Boulder Insider 8.18.2022

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2022

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STAFF Publisher, Fran Zankowski Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor-in-Chief, Caitlin Rockett News Editor, Will Brendza Arts & Culture Editor, Will Matuska Food Editor, John Lehndorff Interns, Chad Peterson, Ben Berman PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman SALES AND MARKETING Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Account Executives, Matthew Fischer, Carter Ferryman, Chris Allred Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar GENERAL Circulation Team, Sue Butcher, Ken Rott, Chris Bauer Bookkeeper, Gina Campanella Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Editor-at-Large, Joel Dyer Cover Photo, Jennifer Hohlfelder (“Pearl Street” 36 x 48” oil on canvas, 2020) Jennifer Hohlfelder is a Boulder, Colorado-based figurative oil painter depicting scenes and figures with a nostalgic flair. Her works, current and upcoming exhibits, and more can be found on her website JenniferHohlfelderArt.com and on Instagram @Jennifer_Hohlfelder_Art.

11 .......By the Numbers Boulder at a glance

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13 .......Media Archaeology Lab Travel through tech of the past

15....... Beat Book Shop

Serving Boulder’s culture literati

19.......Queer Art Organics An open mic for the kids

Reader, welcome to BOULDER.

20 .......Mural Walking Tour

B

Take a walk, see some art

oulder is full of surprises. Whether you’ve lived here for a lifetime or just moved in, there’s always something to discover. That’s what Boulder Insider offers: a guide to discover the hidden wonders of this beautiful city, from its food, music and art to its inclusive open mics and festivals. Take a (rare) rainy day and explore Boulder’s Media Archaeology Lab, where you can go and turn on, open up, play and create with still-working technology from the past, like phonographs, personal computers, handheld devices and game consoles. For the intelligentsia, check out the Beat Book Shop, where owner Tom Peters has rubbed elbows with Beat Generation greats like Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman. Young Boulderites searching for community and identity can find a home at Queer Art Organics, an open mic for youths. The whole family can take a walking tour of a handful of the nearly 100 murals created through Boulder’s Street Wise Mural Festival, or peruse through Boulder Weekly’s (fairly) comprehensive list of Boulder’s festivals throughout the year. Read our stories on Boulder’s community-driven art district in North Boulder, where to get the best selection of international spices and foods, and how to get into intimate concerts held in unexpected places around Boulder. So, we’ve given you a few ideas, now get out there and explore.

27 .......Best of Fest

Boulder’s got festivals every month of the year

31 .......NoBo Art District

A community-built art scene

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Insider is a special issue of Boulder Weekly, which is available every Thursday throughout the county.

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Boulder

2022

by the numbers Founded: 1858 Incorporated: 1871 Counties: Boulder County Elevation: 5,318 feet above sea level Land area: 27.37 square miles Highest Visible Peak: Longs Peak, 14,259 feet Water ways: Boulder Creek, South Boulder Creek, Boulder Reservoir Parks: Chautauqua Park, North Boulder Park, Martin Park, Bear Creek Park, Meadow Glen Park, Central Park, Settler’s Park, Scott Carpenter Park, Valmont Bike Park, Elmer’s Two Mile Park, Elks Park, Crestview Park, Wonderland Lake Park

Population: 108,777

Population growth since 2010: 7.82% Median Age: 28.8 Average work commute: 19.1 minutes Average Household Income: $117,554 Persons in poverty: 20.4% Persons owning a bicycle: 70%

Breweries: 18 Wineries: 3 Cideries: 2 Meadery: 1 Distilleries: 4 Dispensaries: 28 Churches/Synagogues /Mosques: 59 Schools: 56 Museums: 8

Days of Sunshine: 245 Average Winter Low: 18.9 degrees in January Average Summer High: 88.1 degrees in July Average Rain Precipitation: 18.1 inches Average Snow Precipitation: 71.1 inches UV Index: 3.3 yearly average

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2022 BELOW: COMMODORE 64, RELEASED 1982. MEDIA CREDIT: THE MEDIA ARCHAEOLOGY LAB.

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Past is prologue Travel through tech of the past at Boulder’s Media Archaeology Lab by Will Matuska

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disks, she began to wonder what difference it would make to access the poem through other platforms. “So I started what I called then the Archaeological Media Lab and filled this tiny room on campus with about a dozen Apple lle computers,” she says. She began branching out to investigate other differences between devices like the Commodore 64, the computer comparable to the Apple lle at the time. Soon, the lab grew into a collection of “so-called obsolete tech” and MAL was well underway. Emerson was not an expert in the history of computing prior to founding the lab. Now, Emerson focuses on uncovering “crisis points” in past media where there was the possibility to create a technology that’s different from what we have now. She uses past tech alternatives as a way to reimagine alternatives in the future. This research has led Emerson and MAL to uncover some big questions. Emerson tries to expand visitor’s senses of what could be. “We’re always told that computers from the 1970s and 1980s were slow or big or clunky or inefficient,” she says. “But what if there’s some value in slowing down? What if efficiency isn’t as important as longevity?” Boulder might be the perfect place for MAL to exist. Hobbyists, tinkerers and people in the booming tech industry often visit the lab. Emerson says that people’s eyes light up as they gravitate toward the machines they used as kids, like the eMac or Apple Macintosh. Many see the lab as a custodian of history. MAL also prides itself on being open to anyone. Visitors can stay and hang out in the lab as long as they want. This inclusive space has helped build both a local community and one around the world. After experiencing the lab, Emerson hopes visitors “see all these incredible pieces of technology from the past as offering up ideas for how we might do things differently or even better in the future.” This fits the MAL’s motto: “The past must be lived so that the present can be seen.” BOULDER INSIDER 2022

Details: Media Archeology Lab, 1320 Grandview Ave., Boulder. Open-house hours: Monday 2-5 p.m., Tuesday 1-4:30 p.m., Wednesday 12:30-3:30 p.m., Friday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and Saturday noon-3 p.m. No need to schedule a visit. For updated holiday hours and emergency closures: twitter.com/mediarchaeology

