people who do a lot of meetings, whether with agents or daycare teachers. Multi-Joint, Multi-Muscle Exercises — Do a half-squat against a wall while curling a pair of dumbbells. Then press them overhead. That’s a multi-joint exercise, and it’ll work your thighs, shoulders, arms and gut. It will vaporize calories and make your heart do the rumba. Sit on a bench and perform dumbbell curls with one arm. That’s a single-joint exercise. It’ll puff up your biceps. It accomplishes only this one thing (though, to be fair, it does that one thing — encouraging growth of a targeted muscle — very well). Multi-joint, multi-muscle work boosts your heart rate, multiplying the cardio benefits of circuit training. It spreads the benefits around your body, so you don’t look distended in some spots and puny in others. And, since life, being three-dimensional and all, is pretty much a multi-joint affair, these workouts can actually prepare your body to do stuff, not just look like it can do stuff. This is called functional exercise. Whether you need to haul bags of topsoil from your hatchback or do six takes of a scene where you drag a corpse from a burning shed, having strong legs, shoulders and belly muscles will do you more good than biceps that look like trussed capons. Lower Weight — and Its Happy Sidekick, Less Pain — To do multi-joint exercises without tapping your health insurance, you can’t use a weight that’s heavier than the weakest muscle involved in the move can handle. (In the above example, you

might be able to curl only 10 pounds per arm, so you use the 10pound weight for the whole exercise, not the 15 you could use if doing simple standing presses.) As a result, you do more repetitions with lower weights. This tends to make you more lean, strong and flexible. It also flambes more calories and can keep your heart harrumphing. We hope you’re beginning to see a pattern here. Interval Workouts — These are exercises that mix brief bursts of higher-intensity work with longer periods of lower-intensity recovery. The opposite type is called steady-state training, where you sustain the same pace for an extended period. The great thing about intervals compared with steady-state workouts is that intervals — say it along with us now — save time, build your cardiovascular capacity more efficiently and microwave more calories, both while you’re working out and long afterward. A well-constructed strength circuit will essentially provide an interval workout, by alternating higher-intensity strength exercises that make your heart ka-pow with those that permit it to gather itself. Intervals work no matter what shape you’re in: If your “intense” intervals are walking at 4 mph for a minute and recovering for five minutes at 3 mph, that’s fine. Whatever gets your heart moving faster will help you. As you improve, you can gin up the intensity of your bursts or reduce the length of your recovery, or both.

WIDE OPEN - AIR YOU HAVE A CHOICE! • It’s easy to get to - The only OPEN MRI in Central Minnesota between Minneapolis and Duluth. • Wide Open - Air Design for comfort • Highly trained, friendly staff • New A IRIS II High Performance OPEN MRI System offers the latest technology for advanced diagnostic procedures and superb image quality • Ask your doctor about your choices MRI Studies interpreted by the medical doctors of Diagnostic Image Specialist, P.A. • Same day appointments often available • Medicare approved Independent Diagnostic Testing facility, accepting Blue Cross Blue Shield, Medica and most insurance plans.

When you need an MRI Exam, come to the place where we make your comfort and exam quality top priority.

2019 South 6th Street, Brainerd Across from Northern Orthopedics & Brainerd Medical Center 822-OPEN • 877-522-7222 www.lakesimagingcenter.com

26

3


When You Think of a Medical Supply Company What Do You Think Of?

CMYK

Beds? Canes? Oxygen? Wheelchairs? Scooters? Commode's? Yes - We Carry a Full Line of Medical Equipment, But Did You Know We Also Carry: • Foot Support Products • Support Stockings • Lights For Seasonal Affective Disorder • Support Pillows • Lumbar Supports For Cars and Office Chairs • Braces and Supports • Gluten Free Food • Magnifying Glasses

• Massagers Including Bath and Chair Massagers • Exercise Balls • First Aid Supplies • Scales • Bath Mats • Jar Openers • Medication Dispensers • Diabetic Supplies

And Much More!!! North Central Medical Supply Is Your Full Service Medical Supply Store!!! We Bill Medicare - Medical Assistance and Most Private Insurance

Brainerd 314 Charles Street 218-825-7331 1-888-577-7331

2

2 Locations to Serve You

Crosslake 36066 Cty Rd. 66 218-692-5331 1-888-595-5331

H ow do w e attractsom e ofthe nation’sfinestsurgeons?By approaching m edicine asm eticulously asthe surgeons them selves.So ifyou find yourselfin need ofsurgicalprocedure,restassured. You’ve gotthe bestteam w orking w ith you to bring you back to health.

D r.RossB.Bengtson D r.Jam esJ.D ehen D r.Troy M .D uininck G EN ERA L SU RG ERY

218.855.5477 | 800.277.8262 www.brainerdclinic.com | 2024 South Sixth Street

27


CMYK

I’M A RETIRED TWIN CITIES I’d never seen NURSE, and such great care. My husband Gerald and I were visiting the Brainerd area when he experienced gastrointestinal bleeding. He was brought by ambulance to the intensive care unit at St. Joseph’s Medical Center. We were amazed by the care and attention he was given—I was a nurse for 33 years, and I never saw anything like it.

Compassionate Care We didn’t know at the time that St. Joseph’s is the Lakes area’s largest hospital, with 100 specialists, backed by over

1,000 nurses, technicians and support staff. What we did know was that we were in capable and compassionate hands. Gerald was checked on frequently, and the doctors and nurses were polite, knowledgeable and informative. They always told him what was happening next, and made sure he understood everything. They were upbeat and full of good humor. Everyone at the hospital treated him as though he was a friend.

Off the couch Preventing childhood obesity

Peace of Mind We’re moving to the Brainerd area this summer, and are eager to be part of a community with such natural beauty and high quality of life. It’s comforting to know that St. Joseph’s is there to look after the most important thing of all, our health.

Kim Rosencrantz Retired nurse

Summer health risks

Prevention and treatment for nature’s nuisances

No more seizures

Anti-seizure implant changes Staples woman’s life

Where patients come first. www.sjmcmn.org • Brainerd, MN

July 2005

28

UpNorth HealthWatch July 2005  

HealthWatch Magazine July 2005 Off the Couch: Preventing childhood obesity Summer health risks: Prevention and treatment No more seizures: A...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you