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....................................................................... OVERTONES :

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....................................................................... ARTS & CULTURE:

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....................................................................... NIBBLES:

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departments 7 THE HIGHROAD: Trump serves the people — the rich ones, that is 8 DYER TIMES: And now for the oil industry lies 9 THE ANDERSON FILES: How U.S. rightwingers learned to love Putin 11 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 19 NEWS BRIEFS: Short news for short attention spans 31 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 38 WORDS: ‘Summer Time’ by Martin Soosloff 39 FILM: ‘BlacKkKlansman’ collides with cinematic history 41 THE TASTING MENU: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County 47 DRINK: Never enough watering holes in the State of Craft Beer 53 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 55 ICUMI: An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world 57 SAVAGE LOVE: #metoo bad behavior? 59 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Where not to smoke weed 61 CANNABIS CORNER: Finding out how pot does its thing — it’s complicated Boulder Weekly

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Mariah Taylor, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner Interns, Sara McCrea, Anna Mary Scott SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executive, Julian Bourke Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Coordinator, Olivia Rolf Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 18-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo

August 9, 2018 Volume XXV, Number 52 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2018 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

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welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www. boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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the

Highroad Trump serves the people — rich ones, that is by Jim Hightower

D

onald Trump bragged in 2016 that, “I know words — I have the best words.” Well, occasionally he does use some very fine words that convey great promise, as in this sentence: “I’m going to fight for every person in this country who believes government should serve the people — not the donors and special interests.” Similarly, Trump also declared he would “drain the swamp” to rid Washington of those creepy, crawly

special-interest lobbyists. Excellent words. But they only matter if the speaker actually means them, backing their rhetorical promise with action. As we’ve seen though, far from draining the swamp, Trump converted the White House itself into a fetid cesspool of lobbyists, corporate executives and banksters. His transition team was almost exclusively made up of those swamp critters. His glitzy inaugural celebration was bankrolled by Big Oil, Big Coal, Big Pharma and other Bigs that attached their legislative and regulatory demands to the checks they donated. Most of his top officials came straight out of Wall Street and corporate suites, turning Trump’s government into a sump pump that is routinely funneling billions of dollars and special regulatory favors to the

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

moneyed elite. When asked why he put Wall Street hucksters in charge of economic policy, he offered this scramble of words that inadvertently revealed his true, plutocratic soul: “I love all people, rich or poor. But in these positions, I just don’t want a poor person.” Really? Not even one official who understands poverty from first-hand experience and could not only give you advice, but also some understanding? And what about those hard-hit middleclass workers Trump always talks about? Nope, he hasn’t appointed a single one to a top policy position. So, forget Trump’s words. If the poor and middle class aren’t in his government, they’re not in his heart either — nor in his policies. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. August 9 , 2018 7


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s hopefully everyone has heard by now, proponents of Initiative 97, the 2,500foot oil and gas setback initiative, turned in 171,000 signatures to the Secretary of State’s office on Monday, Aug. 6. Since only 98,482 valid signatures from Colorado voters are required to put the initiative on the November ballot, it would seem that even with the oil-industry-backed Republican Secretary of State Wayne Williams trying his best to scrutinize and disqualify every signature possible for his industry pals, we will likely be voting on Initiative 97 in three months. And that vote can’t come soon enough. Here’s something to remember as we all prepare to be inundated by tens of millions of dollars of oil industry advertising falsely claiming that drilling oil wells and producing hydrocarbons only a few feet away from homes and schools and water supplies is perfectly safe: the oil industry constantly lies and prioritizes its profits over your family’s safety. Seriously, here are a couple of examples just from the last few days to prove my point. So you may have heard about the tanker truck that crashed in Poudre Canyon. You know, the beautiful, ecologically priceless canyon through which one of Colorado’s last wild rivers flows. Well, it was first reported that the toxic brew spilled from the truck was produced water. That would have been bad enough. Produced water is the stuff that comes out

of a producing well and contains water contaminated by radiation, mercury and other heavy metals, plus a lot of salt. But a week after this accident, based on some good reporting from The Coloradoan’s Jacy Marmaduke, we find out that our state’s oil industry regulator, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC), isn’t actually sure what the truck was carrying or what the crash spilled into the river. The COGCC is now saying the truck may have been hauling unused fracking fluid. Let me translate that: It may have been carrying a toxic stew of deadly chemicals that are so incredibly dangerous that the oil industry has spent millions on politicians just to assure that it doesn’t have to tell the public all the cancer-causing chemicals in fracking fluid. This, of course, is because the industry knows that if we knew, we would stop them from drilling anywhere near where people live and work. But back to the Poudre River spill. So our esteemed state regulators, a full week after the spill, still claim they aren’t sure what the truck was carrying. Besides demonstrating the complete impotency of Colorado’s oil and gas regulations and regulators, this incompetence is really dangerous. Consider that the COGCC is still saying it doesn’t know if the spilled liquid made it into the river. Hydrology 101: Since it spilled into the river or next to the river, it definitely made it into the river because the shallow groundwater next to see DYERTIMES Page 10

