Boulder Weekly 11.25.21

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• Is Arapaho Glacier still a glacier? p. 12 • This Thanksgiving, don’t forget your hungry neighbors, p.22 • Medicinal mindfulness, p. 29

Despite Boulder’s vocal support for Indigenous peoples, data and residents tell a different story

By Sam Becker and Nick LaBerge


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news:

Despite Boulder’s vocal support for Indigenous peoples, data and residents tell a different story by Sam Becker and Nick LaBerge

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boulderganic:

Arapaho Glacier, Colorado’s largest alpine glacier, has vanished in plain sight by Quentin Septer

buzz:

Jake Shimabukuro jams with Willie Nelson, Bette Midler, Ziggy Marley, Jimmy Buffet, Billy Strings, and more on ‘Jake and Friends’ by Dave Gil de Rubio

nibbles:

We interrupt your Thanksgiving feast for an uncomfortable discussion about hunger by John Lehndorff

15 22 25

beer:

Becca Schepps wants hard kombuchas to succeed by Michael J. Casey

departments 4 5 17 19 20 21 27 29 30

Guest Opinion: Boulder can choose compassion over exclusion Guest Opinion: Can Biden be FDR and stop the Trumpist chaos? Events: What to do when there’s ‘nothing’ to do . . . Film: ‘Licorice Pizza’ is a love letter all around Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Get out Food and Drink: Hamantaschen, challah, and rugelach Altered States: Psychedelic-assisted therapy clinics are becoming more popular as stigma dies Weed Between the Lines: In the U.S., ‘research-grade’ cannabis means ‘sub-commercial quality’

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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e started the Bedrooms Are For People campaign to make Boulder a more inclusive and welcoming place to call home. We want to live in a community that is open, where people are embraced, and have equitable housing opportunities that allow everyone to thrive. We were hoping that come November 3, we’d be able to say, “If you’re living over-occupied, you don’t have to worry anymore.” Despite the measure failing 48-52 percent, we won in a different yet paramount way. Young people, renters, and people who support social justice and climate action showed up in an offyear election and voted for change. We now have the first majority progressive City Council that Boulder has seen in decades. This historic victory was only possible because Bedrooms Are For People fought for a measure that would make a meaningful difference for thousands of people. The new progressive majority on Council gives us hope that moving forward, compassion will win over exclusion and social justice will win over preserving the status quo. Six of the nine city council members endorsed Bedrooms Are For People, and believe that occupancy reforms are needed. At the first City

Publisher, Fran Zankowski Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor-in-Chief, Brendan Joel Kelley Managing Editor, Caitlin Rockett News Editor, Will Brendza Food Editor, John Lehndorff Contributing Writers: Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Emma Athena, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Angela K. Evans, Jim Hightower, Jodi Hausen, Karlie Huckels, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Sara McCrea, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Katie Rhodes, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Account Executives, Matthew Fischer, Carter Ferryman Advertising Coordinator, Corey Basciano Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama BUSINESS OFFICE Bookkeeper, Regina Campanella Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Editor-at-Large, Joel Dyer November 25, 2021 Volume XXIX, Number 16 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism, and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper.

Boulder can choose compassion over exclusion by Chelsea Castellano and Eric Budd Council meeting on Tuesday, we asked the council to initiate a city process to reform occupancy limits and to protect community members from occupancy enforcement and eviction while these reforms are being developed. Keeping vulnerable people housed is a goal we should all have. Specifically, we are advocating for a six-month suspension on occupancy enforcement on unrelated people sharing housing while longer-term reforms are being

developed. Throughout the campaign, we heard from many community members who understood the need for occupancy reforms, but did not support our exact proposal. We took those comments to heart and so did the City Council, and it is clear that any occupancy reforms considered by Council will look different from our ballot measure. We fully support see BEDROOMS Page 6

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Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Can Biden be FDR and stop the Trumpist chaos? by Dave Anderson

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ongresswoman Abigail Spanberger (D-VA) said of Joe Biden, “Nobody elected him to be FDR, they elected him to be normal and stop the chaos.” White House advisor Cedric Richmond disagreed, saying that Biden was elected to “do big things” which are “FDR-like.” After all, this is a time of unparalleled health, economic and civilization-threatening climate crises. Biden talked constantly about Franklin Roosevelt in the campaign. After he was elected, he sat down with prominent historians to discuss lessons from the New Deal. Ironically, many voters wanted Biden to be both FDR and to “be normal and stop the chaos.” Spanberger was undoubtedly remembering our four-year wild and crazy roller coaster ride with a president who was a sociopathic buffoon. But what is “normal” when everyday life turns upside down? When FDR became president, the country was in immense turmoil. The economy had collapsed with many millions unemployed and homeless. Early on, wealthy rightwingers attempted a clumsy military coup to overthrow Roosevelt. Many fascist groups sprang up. In his first inaugural address, Roosevelt tried to reassure Americans. He said that “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself—nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which

paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. “Ordinary Americans had plenty of things to be afraid of. If FDR hadn’t done “big things,” the fascists might have won. Today, the Republicans have become an authoritarian party promoting fear and chaos. In 2018, Stephen Bannon talked about his strategy as Trump’s campaign manager in 2016. He said, “The Democrats don’t matter. The real opposition is the media. And the way to deal with them is to flood the zone with shit.” He boasted that Trump’s campaign “was pure anger. Anger and fear is what gets people to the polls.” Washington Post columnist Paul Waldman says that “flooding the zone” means “to create informational bedlam, throwing up so much attention-grabbing material—the more bizarre and outrageous, the better— that it would be impossible for sanity to gain a foothold.” Trump-supporting politicians have learned how to “flood the zone.” Arizona GOP congressman Paul Gosar was censured by the House of Representatives for posting a gruesome staff-edited anime cartoon video showing characters with the faces of Gosar and fellow GOP reps Lauren Boebert (R-Co) and Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) fighting Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY ) and Joe Biden. Gosar kills Ocasio-Cortez’s character with a sword.

Boebert used the censure proceedings to launch personal attacks on various House Democrats. She accused Representative Ilhan Omar. (D-MN) of incest and of being a member of a terrorist supporting “Jihad Squad.” Omar is a black woman and a Muslim who came to the U.S. as a Somalian refugee before becoming a citizen. Which makes her a perfect punching bag for the far right. Boebert mentioned Omar’s “brother-husband.” This is a lie spread for years on the internet by the far right. It is claimed that Omar’s ex-husband is actually her brother and they married so he could get a green card. Boebert’s attack on Omar outraged Kyle Clark, TV anchor for Denver’s 9NEWS. In an on-air commentary, Clark said news outlets hold Boebert “to a far lower standard” than other lawmakers. He went on: “If we held her to the same standard as every other elected Republican and Democrat in Colorado, we would be here near-nightly chronicling the cruel, false and bigoted things that Boebert says for attention and fundraising.” Clark didn’t directly mention the Bannon strategy of manipulating the media by “flooding the zone,” but he touched on the problem. He said: “This is not about assuming politics is still about things like taxes,

national security, health care, jobs and public lands. This is about us, as journalists, recognizing that we’ll hold a politician accountable if they say something vile once, but we won’t do it if they do it every day.” The next night, he asked viewers how to deal with politicians like Boebert without always spreading their “cruel, false and bigoted” B.S. Clark is a bit too polite. He doesn’t mention the question of violence. In a disturbing piece, New York Times reporters Lisa Lerer and Astead W. Herndon recently noted that historians and scholars who study democracy warn that “the Republican Party is mainstreaming menace as a political tool.” Very few Republican leaders have spoken out against the violent speech and behavior. The GOP’s rich donors are silent as well. Meanwhile, the far right propagandists of Fox News, Newsmax and One America News amplify the lies and disinformation. Threats against members of Congress have jumped by 107 percent compared with the same period in 2020, according to the Capitol Police. School board members, public health officials and election officials have faced a wave of threats. The stench of fascism is in the air. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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the Council and the community are found to be violating these rules, taking a fresh look at how to address they get an enforcement officer this critical housing issue and worksearching their home counting beds ing together toward a solution where and inspecting the number of tooththe whole community benefits from brushes on bathroom counters. We its passage. need the city to show a good-faith We are urging Council to take effort to protect people and work up reforming occupancy limits legis- urgently for permanent solutions on latively and believe that the process housing occupancy. must include If you bethe people most lieve that people impacted by these sharing housing to live laws. The only shouldn’t have way to get public to live in fear of in a community that is participation by enforcement or open, where people the community eviction, please we are aiming to send City Council are embraced, and serve is to ensure an email at they are not at council@boulderhave equitable housing risk of retaliation, colorado.gov. Let enforcement, or them know that opportunities that allow eviction. you support City There is precCouncil reformeveryone to thrive. edent for enacting ing Boulder’s moratoriums on exclusionary policies while occupancy laws. changes are in The council progress. Spewill be meeting cifically relating to occupancy, the on Tuesday, November 30 and will Council halted enforcing occupanbe discussing next steps to protect cy limits on cooperatives while a people sharing housing while percooperative housing ordinance was manent reforms are being developed. developed. We are not asking the The Council hearing your support City to stop enforcing on nuisances on this issue would make a big or risks to health and safety. Every difference. household, related or not, has a Chelsea Castellano and Eric Budd responsibility to adhere to the rules are Boulder residents and co-leads of around noise, parking, and trash, and the Bedrooms Are For People Camdeserves to live in safe housing. paign. Yet if four related people are This opinion column does not found to be violating nuisance rules, necessarily reflect the views of Boulder they get a ticket. If unrelated people Weekly.

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Land of broken promises

Despite Boulder’s vocal support for Indigenous peoples, data and residents tell a different story

by Sam Becker and Nick LaBerge

Through novel analyses of data and interviews with local residents, Sam Becker seeks to understand the extent to which the City of Boulder is living up to its responsibility “to address the past and continuing harm to the Indigenous People”––a responsibility enshrined with the passage of Resolution No. 1190 in 2016. He worked with CU-Boulder computer science PhD student Nick LaBerge to verify the soundness of the data presented in this story.

