Boulder Weekly 6.30.2022

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Rugged road for Meals on Wheels, p. 11

Years

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w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m

Leftover’s legacy, p. 14

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June

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July

Whisky Wenches Spirits Society, p. 27

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Boulder’s nonprofit meal delivery service struggles with grocery prices and supply chain hitches—but asserts “failure is not an option” by Will Brendza

buzz:

How Boulder birthed the band that launched a thousand bluegrass jams by John Lehndorff

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drink:

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departments 5 The Unrepentant Tenant: Interest on Deposits and repairs for tenants 8 Opinion: The irony of a Supreme decision 9 Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 20 Events: What to do when there’s nothing to do 21 Film: Bloated egos and a twist of fate in ‘Official Competition’ 22 Astrology: By Rob Brezsny 23 Savage Love: Licensed and bonded 24 Nibbles: 50 shades of green 29 Cuisine: Are you hungry tonight for Elvis’ tomato fritters? 30 Weed Between the Lines: Cannabis legalization actually makes traffic safer, new research suggests BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Publisher, Fran Zankowski Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor-in-Chief, Caitlin Rockett News Editor, Will Brendza Food Editor, John Lehndorff Interns, Ben Berman, Rebecca Rommen Contributing Writers: Dave Anderson, Emma Athena, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Shay Castle, Angela K. Evans, Mark Fearer, Jodi Hausen, Karlie Huckels, Dave Kirby, Matt Maenpaa, Sara McCrea, Rico Moore, Adam Perry, Katie Rhodes, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Tom Winter SALES AND MARKETING Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Account Executives, Matthew Fischer, Carter Ferryman Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman CIRCULATION TEAM Sue Butcher, Ken Rott, Chris Bauer BUSINESS OFFICE Bookkeeper, Regina Campanella Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Editor-at-Large, Joel Dyer June 30, 2022 Volume XXIX, number 42 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism, and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2022 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Interest on deposits and repairs for tenants by Mark Fearer

Returning to the evolving tenant’s movement in Boulder, my last column promised to delve further into the battle to obtain interest on deposits, and the warranty of habitability.

Interest on Deposits

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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n 1982 the Renter’s Rights Project first introduced the modest concept of getting interest on rental deposits (which includes security and damage deposits along with last month’s rent.) The city’s Human Rights Commission rejected that proposal that year—which required putting deposits into escrow accounts—after heavy lobbying by landlords. After several years of inaction on the issue by the City Council, the newly reconstituted Boulder Tenants Unin decided to start a petition drive to put it on the city ballot in

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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1985. This is the first known instance of a tenant initiative being put to voters, which required landlords to pay tenants half the current prime rate, which at that time was 9.5% (which was later simplified to 5.5%) on their deposits. It was an expensive campaign because the landlord lobby significantly outspent BTU—but newspapers endorsed it along with City Council candidates, and even the Boulder Board of Realtors (who normally opposed most tenant proposals). It passed that year, by a significant margin. Later, the City Council changed the rate to an average that matched a one year certificate of deposit. Unless people are using the Boulder Model Lease (see Unrepentant Tenant, “Rent Control rallies and 1980s tenant battles,” June 2, 2022), which requires interest to be paid, most tenants wouldn’t know they have that right. Although the interest rates are currently much lower than in 1985, the deposits have grown in size (thanks to outrageous rents), making up for that. Interest rates have increased the last six months, and given inflation, those rates will likely continue to increase. see UNREPENTANT TENANT Page 8

JUNE 30, 2022

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The irony of a Supreme mistake

How the Supreme Court’s evisceration of Roe vs. Wade may backfire

by Aaron Haber

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eaving well enough alone” parallels the legal concept of “settled law” or “stare decisis,” but a majority of the U.S. Supreme Court, having very strongly held political views regarding abortion and believing they were responsible for saving millions of lives, erased five decades of precedents by overturning Roe vs. Wade, which had given American women the right to an abortion since 1973. Those on the left have rarely appreciated the depth of belief pro-life Americans have had when it came to their anti-abortion views. And those on the right have rarely understood how prochoice Americans believed in a degree of personal liberty that may represent the ultimate exercise of freedom. Ironically, in their effort to eliminate a woman’s constitutional right to abortion, the pro-life justices’ decision ultimately may backfire. Abortions may become more accessible and more frequently used as a form of birth control. Some States are already seeking to guarantee a right to abortion, contraception, and other medical options as a counter to the Supremes’ edict, while other states seek to ban abortion altogether. There will now be major educational initiatives to inform Americans about the “morning-after pill” (such as Plan B), which prevents a woman from becoming pregnant. This is an anathema to those who believe life begins at conception (which can occur hours after intercourse). There will be similar efforts to provide greater access to medication abortions. This gives a woman the option of taking pills which induce an abortion. Depending on whether a telehealth or in-person visit is required, this medically safe process is relatively inexpensive ($250 to $750). And it often is covered by insurance. This form of abortion now represents a majority of the 930,160 legal abortions in the U.S. according to the Guttmacher Institute (2020 data). This total has decreased approximately 44% from 1990, when 1.6 million abortions were performed. There already are private organizations covering some or all of the costs of abortions. Thanks to the Supremes’ decision, there will be even more efforts to expand access to abortion. The Supremes’ decision likely will 8

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expand the use of abortion as a form of birth control as the above-cited options are expanded in order to counter the decision’s restrictions on abortion access. That is, due to the Supremes’decision, abortion is likely to become so accessible, inexpensive, and convenient that more women may use it as a birth control method. This is why the Supreme Court should have left abortion rights well enough alone—as many of the Justices, in their confirmation hearings and interviews, had said or intimated they would. What too many Americans keep ignoring is how this decision disproportionately and negatively affects poor people, including many people of color. The hard data shows they have less access to good health care, including contraception, pregnancy and birth care, neonatal care, abortion care, and post-natal care. While some organizations have said they would help pay for the costs of abortions for their employees, the poorest among us don’t always have that option. So, in terms of fairness and equality, the Supreme Court has widened the gap between the “haves” and “have nots” in America. For many women, taking time off and traveling to another state for an abortion isn’t an option. This is another reason why the percentage of medication abortions will increase. All Americans should be embarrassed by our infant mortality and maternal morbidity rates. We should be equally ashamed of the lack of high-quality health care available to so many families with young children. Maybe this is an opportunity for those in conflict to get together and promote sex education (so people know what they’re actually doing), contraception (so unwanted pregnancies don’t occur in the first place), improved neonatal and post-birth care, adoption and foster parenting options, and similar actions on which we should all agree. In the meantime, we soon will see if the Supreme Court’s decision becomes a force for informing women how to get an abortion. Aaron Harber, is the host of the nonpartisan Aaron Harber Show. Email: Letters@boulderweekly.com JUNE 30, 2022