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illions of Republicans either support or don’t give a damn about Russian interference in the midterm elections this year. According to a Yahoo Finance/ SurveyMonkey poll of 2,509 Americans conducted July 25-27, 11 percent of people who identify as Republican or lean Republican say it’s “appropriate” for Russia to help the GOP retain control of Congress in the November elections. Another 29 percent say it’s “not appropriate, but wouldn’t be a big deal” for the Russians to help. Gallup reports that the number of Republicans who characterized Russia as a friend or ally has gone up sharply from 18 percent in 2014 to 40 percent today. Democrats’ views of the relationship are about the same, with 25 percent today versus 28 percent in 2014 defining it positively. Why has this happened? There are indications that an increasing number of American rightwingers have concluded that they have more in common ideologically with Vladimir Putin than with their domestic opponents. This head-snapping shift is crucial. Back during the 2012 presidential campaign, the Republican nominee, Mitt Romney, said Russia was America’s main foe and that President Obama was too friendly toward Moscow. Obama responded that he was more concerned about terrorism and pointed out that Russia was no longer a superpower but “a regional power that is threatening some of its immediate neighbors — not out of strength but weakness.” Meanwhile, many rightwingers in the U.S. and Europe were learning to love Vladimir Putin. In 2013, Putin gave a prominent speech denouncing the decadent West: “We can see how many of the Euro-Atlantic countries are actually rejecting their roots, including the Christian values that constitute the basis of Western civilization. They are denying moral principles and all traditional identities: national, cultural, religious and even sexual. They are implementing policies that equate large families with same-sex partnerships, belief in God with the belief in Satan. This is Boulder Weekly

the path to degradation.” That year, the January-February newsletter from the Christian right group called the World Congress of Families (WCF) in Rockford, Illinois, listed the “10 best trends” in the world. The first one was “Russia Emerges as Pro-Family Leader.” The WCF is a creation of a U.S. far-right evangelical and two sociology professors in Russia. The Kremlin banned homosexual “propaganda,” abortion advertising and sacrilegious insults to religious believers. Abortion restrictions were passed and domestic violence was decriminalized. In 2014, Pat Buchanan authored a column entitled “Whose Side is God on Now?” The senior adviser to Presidents Nixon, Ford and Reagan suggested God might be on the side of Putin. Buchanan is the self-proclaimed leader of authoritarian traditionalist “paleoconservatism.” Like Trump, he had been a presidential candidate who stirred up racial animosity. “In the culture war for the future of mankind, “Buchanan argued, “Putin is planting Russia’s flag firmly on the side of traditional Christianity.” Richard Spencer, the coiner of the term “alt-right,” says Russia is both the “sole” and “most powerful white power in the world.” Matthew Heimbach, head of the white nationalist Traditionalist Worker Party believes Putin is the “leader of the free world,” who has turned Russia into an “axis for nationalists.” The neo-Nazis who marched in Charlottesville last year chanted, “Russia is our friend!” Putin’s regime is the most conspicuous and powerful member of a growing coalition of far-right regimes and movements. As Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne recently put it: “If the old Soviet Union was the linchpin of the Communist International, Putin’s Russia is creating a new Reactionary International built around nationalism, a critique of modernity and a disdain for liberal democracy. Its central mission includes wrecking the Western alliance and the European Union by undermining a shared commitment to democratic values.”