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ost digital media labs are known as a place for research using cutting edge tools. The Media Archaeology Lab (MAL) takes a different approach. Rather than keeping up with the newest tech, MAL collects still-functioning tech from the past to help think about an alternate present and future—and you can visit it. MAL, crammed into the basement of the Grandview Cottage on CU Boulder’s campus, has a serious collection of old technology. The lab has acquired old tech from phonograph players, magic lanterns and historic personal computers to handheld devices and game consoles like the Altair 8800b, Commodore 64, Apple lle and more. According to its website, MAL’s collection of functional media could be one of the largest in the world. Lori Emerson, founder and director of MAL, says the lab exists for a variety of reasons. “It’s there to be used by artists to create art using old tech,” she says. “It’s there to educate people of all ages about how strange and varied the history of tech actually is. It’s also there to show people how things used to be in the world of technology and how they could be different in the future.” It functions as an open space for creativity, research and experience-based learning. The lab’s community of staff members, volunteers, students and faculty work to preserve and maintain this technology. Unlike a museum, Emerson says you can’t really understand a piece of technology just by looking at it. “The lab is also about play and giving people a space where they can just freely delight in all these interesting pieces of technology,” she says. MAL also uses its collection of tech for cross-disciplinary experimental research and teaching—much of which intertwines with Emerson’s own research. Prior to founding MAL, Emerson’s background was in experimental poetry and digital poetry. When she discovered a poem called First Screening by Canadian poet bpNichol that was distributed on 5-and-a-half inch floppy

MIDDLE, TOP: EMAC, RELEASED 2002. MEDIA CREDIT: THE MEDIA ARCHAEOLOGY LAB. MIDDLE BOTTOM: SMITH-CORONA COUGAR TYPEWRITER, RELEASED 1963. MEDIA CREDIT: THE MEDIA ARCHAEOLOGY LAB.

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Photo: Chris DeCicco


Boulder

2022

Stranger than fictiо For 33 years, Tom Peters has served Boulder— and the culture literati—at Beat Book Shop

by Nick Hutchinsо

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ruth is stranger than fiction for Tom Peters. At least, that’s how it seems when you talk to the owner of Boulder’s venerable Beat Book Shop. Peters, who is also a published poet and a longtime fan of punk and alternative rock, has been selling books and records from his shop on Pearl Street for more than three decades; and along the way he’s gathered some stories. There was the time when guitarist Joe Perry of Aerosmith visited the shop and asked Peters if he could get him a first-edition of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. Peters says he asked Perry to put him on a guest list so that See STRANGER on PAGE 16

Details: The Beat Book Shop sells used books, records, CDs and memorabilia at 1200 Pearl St., Suite 10

LEFT: THE BOULDER BEAT BOOKSTORE HAS BEEN VISITED BY MANY BEAT CULTURE LITERARI LIKE ALLEN GINSBERG (PICTURED FAR LEFT WITH TOM PETERS) AND PETER ORLOVSKY.

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TOM PETERS

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BOULDER INSIDER 2022

he could deliver the book directly to the rocker at his concert at Fiddler’s Green; but when Peters called the venue to confirm that he was actually on the list, he wasn’t—so Perry never got the novel, which, according to Peters, has a value around $8,500. “Steve grew up in Boston, and he said he wanted the book,” explains Peters. “But I can’t carry around a valuable book at a hot concert unless I know I’m definitely going to be able to hand it off to the buyer.” The list of famous writers and musicians who have visited the Beat Book Shop is impressive. During the many years the store has been in existence, beat culture literati including Allen Ginsberg, Peter Orlovsky, Gary Snyder, Diane di Prima, Lucia Berlin and Anne Waldman all dropped in at various points to browse its racks. Musicians are also drawn to the store. Peters reels off a list of visitors including the Scottish troubadour Donovan, Robyn Hitchcock, Abra Moore, Lady Miss Kier (of the group Deee-Lite), Patti Smith, Glen Hansard and members of the band Yo La Tengo. “The shop allows me the opportunity to meet many interesting people,” Peters shares. “[Glen Hansard] has been buying books from me for a long time now. He and his [then] girlfriend [Markéta Irglová of the band The Swell Season] stopped by when they were in town. They were in the movie Once. Glen was also in the Scottish band Texas. That was a great band. A lot of artists who were big in the ’90s came in. Abra Moore who was in the movie Slacker [and also a member of Poi Dog Pondering before launching her solo musical career] came in. She also performed at my poetry series. The singer [Lady Miss Kier] and the DJ from Deee-Lite stopped by and bought a bunch of poetry books and records. The poet Ai [Ogawa] has also visited.” Peters says he has about 25,000 used books in his shop in addition to vinyl records. A native of Michigan and the son of a teacher and a newspaper writer, he opened the Beat Book Shop in 1990, shortly after graduating from The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University. The store, which has had three locations on Pearl Street since first opening, is currently located (downstairs) at 1200 Pearl St., #10. Peters cites his interest in reading as part of his impetus for selling books. “I would go to the library a lot as a kid. I always loved books,” Peters I

BOULDER WEEKLY


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TOM PETERS

relates. “As I got older I read even more. For the three years before starting at Naropa, I read an entire book every 24 hours. I read a thousand books in three years. I’d start one and finish it every day. There might have been a few times when the books took me a couple days to finish, but I love reading.” In addition to reading, Peters is an avid music aficionado, which is reflected in the music he plays in his shop and the records he sells there. During the years he spent living and working in Los Angeles, prior to settling in Boulder, he says he took in many live musical performances on the coast. “I saw live music in LA every day and collected records vigorously while I was there. I would stop at a store and buy a book and a record every night,” he says. Peters’ obsession with collecting music and books dates back to his youth. “I started buying tapes as a teenager. I had hundreds of tapes that I’d carry back and forth to my car every day in a wooden box that I made. It doubled as an armrest. Over the years I’ve learned a lot about what makes books valuable. Not just what book to read, but how much they are worth and what about them contributes to their price. I retain information about all that stuff. I’ve been doing it for 35 years. The longer you do it, the more you learn about your trade.” Covering the cost of a lease on Pearl Street doesn’t allow for much downtime and requires Peters to stay focused on his job, which he says he still loves. “I work harder now than I ever have before. We mostly keep the lights on by selling books from the store. I figure about 90% of my business is done in here. Online sales might cover the expense of the shop for about two months during a good year. I have to work seven days a week to do this, but I have the same job that I had 33 years ago, which is great. I mean I’ve worked continuously for 33 years at the same job on Pearl Street. I don’t know how many people can say that.” Peters says that January and February are his slowest months for sales. He also notes that he has a few autographed books by Jack Kerouac (although not a signed first-edition copy of On The Road, which with an original dust jacket, he estimates would be worth about $25,000).

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2022 LEFT: AIMEE HERMAN READS A POEM AT ONE OF THE QUEER ART ORGANICS OPEN MIC EVENTS. BELOW: THE OPEN MICS ARE A SPACE FOR EVERYONE—OF ALL AGES AND GENDER IDENTITIES— TO EXPRESS THEMSELVES.