UNREPENTANT TENANT from Page 7

Warranty of habitability

The vast majority of states (42) had a Warranty of Habitability (WOH) back in the 1980s, which requires rentals to be habitable, or a tenant could withhold some/all of the rent until repairs were made. For many years, tenant advocates attempted to gain that protection at the state level, but thanks to annual efforts by the Colorado Apartment Association to bludgeon it to death, it never saw the light of day. In 1982, seeing it wouldn’t pass on the state level, BTU made its first appeal to the City Council for that kind of ordinance. But they expressed little support, arguing that landlord and tenants should work out their own problems—an excuse they used with virtually every issue brought to them. A large imbalance of power between tenants and landlords seemed to make little difference to city leaders, and again, no action was taken. After decades of efforts, Colorado finally passed a WOH in 2009, but it was a watered down version, and few tenants were able to use it. While the state law was improved in 2019 thanks to tenant advocates, it is still daunting to use the WOH. Caution: Withholding rent is a last resort, and requires important documentation before attempting. Jack Regenbogen, a staff attorney with the Colorado Poverty Law Project, said, “I would say I see the law as in need of further improvements.” Their group set up a website to help renters, fixmyrental.org, which leads renters through the steps in getting problems fixed. l

Since Boulder has one of the strongest housing codes in the state, tenants here have it better than elsewhere, who have little/no recourse to get repairs. Boulder tenants can and should call the Housing Department if they are not able to get their landlord to fix problems. Still, there needs to be a less complicated way to get repairs and maintenance from landlords. A reminder that Colorado’s first rally for rent stabilization for mobile home lots will happen Thursday, June 30 at 6:30 p.m. in Denver on the west steps of the Capitol. Sponsored by Together Colorado, it’s pushback against increasing and unconscionable rent increases, especially for low-income people who can least afford crushing costs for housing. Whether you live in a mobile home park or not, resistance is needed. Consider coming down there to show Gov. Polis (who threatened to veto the bill if it included rent control) that rents need to be reigned in. Hot on its heels will be a rally for rent control for all tenants, on July 10. Sponsored by Colorado Homes For All (CoHFA) they said, “Renters’ rights and affordable housing activists will hold a rally on the Capitol steps to make the case for overturning the ban on rent stabilization—on Sunday, July 10 at 1 p.m.” Come on out to these rallies if you’re fed up with never-ending (and often unjustified) rent increases. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Email: letters@boulderweekly.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Reviewer Jill Murphy: MYSTIFIED BY ‘CRIMINALIZATION OF HOMELESSNESS’ I’m mystified by the “criminalization of homelessness” mantra we’ve all heard for years. WTF? It makes no sense to me, because I never received a ticket for anything during the decade I spent as a homeless camper in Boulder and its environs. I got along well with neighbors, business owners and workers, passersby, and law enforcement officers on the city, county, and state levels. (Their only contacts with me were of the friendly check welfare variety.) Most other homeless people I knew were also able to coexist in peace with everyone. Maybe the worst-behaved transients are bringing trouble of all kinds on themselves with bad behavior! BTW, none of the self-styled advocates for the homeless have ever spoken for me. Max R. Weller/Boulder SKELETONS OF BRICK-AND-MORTAR ESTABLISHMENTS LITTER BOULDER The Google complex is beginning to resemble an unmanned ghost ship moored on 30th and Pearl. The City Council deemed opening the doors of the city to this tech behemoth a coup for its foresight and leadership, yet what benefit to Boulder citizens has come from it. Brick-and-mortar establishments appear to be going the way of the buggy whip, aka Macy’s. Perhaps the University too, forging boldly ahead on its South Boulder Campus expansion (also fully approved by the Council) should pay heed to its declining enrollment and rising cost of administration. Mega-yachts can run aground. Robert Porath/Boulder RENT CONTROL IS TOMFOOLERY Most economists agree that rent control is economic tomfoolery. A thermometer tells the truth about the temperature. Market price tells the truth about the scarcity of a product or service. Rent control is like breaking the thermometer because one doesn’t like the temperature. (Credit economist Dave Henderson for the analogy between

temperature and price.) One aspect of rent control that Boulder Weekly’s series of columns on rent control hasn’t mentioned is discrimination. Rent control promotes discrimination because it lowers the cost to landlords of discriminating against prospective tenants. Landlords can afford to be selective to whom they rent because there are many more potential tenants that can afford to pay the artificially low rent-controlled price. Turn away one prospective tenant, and another will soon come along. Landlords who wish to discriminate against tenants on the basis of their age, criminal history, rental history, credit history, weight, height, pet ownership, hair style, clothing style, hygiene, car condition, immigration status, accent, language, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, race, or any other characteristic can afford to be picky when rents are set below market because there are many more prospective tenants to choose from. But if instead rents were at market rates, prospective tenants that can afford the rent are fewer and further between, and landlords can’t be so choosy. Therefore, rent control subsidizes discrimination. Laws can be enacted to outlaw rental discrimination, but anti-discrimination laws are a Band-Aid fix and difficult and expensive to prove in court. Rent control is not a solution worthy of consideration to address the problem of high rents because (among many other problems) it results in increased discrimination against tenants. Disclosure: I’m neither a landlord nor a tenant, and I have no financial interest in any rental property whatsoever. I own my home. Because rent control decreases the supply of rental units, it increases the demand for homes like mine. Therefore, I actually have a financial interest in favor of rent control as it would benefit me financially. Nevertheless, I steadfastly oppose rent control. Chuck Wright/Westminster

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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MEALS ON WHEELS

A rugged road for Meals on Wheels

Boulder’s nonprofit meal delivery service struggles with grocery prices and supply chain hitches—but asserts “failure is not an option”

by Will Brendza

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very morning before the sun comes up, the lights at the North Boulder Meals on Wheels (MoW) location switch on. The kitchen comes to life with a host of volunteers and a handful of paid staff prepping anywhere from 150-250 meals a day; chopping vegetables, cooking food, crafting special orders to request and labeling each one before they’re loaded into delivery cars and dispatched across the city. Each and every one of those meals is hand-delivered to community members in need. “We do 22 routes a day and every route is about seven to 10 stops. So we use 121 drivers a week,” Francea Phillips, president and CEO of the MoW of Boulder program, explains. “It’s this massive activity every morning just preparing the meals and then packaging them up and delivering them.” It’s an operation she likens to running a military unit, with all of the planning, scheduling and problem solving. An operation that is getting increasingly challenging to pull off as inflation rises and supply chain kinks snarl access to resources and ingredients. “I know every household is feeling [the pinch],” Phillips says. “But when you’re trying to do something this size and for this many people, it is life or death.” That isn’t hyperbolic. Some people won’t eat without that meal delivered to their door every day. The consequences of not providing that sustenance can be serious, Phillips says. Boulder’s MoW program is unlike most others throughout the country. At its core the mission is the same: to provide nutritious meals for community members who need them, delivered directly to their doors for free. But MoW of Boulder is distinct in a few ways. First, the monthly menu is normally stacked with meals like fried chicken, pork marsala, lemon butter chicken, and even baby back ribs—a favorite meal among their clients. They also allow people to make special requests for dietary restrictions and even personal preferences. If you’re a vegetarian, they can always make you a vegetarian dish. If you simply don’t like cooked carrots, they’ll make sure your meal doesn’t include them. Phillips says roughly 85% of the meals they send out the door are custom orders. “[I treat] every client like my mother. They deserve respect, choice and dignity,” Phillips says. “We need to ask our clients what feels good to [eat].” Second, Boulder’s MoW doesn’t take any federal or state