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the river that would have been contaminated can only go one place: into the river. But more concerning is the potential impact on the downstream water supply. According to The Coloradoan, Fort Collins Utilities says it saw no water quality impacts at its Poudre River intake after the spill. That’s just great except for one thing: Because no one at the COGCC and therefore anyone at the utility knows what deadly chemicals were spilled, it is impossible for the Fort Collins water supplier to have known what chemicals it should be testing for. Therefore its claim that everything is fine with the water appears to be based on its efforts not to panic its customers rather than some careful testing for the hundreds of toxic chemicals known to be used in fracking fluid. The other recent development showing the industry’s lack of concern for truth and our safety can be found in a new lawsuit against Anadarko Petroleum filed last week by the company’s own shareholders. The claims being made by Anadarko shareholders are shocking. The suit alleges that Anadarko knew that hundreds of its wells were dangerous to the public even before the explosion in Firestone last year that killed two men and badly injured a young woman. The suit says Anadarko executives made the decision to cut millions of dollars in its budget designated to repair or plug the old dangerous wells in order to save money, keep drilling and only repair profitable wells. The suit put it this way: “After oil prices collapsed, Anadarko reconsidered its commitment to safety. It slashed the remediation budget. What was left of the budget was spent remediating Noble Wells that were either good producers or whose poor condition inter-

fered with Anadarko’s drilling schedule. Anadarko did not consider safety threats in determining which few Noble Wells to remediate, even though many of these wells were located near houses or schools.” And, “Because Anadarko wouldn’t know where to look to see if its flowlines and pipelines were severed and didn’t check to see if they were, an explosion was inevitable. Senior Colorado Anadarko executives were well aware of these safety issues.” The incidents I’ve cited above don’t even take into consideration the mountains of research that has been done in the last five years showing that living near oil and gas operations severely increases your health risks in a multitude of ways from cancer to birth defects to serious respiratory illness. So, assuming it makes the ballot, be sure to vote for Initiative 97, and remember the industry’s long history of lying to us when considering its advertising messages. And I just have to toss this one in. The “oil and gas industry” is now actively attempting to rebrand itself as the “natural gas and oil industry.” It would be funny if it weren’t so sinister. The purpose of this rebranding is to better align the perception of this dirty industry with the false claims of the establishment Democrats and the Big Green environmental groups who say natural gas is a part of the solution for global warming despite all the research to the contrary. So who can you trust? Just remember the term “clean energy” is code for natural gas with a few renewables thrown in to greenwash it. Be on your guard my friends. It’s getting messy out there. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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However, Dionne notes, “Putin is, first and foremost, an opportunist, so he is also happy to lend support to forces on the left when doing so advances his purposes in specific circumstances. But the dominant thrust of Putinism is toward the far right.” In 2017, Right Wing Watch, a project of the liberal “People for the American Way,” published a report by Casey Michel entitled “The Rise of the ‘Traditionalist International’: How the American Right Learned to Love Moscow in the Era of Trump.” Michel said Trump’s election helped boost the fortunes of two American movements that enthusiastically supported him: “the white nationalists and the Religious Right.” These labels are politically correct euphemisms which disguise anti-democratic extremism. Michel notes that white nationalists “profess co-equal respect for whites and

non-whites alike.” Actually they promote bogus biological racism. They “would like to return white supremacy to both state and federal law — or, barring that, break off part of the U.S. to form a white ethno-state wholesale.” “The Religious Right” claims that Christians are being persecuted in the U.S. and that they are only advocating “religious freedom.” Actually Michel notes that they “would allow Christian fundamentalism to become the U.S.’s de jure national religion, with attendant legislation targeting LGBT and minority religious communities alike.” Michel says the white nationalists and many within the Religious Right don’t look to Trump as their primary leader. For them, “there is only one country, and one leader, worth emulating.” That would be Russia and Putin. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


letters On StarWater Wednesday Just to clarify: StarWater Wednesday at VisionQuest Brewery is a carnival of hot creativity. (Re: “Just the Beginning,” Arts & Culture, July 26, 2018) The community’s all kinds with one common thread: everyone’s making the scene. The opening interview’s usually an activist. The musical acts run from Spectacle to Mbanza to Pioneer Mother to outrageous psychedelic speed metal guitar trio from Nebraska just passing through. Great dance floor. The performances lead off with Dank the Pirate Poet — topics more widespread than language itself — and anything goes on that wide-open mic. All kinds of poets. The folksingers rap. All kinds of instruments. Drums, electronica. All kinds of MCs plug in their phones and start streaming their monstrous beats. Here comes eight-yearold kid-with-guitar chanting about the eighty eyes and the eighty mouths of the kraken he vanquishes to save us all, followed by his a capella opera singer Mom. There goes that philosopher witnessing Gnostic Scripture throwing himself on the floor. Zoë Clare Starwater herself will often assume her uber-identity as full dread electronicist-poet Fierce le Fey, featured at Arise. Not least, a wild-ass professor who jumps on the bar to holler his passionate poems: Boulder Weekly writer Jonathan Montgomery. He’s not just a journalist, folks, he’s a wellspring of StarWater too. Show up. Bring it. Wage creativity! Blessed be. John Diggory/Philosopher-inResidence, Starwater Collective