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feel like they’re trying to chase us out,” says Indigo, a Boulder resident from the Mescalero people, who’s just finished his daily ritual of packing up his home to avoid being ticketed for violating Boulder’s camping and tent bans. “It’s all about the image of Boulder: money, and high-class living,” he says. Boulder’s Indigenous residents were 42 times more likely to be homeless than white residents during 2019 and 2020, according to Census data and city-specific Metro Denver Homeless Initiative data (see calculations and sources here tinyurl. com/4d3snf6p). During these years, an average of 13 percent of Boulder’s Indigenous residents were homeless, while an average of 0.3 percent of Boulder’s white residents were homeless. Underpinning these results is a largely ignored history of land and resource dispossession––often referred to as settler colonialism––and genocide of Indigenous peoples and their cultures, as well as the discriminatory housing, economic, and social policies built on this area’s foundation of settler colonialism and genocide. The same data show that Indigenous residents in Denver were 9.5 times more likely to be home-

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less than the city’s white residents in 2019, and that Indigenous residents in Longmont were 11.5 times more likely to be homeless than the city’s white residents during 2019 and 2020. These results suggest that the City of Boulder is unique, but not alone, in its failure to address the inequalities stemming from settler colonialism and genocide, and that the policies the city recently passed to criminalize homelessness are indirectly perpetuating legacies of settler colonialism and genocide. “Policies that criminalize homelessness . . . may not be exclusively anti-Indigenous, but the effects of these policies are because our people make up such a disproportionate piece of [those experiencing] homelessness,’’ says Mateo Parsons, Board Chair for Four Winds American Indian Council, who comes from the Warm Springs Apache, Yaqui, and Tarahumara peoples. In 2016, the City of Boulder passed a resolution intended to begin amending the relationship with NOVEMBER 25, 2021

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Indigenous nations and peoples. Resolution No. 1190 declared that the city has “responsibility . . . to address the past and continuing harm to the Indigenous People and the land.” Developed in consultation with federally recognized tribes, the resolution established Indigenous Peoples’ Day in place of Columbus Day, facilitated a process to rename Settlers Park, and encouraged the development of curricula and resources that accurately reflect past harms. In 2021, the City of Boulder glided into its sixth annual celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day. After five years of deliberation, the city agreed to change the name of Settlers Park to Peoples’ Crossing, and agreed to work with representatives from federally recognized tribes to create a land acknowledgment. At the same time, it was also named the best place to live in the U.S. for the second year in a row.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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n a warm November morning, Indigo is relaxing on the grass in Boulder’s Central Park. A police car slowly approaches, and Indigo springs into action. In a commanding, controlled tone that denotes his years in the military, he yells towards a solitary tent 10 yards away: “The pigs just rolled by, get your tent down!” Amid housing crises, a global pandemic, and an impending eviction boom, homelessness continues to grow. Across the West, from Medford, Oregon to Albuquerque, New Mexico, cities look to criminalization as a solution. After an aggressive anti-homeless campaign waged by Safer Boulder—a group with strong ties to Boulder Police Chief Maris Herold—city councilors ushered in laws banning camping, tents, and even propane. Despite the lack of evidence that criminalizing the homeless reduces homelessness, Boulder City Council opted to allocate nearly $3 million to further criminalize homelessness without a clear plan to track its effectiveness. Indigo, who lives in a tent, feels that he and other residents experiencing homelessness are being swept away with the goal of turning Boulder into an epicenter of “high-class living” for urban elites looking for a lifestyle upgrade. Boulder’s homeless residents, Indigo remarks, are often derided as criminal “transients.” But transience does not exist in a vacuum: It’s a cycle produced by the violent transience of white settlers and perpetuated by policy failures, like gentrification, unaffordable housing, and disinvestment in social safety nets. Although the police don’t stop to ticket the person who was awakened by Indigo’s shout, Indigo says it’s ridiculous that people sheltering in tents either have to “violate their own human rights” or “have an encounter with the cops.”

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oulder’s history stands out for its brutality. Some of the area’s dozens of Indigenous communities were ravaged by the Indian slave trade for hundreds of years prior to the coercive treaties, blood-caked gold rushes, and massacres of the 1800s. When gold was discovered in Colorado in the late 1850s, white settlers violently broke the Fort Laramie Treaty and the governor issued a proclamation of genocide. Under this proclamation of genocide, U.S. soldiers slaughtered 300-800 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho peoples in the 1864 Sand Creek Massacre—a death count that likely downplayed or denied that women, children, and elderly noncombatants were included, according to the Sand Creek Massacre Foundation. David Nichols, who served as Boulder County Sheriff and had a University of Colorado Boulder residence hall named after him in 1961, led 46 Boulderites into the massacre, all of whom received a hero’s welcome upon return. “They took everything and gave nothing back,”

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

says Indigo. Fast-forward 157 years, he says, and city councilors talk about “helping” and “celebrating” Indigenous peoples, “but they do nothing: spin doctors, that’s what city councilors are, they’re all spin doctors.” Parsons, of the Warm Springs Apache, Yaqui, and Tarahumara peoples, connects the broken treaties and massacres to the present when he hears about the removal of camps lining creeks and public parks in Boulder and other cities along the Front

is taking some antiracist actions, like ensuring 15 percent of all housing is permanently affordable by 2035, to produce racial equity on the housing front. As Indigo sits on the concrete across from Deacons’ Closet, he explains that he is tired of the city council doing “studies on why housing is so expensive for the wealthy. What about the homeless?” City council should build or acquire permanent housing, better shelters, tiny home villages, and campgrounds, and do it with input from homeless people, he says.

SAM BECKER

he City of Boulder has not acknowledged the connection between racist policies of forced removal and the disproportionately high rates of Indigenous homelessness that exist here. As a result, it has not taken actions, like ending anti-homeless policies and providing a variety of low-barrier services, to produce racial equity on the homelessness front. “The point of the camping ban is to say our public spaces are not appropriate for living in,” says Boulder Mayor Aaron Brockett. While Brockett now says that “criminalization is not the right approach,” he voted in July of this year for a now-enacted policy that makes sleeping in a tent on city property a ticketable offense. To address disproportionate Indigenous homelessness, Brockett says the city “need[s] to provide more service options for people who don’t have homes.” To date, the city council has struck down efforts to increase services, including a sanctioned campground that Brockett supported. Prior to the enactment of the tent and propane bans, 2019 and 2020 data from Boulder Municipal Court show that Indigenous homeless residents in Boulder were up to an average of 16 times more likely to be ticketed for non-violent offenses than Indigenous housed residents—with over 80 percent of the tickets being from offenses that are difficult to avoid while homeless, like camping, possession of alcohol, and trespassing (see calculations and sources here: tinyurl.com/4d3snf6p). “Police have become more aggressive in their removal and ticketing of homeless people since the city [enacted] the tent ban,” laments Indigo. “It’s just cruel and inhumane.” He says he sees parallels between the ways that police dominate, control, and threaten vulnerable people today and the ways that white settlers colonized and massacred his ancestors. When Kurt Firnhaber, Director of Housing and Human Services for City of Boulder, is asked if he is concerned that these policies are undermining the city’s efforts to address the past and continuing harm to the Indigenous peoples, he dodges, saying, “I think one thing we all need to agree on is [that] we shouldn’t have individuals living out on the

Range. “Now, you have governments of those cities that were illegally established in the first place saying that Native people don’t have the right to camp on lands that are legally their homelands and removing them from those places,” he says, incensed. “There’s a direct corollary there, and a direct legacy that these policies are continuing.”

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t the City of Boulder’s Housing Equity Symposium on November 8, 2020, Clay Fong, Community Relations Manager for the City of Boulder’s Department of Human Services, stood in front of an Ibram X. Kendi quote projected on a huge screen that read, “A racist policy is any measure that produces or sustains racial inequity between racial groups. An antiracist policy is any measure that produces or sustains racial equity between racial groups.” The symposium aimed to show a direct line between racist land use policies created during Boulder’s founding, and the city’s current housing unaffordability and lack of racial diversity. In his talk, Fong said Boulder’s history of unaffordability began in 1859 when members of the Boulder City Town Company divided the area that’s now Boulder between themselves and sold the rest for $1,000 an acre. During this time, agricultural land to the east and north of Boulder was selling for about $1.25 an acre. The honesty and commitment to action in Fong’s presentation were striking: The city recognizes it was founded on racist policies that have contributed to Boulder’s racial inequities, and it l

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NEWS from Page 9

street, and we need to get people into housing . . . If every city across the U.S. was approaching homelessness the way the City of Boulder is, we wouldn’t have homelessness in our country.” Firnhaber argues that these policies reduce homelessness because they require people who have been ticketed for nonviolent offenses to interface with service providers as they make their way through the municipal court. “That’s a clever justification,” says Jennifer Livovich, a longtime Boulder resident with a history of homesslessness, but these policies “don’t meet people where they’re at,” and “not everyone receiving a citation engages with the municipal court system.” While Livovich applauds the Boulder Municipal Court’s new community court program and the city’s Housing First approach to homelessness, she notes that the latter only covers about 15 percent of the homeless community (the rate was 11.7 percent in 2021, according to city data), meaning that a large number of homeless residents are still faced with consistent removal and ticketing—actions that perpetuate the racial inequities from settler colonialism and genocide. Indigo says he feels that the “police target us,” and not because they want to help them with services. The message the city is sending is clear, he says: “They don’t want us here.” He adds that he and others haven’t stopped camping because they don’t have any other suitable options.