Don’t stop them now Aimee Herman’s Queer Art Organics by Adam Perry

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imee Herman was a keystone of the artistic community in Boulder in the late 2000s while studying creative writing at Naropa University’s Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, the passionate poet’s curly fire-engine-red hair and glasses marking an unmistakable presence as the weekly host of the since-closed Folsom Street Coffee’s open mic. Herman—who uses they/their pronouns—calls their poetry “an experiment with what happens when you disembowel the gender of a body.” Born in New Jersey, though Brooklyn is where their “heart was born,” Herman returned to Brooklyn after graduating from the Kerouac school. They earned a creative-writing Master of Fine Arts from Long Island University Brooklyn and ran numerous open mics in New York while teaching English at several community colleges and coming to identify as non-binary. “It’s complicated,” Herman says. “I started using that vocabulary in New York, but I have felt it for a long time. I just didn’t always have the words. And non-binary isn’t static for me. I feel trans. I feel queer. I feel like I’m trying everyday to check in with what letters are right to feel more visible to myself.” Last fall, Herman and their husband, Trae, moved to Boulder to be closer to a dear friend from Herman’s time at Naropa and leave the New York pace for a while. Continuing to teach for Brooklyn Community College remotely, Herman brought their Queer Art Organics to the Trident Café, and it eventually moved to Out Boulder. “I moved here to try and feel less anxious,” Herman says, “and I think Trae and I were just done with New York. I created Queer Art Organics at a place [in Manhattan] called Dixon Place, this really great, affirming, experimental place. It wasn’t an open mic; it was a monthly show featuring

about three different queer performers of some sort, and I did that for several years. When I moved here, I felt like I was jonesing to create another space like that and be part of the queer community. “That’s one of the challenges of moving to a new place,” Herman notes. “You have to start over in every aspect. Immediately, a month in, I was reaching out to a whole bunch of places, and I think March was our first show at Trident.” Herman says they have found “so much support and community at Out Boulder,” where Queer Art Organics now takes place the last Sunday of every month, from 3-5 p.m. Performers are welcome to share creative writing and music, but Herman stresses that anything goes. “I think that the weirdness has not yet started,” Herman quips, “but I’m hoping it will as the series continues. I think it’s getting out there more and being comfortable. The strange moments are the best parts of an open mic, where it’s this chain of inspiration.” Herman has published two full-length books of poems and one Young Adult novel, and their poems have been featured in countless journals and anthologies. They also play ukulele and enjoy mixing poetry and music.

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Combining that long creative history with many years of teaching English and small colleges has come to fruition already in Boulder, where Herman will begin teaching English and music this fall at the September School, a private high school that “prioritizes social and emotional learning as highly as academic growth.” On their way to being hired by the September School, Herman became somewhat of a “queer elder” for some local kids, as young as 12, who have been frequenting Queer Art Organics since it debuted in Boulder at the Trident Café. “It’s an all-ages space,” Herman says. “Honestly, my favorite moment was when I first saw the kids on stage. I’ve been going to open mics for so long, and it’s never been people that young. I love that they feel comfortable enough not only to be in that space but to share their art. Kids are 100% welcome.” Straight people are welcome, too, with some guidelines. “I would hope that people see that it’s a queer open mic,” Herman explains, “and if they’re not queer they’re at least honoring the space and maybe reading a poem from a book that I bring, or saying ‘I’m not queer, but I’m reading a poem that’s queer.’” Herman’s relationship with the

BOULDER INSIDER 2022

Details: Queer Art Organics takes place the last Sunday of every month, from 3-5 p.m. at Trident Booksellers & Cafe, 940 Pearl St., Boulder Trident Café is living on, too, with a monthly series called And Now: Featuring… that will welcome an “open jam session” from 6-6:30 p.m. and then feature four or five curated “artists of all kinds.” Queer Art Organics has hosted numerous “features,” from poets to performance artists, and a few have been respected local poets (such as Hayden Dansky) while others have simply reached out to Herman and succeeded in getting their blessing to feature. “I don’t want it to be about your bio,” Herman says. “I don’t care if you’ve featured before; I don’t care if you’ve even written a poem before. If you want a feature, feature. I don’t even need to see your stuff. I trust you. I would like for them to be queer. I have not been disappointed in any of them at all.” As an experienced poet and musician, Herman says they miss not just being a host but also a performer, but Queer Art Organics has been an incredibly positive way to get reacquainted with Boulder over a decade after leaving Colorado for New York City. “My favorite moments are watching people come together, and it’s always a supportive audience. I’ve consistently felt this intense level of support, kindness, community, excitement.” Herman says that local bars, cafes, and spaces off all kinds are welcome to get in touch about hosting one-off editions of Queer Art Organics. “I definitely feel sort of like when I moved here I had one little patch of a quilt, and as the months have progressed I keep sewing on more patches and I have enough maybe to cover my lap right now. I want a queer quilt big enough to fill up rooms.” I

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Boulder

2022

Art that speaks

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by Caitlin Rockett

photos by Matt Maenpaa

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early 100 murals across the city come from Boulder’s Street Wise Mural Festival, which brings diverse artists together every fall to blanket empty walls around the city with optimistic murals that often focus on equality, identity and community. We’ve put together a walking tour that will take you through a mere nine of these murals, starting downtown on 14th Street behind Boulder Theater and running east to Folsom Village, then north to the Dairy Arts Center. We’ve also mentioned a few of our favorite spots where you can stop for food, drinks and more art along the way.

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Alley behind Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St.: 1. Artist: Shannon Galpin, (“Say Her Name”)—Shannon Galpin is

a powerhouse: a global activist, artist, author, explorer, and public speaker. In addition to her conservation work, she spent more than a decade on women’s rights projects in Afghanistan and was awarded an honorary achievement diploma by the International Olympic Committee for her work on gender equality through sports. This mural is a part of her Love Letters series, which highlights violence against women.

2. Artist: Gabriel Sanchez (woman with sunglasses)—Gabriel Sanchez makes paintings that focus on Cuban current events and politics as seen through the lens of portraiture. Sanchez splits his time between Colorado and Cuba.

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3. Artist: Gregg Deal (missing and murdered indigenous women)—Gregg Deal, of the Pyramid Lake Paiute

Tribe, challenges Western perceptions of Indigenous people, touching on issues of race, history and stereotypes. Deal tells stories of decolonization and appropriation that affect Indian country. Nearby: Grab food from one of the seven eateries inside Avanti Food and Beverage (1401 Pearl St.). Walk east along Pearl and stop by Into the Wind (1408 Pearl St.) to see fantastic kites. If you’ve got youngsters in tow, snap a pic of your kid riding a bear, frog or rat at the Children’s Sculpture Playground. Maybe stop by Gelato Boy (1433 Pearl St.) for advanced flavors like blackberry cornbread and lavender poppy. You could also just people-watch a bit, beer in hand for the adults, on Mountain Sun’s (1535 Pearl St.) Pearl-facing patio, because the next mural is right around the corner.