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MEALS ON WHEELS

funds. On the one hand, that limits capital resources, Phillips admits, but more importantly, it allows Boulder’s MoW to serve whoever it wants to serve. She explains that if MoW of Boulder were to accept federal funds, it would only be allowed to serve qualified community members of a certain age or income bracket. A quarter of Boulder’s MoW clients are under the age of 60. “I just don’t want anybody telling me who we can [and can’t] serve,” Phillips says. To her, MoW is so much more than a delivery soup kitchen or an end-of-life service. It’s a community resource available to anyone and everyone who wants to use it, no matter the reason. That independence also means that MoW of Boulder relies solely on corporate, foundation and public donations, plus money raised through creative social-mission ventures. Boulder’s MoW started Think Goodness Foods, a restaurant-quality frozen pie and quiche company, in 2019, and opened The Niche Market grocery store attached to the MoW kitchen at see MEALS Page 12

JUNE 30, 2022

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the beginning of 2022. All of both ventures’ proceeds go to funding the organization. MoW also bought a new facility three years ago in North Boulder, so it no longer rents space. Phillips says there is still $1 million left on the mortgage, but once that’s paid off, the nonprofit will have even less overhead. The annual budget for MoW of Boulder is roughly $1.3 million. But that’s being spread thin by the current situation. With the cost of groceries ballooning and supply chain issues clogging the arteries of commerce, the cost of feeding hundreds of hungry

people for free every day is becoming exorbitant. In the last year, the price of eggs has gone up 11%, the price of milk has gone up 13%, flour rose by 14% and bacon jumped by a whopping 18%. Overall, grocery prices have risen 10% since this time last year, according to CNN’s reporting. MoW of Boulder’s grocery bill has more than doubled this year, going from $13,000 a month to $30,000, Phillips says. The reasons for those price hikes are all over the board: In the case of pork, it largely has to do with labor shortages at meat facilities caused by COVID and an increase in demand MEALS ON WHEELS

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for pork as people cooked more at home. For many agricultural products, the reasons are environmental, as droughts in Brazil, Canada and the U.S. caused coffee, soy and wheat shortages. And, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), slow production, low rates of “hatchability” and anticipated higher feed costs are all to blame for more expensive eggs. Not to mention a highly contagious avian flu outbreak that forced farmers to kill millions of egg-laying hens. And it isn’t just getting more expensive, Phillips says; many ingredients are just becoming harder to find. MoW of Boulder plans its menus out a month in advance so clients know what to expect, and whether or not they have any special requests. That’s become challenging as items like chicken and certain vegetables are accessible one week and not the next. The supply chain isn’t nearly as reliable as it was a year ago, she says. Bill Thayer is the CEO of Fillogic, a logistics company that helps businesses streamline retail, real estate and shipping operations. He’s witnessed the global supply chain pile up firsthand and says that MoW of Boulder’s story is becoming a common one. “[The cost of operation] has never been as expensive as it is now,” Thayer says. He explains that the pandemic increased e-commerce by a factor of 10, which put 10 times more pressure on the supply chain. At the same time, people were getting sick, businesses were shutting down, jobs were being lost and ships full of shipping containers were backing up by the hundreds. Now, he says, add inflation of currency, skyrocketing gas prices and a war in Ukraine to the equation and it’s a recipe for turmoil. Businesses and organizations like MoW of Boulder are going to be struggling to get the resources they need for a while, Thayer predicts. “There’s a ‘new normal,’” he says. “These [supply chain] networks have to be much more flexible.” He likens the supply chain problems to a rock thrown into a pool: Small rocks create small ripples (or supply chain disturbances). In the world of commerce, small rocks are expected. But what’s happened since March of 2020 is more like a boulder that’s been dropped into the water. “There is so much churn in that pool that people are going to drown,” he says. No matter what the business

(or nonprofit) is, keeping its head above water is going to take tenacity and innovation. Lucky for Boulder, Phillips is leading MoW forward with a healthy dose of both. “We’re trying to find every way we can to cut costs,” Phillips says. “It demands more creativity than anyone can imagine.” She describes how they’ve shaved expenses from their margins: they stopped including salad dressing with the salads they pack with every meal. They’ve also stopped using both brown and white paper bags to designate custom from standard meals, as the cost of white bags has increased. And they’ve changed their menu to feature cheaper proteins like tuna, in place of far more expensive options, like those baby back ribs that were so popular. “We can’t do [those meals] anymore,” she says. “And it’s sad because those were special meals for people. They really loved that.” Phillips is also trying to get USDA approval for Think Goodness Foods, so MoW of Boulder can sell its pies and quiches in grocery stores all across the country. Not only could that help offset the increasing cost of groceries, but it could also provide extra capital to pay off the mortgage on the new building. “If [we] had that mortgage paid off, [we] could do 1,500 more meals a month,” Phillips says. For all these creative ideas and for all of MoW of Boulder’s efforts to cut costs, it still needs help. If this is the “new normal,” donations are really the only way MoW is going to be able to maintain the quality of service they’ve been providing to Boulder’s most vulnerable residents. “If there’s any way we need to change, we’ll do it. Whatever we can do, we will do,” Phillips says. “Because, failure is not one of [our] choices.” And while Thayer doesn’t think the supply chain will go back to the way things were any time soon, he is hopeful that this new normal will level out for organizations like MoW— that the pool water will eventually become calmer. “As somebody that’s been in the supply chain for a long time, the supply chain always figures it out,” he says. “I think we’re still figuring this out right now.” To donate to MoW of Boulder, volunteer, or both, visit mowboulder.org.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Email: wbrendza@boulderweekly. l

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF LEFTOVER SALMON

Leftover’s legacy

How Boulder birthed the band that launched a thousand bluegrass jams

by John Lehndorff

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rew Emmitt and Vince Herman don’t exactly love the idea of being musical elder statesmen, but the fact remains that Leftover Salmon is the Rolling Stones of the jamgrass genre. Nearly 37 years after the duo met in Boulder, their band still plays 100 headlining shows a year, and a who’s who of bands, from Greensky Bluegrass to the Infamous Stringdusters, acknowledge Leftover Salmon as their inspiration. “Billy Strings told me once that he was my other son,” mandolinist and singer Emmitt says with a laugh. Strings, who recently sold-out multiple nights at Red Rocks, is bluegrass music’s reigning superstar. Leftover Salmon will be inducted into the Colorado Music Hall of Yonder Mountain String Band and The String Cheese Incident— you can catch all three bands during a three-night run of String Cheese-headlining shows at Red Rocks July 15-17. The party started on Oct. 29, 1985. “I moved to Colorado from West Virginia with a buddy. We pulled into Boulder and saw that ‘bluegrass tonight’ sign on the Walrus Saloon,” says guitarist, singer and songwriter Herman.

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Emmitt was playing at the club with his Left Hand String Band, which already had a reputation locally for playing “bluegrass you could dance to,” Emmitt says. Herman eventually formed the Salmon Heads, which merged in 1989 with the Left Hand String Band to form Leftover Salmon. They added electric guitars and drums and labeled the music “polyethnic Cajun slamgrass.” “What really lured me to Boulder was the Telluride Bluegrass Festival and Hot Rize,” Herman says. “Colorado presented a progressive bluegrass sound.”