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ivovich’s nonprofit organization, Feet Forward, feeds, clothes, and provides resources to over 100 homeless residents, including Indigo, each Tuesday at Boulder’s Central Park. No tickets are written to force them here, they come because they want to, according to Livovich. Indigo is hoping the city builds a centralized navigation center and day shelter where he and others can access all of the resources and community provided by Feet Forward every day, plus shelter from the elements, hygiene, secure storage, mail services, financial services, internet, and computer access, electricity, and other resources. Boulder has a night shelter, l

Boulder Shelter for the Homeless, but Indigo doesn’t stay there. When he returned to Boulder last year after a decades-long absence, he tried to access the shelter, but says he was told to leave the city because he hadn’t lived here for six months––a process called diversion that still disproportionately funnels homeless people of color out of the city, per data provided by Firnhaber. These sorts of barriers, say researchers from Common Sense Institute’s Homelessness Ecosystem Analysis team, reduce the likelihood that someone will use services in the future. “I felt like a third-class citizen,” Indigo says of his experience at the shelter. While Homeless Solutions for Boulder County lifted the residency requirement this summer after the ACLU deemed it unconstitutional, Indigo doesn’t feel comfortable staying there. He says he gave the shelter a try but was repulsed by the way staff bullied residents, the lack of transparency around the rules, the lack of privacy, and the lack of cleanliness. It’s “like a prison,” he says. Winter this time around will be more difficult for Indigo. He recently broke his foot and is supporting himself on a knee that needs surgery. He says he’s interested in the limited number of hotel vouchers the shelter is offering this winter. He’d also like to see the city create a safe outdoor camping space—developed with input from people who might be living there—where he can camp until he gets a house or a van. Thirty miles away, Denver’s newest safe outdoor space is slated to open in late November. The project was spearheaded by a group of Indigenous homeless residents who were forcefully removed by Denver police for violating the city’s camping ban earlier this summer. According to Mateo Parsons, over 10 Denver-based urban Indian nonprofits are “building a community safety net” around this camp to make sure that residents have access to culturally relevant services. Parsons is grateful that the city listened to the demands of this group, but “ultimately,” he says, “this is a short-term solution, and the longer term solution is permanent housing, specifically Native-preference housing. It’s essential to make sure that Native people can live in kinship with

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


each other, and that’s what we see this Native-inclusive SOS site opening the door to.”

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hen Indigo is asked what he thinks of the city’s efforts to address past and continuing harms to Indigenous peoples, he shakes his head in disdain. “When can we have our land back? Even though you tainted it, can we please have our land back?” In 2021, the City of Boulder celebrated Indigenous Peoples’ Day, changed the name of Settlers Park to Peoples’ Crossing, and entered into consultations with representatives from federally recognized tribal nations with ancestral ties to Boulder to create a land acknowledgement and determine next steps on a host of issues, from landback efforts to participation by tribes that are not federally recognized. David Atekpatzin Young, who comes from the Apache, Pueblo, and Genízaro peoples, is frustrated that his tribe, Genízaro Affiliated Nations, has been left out of these consultations because they lack recognition from the federal government—a bureaucratic nightmare that Young says can require tribes to spend millions of dollars and decades of research to prove their Indigeneity. When Sasha Strong, tribal attorney for and member of Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians and the former co-chair of Boulder’s Police Oversight Panel, is asked if she thinks members of federally unrecognized tribes with ancestral ties to Boulder should be able to participate in consultations, she answers, “Absolutely. This whole [process] to become federally recognized is just settler gatekeeping.” Young wants a seat at the table so he can more effectively work to ensure all Indigenous peoples in Boulder have unfettered access to land for ceremonial and cultural purposes. These efforts are part of a swelling landback movement, which Young, Strong, and Indigo say goes beyond the transfer of property deeds to include respecting Indigenous rights, stewarding languages and traditions, and securing food sovereignty, housing, and clean air and water. Above all, they say, landback is a rallying cry for dismantling white supremacy and capitalism and legacies of settler colonialism. “Land acknowledgments are nice,

but they aren’t going to put a roof over [our] heads,” says Strong.

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he colonial logic that fueled the Sand Creek Massacre 157 years ago is still deeply ingrained within the political and economic systems that exist today. “Indigenous communities continue to be impoverished and targeted for continued violence in all its forms, whether we live on a reservation or in a city,” Young observes. In Boulder, where Indigenous

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peoples now make up just 0.2 percent of the population, the city council has a progressive majority for the first time in recent memory. They say they’re committed to housing and racial justice and more humane, less punitive solutions to homelessness. Indigo isn’t particularly optimistic. “City councilors are scared,” he says. “They don’t want to be held accountable for their decisions.” As bright November sunlight

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catches strips of reflective material framing a half-dozen backpacks meticulously prepared for winter, Indigo says he and his friends imagine a “kinder version of Boulder” in which they are respected as “full human beings.” For the time being, he says, “this is our sanctuary.” Sam Becker is an organizer, writer, and researcher living in Boulder, CO. Nick LaBerge is a CU-Boulder computer science PhD student.

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T Just an icefield

Arapaho Glacier, Colorado’s largest alpine glacier, has vanished in plain sight

by Quentin Septer

he air was 34 degrees Fahrenheit, and wind swept across the mountains at 30 miles per hour. A thin layer of snow covered the landscape, fallen overnight, blanketing tussock grasses and boulders of granite and gneiss; willows and cushion plants and dense thickets of knee timber. Six of us trekked among the snow, stone, and tundra. We hiked single-file, heads down, stumbling occasionally in the particularly powerful gales. Above us, clouds sped across the sky like cars on an interstate. Beneath us sat a U-shaped glacial valley, where Middle Boulder Creek flows from headwaters just beneath the Continental Divide. Beyond the valley floor NATIONAL SNOW AND ICE DATA CENTER'S GLACIER PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION.

THE LAST SURVEY of Colorado's glaciers was conducted in the mid1980s and found only seven of the state's 16 glaciers were larger than a tenth of a kilometer, the minimum size for a glacier.

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and across the drainage, a hanging lake came into view. A creek cascaded down a steep and thickly timbered mountainside below the tarn. And just as quickly as it had emerged, the mountainscape was veiled by nimbostratus clouds. With me was Dr. Ted Scambos, along with a team of glaciologists from the University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Scambos is a senior research scientist at CU Boulder’s Earth Science and Observation Center. He’s been conducting glaciology research for more than 30 years. He’s developed automated measurement systems to make remote observations of glaciers without the physical presence of scientists. He’s studied declines in Arctic sea ice. He’s studied glacial thinning in AntarcNOVEMBER 25, 2021

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tica. He’s studied ice discharges flowing from Greenland’s outlet glaciers. And, among many research projects throughout an exceedingly accomplished career, he’s studied the Arapaho Glacier—the largest and, as some have argued, the last alpine glacier remaining in the state of Colorado. We climbed to the apex of Arapaho Saddle, to the ridge overlooking the cirque of the Arapaho Glacier. We looked down into the cirque, toward the glacier itself. What we were seeing—or rather, what we weren’t seeing— didn’t seem to add up. “Where is it?” somebody asked. There was a pause. “There’s no glacier left,” Scambos said. he Arapaho Glacier sits in a bowl-shaped cirque between North Arapaho Peak and South Arapaho Peak, on the eastern slope of the Continental Divide, about 20 miles west of Boulder, Colorado. During the Pleistocene, which began about two and a half million years ago and came to a close at the end of the last Ice Age, roughly 12,000 years before present, much of Colorado was awash in snow and ice. Alpine glaciers layered the landscape. They moved and melted like slow-moving rivers of ice, carving valleys and gorges from the Rocky Mountains themselves. But Colorado’s glaciers have been steadily melting over the millennia, centuries, and decades. A Google search will tell you that Colorado is home to 16 glaciers. Many of these “glaciers,” however, are only glaciers in name. When researchers from the United States Geological Survey surveyed Colorado’s remaining glaciers back in the mid-1980s, only seven permanent ice-fields in the state were larger than a tenth of a square kilometer. And this area—a tenth of a square kilometer, about the size of 15 city blocks—is a point at which glaciers become little more than sizable fields of snow and ice. “While there is no global standard for what size a body of ice must be to be considered a glacier,” reads a white paper from the United States Geological Survey, scientists typically “use the commonly accepted guideline of 0.1 square kilometers (about 25 acres) as the minimum size of a glacier. Below this size, ice is generally stagnant and does not have enough mass to move.” This brings us to the second criterion often used to define a glacier. A glacier has to be flowing beneath its own mass. It has to be massive enough to move. For a long time, the Arapaho Glacier had

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see ICEFIELD Page 13 BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


enough mass to move, and it certainly occupied an area larger than a measly 25 acres. At its largest, sometime between 19,000 and 26,000 years ago— an era known to glaciologists as the Last Glacial Maximum—the Arapaho Glacier was nearly nine miles long. It was a full-on, bonafide alpine glacier. And for a long time, it was deemed the last true alpine glacier in the state of Colorado. The Arapaho Glacier was officially “discovered”—that is to say, recognized as a glacier—in 1900. Two years later, in 1902, a glaciologist by the name of N. M. Fenneman published the first study on the Arapaho Glacier in the Journal of Geology. Scientists have been studying the glacier ever since. As atmospheric temperatures have risen, the Arapaho Glacier has melted rather drastically over the last 120 or so years. Fenneman and other glaciologists of his time reported that the Arapaho Glacier occupied an area of about half a square mile by the turn of the 20th century. Fenneman reported that the glacier was 16 meters thick—about the height of the average aspen tree. Half a century later, in 1951, a glaciologist named Ronald L. Ives reported a thickness between 25 and 130 meters. It’s a rather wide spectrum. On one hand, the glacier may have been as thick as the distance between first and second base on Coors Field. Or, it may have been as thick as the Great Pyramid of Giza is tall. By 1979, researchers estimated that the glacier was between 30 and 50 meters thick—as thick as a couple semi trucks are long. Others estimated that the glacier had lost more than half of its ice in the preceding two decades. There is, however, a problem with the data referenced in the paragraph above. These numbers were calculated using outdated scientific methods and outright ancient technology. In some cases, these early glaciologists weren’t doing much more than guessing. “These area and thickness measurements were highly uncertain, and thus should be considered educated estimates at best,” Scambos and his colleagues wrote. By 2007, when Ted Scambos and his colleagues turned their attention to the Arapaho Glacier, the glacier occupied an area of about 0.16 square kilometers—an area about the size of Thoreau’s beloved Walden Pond. In 2007, the maximum thickness of the Arapaho Glacier, according to the team’s data, was 15 meters. They published their results in Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research in 2010. Come August 2021, when Scambos and his colleagues and I trekked to the apex of Arapaho Saddle, we intended to carry out the first study of the Arapaho Glacier in over a decade. The researchBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