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Alley behind Mountain Sun Pub, 1535 Pearl St.: 4. Artist: Cal Duran—Cal Duran grew up in Colorado with roots

that bridge India and Native America. His work explores parallels between these hybrid identities, mostly in myth, religion and ritual. He uses ancient traditional processes to produce work through clay and sculpture. Nearby: Keep heading east on Pearl and stop by Colorado Glass Works (1500 Pearl St., Suite D), where owner/artist Meggy Wilm sells beautiful handmade stained glass pieces, but also teaches classes and sells supplies to get you started on your own stained glass art.

See MURALS on PAGE 22

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1647 Pearl St. (east facing wall on 16th Street): 5. Artist: Moe Gram—Moe Gram is a multidisciplinary artist who creates paintings, murals, collages and installations. Gram’s work involves themes of identity, empathy, human connection and self reflection through vivid colors and the suggestion of movement, noise and texture.

Nearby: Paradise Found Records and Music (1646 Pearl St.) owner Will Paradise bought Bart’s Records from Bart Stinchcomb in 2016 and ran the store for five years under the original moniker at cramped digs on Folsom Street. Paradise moved the operation to Pearl in 2021 for more spacious accommodations and a gentle makeover. Stocked full of vinyl, CDs, books, posters and stereo equipment, plus a staff eager to talk about records, it’s a music-lover’s paradise. Continue to explore other offerings on your easterly walk down Pearl Street as you make your way to the Chamber of Commerce.

Boulder Chamber of Commerce, 2440 Pearl St.: 6. Artist: Armando Silva—Armando was born in Sombrerete, Zacatecas,

Mexico, and moved to northern Colorado with his family at age 5. A recipient of a Governor’s Creative Leadership award from Colorado Creative Industries, Silva has collaborated with cities, nonprofits, businesses and educators across the state. His large-scale mural installations often focus on compelling portraits that tell personal stories. Nearby: Stop by River and Woods (2328 Pearl St.) if you’re feeling up to another drink or maybe a cheese board to share with friends. This century-old miner’s cabin has a charming backyard patio. See MURALS on PAGE 24

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1845 Folsom (the building is vacant, next to an empty lot): 7. Artist: Julio Mendoza: Julio “Jwlç” Mendoza was born in El Paso, Texas, but raised in Ciudad Juárez until he was 11 years. Since then, he’s lived in the Westwood area of Denver, growing in his artistic practice through the support of the local community. His culture, heritage and identity are central to his work.

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Experience Boulder By

E-Bike

Folsom Village, 1605 Folsom St. (the shopping center that houses Village Coffee Shop): 8. Artist: AJ Davis—AJ Davis has worked alongside internationally

renowned artists including Nychos, Mike Giant, and Fabian ‘Bane’ Florin to create limited edition series of cast metal sculpture. He’s painted walls in Europe, Indonesia and Central America. Nearby: Snag an e-bike if you can, because your next stop is about a half a mile away at the Dairy Arts Center. But you should stop into McGuckin’s Hardware (2525 Arapahoe Ave.) to see why it’s a beloved business— more department store than hardware store. If you’ve skipped out on eating at other parts of the journey, let us suggest a stop by Efrain’s, where you can bliss out over the cuisine of Northern Chihuahua. And margaritas.

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Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St.: 9. Artists: Spray Their Name (Hiero Veiga and Thomas Evans)—Denver artist

Thomas “Detour” Evan’s colorful portraiture dots seemingly all of Denver. With Boston-based painter Hiero Veiga, the two have paid tribute to victims of police brutality under the moniker Spray Their Name. Here in Boulder, the Dairy Center wears a striking portrait of Sandra Bland, who hung herself in her jail cell at age 28 after being arrested for a routine traffic stop. Nearby: Head inside the Dairy—a former milk-processing facility—for a smorgasbord of artistic offerings: You could catch a hip art house movie at the Boedecker Theater, stroll through the art exhibitions, or see if there’s a dance performance, comedy, new play or intimate concert going on.

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Boulder

JANUARY

2022

Best in fest

Boulder’s got festivals every month of the year

Boulder Philharmonic 2022-23 Season

Jan-May, 2023 January through May, Boulder’s professional symphony orchestra performs a season of classical delights at Macky Auditorium, schools and other venues. Classical music lovers can look forward to “An Afternoon With Bruckner,” on Sunday, Jan. 22 at 4 p.m. Here, Boulder Phil concertmaster Charles Wetherbee leads Bruckner’s Symphony No. 7, considered one of the greatest symphonies ever written.

FEBRUARY

Stout Month

All February For more than 20 years, the Mountain Sun pubs and breweries have hosted Stout Month to ferry us through the darkest days of winter. The pandemic stole that joy (and so much more) from us in 2021—and so far in 2022. Here’s hoping for pints of Girl Scout Stout and Megatron Imperial in February 2023.

MARCH

Boulder International Film Festival

March 2-5, 2023 Helmed by sisters Robin and Kathy Beeck, the Boulder International Film Festival is a spunky gathering that attracts some 25,000 movie lovers each year with films, filmmakers and actors from around the world. This four-day celebration of the art of cinema includes crowd-favorite events like CineCHEF and the Adventure Film Pavilion, plus nightly parties, live music, lots of good movies and, of course, celebrities (like Shirley MacLaine, Alan Arkin, Bruce Dern, Oliver Stone, William H. Macy, Peter Fonda…).

Boulder Arts Week

March TBA-April TBA, 2023 Boulder ranks in the top 2% in the country for concentration of artists and arts and culture organizations and businesses. Boulder Arts Week celebrates all the city’s BOULDER WEEKLY

Boulder Taco Fest features high-flying luchadores along with delicious tacos every August. Good, clean family fun.

BolderBoulder 10K Road Race

rich art community has to offer through art walks, exhibitions, performances, music, theater, public art, lectures, film screenings and workshops at venues throughout the city.

Conference on World Affairs at the University of Colorado TBD, 2023 More than 100 experts on a variety of topics descend on Boulder for this fourday event featuring hundreds of panels, discussions, plenaries, concerts and events—all free and open to the public.

TBD, 2023 Here in Boulder, we celebrate the awakening of the tulips, where little ones dress up like fairies and elves and descend on Pearl Street to rejoice at some 15,000 tulips opening up to the spring sun. There’s live music, foam sword dueling, arts and crafts, and scavenger hunts. Oh, and a fairy parade. D’uh.

Colorado MahlerFest

Local Lab New Play Festival

TBD, 2023 Local Theater Company specializes in producing original works, often with a focus on plays developed in the Western U.S. The company will mount four plays this spring for its annual Local Lab New Play Festival, chosen from a recordbreaking 140 submissions. This three-day theater festival of new works includes fully-staged concert readings, workshops and the opportunity for playwrights and attendees to converse.