Correcting Danish I have here what can only be described as a need for a large correction in your paper. Paul Danish, who masquerades as a sage or raconteur shows what happens when one writes (or talks) about a subject about which he knows nothing. In his July 19 piece (Re: “Tales From Rocky Flats,” The Danish Plan) Danish tantalizes with his extramedia peek into some of the history of a tragic government miscalculation. Danish tells us of “nucleuses.” The word is nuclei. Further, and even more deceiving, he offers a brief basic lesson in the isotopes of hydrogen. Deuterium, also known as 2H, has one proton and only one neutron. Its atomic number is one, like 1Hydrogen, but its atomic weight is two. That’s Boulder Weekly

why it is “2H.” Similarly, tritium or 3H, has two neutrons and one proton in its nucleus. Atomic weight here is three. It does make a difference. Tritium, with that extra neutron, is somewhat unstable. That is why it is radioactive. Tritium is required in nuclear warheads, as Danish implies. Consider it like a kind of “booster.” With its halflife of only about a month, each and every tritium load in each and every

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warhead must be recharged or replaced at least once every nine months or so. Danish completes his trifecta of error by stating that the radiation from tritium can be “stopped” by a piece of paper. Were the decay of tritium to Helium-3 accomplished by an alpha particle (two neutrons plus two neutrons), this might be true. The decay of tritium, however, is accomplished by emission of a relatively

low-energy beta particlae (basically an electron) and a neutrino. It is unlikely a piece of paper could “stop” this beta, and it is certainly most unlikely the neutrino could be. Neutrinos have been observed passing completely through the Earth without interacting with any matter. I hope you will set the record straight. Kindly publish this correction, and do get Danish a new librarian. Gregory Iwan/Longmont

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feature

ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE

An indicted journalist reflects on conspiracy in today’s America

by Aaron Cantú

Editor’s note: When Aaron Cantú arrived at his new job at the Santa Fe Reporter last year, he came with the baggage of a recent arrest. Two months earlier, he spent a night in jail with hundreds of others detained during protests on Inauguration Day in Washington D.C. His actions consisted of walking, wearing black and being a witness to history as a freelance journalist. Yet, a few months later, and despite having no clear evidence of such crimes, federal prosecutors slammed him with eight felony charges, including conspiracy to riot and property damage. After nearly 18 months, however, the feds dropped the charges. Cantú is finally able to publicly reflect on the ordeal, and what follows is an essay that puts a real conspiracy into context.

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or over a year, federal prosecutors and agents have perused my digital communications, tried to hack my cell phone and possibly collected my social media records. The chill of seeing the state in possession of your private political discussions is difficult to convey. I’m not being paranoid; this really happened. The feds invaded my life in pursuit of their own conspiracy theory about a raucous protest in Washington D.C. that resulted in eight felony charges against hundreds, myself included. The overwhelming sense of being watched has abated some since the charges were dropped, but I’m sure people within the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia — the local arm of the Trump Administration’s Justice Department — will read every word of this essay, with an eye

Boulder Weekly

for anything they can use to refile criminal charges against me or the 186 people still living under a five-year statute of limitations. A few weeks after my arrest in Washington D.C., on Jan. 20, 2017 ( J20), I accepted some painful advice: Don’t criticize the Trump administration publicly. At that point, I was hoping for my charges to get dropped before my eventual indictment in May. The inability to speak freely on social media and in the publications I wrote for drained my confidence; I still reflexively self-censor, often deleting tweets for no real reason. Even though my charges have gone away, writing this is hard. This pounding in my chest, this trembling hand and sour stomach and sweaty tunnel vision are what it feels like to have your freedom of speech curtailed by the state. I went to D.C. with several other journalists to report on Trump’s ascent, following a year of bubbling anti-fascism against his campaign. I currently enjoy the haven of a newspaper willing to hire lawyers who bite back, but in January 2017, I was a freelancer using vacation days from my full-time job to go witness history. This was a completely uncharted assignment: How violent could this get? Would American jackboots try to stomp me in the streets? In the end, it didn’t matter whether I presented myself as a journalist on J20 or that I only carried a sandwich and a notebook; white supremacists wound up messing with me anyway for over a year See J20 Page 14