University of Colorado Boulder’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences—a pair of crampons. “Thanks again for lending these, Mike,” I said. “It’s a shame we couldn’t put them to use.” Had the weather cooperated, we would have needed the gear to collect our ice cores. “No problem,” Mike said with a sigh. “I certainly wish we could have used them, too.” He took the gear and began packing it away. Scambos and I shook hands. “Thanks again for inviting me along, Ted.” We discussed dates for the upcoming historical photographs and drone survey of the glacier. I told him THESE DAYS, ers brought ice drills, ground penetrating I’d do my best to be there. Arapaho Glacier looks like little more radar equipment, and a drone to conduct “So, the Arapaho Glacier,” I said. than a sledding hill. an aerial survey of the glacier. Scam“It’s just . . . not a glacier anymore?” I (Photo by Patrick bos invited me along to write about the was seeking some kind of closure. Sheehan) expedition. Typhoon-esque winds, frigid Scambos looked up for a moment, temperatures, and a snowstorm at altitude in thought, toward the steep, timthwarted our attempts to study the glacier, bered slopes of the glacial valley that however. enclosed us. “That ice doesn’t appear And that day, our brief, fleeting view of the Arapa- to be flowing,” Scambos said. “And by the looks of ho Glacier was a gloomy one. Obscured by cloud cov- it, it isn’t 25 acres, either.” er, the glacier looked like little more than a sledding “I’d say the Arapaho Glacier has safely entered hill with a bright blue lake at its base—a hazard when permanent ice field status,” Mike MacFerrin noted it comes to sledding, to be sure. The remaining ice of as he loaded gear into the back of his crossover. the glacier was thin and darkened by settled partic“Yeah,” Scambos agreed, nodding slowly. “It’s ulate matter and rocky debris. Boulders were strewn really just an ice field now.” about the lower reaches of the glacier, just above the n September of this year, Scambos and his team lake. The stones had fallen in rock slides further up managed to collect some data on the Arapaho the mountain. Along the perimeter of the glacier, rock Glacier. “Time has not been good to this glacier: at outcroppings emerged from the ice—outcroppings least, not the most recent times,” Scambos writes not seen in historical photographs, the glacier has via email. grown so thin. “We collected probably a kilometer of radar “A small group managed to get to the ridge, data; and 1.4 meters of ice core; and while I have without any of the science gear, but we got a view not seen any results, the completely soaked nature of the glacier.” Scambos says. “There is not a lot of of the ice that day (the borehole filled with water to it left. It is small enough that there may only be a just 16cm below the surface; rivulets and gushing small area where the radar profile and ice core are sub-surface streams everywhere) gives me some possible . . . this really is the end for Arapaho.” doubt that we will get much there—but I look forConfronted with our view of the glacier—or ward to the actual results.” The results of the study lack thereof—we hike around on the ridge for have yet to be published. The team drilled core a time, searching for landmarks of historical samples to a depth of 1.4 meters, but “below that, perspectives from which the glacier has been despite numerous tries, the ice simply dissolved into photographed over the past century. Amidst the the meltwater before we could retrieve it,” Scambos overcast clouds, however, the photographs would writes. “On the other hand, the historical-repeat have to be snapped another day. We trekked photos, the drone SfM [Structure from Motion] down the mountain, into a thicket of subalpine data, and simply the record of the current activity fir in which we’d left our scientific equipment on the glacier near the tarn lake, rock glacier, etc. that morning. We gathered the gear, strapped it will yield interesting results.” to our backs, and hiked on, down to the Fourth The results, however interesting they may be, of July Trailhead. We reached our respective will prove empirically what Scambos, his colleagues, vehicles. I handed Ted an ice axe. I handed and I saw at a glance in August of this year. The Mike MacFerrin—a research glaciologist at the Arapaho Glacier is no longer a glacier at all.

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BOULDER WEEKLY GIVEAWAYS


The Bela Fleck of the ukulele

Jake Shimabukuro jams with Willie Nelson, Bette Midler, Ziggy Marley, Jimmy Buffet, Billy Strings, and more on ‘Jake and Friends’

by Dave Gil de Rubio KAYOKO YAMAMOTO

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n the world of stringed instruments, the four-string ukulele was a small and kitschy lute that was associated with the likes of the late Tiny Tim and vaudeville. More recently, it’s gotten a slightly cooler image as artists ranging from actress Zooey Deschanel to musicians Nellie McKay and Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder have been using the uke to express themselves. But the biggest advance is coming courtesy of Jake Shimabukuro. Not unlike what Bela Fleck has done for the banjo, Shimabukuro is doing the same for this humble instrument associated with Hawaii and tropical-themed shirts. And while the aforementioned Deschanel, McKay and Vedder are serviceable players, Shimabukuro has spent the past two decades as a solo artist, giving the uke a far higher pop culture presence. Expect this elevation to go next level with the release of Jake & Friends, a 16-track project that Duetslike collaboration with an array of artists ranging from Willie Nelson and Bette Midler to Ziggy Marley, Michael McDonald and Jimmy Buffett. It’s a labor of love whose seeds were planted four years ago by Shimabukuro’s agent Dan Fletcher. “Dan was telling me that I had to do a Duets kind of record and then he started naming some artists,” Shimabukuro recalled in an early November interview. “I thought it would be awesome, but in the back of my head I never thought it was going to happen. The thing that really got the ball rolling for us was when Ray Benson (the lead singer of Western swing band Asleep At The Wheel) agreed to co-produce it with us. The first phone call he made was to Willie Nelson, who said he’d do it, and two months later we were in the studio recording ‘Stardust.’ Once we had that track down, it gave the album credibility and momentum. Before we knew it, we did tracks with Michael McDonald and Bette Midler. We started it pre-pandemic, but finished it during the lockdown.” Opening with an ethereal reading of Stevie Wonder’s a musical bed for fellow Hawaiian Jack Johnson and guest vocalist Paula Fuga. Jake & Friends allows the across a broad swath of musical genres. “Smokin’ bluegrass virtuoso Billy Strings that eventually morphs from both parties. “Elsewhere” delves into canons of Jimmy Buffett (“Come Monday”) and Bette Midler (“The Rose”) with help from the song’s respective authors.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

that it wasn’t just for fun. And while I had deadlines and new responsibilities, it was such a great learning experience. There were times when it was hard, challenging and frustrating, but I learned so much. I had a really great A&R person working with me at Sony who pushed me, gave me ideas and songs to listen to and would suggest I try this or that.” Like many of his musical peers, the pandemic turned out to be the one force of nature that forced Shimabukuro to slow down. With two young children at home and a wife who months of the lockdown. where I wasn’t thinking about playing,” he said. “There were just so many And as someone who broke onto the scene other things going on and your focus ON THE BILL: JAKE when a performance of “While My Guitar Gently really shifts.” SHIMABUKURO: Weeps” went viral back in 2006, Shimabukuro does But with his children shifting Christmas in a deep dive into The Beatles songbook on cuts from remote learning and returning Hawaii. featuring Marley (“All You Need is Love”), Anderson to school, the siren song of the uke 8 p.m. Tuesday, (“A Day In the Life”) and Vince Gill and Amy Grant called him back. December 14, (“Something”). It all adds up to an experience that “After a certain point, I’d be up late Boulder Theater, has left Shimabukuro both grateful and humbled. at night and I couldn’t get to sleep,” he 2032 14th Street, “Each [session] has its own story and memosaid. “I have a little home studio and Boulder. Tickets: rable moments,” he said. “In general, what I really I’d go in there and start writing and re$35-$45 love about this album is how diverse it is. As a fan cording myself play. That really helped of the ukulele, I just love how it’s being presented because I’m not good about sharing in all these different styles with these iconic voices and my feelings and talking about how I feel about things. Music artists from different genres. In my wildest dreams, I helps me to navigate those things so I feel like I’m expressnever thought I would hear a ukulele played with Sonny ing them somehow. I did a lot of playing by myself and it Landreth’s guitar. Or Warren Haynes. Or Jon Anderson’s really helped me through a lot.” voice. And it doesn’t even have to be me playing. For Shimabukuro is wrapping up the remainder of the my own ears in my lifetime to hear the ukulele with that sound still just blows my mind.” currently back on the road and shifting from doing a twoShimabukuro’s relationship with the uke goes back to man ukulele-bass show and expanding into a four-piece his mother placing the instrument in his hands at the ten- that includes The Voice contestant Thunderstorm Artis on vocals and guitar. As someone who has fully embraced anese-American found himself a part of the award-winand thoroughly missed the synergy of playing before a ning local trio Pure Heart alongside percussionist Lopaka live audience, Shimabukuro is embracing the experience. Colón and guitarist/vocalist Jon Yamasoto. By 2002, Shimabukuro had signed a multi-album water, Florida,” he said. “I walked out there and started record deal with Sony Music Japan International. It was a everybody was cheering and it hit me. I hadn’t felt that in struck him when the ink was barely dry on his contract. so long and I started crying because it was so emotional. I remember later on in the night, I joked around that I was en-album recording deal back in 2000 with Sony Music in so grateful to be performing in front of a live audience again because I forgot what that was like. It comes back pressure, knowing I had to come up with seven albums to enjoying the kind of connection you can make with the audience. Just the joy you can share through music, time I felt pressure that there was this other side to it and creativity and being in the moment.” l

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E VENTS

Avista Adventist Hospital Louisville Turkey Trot 5K

EVENTS

9 a.m.-noon, Thursday, November 25, Front Street, Downtown Louisville, 951 Spruce Street, Louisville. Price: $5-$30 Gather your neighbors and friends on Thanksgiving morning for the 2021 Avista Adventist Hospital Louisville Turkey Trot. Your entry and any other food donation goes to support Community Food Share, whose mission is to eliminate hunger in

If your organization is planning an event of any kind, please email the managing editor at crockett@boulderweekly.com

‘The Song of The Lorax ‘

7:30 p.m. Friday, November 26; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, November 27, Dairy Arts Center, Carsen Theater, 2590 Walnut Street, Boulder. Tickets: $24-$34, thedairy.org The Song of the Lorax is an immersive, multi-media show including original live music performed by the award-winning Ivalas String Quartet, a forest sound installation, spoken word, and the spellbinding photos by conservation photographer T.J. Watt. Inspired by the story of Big Lonely Doug, a 1,000-year-old Douglas Fir spared by loggers on Vancouver Island, The Song of the Lorax will connect listeners to the plight of deforestation and climate change in ways that are both deeply moving—and that also offers hope for the future. The show will be followed by a talk-back featuring ways to get involved with forest protection right here in Boulder. All

leadership. For every $1 donated, Community Food Share can provide $5 worth of groceries.