April 29 & 30, 2023 For the past four years, the Bluebird Music Festival has brought acts such as Margo Price, Colin Meloy of The DecemI

MAY

Tulip Fairy & Elf Festival

APRIL

Bluebird Music Festival

berists, Waxahatchee, and many more to Macky for three days of concerts in the heart of the CU Boulder campus.

May 17-21, 2023 In the early 1970s, Robert Olson returned to CU Boulder’s College of Music from a study abroad program in Austria where he fell in love with the music of Gustav Mahler. He founded MahlerFest in 1988. Today the festival features chamber concerts, group dinners, open rehearsals, and even sometimes films, ballets, and art exhibitions related to Mahler’s music

Boulder Creek Festival

TBD, 2023 The “official” kickoff of summer in Boulder, these three days of festivities on the banks of Boulder Creek feature makers, artists and small businesses, family activities, music, food and entertainment.

BOULDER INSIDER 2022

TBD, 2023 The BolderBoulder 10K is one of the largest and most highly acclaimed 10Ks in the world, with runners, joggers, walkers and spectators of all ages—many in costume—and a firework-splashed bash at the finish line in Folsom Field stadium. It’s a Memorial Day weekend classic.

JUNE

Colorado Shakespeare Festival

TBD, 2023 For more than 60 seasons, the Colorado Shakespeare Festival has celebrated and explored Shakespeare with both classic interpretations and reimaginings of the Bard’s works. Plays are performed beneath summer night skies in the historic Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre on the CU Campus.

Boulder County Pride

Boulder Pridefest: June 11, 2023 Longmont Pridefest: June 30, 2023 Whether you’re looking for something the whole family can take part in or a more 21-plus experience, there’s something for everyone at Boulder County Pride Week. Sign up for teen art classes, adult networking events, music, trivia, dancing and more through Out Boulder County.

Boulder Jewish Festival

June 4, 2023 For 25 years, this one-day festival has highlighted Judaica through live entertainment, fine art and food, community organizations and activities for all ages. In 2023, the festival will be held in the Boulder County Courthouse Lawn and 1200-1400 blocks of the Pearl Street Mall. See FESTIVALS on PAGE 28 I

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Boulder

2022

COURTESY OUT BOULDER COUNTY

FESTIVALS from PAGE 27

JULY

Boulder Environmental/ Nature/Outdoors Film Festival

TBA, 2023, Dairy Arts Center A stimulating four days featuring narrative, documentary features and short films from around the globe, with postscreening Q&As with guests from the film, scientists and outdoor sports enthusiasts.

Hanuman Festival

July 13-16, 2023 Hanuman Festival offers an intimate, retreat-style yoga gathering with a limited number of passes. The festival takes place on Boulder County’s Yellow Barn Farm (9417 N. Foothills Highway, Longmont) with locally sourced farm-totable dinner on Saturday included for all three-day passholders.

Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance Festival

TBA, 2023 Beginners through advanced aerial dancers can learn and grow in their practice through two weeks of classes, lectures/ demonstrations, informal discussions and performances.

AUGUST

Boulder Taco Fest

TBD, 2023 It’s Taco Tuesday on steroids… and also on a Saturday. A selection of the tastiest tacos from Boulder County vendors, a curated list of craft breweries, tequila tasting, high-flying Luchadores, awesome live bands, and lots of free fun for kids— right on Boulder Creek. This bad boy tends to sell out quick.

Colorado Brazil Fest

TBD, 2023 Hosted by Boulder Samba School, the Colorado Brazil Fest (CBF) is the largest festival of its kind in Colorado, and also one of the largest in the nation, with 1,500-2,000 participants each year, offering two rhythmic days of Brazilian music, dancing and more at Boulder’s Bandshell.

SEPTEMBER

Street Wise Boulder Mural Festival

September 29-October 2, 2022 Large-scale murals by dozens of artists are created all over town in the span of just a few days in Boulder. See page 20 for a walking tour of a mere handful of Street Wise-produced murals.

Downtown Boulder’s Fall Fest

September 16-18, 2022 This three-day autumn festival features live music, great food, local microbrews, wine and margaritas, with the added excitement of children’s activities and featuring Firefly Handmade Markets.

Jaipur Literature Festival Colorado

September 16-18, 2022 Fellow millennials, this is the adult version of the Scholastic Book Fair. Boulder’s Jaipur Literature Festival welcomes the public for a series of author talks and events for the camaraderie, the caravan of ideas, and the magical flow of conversations.

Festival del Sol

September 18, 2022 Enjoy live music, food trucks, outdoor beer/wine garden, traditional dance, games, children’s activities, photo booth, and local art vendors at the Chautauqua Auditorium and surrounding gardens.

Mapleton Hill Porchfest

September 18, 2022 No better way to get to know your neighbors than a good ol’ block party. Hosted in the historic Mapleton neighborhood of Boulder, dozens of local musicians play and sing on quaint porches at this free event.

Studio Arts Chili Bowl

September 18, 2022 Chili Bowl is Studio Arts Boulder’s annual fundraiser. Chefs from local restaurants compete in a chili competition. Guests can taste chili with the purchase of a

Boulder Creek Hometown Festival August 19-21, 2022 28

Featuring arts and crafts exhibitors, live performances at the Bandshell, craft beer garden and a food court, The Great Zucchini Race, the LETR StarLite Classic Car and Motorcycle Show.

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bowl, plus shop for beautiful handmade pottery.

Out Boulder County hosts Pride festivities.

OCTOBER

Indigenous Peoples Day

October 10, 2022 For the last seven years, the City of Boulder and community organizations have worked together to host annual events and festivities to promote knowledge about Indigenous Peoples and honor the city’s Indigenous Peoples Day Resolution.

DECEMBER

Right Now Global Climate Summit

Boulder Bach Festival

December 1-4, 2022 This three-day summit will gather some of the world’s foremost human rights, scientific, political, educational, cultural and industry leaders to commit to specific outcomes that will address the adverse effects of climate change on human rights.

October-May A concentrated series of Bach-focused concerts, symposia and educational events each spring and a number of outreach concerts and other community events throughout the year.

Flatirons Food Film Festival

October 21-22 Local food, food insecurity, chefs and restaurants, international cuisine, the environment, organic and regenerative agriculture, food justice—these are the topics the Flatirons Food Film Festival brings to the table. Take in this extended weekend extravaganza of food-related films, expert speakers and fun culinary events.

Lights of December Parade

December 3, 2022 Kick off winter and light up the dark nights with marching bands, floats, fire engines, holiday carolers and more. The grand finale includes an appearance by Mr. Claus.

WinterFest at Colorado Chautauqua

Munchkin Masquerade

December TBA, 2022 If you’re looking to make magical winter memories with the family, Colorado Chautauqua’s WinterFest is the way, featuring a festival of lights, kids concert, breakfast with Santa, Santa’s Cottage, horse-drawn carriage rides, historic tours, public art, a Winterfest market, a scavenger hunt and a photo station.