Black Sabbath and Hot Rize

Before moving to Boulder, Emmitt’s family lived in Nashville where he was exposed to mainstream country artists like Dolly Parmy siblings brought into the house was Black Sabbath’s Paranoid,” he says. In Boulder, Emmitt learned to play the electric guitar, and took mandolin lessons from Tim O’Brien of Hot Rize. “Growing up in that scene as a teenager was great, going to clubs like Tulagi and the Hungry Farmer, and the Rocky Mountain Bluegrass Festival and Telluride Bluegrass Festival,” he says. “The big thing was the openness of people to accept progressive bluegrass and not thumb their noses at it.”

Bluegrass you can dance to

In the 1980s, bands like New Grass Revival were shunned by BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


stodgy bluegrass conservatives simply because they featured an electric bass. Also, grooving wasn’t exactly encouraged in bluegrass. “When you went to bluegrass festivals, people sat in their chairs,” Emmitt says. “We were part of a movement to get people up on their feet. We were amazed that we could go to places like the Gold Hill Inn and the ski towns and play bluegrass in rock ‘n’ roll venues.” As Herman notes: “They were people who understood that you could dance to bluegrass and that bluegrass could get rowdy.” There was a more pressing reason why band members wanted to rock out on acoustic instruments: They didn’t want to get a day job. “At that time, bluegrass was strictly summertime music, so bands could

One major band that counts

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Leftover Salmon. July 1 and 2, Mishawaka Amphitheatre, 13714 Poudre Canyon Road, Bellvue, themishawaka.com July 16, Red Rocks (with String Cheese Incident), 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, redrocksonline.com Aug. 12, 13, Bar Ranch, 850 CO Road 49, Gunnison, ibarranch.com

parents, everybody, including bluegrass musicians, were telling me, ‘You can’t do this for a living.’ Well, we found out we could play all winter in Boulder, Aspen, Vail, Steamboat and Crested Butte.” However, that ability was the result of some timely sound technology innovations. Up until the early 1980s, musicians playing when playing into microphones. “There was virtually no way to plug in an acoustic instrument,” Emmitt says. “Sam Bush (of New Grass Revival) was one of the the instruments that made it possible to be heard. I could play my mandolin and it didn’t sound crappy.”

Less jammy than some

From its earliest days, Emmitt, Herman and other band members were writing original tunes. “What always grabbed me about bands were the songs,” Emmitt says. “Hot Rize had great songs. We’re in the jam band genre and I’m thankful for it, but we didn’t get into music to jam on one chord for 40 minutes. We have some long jams, but our music is more based on songs.” Original tunes like “Troubled Times,” “Liza” and “Highway Song” have become Leftover Salmon favorites that fans sing along to, a fact that still wows Emmitt.

Jamgrass ancestors and descendants

Leftover Salmon knows that it stands on others’ shoulders.

do, to mix rock and bluegrass,” Emmitt says. “New Grass Revival helped to open the door, along with Hot Rize and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. The Seldom Scene was the original jam-y bluegrass band, but you really have to go back to the Earl Scruggs Review. Earl was way out on the cutting edge.” That family band, led by the legendary banjoist, played rock songs and featured a drummer. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

is The String Cheese Incident. “String Cheese came up watching us do our thing and then went in a different direction and got way bigger than us,” Emmitt says. When the old friends in Leftover and String Cheese are on the same concert bill, they almost always jam together. “We’ll play ‘Sittin’ on Top of the World,’ ‘Quinn the Eskimo,’ or some bluegrass songs. Like us, they can morph into different styles. When I sit in with String Cheese it feels like the same band with the same kind of concept,” he says. enced mandolin superstar Chris

played the MerleFest festival (in North Carolina), Chris was only 13. He sat in with us—literally, he always sat in a chair when he played. Chris had never plugged in, so I gave him my mandolin and he got up and started dancing around.”

The Leftover future is bright

At the age of 32, Leftover Salmon is as strong as ever, with a lineup featuring Emmitt and Herman plus banjo wiz Andy Thorn, bassist Greg Garrison and drummer Alwyn Robinson. Leftover Salmon recently recorded a new album at Compass including “California Cotton Fields,” a tune recorded by The Seldom Scene. “It’s sung by our newest member, Jay Starling, who is the son of John Starling, the lead singer of The Seldom Scene,” Herman says. One highlight of the new covers collection—due out in the fall—is the classic “Blue Railroad Train” with guest Billy Strings. “It harkens back to the origins of the music that inspired slamgrass,” Herman says. The white-bearded Herman recently moved to Nashville. “I he says. “I have a plethora of tunes that are a little more country sounding.” When Leftover Salmon travels, Emmit says he is usually approached by young musicians asking questions like, “What kind of pickup do you use?” “It’s the kind of thing I used to ask about,” he says. “It’s pretty cool. Maybe we were the forebearers, but some of it was just good timing.” Herman agrees. “I’m proud that we played a role in attracting people to this music—listening and playing it. The lesson is: If we could do it, anybody could do it,” he says. Email: editorial@boulderweekly.com l

JUNE 30, 2022

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Family blues

California-based husband-and-wife blues rockers Little Hurricane share the stories behind the chemistry that’s fueled their decade of musical success

by Ben Berman

F

amily has always been at the heart of Little Hurricane’s music. That seems like an inevitability for a band entirely composed of a husband and wife who met on Craigslist in what they assert was “more than a missed connection.” Guitarist Anthony Catalano and drummer CC Spina have turned that impulsive jam-session meetup into marriage, children, and more than 12 years of undeniable chemistry on their records. “We kept our relationship a secret because we didn’t want that to be the focus of our band,” Catalano says. “But

lar style. From their home studio in Lake Tahoe, Catalano smiles over Zoom as he settles on somewhere between “dirty the sound they’ve curated. Regardless of what their music sounds like on a particular track, that familial bond shines through in their lyrics and overall tone. “I feel like there’s a dynamic, with female energy on the drums and the power that CC gives, and the energy that I’m bringing. Our songs have a tempo,” says Catalano. “And the two of us can ebb and kind of a little ride of emotions.” That focus on their pairing has been the secret sauce behind Little Hurricane’s success, as the couple hasn’t included other members aside from the odd backing instrumentalist on tour, or some help in the recording studio. While some contemporary rockers who move between different genres as casually as Little Hurricane might feel the need to branch out and include layered orchestral tapestries in their recordings, Catalano and Spina always hone in on guitar and drums, creatcatchy, stripped-back hooks and foot-tapping grooves. “We’re always trying to do something different,” Catalano admits. “But it always ends up

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ultimately, we changed our position on that, because I realize our music is us.” Hailing from San Diego, Catalano worked as an audio engineer for years before realizing he had a knack for songwriting and performance. now,” he says. It ultimately led him to Spina, who quickly impressed him with her style of drumming. Right away, the two formed a bond over their love for an eclectic variety of genres, ranging from date, as they weave through the sounds of 2010s-era indie rock contemporaries, never choosing to commit to one particu-

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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to its most essential parts.” For many artists, relying on the same creative partner for a decade or more, coupled with a pandemic that put a hard stop on touring, might leave them stir crazy. “(Touring) was a big part of our lives, and it was a real shock not to have that component anymore,” Catalano asserts, though he says spending all that time with the family has given him a renewed sense of creativity in its place. In the past few months, the duo began work on their sixth album, Life is but a Dream, a collection of nursery rhymes infused with the sensibilities of blues rock. This, of course, was inspired by getting JUNE 30, 2022