Meet the Author: Jen Simmons

2-4 p.m. Saturday, November 27, Used Book Emporium, 346 Main Street, Longmont. Free Local Author Jen Simmons will sign her book, Shipley’s Secrets, a story about family, trauma, and the healing power of love. In Shipley’s Secrets, foster child dled with trauma and abuse. When Malcolm’s placed in the care of a new foster home, he meets Adler and Sal. Three boys having grown up with no family, no

separation from each other. That is, until an unlikely savior steps in.

Centennial State Ballet presents Sugar Plum Tea Party

4 p.m. Saturday, November 27; 1 p.m. Sunday, November 28, Dickens Opera House, 300 Main Street, Longmont. Tickets: $25-$55, centennialstateballet.org The Sugar Plum Fairy warmly invites you to Centennial State Ballet’s Ninth Annual Sugar Plum Tea Party, hosted by Dickens 300 Prime. Tickets include a warm tea; a musical accompaniment with a mini-Nutcracker performance; and photo opportunities with characters from the show.

Dona Laurita: ‘The Silhouette Project’

December 1-January 28, east window art gallery, 4949 Broadway, Unit 102-B, Boulder. Price: Free, eastwindow.org Photographer Dona Laurita’s third incarnation of The Silhouette Project tells the stories attention to the underrepresented AYA (adolescent and young adult) cancer community. Through silhouetted images colored by text taken from spoken interviews, The Silhouette Project tells the stories that make these journeys unique and illuminate the aspects that unite the AYA community.

Kitchen Table

5:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 30, Center for Community, Abrams Lounge, 2010 Willard Loop Drive, Boulder, Kitchen Table offers leadership and community building opportunities to CU Boulder students identifying as women of color working their way through a predominantly white university. By attending Kitchen Table programming in the women of color and connect with other like-minded folks, both peers and sister organizations doing parallel work. see EVENTS Page 18

For more event listings, go online at boulderweekly.com/events

Boulder’s Local Music Shop Since 1971 Shop online at hbwoodsongs.com for no contact pickup or freelocal delivery (on purchases over $20). Open to customers or for pick-up with these new hours of operations: Mon.-Fri. 11:30am - 5:30pm, Sat. 11am - 5pm, Sun. 12-4 pm

3101 28th St, Tebo Plaza, Boulder BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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hbwoodsongs.com 17


EVENTS from Page 15

Author Talk: Joshua Coombes—‘Do Something for Nothing’

FRI. NOV 26 - SAT. NOV 27

SAT. NOV 27

TREVOR HALL

TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENTS

TUE. NOV 30

97.3 KBCO & WESTWORD PRESENT

SHAKEDOWN STREET FRI. DEC 3

MR. MOTA

REI CO-OP STUDIOS PRESENTS: SPIRIT OF THE PEAKS WED. DEC 1

THE ROCKY COASTS, KEEP OFF THE GRASS, TOP LIP FRI. DEC 10

FACE VOCAL BAND CHRISTMAS CONNECTION

ROOSTER & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

THU. DEC 2

DJ GANO, PASHMONIX

ROBERT GLASPER + CORY HENRY

BLUNTS & BLONDES SAT. DEC 11 ROOSTER PRESENTS: HOME ALONE TOUR

PROF

J.PLAZA, ANDREW THOMAS, WILLIE WONKA

THU. DEC 9

CHVRCHES

SPECIAL GUEST DONNA MISSAL

THU. DEC 16

SAT. DEC 11

KINGS OF PRUSSIA + TUMBLEDOWN SHACK

TRACY BUNDY’S ACOUSTIC HOLIDAY

FRI. DEC 17

13TH ANNUAL

GLEN PHILLIPS OF TOAD THE WET SPROCKET TUE. DEC 14

MORSEL

88.5 KGNU PRESENTS: CHRISTMAS IN HAWAII

HIGH COUNTRY HUSTLE, BUFFALO COMMONS

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

SAT. DEC 18

FRI. DEC 17

ARLO MCKINLEY

LACUNA: TOM HAMILTON & HOLLY BOWLING

SENORA MAY, EXTRA GOLD FRI. DEC 31

BELL’S BREWERY PRESENTS

AN INTIMATE EVENING OF IMPROVISATION

THE TRIP OUT TOUR

MON. DEC 20

GODLAZER

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

THE CRYSTAL METHOD

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

SAMMY BRUE

FRI. JAN 14

FRI. DEC 31

SLOW BURN WINTER TOUR

BUMPIN UGLIES

ARTIKAL SOUND SYSTEM, JOEY HARKUM SAT. JAN 15

THE PETTY NICKS EXPERIENCE MOUNTAIN ROSE

SUN. JAN 16 97.3 KBCO, BOULDER WEEKLY & GRATEFUL WEB PRESENT

LAWRENCE SWATKINS

THU. JAN 20

THE UNLIKELY CANDIDATES AMZY

FRI. JAN 21

BURY MIA

MON. JAN 24

EIVØR

RAMAKHANDRA SAT. JAN 15

RELIX, 97.3 KBCO & GRATEFUL WEB PRESENT

THE JERRY DANCE PARTY FEAT. DJ JERRBROTHER MON. JAN 17

THE SECOND CITY THE ABSOLUTE BEST FRIGGIN’ TIME OF YOUR LIFE TUE. JAN 18

WOOLI

PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

FISHER

TRIVECTA, ACE AURA, SHANK AARON JAN 28 .......................................................................................... JIMKATA JAN 29 ................................................................................ MELLOWPUNK FEB 6 ........................................................................................ PASSAFIRE FEB 19 .................................................................. JANE AND MATTHEWS FEB 25 ............................................................................................ SPORTS

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Friday, November 26

The Well Intentioned Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt Street, Longmont. Free The String Cheese Incident. 7 p.m. Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop Street, Denver. Tickets: $59.95-$89.50 The Long Run “Alter Eagles.” 8 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main Street, Longmont. Tickets: $20 Trevor Hall (Night 1). 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th Street, Boulder. Tickets: $49.50-$54.50 TaylorFest. 9 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Avenue, Denver, $16-$20

Saturday, November 27

Joe C. Wails Gang. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt Street, Longmont. Free The String Cheese Incident. 7 p.m. Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop Street, Denver. Tickets: $59.95-$89.50 Trevor Hall (Night 2). 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th Street, Boulder. Tickets: $49.50-$54.50 Seven Lions & Ophelia Records Present: Pantheon Tour. 8 p.m. 1STBANK Shakedown Street. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th Street, Boulder. Tickets: $12.50-$17.50

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

LUCINDA WILLIAMS AND HER BAND BUICK 6

JAN 21 .................................................................................... GOTH BABE JAN 22 ....................................................................................... DIRTWIRE FEB 1 ........................... ANAIS MITCHELL + BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN FEB 2 ......................................................................................... STEVE VAI FEB 3 ......................................................................................... SON VOLT

THU. JAN 27

CONCERTS

RADIO 1190 PRESENTS

CRUMB’S NEW YEAR’S EVE BOULDER BASH

WED. JAN 19

THE LOSERS CLUB, DAYSHAPER, HELLOCENTRAL

Big Kid Ornament Making

9 a.m. Wednesday, December 1, Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Tickets: $6, bit.ly/3DOmZpk Create Christmas and winter holiday decorations with the young people in your life, ages 5-12. Adults will help their kids craft, paint, and create keepsakes that will delight for years to come.

EVENTS

JUST ANNOUNCED MAR 5 ...................................................................................... G. LOVE & THE JUICE

6:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 30, Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl Street, Boulder. Tickets: $5, boulderbookstore.net In 2015, while working at a London hair salon, Joshua Coombes took to the streets with his scissors to build relationships with people sleeping rough in the capital. This inspired him to begin posting transformative images on social media to amplify their voices. #DoSomethingForNothing was born—a movement that encourages people to connect their skills and time to those who need it. Via the simple act of a haircut, readers are taken on a geographical and emotional journey into the lives of humans experiencing homelessness in different cities across the world.

Tuesday, November 30

Polo G. 7 p.m. Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop Street, Denver. $55.00$89.50

Wednesday, December 1

Face Vocal Band. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th Street, Boulder

For more event listings, go online at boulderweekly.com/events 2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

NOVEMBER 25, 2021

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


A nation of two and L.A. on my mind

‘Licorice Pizza’ is a love letter all around

ON THE BILL: LICORICE PIZZA opens in limited release on Nov. 29.

by Michael J. Casey

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othing else matters when you’re in love. People come and go, jobs come and go, the world turns, but none of that sticks. Not that you’re oblivious to such things, it’s just that they all take a backseat to the person right in front of you. And for Gary Valentine, that person is Alana Kane. They meet at high school. Gary (Cooper Hoffman) is 15 and having his yearbook pictures taken. Alana (Alana Haim of the band Haim) is 25 and works for the company taking the pictures. Gary is a child actor and a born hustler. He charms Alana, even if her shell seems impenetrable. It’s a great meetcute, the camera tracking and swirling around Gary and Alana, intoxicated by young love. They part knowing this will go somewhere special. Us, sitting in the audience watching, suspect the same. And then one of the photographers, a middle-aged man, pauses while taking a photo, reaches around, and slaps Alana on the ass while she walks by. His smile says everything you need to know about him. Her face says everything you need to know about her. Their interaction says everything you need to know about gender dynamics in the 1970s. All the men in Licorice Pizza, the latest from writer/director Paul Thomas Anderson, are louses, save for Gary, and Alana’s father, Mordechai Haim— Alana’s father in real life. Her real-life mother plays her mother in the movie, and her two older sisters, Danielle and Este, play her older sisters. I don’t know if it’s restraint on Anderson’s part or a missed opportunity that none of them launch into song. The real-life Haims grew up in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley in the 1990s. Anderson also grew up in the Valley, albeit in the 1970s, which is when Licorice Pizza is set, of the ’73 Oil Embargo. None of those details really matter to the movie; I just thought you’d like to know. What does matter is that slap on Alana’s backside. It’s a reminder that no matter how idyllic the past looks from today’s vantage, danger lurked