August 9, 2018 13


J20 from Page 13 Aaron Cantú

afterward by working with authorities to prosecute and harass me. I pitched a dispatch soon after getting released from jail, but pulled it for legal concerns. After 18 months, the actual memories of the half-hour march leading up to my arrest have mixed with dreams and nightmares of the day, as well as descriptions in multiple indictments, trial transcripts and media reports. My mind’s eye remembers a dark funhouse of corporate buildings and unusually waifish, Jack Skellington-esque riot cops hemming me into a larger group. Everything looks gray and morose; it may have rained a bit. Police relentlessly deployed sting-ball grenades and pepper spray; the final tally was at least 70 grenades thrown at people blocks away from where Donald John Trump was sworn in as the 45th U.S. president. Creaks and shatters created by objects smashing glass, including the insured windows of a Bank of America branch and a Starbucks, are more memorable than any destruction my eyes may have seen. Very, very loud police sirens, punctuated by grenade explosions and screaming, overwhelm everything else. “The inappropriate and extensive use of less lethal munitions suggests the need for increased supervision of officers during mass demonstrations,” said a recent report from the staid Police Foundation, which evaluated the Metropolitan Police Department’s conduct at Inauguration Day protests. Impossible to forget are the feelings throughout the march: The whole-body nerve rush when I first saw a huge mass of marching people extending at least a whole city block; the panic run as the sting-ball grenades burst near my feet; the euphoria of an ungovernable moment, however frightening and unpredictable, that disrupted the lawful monotony binding our violently unequal social system together; and the shock when I checked my phone from inside the mass arrest and saw that protests in D.C. had overtaken Trump’s inaugural speech as the top headline on CNN.com. If protesters weren’t able to stop the actual inauguration, they still marred it in history. When the first six of over 200 defendants went to trial last November, prosecutors used expressions of apparent excitement, wonder or awe during the march as evidence of a conspiracy to riot. “I’m fucking blissed out,” photojournalist and acquitted defendant Alexei Wood announced in a livestream from the march that day. The feds later tried to use it against him in court. In an identical indictment filed against all defendants, prosecutors also used randomly shouted phrases like “Fuck it up,” “Fuck capitalism,” and “Whose streets? Our streets!” to transform an adrenal impulse into a criminal agreement among riotous coconspirators. The thought that I might be seriously screwed first occurred to me inside the police wagon transporting us to be processed. I sat cramped and bound along with nine other people in one of half a mile’s worth of law enforcement vehicles flashing various 14 August 9, 2018

threatening, anti-social act against society, apparently menacing enough to warrant decades in prison. The motive to bust a conspiracy also explains the Justice Department’s initial demand last summer to review 1.3 million IP addresses of people who visited DisruptJ20.org, a website used to organize loosely affiliated masses of protests that took place at the inauguration. Despite an outcry from the media and civil rights groups, the court eventually granted much of the prosecutors’ request, yet they could find no actual conspiracy. This data-vacuuming extended to the cell phones that all arrestees were carrying that day. The Metropolitan Police Department used technology from an Israeli security firm called Cellebrite to extract information from all confiscated phones that weren’t sufficiently encrypted. After one anonymous defendant’s phone was raided, the defendant received an 8,000-page dossier containing years of personal data, including “intimate emails to and from my friends and lovers through more than a decade, [late] night political debates over chat apps that helped shape my values and convictions,” and more. The horror of a hostile state downloading a record of your developing identity reaching back to early teen years hues of light, as if carrying highis a possibility unique to millennials and priority enemies of the state. I later generations that grew up on the Smoke from a burning knew then we weren’t going to internet. limousine as seen hours after mass arrests on get off with a simple citation, To my knowledge, the feds were Inauguration Day. and that I was probably going to never able to crack into my phone thanks have to tell my mom. I didn’t to strong encryption — though they expect, however, that I would be made clear that they were specifically charged with eight felonies for the act of attending interested in me, declaring in one motion from last and reporting on a confrontational protest, or that I October that they were undertaking “additional would be facing a combined 80 years in prison for efforts” to get my data. But I was sufficiently terrified these charges. by other fishing expeditions, including subpoenas Months later I not only considered my own future, issued to Apple, Facebook and possibly Twitter for but the far-reaching political implications of these communications between and among co-defendants. I cases: Why did the United States Attorney’s Office never received a notice from any of these companies for the District of Columbia find it appropriate to that my accounts had been subpoenaed — though hang virtual life sentences over the heads of 214 peoapparently, they do not have to notify you or can be ple after an indiscriminate mass arrest? How could gagged from doing so — but others did, and I still they have so shamelessly gleaned evidence from fartreat my online presence as if it’s bugged. right groups like Project Veritas, a discredited organiAll this reaching by the prosecutor’s office turned zation known for making deceptive gotcha videos, as out to be for naught. Although Assistant U.S. well as the paramilitary group the Oath Keepers, and Attorney Rizwan Qureshi mumbled to an unbelieving still felt they had a legitimate case? Where was the D.C. jury at the second and only other trial of defenmotivation — the conspiracy — to pursue these cases dants that there had been a conspiracy to “destroy coming from? your city,” this was never proven. That trial in May Mass arrests at protests have happened plenty of ended in acquittals and mistrials, after the first resulttimes in cities across the country, including D.C. in ed in total acquittals last December. The pair of fail2002 when hundreds at a World Bank protest were ures set the stage for the eventual collapse of the case arrested and later lavished with civil settlement in its entirety, letting the few dozen remaining defenmoney. What appeared new in the J20 case was the dants go free. attempt to color protesters’ actions as part of a preThe second trial took place at the D.C. Superior planned conspiracy between strangers to cause mayCourt where, in another room, a chief judge deterhem. mined that Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Kerkhoff By wrapping up distinct actions like allegedly had intentionally misled the court about the existence breaking windows, chanting and lighting fireworks at See CANTU Page 16 a protest into a single conspiracy, they became one Boulder Weekly