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familiar with these songs when singing them to their children each night. “You grow up with these songs, you know? It’s kind of ingrained into your earliest memories. The songs aren’t new, they’ve been sung the same way for 300 years,” Catalano says. Catalano found it a “songwriting challenge” to incorporate wonderfully weird elements like a slide guitar into classics like Row, Row, Row Your Boat, but in the end, was happy with the results, which will culminate in a 16-track album set to release later this year. Additionally, that stay-at-home creative process has found ways to yield both fun opportunities and more inspiration for future music. Just last summer, Catalano had the opportunity to engineer Neil Young’s 41st studio album, Barn, which was recorded at Studio in the Clouds, located in the remote San Juan mountains near Telluride. reminisces. “It was a weird experience.” As the band transitions to a post-pandemic world, one where they’re much more saddled with the added responsibilities of parenthood or helping other artists record, they don’t seem to view their own music taking a backseat. In fact, Catalano is eager to proudly display their at-home studio, where they plan to invite artists both big and small for an opportunity to record their work and get guidance from the seasoned pair. “It’s a way to get our creativity out,” Catalano says, alluding to how returning to his roots as a producer will make the work of Little Hurricane even stronger. “Of course, people are like, ‘Oh, they changed,’ or, ‘Oh, they’ve gone soft,’ or, ‘Their sound has changed.’ And really, we’re just writing different kinds of music. Even if we try to write a country song, it ends up sounding kind of like us, because it’s still the same old vintage drums. I feel like the lane is us. And the lane is the sound that we create.” “It’s all one and the same now,” he adds, “where our relationship onstage and offstage is this dynamic of the two of us and the energy that we create. It’s been special. I never predicted my life going this way.” Email: editorial@boulderweekly.com 17


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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Tactile exhibition turns education into exploration

Hands-on homebuilding at the Longmont Museum

DETAILS: Tipi to Tiny Homes: Hands-on Homebuilding. Through Jan. 8, 2023. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont

by Matt Maenpaa

D

ogs guard sheep grazing in a meadow, while the shepherd’s wagon looks on in the distance. Elsewhere, a Lakota tipi provides shelter for a young family as they travel across the high plains, insulating them from blustering winds. Since the earliest days, humanity has sought shelter from the elements. Eventually those would turn from caves to huts, from cabins to houses, a safe place to raise families and livestock. Tracking that journey—from the early days of indigenous people on the Front Range like the Ute, Lakota and Arapaho, to the colonizers and settlers of the United States—can be awe-inspiring. Even within Boulder County, trails like Lion’s Gulch lead to the ruins of homesteads dating back to the late 1800s. Those homes and old trails are a testament to perseverance, when one considers the resources required to create a home miles from the settled world. Though the process of building a house has changed at its core. Walls and a roof to keep out the elements, windows to let the light in. Access to water and food nearby may be easier, with city plumbing and a variety of grocery stores, but the needs still remain. Taking a hands-on approach, the Longmont Museum’s latest exhibition explores the history of homes—from Lakota tipis and those early shepherd’s wagons, all the way to the title—Tipi to Tiny House: Hands-on Homebuilding—the exwhat it takes to make a home. “It’s good to have a hands-on exhibit again, because we took a sabbatical from them during COVID, so it’s good to see kids back in the gallery,” says Jared Thompson, curator of exhibits at the Longmont Museum. “It was all designed and fabricated here at the museum.” The entrance to the gallery invites visitors into the exploration, giving children and adults alike a tactile experience with architecture and education. Visitors are encouraged to sit inside a tipi or shepherd’s wagon and discover for themselves what life could have been like. “You could read about it, but here you can actually go in and see what it’s like,” Thompson says. “It answers so many questions without just reading about it, like how they slept or ate.” Thompson explains. The shepherd’s wagon dates back to the turn of the 19th century, inspired by the Basque people BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

MATT MAENPAA

visitors from the ground up, Thompson says. Using foam keeps the materials light for children, as well as preventing any unfortunate injuries from structural collapse. Nearby, another interactive component distills the purest form of building most children start on—the pillow fort. Rather than using actual couch cushions, Ann Macca, museum curator of education, found pieces of durable and easily washable foam from Foamnasium, Thompson explains. “The concept was that a lot of kids’ is right there with materials in their home,” Lee says. A tiny home stands in the corner of the gallery, overlooking the pillow fort arena. The home was built to scale by museum staff, Thompson says, complete with a visit from code enforcement to give who came over from Europe during the Gold Rush. When that didn’t quite pan out, he says, settlers would return to a life of sheep-raising they were familiar with. The tipi was built from Lakota designs, Thompson says, under the advice and guidance of Native American Cultural Advisor for Denver Public Schools and Lakota member Steven LaPointe. Thompson and the exhibition design team at the museum practiced building and taking down the tipi “He showed us how to set it up and drilled us on it,” Thompson says. “We probably set it up eight or nine times.” “Steven works a lot with youth in the Native American community and outside of it,” says museum exhibition technician Brack Lee. “He would time middle-school kids setting up these full-sized tipis, then compare our times and tell us how much faster the middle-school kids were.” The details include the oval shape that functions as a windbreak, Thompson explains, with layers inside that keep air circulating. The size of the tipi in the gallery is representative of one a younger couple just starting out would have, Lee adds. “We learned from Steven that typically a young woman would be gifted a small tipi when she came of age,” Lee says. “They would increase the size of the tipi from the bottom up, by adding more material as the family grew bigger.” Moving into more modern eras, visitors have the opportunity to construct a log cabin resembling the more permanent structures of European and early American settlers. Rather than something like the Lincoln Log children’s toy, the Museum exhibition designers actually milled foam pool noodles into shape utilizing the museum workshop. The log cabin can be totally constructed and shaped by the l

JUNE 30, 2022

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in Lyons provided consultation on the tiny home, he explains. The 22-foot-long home includes sleeping quarters, a composting toilet and accurate placement for kitchen appliances. Thompson and the staff started construction on it in 2019, when the exhibition was originally conceived, designing it to come apart in pieces for easy storage. doll-house sized representations of a log cabin and a more modern-style home to help visitors understand the scale and size in relation to modern furnishings. Inspired by the tale of the three little pigs, Lee explains, a wind tunnel shows visitors how a variety of materials and substrates can stand up (or fall down) under the brunt of heavy gusts. Next to it, a hot box demonstrates the impact of insulation on temperature control. Rounding out the exhibition is a set of LEGO-like pieces from Irish company ArtKit, encouraging visitors to build their own complex architectural wonders. The pieces are actually models and prototypes, Lee explains. “It’s been pretty popular. We were concerned that it might be too complex for our visitors, but we’ve found some really great creations,” Thompson adds. Longmont Museum Marketing Manager Joan Harrold explains that bringing in high-quality exhibitions, be it homebuilding, the papercraft exhibition that preceded it, or world-famous artists like Degas and Ansel Adams, is a driving force from the curatorial staff like Thompson and Macca. “To be able to do that in Longmont, so people can bring their kids without having to drive to Denver, it’s really a backyard-access experience,” Harrold says. Email: editorial@boulderweekly.com 19


E VENTS

The Spark presents ‘Little Women’ the Musical

EVENTS

July 1-10, The Spark, 4847 Pearl Street, B4, Boulder. Tickets: $18-$28, thesparkcreates.org Based on Louisa May Alcott’s life, Little Women follows the adventures of sisters Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy March. Jo is trying to sell her stories for publication, but the publishers are not interested—her friend, Professor Bhaer, tells her that she has to do better and write more from herself. Begrudgingly taking this advice, Jo weaves the story of herself and her sisters and their experience growing up in Civil War America.