THURSDAY & FRIDAY NOVEMBER 18-19

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pinball machines, Barbra Streisand’s Bradley Cooper), even the local city council election. All those things come and go—even the creep in a number 12 shirt haunting the movie’s perimeter. The creep’s sudden presence rupscene is almost shot for shot, line for line, lifted from Taxi Driver. Yet, Anderson makes it feel new. Coming-of-age movies, set in the ’70s, movies set in Los Angeles are all well-tread territory. But, again, Anderson makes it all feel new. How? By shattering the form completely. Remember that old Anton Chekhov edict: Any gun brought on third? Anderson disagrees. There’s a lot in Licorice Pizza that is introduced and never resolved or explained, including the title—it’s the name of a long-gone record store—but none of that matters. What matters are Gary and Alana. Together, they are strong enough to make the rest of the world fall away.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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in the daylight. And when Alana isn’t being harassed, she’s being marginalized. When actor Jack Holden (Sean Penn) takes her out on a date, he can’t help but recount the Korean War for her, regardless of how little she wants to hear about it. And when Holden’s former director and present drinking buddy, Rex Blau (Tom Waits), shows up at the restaurant—The Tail o’ the Cock, a real Studio City haunt with a name that does double duty here—the two men push her aside to relive their glory macho days. The scene culminates with a fully loaded Holden jumping a motorcycle over a pile of burning wingback chairs on the eighth green of a golf course. All Alana wanted was to make Gary jealous by going for cocktails with an older man. Now she’s wrapped up in this. Licorice Pizza is a compilation of such scenes, vignettes that connect somewhat loosely but make perfect sense. The connections work because Gary and Alana make them work. Because what matters is them: Not daredevil stunts, oil embargos and

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 18

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 19

SHIFT

BREAK SCIENCE

MIDNIGHT NORTH

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 26

W/ FLASH MOUNTAIN FLOOD

SHLUMP

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BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

LIBRA

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Aries author Chris Brogan says,

“Don’t settle. Don’t finish crappy books. If you don’t like the menu, leave the restaurant. If you’re not on the right path, get off it.” That’s the best possible counsel for you to hear, in my astrological opinion. As an Aries, you’re already inclined to live by that philosophy. But now and then, like now, you need a forceful nudge in that direction. So please, Aries, go in pursuit of what you want, not what you partially want. Associate with the very best, most invigorating influences, not the mediocre kind.

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: There’s a Grateful Dead song, with lyrics written by John Perry Barlow, that says, “You ain’t gonna learn what you don’t want to know.” I propose you make that your featured advice for the next two weeks. I hope you will be inspired by it to figure out what truths you might be trying hard not to know. In so doing, you will make yourself available to learn those truths. As a result, you’ll be led on a healing journey you didn’t know you needed to take. The process might sound uncomfortable, but I suspect it will ultimately be pleasurable.

TAURUS

SCORPIO

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Author Kurt Vonnegut wrote wistfully, “I

still catch myself feeling sad about things that don’t matter anymore.” If similar things are running wild in your head, dear Taurus, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to banish them. You will have extra power to purge outdated emotions and reclaim at least some of the wild innocence that is your birthright. PS: There’s nothing wrong with feeling sad. In fact, feeling sad can be healthy. But it’s important to feel sad for the right reasons. Getting clear about that is your second assignment.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: “I’ll walk forever with stories inside me

that the people I love the most can never hear.” So says the main character in Gemini author Michelle Hodkin’s novel *The Evolution of Mara Dyer*. If that heart-rending statement has resonance with your own personal experience, I have good news: The coming weeks will be a favorable time to transform the situation. I believe you can figure out how to share key stories and feelings that have been hard to reveal before now. Be alert for unexpected opportunities and not-at-all-obvious breakthroughs.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: A study of people in 24 countries concluded that during the pandemic, over 80 percent of the population have taken action to improve their health. Are you in that group? Whether or not you are, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to go further in establishing robust self-care. The astrological omens suggest you’ll find it easier than usual to commit to good new habits. Rather than trying to do too much, I suggest you take no more than three steps. Even starting with just one might be wise. Top three: eating excellent food, having fun while exercising right, and getting all the deep sleep you need.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Leo-born scholar Edith Hamilton loved

to study ancient Greek civilization. She wrote, “To rejoice in life, to find the world beautiful and delightful to live in, was a mark of the Greek spirit which distinguished it from all that had gone before.” One sign of Greece’s devotion to joie de vivre was its love of play. “The Greeks were the first people in the world to play,” Hamilton exulted, “and they played on a great scale. All over Greece, there were games”—for athletes, dancers, musicians, and other performers. Spirited competition was an essential element of their celebration of play, as was the pursuit of fun for its own sake. In resonance with your astrological omens, Leo, I propose you regard ancient Greece as your spiritual home for the next five weeks.

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Poet Renée Ashley describes what she’s attracted to: “I’m drawn to what flutters nebulously at the edges, at the corner of my eye—just outside my certain sight. I want to share in what I am routinely denied or only suspect exists. I long for a glimpse of what is beginning to occur.” Although I don’t think that’s a suitable perspective for you to cultivate all the time, Sagittarius, I suspect it might be appealing and useful for you in the coming weeks. Fresh possibilities will be coalescing. New storylines will be incubating. Be alert for the oncoming delights of the unknown.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: What could you do to diminish your suffering? Your next assignment is to take two specific steps to begin that process. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you’re more likely than usual to see what’s necessary to salve your wounds and fix what’s broken. Take maximum advantage of this opportunity! I proclaim this next chapter of your life to be titled “In Quest of the Maximum Cure.” Have fun with this project, dear Capricorn. Treat it as a mandate to be imaginative and explore interesting possibilities.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: “It is a fault to wish to be understood

before we have made ourselves clear to ourselves,” wrote my favorite Aquarian philosopher, Simone Weil. I agree. It’s advice I regularly use myself. If you want to be seen and appreciated for who you really are, you should make it your priority to see and appreciate yourself for who you really are. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to make progress in this noble project. Start this way: Write a list of the five qualities about yourself that you love best.

VIRGO

PISCES

of the band Florence and the Machine told an interviewer why she wrote “Hunger.” She said, “I looked for love in things that were not love.” What were those things? According to her song, they included taking drugs and performing on stage. Earlier in Florence’s life, as a teenager, “love was a kind of emptiness” she experienced through her eating disorder. What about you, Virgo? Have you looked for love in things that weren’t love? Are you doing that right now? The coming weeks will be a good time to get straight with yourself about this issue. I suggest you ask for help from your higher self. Formulate a strong intention that in the future, you will look for love in things that can genuinely offer you love.

the sign of Pisces, praises our heroic instinct to rise above the forces of chaos. He writes, “The most authentic thing about us is our capacity to create, to overcome, to endure, to transform, to love, and to be greater than our suffering.” You’ve been doing a lot of that excellent work throughout 2021, dear Pisces. And I expect that you’ll be climaxing this chapter of your life story sometime soon. Thanks for being such a resourceful and resilient champion. You have bravely faced but also risen above the sometimes-messy challenges of plain old everyday life. You have inspired many of us to stay devoted to our heart’s desires.

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Virgo singer-songwriter Florence Welch

20

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Scorpio author and philosopher Albert Camus was a good thinker. At age 44, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature—the second-youngest recipient ever. And yet he made this curious statement: “Thoughts are never honest. Emotions are.” He regarded thoughts as “refined and muddy”—the result of people continually tinkering with their inner dialog so as to come up with partially true statements designed to serve their self-image rather than reflect authentic ideas. Emotions, on the other hand, emerge spontaneously and are hard to hide, according to Camus. They come straight from the depths. In accordance with astrological potentials, Scorpio, I urge you to keep these meditations at the forefront of your awareness in the coming weeks. See if you can be more skeptical about your thoughts and more trusting in your emotions.

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FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Nigerian author Ben Okri, born under

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


distracting. Opening the relationship is not an option

BY DAN SAVAGE Dear Dan: You recently posted a letter from a woman who was dating an “age appropriate” man. Could you 65-year-old straight white guy. Twice mar-

to me that anything that does not revolve around his penis penetrating something and coming out perfectly clean is a turnoff

Call 720.253.4710 All credit cards accepted No text messages

guy could divide his age in half, and then add the number 13 to that number to get the minimum age for a potential partner. Under Restrictive Edicts dating women my age, or older than me. But so far, my contacts with older women Dear FAILURE: There’s no way DTMFA. guidance from you on this subject. —Aging Gentleman Enquires Sincerely Dear AGES: Oh, wow—one of those rare older men into younger women. Don’t see your kind every day. Fuck, marry, or keep any consenting adult who’ll have you. Be realistic about your prospects (twice divorced and getting up there), AGES, and make a conscientious effort to control for dickful thinking, i.e., the kind of wishful thinking men of all ages engage in when their dicks are hard. Also, don’t be cluelessly coercive. Straight guys need to bear in mind that women are taught to prioritize men’s needs over their own (that’s the way women are socialized) and to fear male violence (that’s the way women are terrorized). Consequently, many women a man. So, when a woman gives you an

Dear Dan: relationship with my boyfriend for a year. when it happens—which is about twice a

be ex-boyfriend with a lovely parting gift, and a Fleshlight. Duct tape them together, leave them on your side of the bed, take your shit and go. Because it’s a warm, silent hole your boyfriend wants for a partner, ing suite of female reproductive organs, to say nothing of a woman with needs, wants, your ex-boyfriend won’t miss you or your vagina that bleeds or your ass that poops or your mouth that opens and asks for

within a week you’ll realize being alone is tyrannical shit. ty much have to love him—or you’d have to convince yourself you loved him—to put up with his shit for a week, much less a year. But the longer you stay in this frustration and resentment will grow, and a day will inevitably come when you’re no longer in love with him and what’s and sense of sexual agency will have been destroyed. Don’t wait until the love is gone and the damage is permanent to made your boyfriend the asshole he is,

my period comes, a side effect with

that has you doubting your own sanity.

is present, nothing can happen since you aren’t required to get him a parting gift, lovely or otherwise. Get yourself a powerful vibrator instead. Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, visit savage.love. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021