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of nearly 70 videos recorded by Project Veritas operatives at protest planning meetings ahead of the inauguration. The operatives handed over the surreptitiously recorded videos to a D.C. police detective, Greggory Pemberton, who would spend an entire year investigating the J20 case. Defense counsel later discovered personal tweets sent out by Pemberton indicating his sympathies with the racist pro-Trump digital underbelly, and used them to undermine his testimony at trial. According to a recent filing from former defendants, the withheld videos “cut against the theory that the ... meeting was an exclusive, secretive meeting to plan unlawful conduct.” The ’60s-era stereotype of violent leftists whispering clandestine plans was part of the narrative prosecutors tried to create, and they went as far as lying in open court to preserve it. This isn’t the first time that authorities in D.C. have hunted for clues of a conspiracy post-riot. After the city’s black residents rose up following the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in April 1968, resulting in $27 million ($193.4 million today) in damages, the feds wanted to know who, if anybody, had orchestrated the chaos, and whether similar uprisings in over 100 cities had been part of a revolutionary conspiracy to overthrow the white American system. Stokely Carmichael, then the leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, emerged as a primary suspect. Shortly after King’s murder, Carmichael told a radio host from Havana, Cuba, that it was “crystal clear [that] the United States of America must fall in order for humanity to live, and we are going to give our lives for that cause.” But no conspiracy indictment was ever filed against Carmichael, or anybody else. The fact that conspiracy charges were filed for so many in the J20 case after a mere $100,000 in damage illustrates how much prosecutorial aggression has advanced the last half-century. Some in radical circles have called attention to the white privilege of the J20 defendants, arguing that by virtue of their whiteness (or, for the minority of nonwhite defendants, their proximity to that pool of privilege), defendants had access to platforms, sympathy, support networks and resources that most low-income and nonwhite defendants lack, and that these advantages were hugely responsible for our success. I mostly agree with this analysis. It is also true that the entire legal premise underpinning the multiple felony charges filed against each of us was steeped in the United States’ centuries-

long defense of white supremacy. The anti-rioting statute under which we were charged, which calls for a maximum sentence of 10 years if convicted for rioting where serious injury or at least $5,000 in property damage occurs, was passed in 1967 by Congress in the wake of black urban uprisings in that decade. Prosecutors used the new statute against black D.C. residents the following year. But the connection goes deeper. The unifying legal theory of our prosecution was that we engaged in a conspiracy, and were therefore each equally liable for all property destruction or injury that occurred that day. This theory of liability stems from a mid-20th century Supreme Court decision in a moonshining and tax evasion case, but conspiracy law’s modern origins extend to the founding of this country and beyond as a legal weapon of colonialism and counterinsurgency, primarily against black revolt in the founding of the American state. At the end of the 1600s, as the population of enslaved Africans in America grew, “the more encompassing category of ‘whiteness’ ascended,” writes Gerald Horne in The Counter-Revolution of 1776, where Horne argues that the Anglo-Saxon settlers’ war for independence entrenched slavery. By 1680, one colonial legislature had drafted a bill “to prevent Negroes’ insurrection,” and this was followed by a torrent of similar anti-conspiracy legislation in the colonies over the next several decades in response to planned and executed rebellions by African people and their sometimes-allies: European servants and Native Americans resisting invasion. One of the most famous pre-1776 conspiracies was the New York Conspiracy of 1741, in which prosecutors accused black enslaved people and poor whites of conspiring to burn the city and overthrow the colonial governor. The colony’s narrative, as established by a fire-breathing judge named Daniel Horsmanden, was that a multiracial group held secret meetings at a white-owned tavern for months before setting fire to the governor’s home, a church and horse stables in wealthy white neighborhoods. Four white and 30 black people were sentenced to death for their alleged role in the plot, and an additional 70 enslaved Africans were exiled from the colony. At the trial, which took on the sort of puritanical zeal legible in the J20 case, the prosecution coerced witnesses into affirming the judge’s racist belief that the “conspiracy was of deeper design” and “more dangerous [a] Contrivance than the Salves [sic] themselves were capable of.” The most seriBoulder Weekly