October 31, 2022 Each Halloween, Downtown Boulder is invaded by tiny ghosts and goblins, dinosaurs and dragons, fairies and princes, superheroes and animals of every size for trick-or-treating along Pearl Street.

NOVEMBER

Boulder Jewish Film Festival

Chanukah on Pearl Street

November 3-13, 2022 This year marks a decade for this intimate film festival that explores the human experience through film and provides audiences with insight into the Jewish experience.

BOULDER INSIDER 2022

December TBA, 2022 Music, fresh soufganiot (jelly donuts), hot latkes, hot cocoa, tossed gelt to take home and the lighting of the giant menorah.

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BOULDER WEEKLY


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Fuji Restaurant & Bar Konnichiwa / Tashi Delek!

Welcome to Fuji, Taste of the Himalayas. We have been proudly serving Boulder, CO since 2015. Fuji Restaurant and Bar is a small, family-owned, Asian Fusion restaurant created from a mix of Japanese and Sherpa kitchen food and culture.

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Boulder

2022

COURTESY NOBO

No slowing down the arts The NoBo Art District takes a community -oriented approach to building an art scene

by Ben Berman

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hile thousands flock to Boulder for its reputation as an outdoor recreation mecca beneath the picturesque Flatirons, it might be easy for newcomers to miss the fact that the city boasts an up-andcoming art district as well. Tucked away on the northernmost end of Broadway, blocks of the city have quietly amassed eclectic, vibrant collections of murals, gallery spaces and cafés through reclaimed warehouses and new constructions like a forthcoming expansion of the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art. Much of this revitalization can be attributed to the ambitious work of the NoBo Art District, a grassroots organization responsible for cultivating and reassembling Boulder’s art community through a pandemic that shuttered much of the district’s opportunity for expansion over the last two years. Much of the organization’s work focuses on collaborating directly with artists to ensure that the north end of Broadway consistently showcases visual artwork and interactive installations in mixed-use spaces. “(NoBo) really supports the art community and wants to be involved on that level of keeping people connected and making it an aesthetically interesting place to be here in Boulder,” says Julie Ireland, a north Boulder resident, visual artist and art curation manager who, for the duration of the pandemic, has helped NoBo curate large-scale exhibits and events. “There’s just a ton of collaborations in the city that come in with people doing creative things or wanting to host their events here,” says Leah Brenner Clack, interim director of the NoBo Art District. “We continue to see interest from people that want to come and add to the creative culture that’s blossoming more and more every day up (in North Boulder).” Much of the neighborhood’s recent growth is a result of deliberate planning by the organization, such as consistent art walks on the first Friday of each month or the installation of various murals or little libraries on sidewalks, but Clack insists that the neighborhood’s appeal BOULDER WEEKLY

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and subsequent attractiveness for various artists has remained organic since the beginning. “It’s a little more gritty,” says Lisa Nesmith, president of the NoBo Art District. “Part of it isn’t even in the city. It’s unincorporated. So it feels a little more free.” “I love the fact that it’s off Broadway, you know?” adds Ireland. “It’s really accessible to people, in terms of alternative transportation and things like that.” Though the organization began in 2009 and has chugged along with the consistent strategy of further connecting the neighborhood each year, NoBo’s leadership noticed a boom in popularity last year as many of its galleries were able to ditch the pandemic protocols of distancing or resorting to online art showcases. “Our first Friday event went from 200 to 400 people pre-pandemic, to like, 800 to a thousand people coming out,” says Nesmith. “It was like, ‘Wow, I think people really missed this kind of thing.’” Collaborators like Ireland have noticed an uptick in interest from various businesses who seek to display local art in their spaces and invite residents in. “I love the fact that when I put out a call for an artist to show in a business venue, instead of getting one or two responses, I’m now getting anywhere from 15 to 25 artists,” Ireland says. Now that the hunger for the arts has returned at full force, the leadership of the NoBo Arts District turn their sights toward the future, one where that attitude of collaboration is pushed to the forefront. A major focus, Nesmith says, is to get more and more art shows hosted at these businesses, or conversely, have other events be hosted in the district’s many gallery spaces as the neighborhood seeks to prioritize mixed-use development. Members of the organization, who range from individual artists to a variety of business owners, can host workshops, film screenings or book BOULDER INSIDER 2022

releases at the NoBo Art Center free of charge. “If you have NoBo Art District is cultivating an exhibition or Boulder’s grassroots art coman event and you munity. Even in the wake of the need space, it’s pandemic it’s flourishing. like, ‘Yes, come do it here!’” says Clack. “There’s no gatekeeping going on. It’s pretty open to everyone.” Despite its close partnership with these local artists, the organization seems to have a sense of trust in the neighborhood’s growth: trust that its artists will put on interesting events year-round, and trust that the public interest in all of it will continue to naturally expand. Because of this, leadership at NoBo is assured the growth of the neighborhood will stem from the passions and interests of its resident artists above all else. “Right now, we’re engaging with the community through outreach and surveys about what the needs are and what the community wants,” Clack says. “I think that’s really important for people coming into NoBo, developing whatever it is they want real estate or community wise. I’m really excited to see where that goes.” “We hear comments, like, ‘This is what Boulder used to be like.’ Not gentrified, kind of different and weird,’” says Nesmith. “I can bring my dog. And listen to music. And chat with people who are different from me. After the pandemic, people were really craving something easy like that.” I

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Boulder

2022

Global groceries by John Lehndorff Your roadmap to Boulder’s world of international food markets

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irst impressions can be deceiving, especially when it comes to food in Boulder. While there is an impressive roster of international eateries in the city dishing everything from Thai to Middle Eastern cuisine, sources for global ingredients aren’t obvious to newcomers. They won’t find those long boulevards chockablock with global food markets and bakeries that cities like Denver and Aurora boast. Granted, Boulder is rich in supermarkets as well as Sprouts, Trader Joe’s, Vitamin Cottage, Whole Foods and Savory Spice Shop that are well stocked with the most common international ingredients and seasonings. However, that’s not nearly enough if you are serious about

authentic global cooking. That’s especially true for the area’s large contingent of foreign-born students, scientists and techies. Where do locals source the necessary ingredients needed for crafting Indian, Brazilian, Indonesian, Provencal and Guatemalan dishes at home without driving to Denver? If you poke around a little, you’ll find an amazing variety of familyrun markets tucked away in strip malls and side streets across Boulder. They tend to be small and jammed with goods from floor to ceiling. The culinary roster has grown with the opening of shops offering goods for cooking South American and Afghani fare.

Middle East and Central Asia

Silk Road Grill and Market, 2607 Pearl St. Mediterranean Market & Deli, 2690 28th St.