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SUSAN FRANCE

Pass the compassion

We interrupt your Thanksgiving feast for an uncomfortable discussion about the hunger next door

by John Lehndorff

SISTER CARMEN COMMUNITY CENTER FOOD BANK

A

fter 2020’s safely distanced Thanksgiving Day gatherings, large groups of family and friends are reuniting to break bread this week in Boulder. We look forward to the hugs, the

also fear the potential political discussions around the table. As a Thanksgiving Day host, your mission is to subtly guide the event so that everyone leaves still on speaking terms. The host’s job also comes with the responsibility to acknowledge the gorilla sitting in the middle of your festive dining room table. It’s hunger and its cousins. We’re not talking about feeding people a Thanksgiving or Christmas meal. That’s a nice annual guilt-washing gesture but it doesn’t touch on the pervasive food insecurity encountered daily year-round by your Boulder County neighbors. None of us wants to dwell on the damage that malnutrition does to children and families on Thanksgiving. We live in Boulder County, which has developed a stellar reputation as the home of stellar dining, craft brewing, natural foods, and organic farming, but the seasonings are not celestial for everyone who calls this place home. bors are food insecure, a problem the pandemic continues to make worse. That includes an estimated 15,000 City of Boulder residents who experience some form of food insecurity every month despite increased SNAP are much more likely to experience it. It’s not just the impact food insecurity has on nutrition and wellness in general—the fear of running out of food or being able to serve good meals, not just calories, has been directly linked to feelings of depression, anxiety and lack of dignity. Just ask anyone who has had to swallow their pride and visit a food bank in the past two years. We may passionately argue about other social, religious and political issues, but can we agree that nobody

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


deserves to experience this, no matter their zip code? When so many suffer this kind of damage, it makes you wonder whether Boulder, Longmont, Lafayette, or Louisville really are the much-touted best places to live in the U.S.A. On Thanksgiving, I ask the hosts at feasts and gatherings to do something brave. welcome, grace, or meditation, take a moment to tell them about hunger and to pass a zation feeding folks in Boulder County. With rising food prices, a shortage of truckers, and supply chain crises, local food banks will accept the dusty cans of Great Northern beans from your pantry, but what they need, because of the scale of the problem, is cash. Suggest to your guests it’s a service fee for living in paradise or a compassion tithe. Accept checks, debit cards, Apple Pay and Bitcoin, if you like. Remind anxious-to-dine friends and family that the money isn’t going to aid national or statewide programs for people they will never see, but rather those families in cars they see at stoplights on Arapahoe Avenue. The sheer number of these reputable nonin to the scope of this community problem as another pandemic winter ensues. Beside cash, all of these organizations welcome volunteers. Harvest of Hope Pantry: This organization solely focuses on maintaining a Boulder food pantry that serves everyone who comes to the door, including residents without kitchens. www.hopepantry.org EFAA: Emergency Family Assistance Association helps families with housing, transportation and hunger issues and maintains a North Boulder food bank. www.efaa.org Community Food Share of food for agencies throughout Boulder County with mobile and on-site pantries and programs for seniors. www.communityfoodshare.org Boulder Food Rescue: The organization collects soon-to-expire or overstocked food and produce from more than 20 Boulder supermarkets primarily by bicycle and distributes them to low-income housing, pantries, senior community centers and other sites organized by the residents. www.boulderfoodrescue.org Sr. Carmen Community Center vulnerable residents with basic services and resources including a large food pantry serving Lafayette, Louisville, Superior, and Erie. www.sistercarmen.org Meals on Wheels: Open since 1969, Meals on Wheels delivers nutritious meals to

Great Gifts of the Finest Foods & Imported Specialty Goods Skip a plane ride over the pond this holiday season and excite all of your senses in “La Vie Parisienne Boheme” while experiencing a truly original European Marketplace right here in Colorado!

Visit our wonderful wine and bubbly selection featuring over 60 varieties to pair perfectly with your festivities!

DAILY ARRIVALS of NEW & BEAUTIFUL HOLIDAY PRODUCTS!

www.mowboulder.org Feed the Stampede: Yes, there is a food insecurity problem at the University of Colorado Boulder, too. According to a recent national survey, 38 percent of students at four-year institutions face food insecurity. The Feed the Stampede on-campus pantry and mobile pantry have distributed more than 218,000 pounds to students. www.colorado.edu/volunteer/food As you go through this holiday season, party hosts can continue this soul-gratifying tradition. When your guests ask: “Is there anything I can bring?” respond by saying: “Yes, cash.”

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Words to chew on

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John Lehndorff hosts a call-in version of Radio Nibbles Thanksgiving Day at 8 a.m. on KGNU (88.5 FM, streaming on www.kgnu.org) to answer listeners’ last minute feast cooking questions.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021

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Getting the word out on Mortal XXX Becca Schepps wants hard kombuchas to succeed

by Michael J. Casey

I

thought that Mortal Kombucha was trying to be a hard kombucha, probably from day one,” Becca Schepps tells Boulder Weekly. You know Schepps: She’s the woman you read about two weeks ago, the one who started the Boulder-based kombucha company slightly out of spite and guided it to a successful line of non-alcoholic beverages adorning grocery store shelves around town. Well, that was only half the story, because Schepps’ kombucha isn’t just hanging out in the coolers with the sodas and coconut water, but by the beer aisle as well. She calls them Mortal XXX, four hard kombuchas clocking in at 5.2 percent alcohol by volume apiece: Cucumber Cool Off, Guavaloha Punch, Lavender Afternoon, and Pineapple Kapow. But, there was a hitch. Schepps knew how to make kombucha; she just didn’t know how to make beer. “It’s not as easy to make an alcohol product if you have no brewing experience,” Schepps says. So, she went looking for someone who did. “I was bothering every person I knew in beer,” she continues. “Like, ‘Help me do this.’” But kombucha contains active yeast, and most brewers are about controlling yeast. “Breweries do not like kombucha,” Schepps says. “They don’t want it in their lines. They don’t want to share kegs with you because you could just ruin their whole life.” Thankfully, Schepps had a connection with the guys at Boulder Fermentation Supply. They were the ones who helped her learn how to make kombucha in the next door, VisionQuest, and are no strangers to off-kilter projects. how to make hard kombucha,’” Schepps recalls. It also helped that Kandle had recently opened a third business, this one in North Boulder: Adamant Brew-

ing & Blending. Dedicated to mixed fermentation and oak-focused beers, Adamant was a chance for Kandle to play around with anything that might contaminate Vision Quest’s clean beers, including hard kombucha. That was in the fall of 2019. “In the winter, we had something really solid,” Schepps says. So Schepps ordered cans and labels, and Mortal XXX was ready for stores on March 6, 2020, with a launch party scheduled for March 13. “And then the world shut down,” Schepps says with a laugh. “The worst day in the world to launch a new product.” But like the pandemic-induced pause that allowed Schepps to regroup and reimagine the direction Mortal Kombucha was taking, the same

ON TAP: VISIT MORTALKOMBUCHA.COM for more information on Mortal Kombucha, Mortal XXX, both.

new brewery. Kandle closed Adamant in June 2020, and Natural Groceries and Whole Foods were ready for their second order. “We started talking to our co-packer [Rocky Mountain Cultures] up in Gypsum, who was trying to get their liquor license,” Schepps says. “But the TTB had also kind of—not shut down—but been on pause for approving new liquor licenses.” So Rocky Mountain Culture’s vice president of product development and quality control, Steven Dickman, “Because they’re best friends,” Schepps explains. we’ll make it for you.’ So we made it with them for a little bit until our co-packer got their liquor license up and running.” Which makes things a whole lot easier for Schepps. Now Mortal Kombucha and Mortal XXX share the same base kombucha and are made in the same facility under the watchful eye of Dickman—no stranger to kombucha himself as he founded High Country Kombucha back in

2004. The only thing left standing in Schepps’ way is consumer perception. Kombucha is pretty popular these days. So are beer alternatives like cider and seltzer. And while it seems like hard kombucha should be a no-brainer, inconsistencies and scalability issues from other producers have held hard kombuchas back. A trend Schepps is hoping Mortal XXX can buck. “This is a more exciting way to get seltzer,” Schepps says. “You like seltzer, but you feel kind of like, meh, after you drink it? Here you go, try this . . . You like cider, but you can only have a few because, like, they have that tart, too tart, taste after a while. Try this.” “So the idea is to really get that word out,” Schepps says. “Don’t be scared of hard kombucha. It is a great low calorie, gluten-free functional beer alternative that can taste just as good as your pilsners, pale ales, ciders, saisons, and sours.”

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JOHN LEHNDORFF

Taste of the Week

Hamantaschen, challah, and rugelach @ Boulder

by John Lehndorff

T

his year Thanksgiving Day dovetails with Hanukkah, November 28 to December 6. Since the Festival of Lights involves eight days of gatherings, appropriate treats to serve family and guests are essential. While the recently opened Rosenberg’s Bagels & Delicatessen, 1262 College Avenue, is becoming known for its classic sandwiches, it also quietly provides access to the goods from one of the better bakeries in Denver. For starters, there are hamantashen, buttery cookies topped with jams including apricot and raspberry. My favorite is the sweet JOHN LEHNDORFF

a crunchy sugar coating. At Rosenberg’s, that means cinnamon walnut, chocolate, raspberry walnut, and apricot deli favorite, black and white cookies, are cake-like rounds perfectly glazed with vanilla and chocolate sweetness. Other sources of pastries in Boulder include the Village Nosh online (thevillagenosh.

babka, and poppy seed makowiec (potica). Rye Society Deli in the Avanti food hall offers rugelach and black and white cookies. Besides Rosenberg’s, other local sources of challah bread loaves include Moe’s Bagels and Breadworks in Boulder and Longmont’s Babette’s Bakery and Whistling Boar catering.

Another roadfood attraction Jewish deli cuisine was the original Zaidy’s Deli where generations of Denverites gathered to satisfy their craving for pastrami sandwiches, blintzes, chopped liver and knishes. The heavy sigh that erupted when the eatery closed several years ago turned to joy when Zaidy’s Deli recently reopened at 600 S. Holly Street in Denver. On my return, it was great to see Zaidy’s near-perfect chicken matzo ball soup was still on the menu. Clear chicken broth (no murky stock here!) is packed with only the necessities: noodles, celery, onion, carrot rounds, and chicken pieces with a tender matzo ball so big half of it sits above the soup. The steaming broth has that chicken-fat sheen. Big eaters go for an extra ball and extra broth. Meals here still come with classic half-sour deli pickles. Zaidy’s Deli is also a bakery and market offering everything from raspberry chocolate rugelach and black and white cookies to challah and bialys.