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in their own high-profile conspiracy cases, though not necessarily as defendants. For example, Roger Stone, the longago Nixon ratfucker and more recently a top campaign adviser to his friend Trump, sent far-right spies to inauguration protesters’ planning meetings as far back as December 2016. Stone was referenced in a July federal indictment against a dozen Russian intelligence military officials as a “senior member of [Trump’s] campaign” in direct contact with Russian hackers targeting the 2016 presidential election. Another is Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III, the top official overseeing the J20 conspiracy prosecution. In March 2016, Sessions was beckoned in an email sent to Trump campaign advisor Rick Dearborn from Republican activist Paul Erickson, who wanted to arrange a meeting between Trump and Vladimir Putin. A criminal complaint unsealed in July claims Erickson was manipulated by a Russian state operative named Maria Butina to gain access to top Republicans. In another twist, the J20 defendants may have been saved by prosecutors out of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in D.C. turning their attention to Butina’s conspiracy prosecution. To this day, neither Sessions nor any prosecutor from the U.S. Attorney’s Office in D.C. have spoken publicly about J20. While prosecutors don’t often comment publicly on their cases, especially when they lose, this could have been the perfect chance for this Justice Department to trumpet its lawand-order bonafides, which makes its silence striking. Instead, prosecutors showed their asses in court, just as the authoritarian-leaning Trump presidency — which includes the Russia meddling cases, the overt embrace of white supremacy, the attacks on the press, the ultra-nationalism and everything else — is showing the country’s ass to the world right now. The power structures animating U.S. life are themselves the result of long-running conspiracies, and to update Horne’s analysis, the American project is being intensely interrogated in this moment. History shows that when a state’s ability to present itself as a stable force for social order wanes, illegal conspiracies begin to sprout. That’s not what happened at the J20 protests, but it would be ahistorical to think it wouldn’t happen somewhere else — or that a journalist wouldn’t be there to cover it. This article first appeared in the Santa Fe Reporter.

in

ous transgression, in the law’s eyes, was the conspiracy of comradeship between whites and blacks against colonial rule. After all, it had only been a few decades since “whites had achieved a sense of race solidarity at the expense of blacks” in some of the colonies around 1700, according to contemporary historian T.H. Breen. Elite settlers threatened by the growing population of Africans saw the creation of pan-European solidarity (i.e., “whiteness”) in the colonies as necessary to gird against constant rebellions. Key to the eventual supremacy of the concept of whiteness, Horne writes, was that it not be interrogated too hard, lest “the loose threads of class hierarchy that this racial category otherwise obscured” unravel and ruin the entire colonial project. This gets to the heart of the matter: In order for the colonies to overcome endless conspiracies to revolt by people they kidnapped, enslaved, exploited and colonized, its ruling elite had to create their own conspiracy — the institutionalization of “whiteness” — in defense of its power. The Bill of Rights would later implicitly enshrine the three points of power in the new nation, including whiteness, property ownership (wealth) and cis-hetero maleness, consolidating ruling class power through the law. Writing for the Harvard Law Review nearly a century ago, Francis B. Sayre wrote that American courts often use conspiracy law as a cudgel, “especially during times of reaction, to punish, as criminal, associations for which the time being are unpopular or stir up prejudices of the social class in which the judges have for the most part been bred.” It’s more than just prejudice: Today the U.S. elite reaffirms its power through law, war, trade and politics daily, in a coordinated effort to preserve the status quo in all its structural inequality. This extreme and concentrated power is its own kind of conspiracy, one which allows the state to persecute others it considers illegal. There isn’t enough room here to chronicle the ways conspiracy law has been used since the 17th century to criminalize associations of nonwhite people, laborers, immigrants, protesters, revolutionaries and others, nor consider nuanced exceptions, such as mafia prosecutions that rope police and politicians into criminal rackets. But fundamentally, the difference between a legitimate and illegitimate conspiracy comes down to power. It’s ironic that some top Trump cronies involved in the J20 conspiracy prosecution are themselves caught up