If your organization is planning an event, please email the editor at crockett@boulderweekly.com

Louisville Fireworks and Fourth of July Celebrations p.m.) Monday, July 4, Coal Creek Golf Course, 585 W. Dillon Road, Louisville Join the community for free hot dogs and sausages beginning at 6 p.m. (available while supplies last), bounce houses, face painting, giant bubbles, entertainers, and patriotic music from the Boulder Concert Band. The p.m. Fireworks will be launched from the Coal Creek Golf Course.

Town Of Superior Fourth of July Celebration

7 a.m.-noon. Monday, July 4, Superior Community Center, 1500 Coalton Road, Superior Celebrate the “Superior Spirit” with the

Art in the Garden—A Step by Step Landscape Painting Experience

Mile downhill race, the community parade, the pancake festival, and the Community Center Celebration. Also enjoy live music by The School of Rock, family-fun entertainment, and business vendors coordinated by the Superior Chamber.

10 a.m. Saturday, July 2, Chautauqua

Baseline Road, Boulchautauqua.com Come enjoy some sunshine at Chautauqua Park and bring home your very own painting. Participants will paint a piece, step by step, inspired by the beautiful surroundings at Chautauqua Park. This event is appropriate for families, couples and friends. Participants should wear clothes to paint in and bring a blanket to sit on for comfort while painting. Don’t forget to bring a water bottle and sunscreen.

Longmont Fourth of July Celebration

Lafayette Chamber of Commerce Independence Day Fun and Fireworks

4-10 p.m. Saturday, July 2, Waneka Lake, 1600 Caria Drive, Lafayette

Colorado Music Festival

dusk.

Drive, Boulder. Tickets: coloradomusicfestival.org The internationally acclaimed Colorado Music Festival is held four nights per week for seven weeks at the historic Chautauqua Auditorium, showcasing an orchestra of professional classical musicians from all over the world. This year’s performers include Takács Quartet, pianists Jan Lisiecki and Gabriel Montero, a dramatic reading of A Midsummer Night’s Dream by actor John de Lancie (American Shakespeare Festival, TV’s Star Trek The Next Generation), clarinetist Anthony McGill, violinist Tessa Lark, Timothy McAllister on saxophone, and, of course, the Colorado Music Festival Orchestra.

Boulder Symphony presents July Fourth Concert Celebration

7 p.m. Monday, July 4, Glen Huntington Bandshell, 1212 Canyon Blvd., Boulder. Tickets: $5-$10, bouldersymphony.org Celebrate July Fourth with Independence Day symphonic classics, from “Rodeo” to “William Tell” and the “1812 Overture” at the historic Boulder Bandshell with the Boulder Symphony, conducted by Devin Patrick Hughes. From Jessie Montgomery’s “Soul Force” to tunes from Star Wars, Star Trek and Harry Potter, you won’t want to miss this celebration of great American music.

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using comedy, props, and interaction to present the fanciful tale of Tubby the Tuba.

For more event listings, go online at boulderweekly.com/events

JUNE 30, 2022

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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D

on Humberto (José Luis Gómez) has turned 80. He’s the head of a pharmaknows this because he knows how others see him: obscenely wealthy with no

that Humberto is the maker of this movie. were so simple. that’s as funny as it is sharp. The director Humberto hires is with an uneven track record and a

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by Rob Brezsny ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: My readers and I have collaborated to

provide insights and inspirations about the topic “How to Be an Aries.” Below is an amalgam of my thoughts and theirs—advice that will especially apply to your life in the coming days. 1. If it’s easy, it’s boring. —Beth Prouty. 2. If it isn’t challenging, do something else.

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ability to gather the energy to get unstuck, to instigate, to rouse—for others as well as yourself. 4. You are a great initiator of ideas and you are also willing to let go of them in their pure and perfect forms so as to help them come to fruition. 5. When people don’t get things done fast enough for you, be ready and able to DO IT YOURSELF.

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TAURUS

“I don’t like needing anyone for anything.” They fancy themselves to be rugged individualists with impeccable help or support of other humans. I don’t argue with them; it’s impossible to dissuade anyone with such a high level of delusion. The fact is, we are all needy beings who depend on a vast array of benefactors. Who built our houses, grew our food, sewed our clothes, built the roads, and create the art and entertainment we love? I bring this up, Taurus, because now is an excellent time for you to celebrate your own neediness. Be wildly grateful for all the things you need and all the people who provide them.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Bounce up and down when you walk. Express 11 different kinds of laughs. Be impossible to restlessness spawns. Keep changing the way you change. Be easily swayed and sway others easily. Let you think. Live a dangerous life in your daydreams but not in real life. Don’t be everyone’s messenger, but be the messenger for as many people as is fun for you. If you have turned out to be the kind of Gemini who is both saintly and satanic, remember that God made you that way—so let God worry about it.

CANCER

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JUNE 21-JULY 22: As a child, Cancerian author June Jordan said, “I used to laugh all the time. I used to laugh so much and so hard in church, in school, at the kitchen table, on the subway! I used to laugh so much my nose would run and my eyes would tear and I just couldn’t stop.” That’s an ideal I invite you to aspire to in the coming days. You probably can’t match Jordan’s plenitude, but do your best. Why? The astrological omens suggest three reasons: 1. The world will seem funnier to you than it has in a long time. 2. Laughing freely and easily is the most healing action you can take right now. 3. It’s in the interests of everyone you know to have routines interrupted and disrupted by amusement, delight, and hilarity.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: In accordance with the astrological omens, here’s your assignment for the next three weeks: Love yourself more and more each day. Unleash your imagination to come up with new reasons to adore and revere your unique genius. Have fun doing it. Laugh about how easy and how hard it is to love yourself so well. Make it into a game that brings you an endless stream of amusement. PS: Yes, you really are a genius—by which I mean you are an intriguing blend of talents and specialties that is unprecedented in the history of the human race.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Novelist Lydia Peelle writes, “The trouble was, I knew exactly what I wasn’t. I just didn’t know who I was.” We all go through similar phases, in which we are highly aware of what we don’t want, don’t like, and don’t seek to become. They are like negative grace periods that provide us with valuable knowledge. But it’s crucial for us to also enjoy periods of intensive

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not, at least for now. You’re ready to begin an era of

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: You need the following experiences at

least once every other day during the next 15 days: a rapturous burst of unexpected grace; a gentle eruption of your strong willpower; an encounter with inspiration that propels you to make some practical improvement in your life; a brave adjustment in your understanding gives you more time and energy to cultivate a really good thing.