Culinary calendar

Meals on Wheels in Boulder has a slew of volunteer positions available. Jobs include drivers, packers, kitchen assistants, Eat Well Café lunch cashiers, and Niche Market cashiers. mowboulder.org/volunteer

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BLACK CAT FARMS

What to do with too many carrots

Once you sample one of the heirloom carrots grown and sold at the Black Cat Farm stand at 4975 Jay Road, you have one of those lightbulb moments. All carrots are not the same, and most supermarket carrots are truly tasteless. Besides varieties of carrots like like Chantenay, Jaune du Doubs, and Shin Kuroda, the year-round stand also offers winter produce, meats, breads, grains, and prepared foods. Here’s a popular recipe from chef Eric Skokan’s Black Cat Bistro menu.

ROASTED CARROTS WITH TARATOR SAUCE 1 two-pound bunch of carrots salt Tarator Sauce Remove the tops from the carrots. Steam tops as greens or use in pesto. Trim and peel a baking sheet and roast in a preheated 400-degree oven for about 15 minutes, or until carrots until tender and just beginning to brown. Transfer quickly to a bowl, top with sauce and serve immediately. TARATOR SAUCE 1 cup toasted whole almonds About 2 tablespoons roasted garlic sea salt fresh lemon juice d processor, combine the nuts, garlic, and 2 tablespoons water. Process on high speed until very smooth, scraping the sides of the bowl if necessary. With the motor running, slowly add the oil until fully incorporated. Season with salt and lemon juice. Store in a tightly covered container in the fridge for up to four days.

NOVEMBER 25, 2021

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


The power of medicinal mindfulness

Psychedelic-assisted therapy clinics are becoming more popular as stigma dies—Boulder’s own has been treating patients since 2012

by Will Brendza

T

he two men were biking together when a car came out of nowhere and hit one of them, killing him. The second biker was left physically unscathed, but he was severely traumatized, having watched his best friend encounter a fatal accident right anxiety plagued him for years—he couldn’t escape the memory of that tragedy—and it didn’t seem to be abating. He was suffering and he’d tried conventional treatments: psychotherapy, meditation, medication, etc. But nothing seemed to be helping. That’s when his therapist suggested trying psychedelic-assisted therapy. Following research from places like the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), this emerging form of medicinally enhanced psychic treatment is rapidly gaining momentum and popularity (“Shattering the psychedelic taboo,” November 11, 2021). The cyclist agreed, found Daniel McQueen with the Center for Medicinal Mindfulness, and signed up for several sessions at the Boulder-based clinic. “He was able to come away with a lot of personal resolution and acceptance,” McQueen, who has over 20 years of transformational and healing arts experience, recalls. “It was healing his own trauma, but also addressing the grief over the loss of his friend. And then also stepping into the transpersonal realm of spirituality and understanding his relationship to the world in a way that felt really meaningful for him.” The man’s PTSD symptoms waned over numerMcQueen says the patient had faced his trauma and worked through those knots that conventional therapy hadn’t been able to untangle.

“It’s not always easy, but it’s always worth it,” he says. “There’s incredible gifts in the transformational process of waking up to yourself.” It’s just one success story of many that sticks out in McQueen’s mind. His kind of to open up in this state and in the entire country. They’ve learned a lot over

ment programs as they did. Currently, the Center for Medicinal Mindfulness offers both cannabis-assisted and ketamine-assisted psychotherapy; it offers private sessions or retreats, group sessions, training, and community events. therapy, they’re working hard to educate and enlighten people about it as well. “These medicines, ketamine and cannabis, are very emotionally supportive and positive experiences,” McQueen says. “Even hard [traumatic] material feels really ‘held’ and emotionally supported.” McQueen has had an interest in psychedelic medicine since he was a teenager, he says. He studied transpersonal therapy at Naropa, and has been working with legal, medicine-enhanced therapy for many years. He started the Center for Medicinal Mindfulness in Boulder in 2012 following the legalization of cannabis, and has been helping people work through their own traumas using the powers of psychedelic medicine ever since. In 2019 he published a book, Psychedelic Cannabis: Breaking the Gate, where he details his process of using cannabis as a full-blown psychedelic medicine. It ing,” meditation, music, and of course, guidance. All of which is built into the program at the Center for Medicinal Mindfulness. “I’m there [during sessions] to help guide people if they get into choppy waters when it comes to addressing their human trauma,” McQueen says. McQueen will administer the cannabis blend, and set the patients up on a bed with fuzzy blankets and eye-covers. “People will lie down and I guide them through a general body-scan meditation with eye coverings and

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maybe 10 minutes, the person’s having a full-blown psychedelic experience.” These experiences are shorter than a conventional psychedelic journey like ketamine or psilocybin, McQueen says. If a patient needs to come out, it’s as easy as sitting up and taking the blindfold off. The setup for McQueen’s ketamine-assisted therapy is similar, he says, though it serves different purposes (and is not as easy to sit up out of). He explains that cannabis is a very “somatic medicine,” allowing people to dive deeper into their own body and resolve deep trauma. Ketamine, by contrast, is an anesthetic drug and a very strong dissociative psychedelic that pulls a patient away from the “self.” It can also help to “reset” the patient’s nervous system, according to McQueen. That contrast is why the two forms of psychedelic-assisted therapy work so well together, and why McQueen integrates both into some patient’s therapy sessions over several weeks or months. “Sometimes we have protocols where we’ll start with ketamine if somebody is really having a hard time and that’ll help regulate their nervous system,” McQueen says. “Then we’ll do a series of cannabis sessions to help them do the deep dives into the trauma resolution work. Then, at the end of that we’ll reset their nervous system again with another ketamine experience to reorient [them] towards health and wellbeing.” With more research about psychedelics being surrounding these substances starting to dissolve, psychedelic-assisted therapy centers like the Center for Medicinal Mindfulness will undoubtedly become more prevalent. McQueen says they already have international programs that work with psilocybin and DMT, but they’re waiting for the laws in the U.S. to change before they venture into that territory here. They’re “100 percent” moving in that direction when they can, McQueen says. “We’re just in a really unique position to have been working with plant medicine [for so long] already,” he says. It’s a fact that he says he never takes for granted. “I’m just super fortunate that I get to do the work I do as a legal, psychedelic guide.”

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Strains of NIDA

flect Legal Markets.” In it, cannabinoid profiles among commercial plants from Denver, Oakland, Sacramento, and Seattle were compared against that of NIDA’s. It was a phenotypic study, examining the outwardly observable characteristics of the different plant products. “We found that NIDA’s cannabis has lower variation and has lower potency compared to the private market,” Verga says of the 2017 paper. They concluded that NIDA’s cannabis consistently showed limited diversity in cannabinoid levels, in the cannabinoids present, and in the ratio of those cannabinoids. “If you smoke cannabis from NIDA you are probably not going to feel the same thing that you’re getting from dispensaries,” Vergara says. Vergara’s more-recent 2021 study of NIDA’s cannabis, titled “Genomic Evidence That Governmentally Produced Cannabis Sativa Poorly Represents Genetic Variation Available in State Markets,” was a follow-up to their 2017 paper. It examined the genotypic variation in NIDA’s cannabis (that would account for the phenotypic expressions they observed in 2017) compared to that of commercial cannabis. And again they discovered that they were disconcertingly dissimilar. “What we found is that the genome is very different from the strains of the available markets,” she says. “They do not [genetically] cluster with any other commercial strains. They cluster kind of on their own. They’re more similar to each other than to any commercial strain.” This means that all of the scientific data coming from other research on cannabis isn’t as accurate as it

In the U.S., “research-grade” cannabis means “sub-commercial quality”—which is hurting scientific progress

by Will Brendza

F

or a very long time, “research grade” cannabis could only come from a single source: the National Center for the Development of Natural Products at the University of Mississippi—a facility producing marijuana exclusively for the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA) research. All cannabis used in scientific settings throughout the U.S., be it at a university lab or with a private researcher, had to come from NIDA. But NIDA’s cannabis is of exceptionally poor quality, as researchers like Daniela Vergara have found. It’s a problem that has been hindering scientific, medical, and legal progress in marijuana research, she says, but it’s a problem that has a very simple solution. Vergara is an evolutionary biologist studying cannabis genomics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She and her colleagues have produced two papers examining the quality of NIDA’s cannabis: The first, in 2017, examined the phenotypic variation of the federally produced marijuana, and the second, in 2021, looked at its genomic variation. Both studies examined NIDA’s strains from different angles, yet came to very similar conclusions: “Federally produced cannabis does not reflect [what’s being sold in] the legal market,” Vergara says. Her 2017 study is titled “Compromised External Validity: Federally Produced Cannabis Does Not Re-

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could (or should) be, according to Vergara. “People are not buying NIDA’s cannabis when they go to a dispensary,” Vergara says, and that’s simply because the two strains of cannabis that NIDA grows aren’t even commercially available. “[We] are analyzing just a fraction of genomic variation of [what is] out there . . . so all of the scientific claims that have been made using those varieties may not be valid.” She likens it to any other genetic study: If you’re trying to research human genetics, but were only allowed to study two people, and they were both siblings, your results wouldn’t be very representative. Vergara isn’t the only researcher who has come to these conclusions. In 2019, a group of researchers led by Anna L. Schwab (a co-author on Vergara’s papers) found in a separate study that NIDA’s cannabis was genetically more similar to hemp than psychoactive marijuana. And in 2021, in another study comparing NIDA’s cannabis to both commercially- and wild-grown cannabis, Schwabe found, “‘research grade marijuana’ provided for research is genetically distinct from most retail drug-type cannabis that patients and patrons are consuming.” These studies provide evidence that NIDA’s cannabis is skewing the scientific understanding of the cannabis plant and its effects, which is undoubtedly holding legalization back. That seems to be changing, though. In May 2021 the DEA finally changed its policy, ending NIDA’s cannabis monopoly by licensing four other bulk cannabis manufacturers to produce research-grade marijuana for science. It isn’t a perfect situation, since researchers still can’t get their research-grade cannabis from a dispensary—but it could help mitigate the problem. Now, government-approved cultivators are allowed to provide researchers with any marijuana product currently on the market. Problematically, though, they still have to grow and produce those products solely themselves, all at their DEA-licensed facilities. Vergara points to a much simpler, and far more effective solution that would solve all of these problems: “Legalization,” she says, flatly. If the federal government simply ended prohibition, cannabis science would no longer be held up, held back, or held hostage by the DEA.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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