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SUSAN FRANCE

iddle Eastern eateries and markets had occupied this location for many years, but the opening of Silk Road Grill and Market provided one of Boulder’s first tastes of Afghani food. The deli dishes favorites like hummus, gyros, falafel and kebabs on long basmati rice, but be sure to step out with authentic homestyle Afghani preparations such as Kabuli palow and lamb shank. The shelves offer a limited range of teas (chai), spices, condiments and pickles. The Mediterranean Market and Deli is a longtime go-to source for take-out foods including falafel pitas with hummus and tzatziki, spanakopita, and merguez lamb sausage sandwiches. The deli packs fresh olives and Bulgarian feta as well as Middle Eastern and Eastern European grocery items including sesame seed snaps, cherry jams, olive oils, date syrup, halvah, baklava and imported Kit Kat bars. Don’t miss the great selection of fresh flatbreads (including Turkish simit).

FIND ALL THE INGREDIENTS YOU NEED TO MAKE YOUR FAVORITE MIDDLE EASTERN DISHES AT HOME AT THE SILK ROAD GRILL AND MARKET ON PEARL STREET.

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Southern South America

Cuji Foods, 3340 Arapahoe Ave., cujifoods.com

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here have been plenty of places nearby to find Central American foods, but until Cuji Foods opened in Boulder, the tastes of South American have been hard to find. The small shop imports foods and ingredients directly from nations from Venezuela to Argentina. The shelves are stocked with coffees, teas, cassava crackers, chocolate bars and bottled garlic sauce. Frozen favorites include arepas, ready-tobake Argentinian meat pies, empanadas, cheese bread, various sausages and prime meats from Uruguay. A cooler provides cheeses and chilled yerba mate and other drinks.

GOT GUAYAMANO? IF NOT, A QUICK STOP AT CUJI FOODS AND ALL YOUR SOUTH AMERICAN CHEESE NEEDS WILL BE FULFILLED.

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Asia

Mexico and Central America

India and South Asia

India Bazaar, 1542 28th St. India’s Grocery, 2877 28th St.

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oulder’s two small Indian grocery stores provide their regulars with some fresh vegetables plus the right varieties of basmati rice, spices, pickles, chutney, flours, curry mixes, yogurt, ghee, papadum and chai. The frozen cases offer prepared dishes, paneer, snacks and Halal meats including goat. Both stock Indian breads including paratha, chapati and naan. These are great places to get advice on how to make tandoori or vindaloo.

Asian Food Market, 2829 28th St.

Panaderia Sabor a Mexico, 2839 28th St. Las 10 Americas Carniceria, 2887 30th St. El Valle Market, 2887 30th St. La Loma Carniceria Mexican Grocery Store, 4483 Broadway

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y far the largest contingent of international markets in Boulder feature foods from Mexico as well as Central American and Caribbean nations. Panaderia Sabor a Mexico is primarily a wonderful bakery with a wall of pastries, pan dulce, orejas, bolillo buns, cinnamon sugar-dusted churros, cream-filled horns and cupcakes, pineapple and pumpkin empanadas and tres leches cake. The rest of the tightly packed shop is stocked with tortillas, cheeses, candies, snacks and other foods. Shop here for a wide selection of colorful, candy-filled party pinatas. Las 10 Americas Carniceria, El Valle Market and La Loma Carniceria are known for their butcher departments filled with fresh cuts of meat. These larger stores are a great source for all the vegetables, dried chilies, canned goods and seasonings needed to cook Mexican and Central American fare at home.

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t 36 years old, the Asian Food Market is the grandmother among Boulder’s markets. It looks tiny from the inside, but the interior rooms are floor-to-ceiling with the vegetables and canned and dry ingredients for Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Indonesian, Thai and other cuisines. Dim sum options and meats for pho fill the freezers, and coolers are loaded with canned beverages and fresh, locally made essentials like kimchi and dipping sauces. There’s an aisle of noodles, plus teas, teas, coffees and condiments. Don’t miss the giant freshly fried sesame ball snacks, soft in the middle and mildly sweet. (For a much more extensive stockpile of Asian ingredients and seafood, visit Pacific Ocean Marketplace in Broomfield.)

France & Europe

LeFrigo, 5630 Arapahoe Ave.

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John Lehndorff is the food editor of Boulder Weekly and host of Radio Nibbles on KGNU.

SUSAN FRANCE

oulder’s French-oriented deli is a delight, starting with freshly made sandwiches like the LeFrigo Royal— that’s Paris ham, saucisson, prosciutto and cornichons on a buttered baguette. There is also a glass case of freshly baked pastries, quiche, croissants and baguettes from a local French bakery. European food lovers sigh when they see the shelves of imported jams, olives, sauces, chocolates and sweets. The cooler is stocked with pate, cheeses, French-style sausages and frozen ready-to-heat treats. (Another great nearby source of French foods and cheese is Longmont’s Cheese Importers.) LEFRIGO ON ARAPAHO HAS ALL YOUR NEEDS FOR FRENCH AND EUROPEAN CUISINE COVERED.

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Unexpected

Boulder

2022

places House shows and tiny concerts along the Front Range

by Colette Czarnecki

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n a Friday evening in July, two people stand outside a shoe store on the Pearl Street Mall, checking ID and vaccination cards for people who want to enter. Inside, among the shoes, about 30 people sit on sarape blankets laid on the floor and along curvy, contemporary wooden benches in the back. There’s a chill vibe in the air, and shoe shopping isn’t the reason. Attending concerts and small, intimate shows held in unexpected places brings another layer of ambience to a night of live music. These places in Boulder and areas along the Front Range invite people to experience this enchantment yearround. The only question is: Where?

Sofar Sounds

The show I decided to see was at Allbirds that Friday evening, hosted by Sofar Sounds. Hours before I arrived, I had no clue where I was going to watch the musicians play. I also didn’t know who was going to play. The mystery added to the excitement. This was also Denver-based amateur DJ Maxwell Poyser’s first time at a Sofar Sounds concert. What brought her to the event was “the love of music and trying out new things,” she said, as she sat with her friend and drank the canned beer they brought to the BYOB show. Before the music began, MC and show experience lead Jamaal Curry entertained the crowd and prepped the audience for the show. He interacted with the audience to discover that one person present attended a Sofar Sounds event in Sydney, Australia. The company connects artists with communities in over 400 cities around the world. Curry, who also is an artist, said, “the goal of these shows is to pay attention to the artist. It’s a global music community where artists are not the background.” Then, he introduced the first act, Dora. Dora sat down in front of the audience with her guitar. She introduced her friend, Froggy, who performed with her for the first few songs. Together, they sang sad breakup songs with an acoustic guitar. Dora captivated through some cover songs and personal stories. She blended myriad covers into one song, snippets of each, including Justin BOULDER WEEKLY