SCORPIO

APRIL 20-MAY 20: I know three people who have told me,

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self-revelation about what we do want, what we do like, and what we do seek to become. In my astrological

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Here’s my recommendation, Scorpio:

In the coming weeks, spend extra time watching and listening to wild birds. Place yourself in locations where and talk about birds. Use your imagination to conjure up fantasies in which you soar alongside birds. Now read this story about how birds are linked to happiness levels: tinyurl.com/BirdBliss

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: In accordance with current astrological omens, I have four related suggestions for you. 1. Begin three new projects that are seemingly beyond your capacity and impossible to achieve with your current levels of intelligence, skill, and experience—and then, in the coming months, accomplish them anyway. 2. Embrace optimism for both its beauty and its tactical advantages. 3. Keep uppermost in mind that you are a teacher who loves to teach and you are a student who loves to learn. 4. Be amazingly wise, be surprisingly brave, be expansively visionary—and always forgive yourself for not remembering where you left your house keys.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: If you ever wanted to use the Urdu lan-

guage to advance your agendas for love and romance, here’s a list of endearments you could use: 1 jaane-man (heart’s beloved); 2. humraaz (secret-sharer; pritam (beloved); 4. sona (golden one); 5. bulbul (nightingale); 6. yaar (friend/lover); 7. natkhat (mischievous one). Even if you’re not inclined to experiment with Urdu terms, I urge you to try innovations in the way you use language with your beloved allies. It’s a favorable time to be more imaginative in how you communicate your affections.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Author John Berger described birch trees as “pliant” and “slender.” He said that “if they promise a kind of permanence, it has nothing to do with solidity or longevity—as with an oak or a linden—but only with the fact that they seed and spread quickly. They are ephemeral and recurring—like a conversation between earth and sky.” I propose we regard the birch tree as your personal power symbol in the coming months. When you are in closest alignment with cosmic rhythms, you will express its spirit. You will be adaptYou will serve as an intermediary, a broker, and a go-between.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: People who don’t know much about

astrology sometimes say that Pisceans are wishywashy. That’s a lie. The truth is, Pisceans are not habitually lukewarm about chaotic jumbles of possibilities. They are routinely in love with the world and its interwoven mysteries. On a regular basis, they feel tender fervor and poignant awe. They see and feel how all life’s apparent fragments knit together into a luminous bundle of amazement. I bring these thoughts to your attention because the coming weeks will be an excellent time to relish these superpowers of yours—and express them to the max.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BY DAN SAVAGE (Weekly deadlines being what they could be a lot less hypocritical and a lot are, this column was written before the more respectful. Do you think I should say Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.) something? How should I go about it? I’ve We knew this was coming, thanks to the SCOTUS Leaker, but that didn’t make last week’s news any less devaswants to be left out of this. tating. (Who’s the leaker? My money’s —Bad At Creating Catchy Acronyms on Ginni.) So, what can we do now? We can march, we can donate, and we can Dear BACCA: Let’s say you say vote like the Right has been voting for something, BACCA, but leave your wom50 years, i.e., we can vote like judicial an friend out of it. The kind of guy who appointments matter. But if you want to thinks a woman in an open relationship is do something right now that will piss off sexually available to all—not just down to the people out there celebrating Dobbs, fuck, but down to fuck him—is the kind of consider making a donation to the Nation- guy who will interpret any ambiguity in an al Network of Abortion Funds. Actually, order to “stop” as license to keep doing don’t just consider making exactly what he’s been doROMAN ROBINSON a donation, do it right now: ing. So, if you can’t tell this abortionfunds.org/donate. guy your mutual friend exThis is going to be a long plicitly told you she 1. wants him to stop and 2. deputized you to tell him to stop, this woman’s right to control her dude is going to tell himself you were only guessing at protect all the other rights how she feels (she doesn’t social conservatives want to like this, she doesn’t want claw back, from the right of him) and that his guess (she opposite-sex couples to use likes it, she wants him) is contraception to the right of as good a guess as yours. same-sex couples to marry He may even play a little to everyone’s right to enjoy non-PIV sex. three-dimensional-pseudo-male-feminist (When they say they want to overturn chess and accuse you of being the sexist Lawrence v. Texas, which Clarence Thom- and controlling one—it’s her body, her as said in his concurrence, they’re not cheek, you shouldn’t be speaking for her, just talking about re-criminalizing gay sex etc. but re-criminalizing a whole lot of straight To get this guy to stop without saying sex; Lawrence overturned sodomy laws, something to him herself, BACCA, your and anything non-PIV meets the legal friend needs to give you the OK to make it abundantly clear that she deputized you where abortion became illegal overnight, to speak on her behalf. (“She asked me to tell you to knock it off, and now I’m telling you. Knock it off. If you don’t believe me, you need to know about M&Ms (mifepriask her.”) She’ll need to be prepared for the almost inevitable follow-up question org. —Dan (“Have I been making you uncomfortable?”) and the maudlin, self-pitying Dear Dan: I’m a dude. A woman apologies (“I’m so sorry! I feel terrible!”) friend of mine in an open marriage and/or rationalizations (“I was just being recently told me that a male friend of ours friendly!”) that are likely to follow. greets her by kissing her on the cheek. And if he ever comes in for a kiss again, This is something he only does with her. she needs to be ready to either use her She feels this happens because she’s words (“No. Don’t. Stop.”) and/or stick her physically intimate with someone in our hand out in front of her—not a hand held out friend group who’s not her husband and for a shake (she doesn’t want him pulling that therefore my friend sees her as “publicly available.” I’ve personally heard to land on his sternum if he keeps coming this guy describe this woman friend of toward her, with a stiff arm (lock that elbow!) mine as “DTF.” I’ve known this guy for so he can’t come any closer. years and I just feel bad about the whole thing. The strangest thing is that this dude Email questions@savagelove.net is in an open relationship himself and Follow Dan on Twitter @FakeDanSavage. really should know better. It seems like he Find columns, podcasts, books, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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food you associate with me. Frankly, anybody who reads this column knows that I write a lot about desserts and breads, plus doughnuts and lots of cheese. I was sitting at Mumtaz Mediterranean of spanakopita, when my culinary life passed before my eyes. Mumtaz, open since 2007 in Lafayglar bundles of spinach and feta that are virtually irresistible with a side of creamy cucumber yogurt sauce for dipping. I just realized that I have a serious, lifelong thing for spinach that started with

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kid. My mind ticked off the ridiculous number of spinach-y dishes at local restaurants I’ve tasted and raved about. I’d like to think it’s because spinach is one of the most nutrient-dense foods you can eat. It’s hard not to pat yourself on the back when you’re eating serious carotenoids, vitamin C, vitamin K, folic

me to admit that health isn’t solely why I gravitate in a green leafy direction. I just love the taste of treats like the Turkish spinach feta roll at The BOCO Restaurant in the Meadows Shopping Center. The house-made delight is a spinach and feta mixture baked in a mildly sweet, yeasted dough. Served with butter, it’s almost like a spinach Danish for breakfast. That’s quite a different thrill from the spinach and cheese pupusas offered at the Pupusas Familia stand at Boulder discs is wrapped in a soft cornmeal shell and griddled until crispy. They are perfect with crunchy curtido slaw and hot sauce. At Boulder’s Ali Baba Grill, the chopped greens are blended with onion, pomegranate, walnut and olive oil, wrapped in wonton skins and lightly fried. The aroma is amazing when these sambusek are cracked open.

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50 shades of green

Superfood spinach stars in spanakopita, sambusek and saag on Boulder menus

by John Lehndorff Nearby at the Mediterranean Market & Deli, spanakopita is more like a Middle Eastern hand pie or calzone. Spinach and feta are wrapped in a light dough and griddled so it’s not oily. It’s satisfying when chunks are dunked in thick yogurt sauce with a dab of sriracha and zaatar, a thyme and olive oil dip. Traditional Greek spinach pie is a mainstay at Boulder’s Kalita Grill. The Greek eatery’s take on spanakopita around a great spinach and cheese middle. The baked pie is griddled and plated with Greek salad and tzatziki sauce. What’s not to like about creamed spinach? I invariably order saag paneer— the creamy spiced spinach with chewy paneer cheese chunks—and the obligatory warm garlic naan to scoop it up when at Kathmandu other Indian eateries. The list of local spinach greatest hits also features the creamed spinach served at Jax Fish House and the Boulder Cork, feta and spinach pierogies at the Pierogies

However, transparency forces

Factory, and pastry-wrapped espinaca empanadas at Rincon Argentino. My spinach affection doesn’t always require the presence of cream, cheese, spinach salad with a creaveable warm dressing makes for a killer summer meal. spinach salad dressing from a legendary Boulder restaurant on page 29. However, a great spinach salad requires great spinach, and all spinach is not created equal. Sadly, so-called “baby spinach” is virtually the only variety of spinach available at most supermarkets. “Baby” spinach is no more an infant than those “baby” carrots, which are just ground down big carrots. Baby spinach is shaped leaves. This is the white bread/ button mushroom equivalent, a blandly acceptable gateway spinach that lacks known as curly-leaf savoy spinach. That variety has denser dark-green leaves, a crunchier texture and a whole lot more bitterness, but that gets balanced by the salad ingredients and dressing. That’s the spinach I found last week at the Black Cat Farm booth at the

BLACK CAT FARM, PHOTO BY SUSAN FRANCE

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Boulder Farmers Market. Currently the stand offers Olympia spinach, but, as the season goes on, the farm will harvest other toothsome varieties including Jericho, Tango and Winter Marvel. Make the rounds at the market or local roadside farm stands to explore more variations on a fresh spinach theme. If you saute spinach as a side dish for a dinner, remember that it takes more spinach than you can imagine to feed a family. Always enjoy the pot liquor—the liquid left in the pan after you cook spinach—that’s full of nutrients. I draw the line at spinach smoothies. I’d rather just chew my greens.

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When I recently interviewed Francea Phillips, the CEO of Meals on Wheels on Radio Nibbles, it was alarming to hear how rapidly costs have risen to deliver meals to elderly and sick Boulder residents. The nonprofit’s grocery bill has gone up from $13,000 to $30,000 each month since January, she reports. Some essential ingredients simply aren’t available, and everything else, including gas, has also gone up. One simple, satisfying way to support Meals on Wheels is to eat pie on July 4. Pick up house-made cherry, blueberry, Dutch apple, and strawberry-rhubarb pies on sale through July 2 at The Niche Market, 3701 Canfield St., Boulder. … Boulder’s curbside view changes on Aug. 31 when the emergency pandemic patios must be removed at restaurants, brewpubs, taverns, brewer-

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Local Food News

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extract, calcium carbonate, pink Himalayan salt and shiitake mushroom extract.

Words to Chew On

“We think that if we just meditated enough or jogged enough or ate perfect food, everything would be perfect. But from the point of view of someone who is awake, that’s death.” — Pema Chödrön Boulder Weekly food editor John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:20 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (88.5 FM, streaming at kgnu.org. Comments:

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by John Lehndorff

Are you hungry tonight for Elvis’ tomato fritters?

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he release of Elvis icon, has piqued interest in the King’s life, music and food obsessions. For the occasion, I unearthed Are You Hungry Tonight?, a keepsake 1992 cookbook featuring recipes for foods that Elvis loved. He was famously fond of comfy Southern favorites. The volume includes his beloved peanut butter and banana sandwiches, a reminder of Elvis’ Colorado connection. In 1976, Elvis and

EAT LIKE THE KING: Elvis had a soft spot for Southern comfort food, and this recipe for tomato fritters gave him rubber legs.

Mine Company—was a butter-basted loaf of white bread stuffed with one pound of bacon, a jar of peanut butter and a jar of blueberry preserves. This recipe from the collection is perfect for the arrival of the summer local tomato season. The dish is a red ripe cousin of the South’s fried green tomatoes. Tomato Fritters 2 large ripe tomatoes (approx.) 1/2 teaspoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1 egg, beaten 1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce Oil (for deep frying) Bring a large saucepan of water to boil. Plunge the tomatoes in the water, and hold them there for about one minute. Remove the tomatoes from the water and hold them under cold running water to remove the skins. Cut the tomatoes horizontally and remove the seeds. Coarsely chop the tomatoes. tomatoes, Worcestershire sauce and cheese. Shape the mixture into patties and deep fry in hot oil for about 45 seconds on each side, or until golden. Drain on paper towels. Serve warm with hot sauce or pimento cheese dip. Makes about four servings.

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f you see the rooster stamp and green cap, grab some bottles of sriracha while you can. The maker of the popular hot sauce, Huy Fong Foods, announced that due to drought in Mexico, where it grows most of its hybrid red jalapeno pepper, the company is temporarily halting production of sriracha and its other spicy products until the fall. sauces that might make you forget that brand name stuff. organic cayenne and Portugal peppers and garlic grown on

Boulder Recipe Flashback: Dress your spinach salad

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his dressing from Boulder’s legendary European Cafe was made for all those spinach salads you’ll be loving this summer. The European Cafe, located near 28th Street on Arapahoe Avenue, starred chef/potato artisan/banjo expert Radek Cerny, who went on to open L’Atelier in Boulder and the current Atelier by Radex in Denver. In the late 1990s, Cerny shared this requested recipe. European Cafe Soy Ginger Dressing 3/4 cup sesame oil 3/4 cup garlic-infused olive oil (see recipe) 1/2 cup vegetable oil 3/4 cup rice vinegar 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons fresh ginger juice To make garlic-infused olive oil, mince three large cloves of garlic, mix with olive oil and refrigerate overnight. To make fresh ginger juice, peel 1/2 pound fresh garlic and puree in a food processor. Place in a clean towel and wring out the juice. A strainer can also be used. Combine all ingredients and whisk until well-blended. Taste and adjust seasonings. Dressing will separate into layers between uses. Refrigerate. To serve, heat until very warm and spoon over spinach and other fresh greens.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Sriracha Shortage! Hot Local Alternatives

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Boulder’s Seed Ranch Flavor Co. blends chipotle peppers into its memoraThe thick red Rocoto Hot Sauce from Longmont’s Chiporro Hot Sauce is an ideal sriracha substitute (chiporro.com). sauce combines roasted tomatoes, chilies and spearmint for a refreshing saucy change (greenbellyfoods.com).

Culinary Calendar: Taking a Stand

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e are assembling a comprehensive guide to farm stands in Boulder County and beyond to support local family agriculture. Help make the guide complete by emailing hours, offerings and detailed farm stand locations to: nibbles@boulderweekly.com

Send information about Boulder County and Colorado food and drink events, classes, festivals, farm dinners, farm stands and tastings to: nibbles@boulderweekly.com. JUNE 30, 2022

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Spilling over into traffic

Cannabis legalization actually makes traffic safer, new research suggests—stacking another reason against prohibition

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Journal of Law and Econom-

by Will Brendza

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Email: wbrendza@boulderweekly.com

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