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Bieber’s “Peaches” and Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody.” It was a hit. We all sang along and she suggested we all sing to the person sitting next to us during a chorus. Originally from Boston, but currently residing in LA, the alternative-pop singer/songwriter was on her first Sofar Sounds tour. “It’s the best,” Dora said of performing with Sofar. “They’re built for people that are songwriters. I feel like because people sit and want to listen … the vibe is so chill.” For Brandy Sanchen, Sofar Sounds regional crew operations manager in Denver, the events blend many of her favorite things—live music, community, discovery and an intrinsically eccentric flair. “They happen in magical backyards that are lit up by twinkling, dreamy rooftops that overlook the city and mountains,” Sanchen said. “Union Station in Denver, we’ve hosted in shoe stores, museums, breweries, motorcycle shops, music studios, you name it.” Future dates to look out for are a ’90s-hits night in Englewood, and a Beyonce-themed night in Denver’s RiNo neighborhood. Sofar also offers a back-to-school discount between Aug. 15 and Sept. 30. (Promo code: backtoschool)

Mile High Music

Less than 30 miles north of Boulder, in Berthoud, Mile High Music host Terry Georgia began the singer/songwriter venue a year and a half ago. Originally from Colorado, she moved back to the Centennial State from D.C. to take care of her sick father and be closer to family. She wanted to host house concerts since attending her first 15 years BOULDER INSIDER 2022

ago, but never had the space until her move back West. Here, she intentionally moved into a house to accommodate enough people for the shows. “Each (house concert) has its own personality,” Georgia said. “I’ve been to some where there’s a lot of alcohol involved and people are having a good time that way. But others are very quiet, you know, you sit there and you listen. And people come in, they listen, they go home. C HR IS H Other times, people hang out afOL DE R ter the show and it becomes a real community.” She prefers to host singer/songwriters because she found there’s an entire network of talented artists she hasn’t experienced anywhere else. She wants to expose her audience to a more underground music scene. “You realize there’s this entire network of hosts across the country who do this, mostly for the love of music, almost entirely for the love of music, because we don’t get paid,” she said. “And we don’t make money, we end up spending money to host these things. And all the money that comes in is donations. And all of that goes directly to the artist. The hosts make nothing.” Since she recently moved to the area, her audience is gradually catching on about her house shows through word of mouth and the Colorado House Concerts Facebook page. Sometimes a significant number of people show up (no more than 20 due to COVID) and sometimes only a few. Mile High Music’s last house show this year will be Sept. 23 with traveling musician Marc Douglas Berardo. When speaking about her passion to share music, Terry said, “People have been doing house concerts forever… inviting the village to sit See CONCERTS on PAGE 36 I

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CONCERTS from PAGE 35 around the campfire and listen to a traveling troubadour. It’s been going on forever. It’s something that’s kind of ingrained in us, in a way. It’s just finding ways to access that.”

Fraser Valley Folk

Heading west, another small concert series is held in the emerald green Fraser Historic Church six times a year. Originally from Wisconsin, husband-and-wife team Bambi and John Statz moved to the mountain town in 2013 and began attending small house concerts and classical music series in the area. They were inspired to emulate the small concert setting with folk musicians. They founded Fraser Valley Folk in 2015 .

Their traveling folk-musician son, John Statz, plays a role in connecting with musicians and scheduling them to perform at the small shows. Musicians from all over the country—and one from Sweden—have played in the historic church-turned-community center. Bambi said she believes the musicians “leave with a flavor of our town from people who truly appreciate them.” Again, musicians are not background noises at a Fraser Valley Folk concert, as they can be in bars. During a show, the audience often learns about the musicians’ life stories and the meanings behind their songs.

“We have listening audiences, you could hear a pin drop, because they’re listening to the lyrics,” Bambi said. Fraser Valley Folk holds three concerts in the spring and another three in the fall each year. Audience members must RSVP through the Fraser Valley Fork Facebook page, or email (fraservalleyfolk@gmail.com). They ask for $15 donations and most of it goes to the musicians.

Boulder Music Venues H Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder

A venue for the more established artists visiting the city, Boulder Theater is nestled in the heart of downtown Boulder. Opened in 1906, Boulder Theater offers an 850-seat venue hosting events ranging from comedy shows to concerts to corporate events. Now a Colorado historic landmark, the beautiful art deco design at Boulder Theater makes for a lovely place to spend an evening.

H Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder

Before becoming a live music venue, Fox Theatre opened as a movie theater in 1961. After a period of closure and remodeling The Fox reopened its doors primarily as a music venue on March 6, 1992. Located on the Hill, the Fox was once listed by Rolling Stone as one of America’s best venues. It continues to host phenomenal shows in a historic location.

H Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Boulder

Located up Fourmile Canyon, Gold Hill Inn provides an intimate venue, isolated from city lights. In the summertime, Gold Hill opens its doors to the warm air with performances taking place outside in the beer garden depending on the weather.

H Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland

Located 20 minutes west of Boulder in the

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beautiful town of Nederland, the Caribou Room offers world-class audio and visual experience. The Caribou Room was thoughtfully designed using mostly recycled materials such as recycled pine Beetle kill wood and old wine barrel heads. Events at the Caribou Room are virtually 100%-zero waste, using compostable cups and utensils.

Located in South Boulder, Caffe Sole offers European-inspired weekend jazz club dinners, featuring international sounds. The intimate venue operates on a first-come, first-serve basis, with a suggested $15 cover charge.

H Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Base-

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line Road, Boulder

Built-in 1898, Chautauqua Auditorium sits in the shadow of the famed Flatirons and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. The auditorium’s barn-like architecture lends itself to one-of-a-kind acoustics that have hosted the likes of musical legends including B.B. King, Ziggy Marley, Graham Nash, and Joan Baez.

H Velvet Elk Lounge, 2037 13th St., Boulder

Opened in May 2022, the Velvet Elk Lounge is Boulder’s newest music venue, born from a desire to create a small, funky venue where you can get a proper cocktail and listen to great local music. When there is no live music, check out the Lounge’s calendar for any number of other events, like DJ dance parties.

H Caffe Sole, 637R S. Boulder Road, Boulder

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H eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., BouleTown Hall is a live music venue, full-service recording studio, and community center all in one. True to eTown’s 24-year commitment to environmental education and “doing the right thing,” this facility, converted from an old church, is quite possibly the greenest music and media center in Colorado.

H Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette

The Muse Performance Space in Lafayette is an intimate venue suited for smaller shows or private events. Created and run by working musicians, Muse was designed with performance experience in mind.

H Nissi’s Entertainment Venue &

Event Center, 1455 Coal Creek Drive, Unit T, Lafayette Located in Lafayette, Nissi’s is an award-winning music, entertainment and event center, focused on featuring both national and regional artists.

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