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Turning culture into action with Yo-Yo Ma

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Oil and gas setback initiative earns enough signatures to be put on ballot, awaits final approval

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olorado Rising announced on Aug. 6 that it had submitted more than 171,000 signatures to the Secretary of State in its quest to put Initiative 97 on the November ballot. The group needed to collect at least 98,492 signatures from registered voters in Colorado by the Monday deadline. If enough signatures are certified (a certain portion of signatures on most petitions are thrown out for various reasons), Colorado voters will be able to decide in November if they want to enact 2,500-foot setbacks on all new oil and gas operations in the state. “We are proud and thankful for this monumental effort by the people of Colorado to create a commonsense setback from this increasingly brazen and destructive industry. We are committed to protecting our neighborhoods from this explosive and toxic industrial development that risks our children’s health and jeopardizes the safety of our homes,” said Colorado Rising President Tricia Olson in a press release. Colorado Rising made multiple claims over the last several weeks that protesters were being organized to interrupt their efforts and intimidate potential signers. The group said about 750 volunteers across the state helped collect the signatures. Oil and gas industry groups have been running commercials against the measure, stating that passage of 97 would stifle the industry. The Colorado Petroleum Council claims passage of 97 would cost the state 100,000 jobs and $1 billion by 2030. “Should Initiative 97 qualify for the ballot, there will not be an issue that would have a more devastating impact on the statewide ballot this year,” said Tracee Bentley, executive director of the Colorado Petroleum Council, in a press release. “This disastrous proposal will negatively impact every Coloradan’s pocketbook, will reduce the quality of life that we value in Colorado, and cost thousands of jobs.” Proposition 108 also received enough signatures. It’s backed by the Colorado Farm Bureau and the oil and gas industry, and would allow for property and mineral owners to sue local and state governments when their actions (perhaps such as instituting setbacks) devalue their assets. Boulder Weekly

Jill Kaplan

orld-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma is on a mission to turn culture into action by bringing together communities and organizations to address the most pressing social issues of our time. He was in Denver on Aug. 2, traveling between different nonprofits and community organizations, creating dialogue and responding with music. At an event in collaboration with Youth on Record, Boulderite Ana Casas shared her autobiographical monologue about her brother’s deportation following a marijuana possession charge. She was accompanied by former Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett, who has been helping Casas share her story through Motus Theater’s production of Do You Know Who I Am? read by law enforcement officers. In response to her story, Ma played “Song of the Birds,” a Catalan folk song about family. “Music, like all of culture, helps us to understand our environment, each other and ourselves,” Ma said, according to a press release from Motus Theater. “Culture helps us to imagine a better future. Culture helps turn ‘them’ into ‘us.’ And these things have never been more important.” The Aug. 2 event was the beginning of Ma’s two-year tour across six continents focusing on the culture in action project and associated with the release of a new album, Six Evolutions, a recording of Bach’s Cello Suites. He played at Red Rocks Amphitheatre the night before.

Boulder Weekly earns multiple AAN Awards

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oulder Weekly took home several honors at this year’s Association of Alternative Newsmedia (AAN) awards. Arts and Culture Editor Caitlin Rockett won first place in Music Writing for several pieces published in 2017 — a story on Bonobo that painted the popular artist in a new light, a thought-provoking conversation with Marilyn Manson’s guitarist Tyler Bates, and an intimate feature of Vagabon, aka Laeticia Tamko. Rockett also earned second place in the Arts Feature category for her story, “Roots and Shoots,” which profiled a program about animal behavior for inmates in the Boulder County jail. Senior Editor Angela K. Evans won third place in the Music Writing category for her profiles of Jason Isbell, Billy Corgan and Tennis’ Alaina Moore. Winning an AAN award, let alone three, is a high honor for any alt weekly. This year’s winners were chosen from a field of nearly 700 entries submitted by 55 alternative publications across North America. To read the winning stories, read this article on boulderweekly.com.

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boulderganic The future is (hopefully) green Boulder gets its first succulent wall by Sara McCrea Travis Popiel

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nce a day for one minute, the automatic irrigation system threaded through Peloton West condominiums’s new succulent wall whirs to life. Plants on the west-facing side are watered more frequently than it’s north-facing counterpart, due to different levels of sun exposure. But once the plants have adjusted to their new soil and living conditions, watering will dwindle to once a week, as they are highly adaptable and don’t require much water. Able to withstand conditions without much care, succulents are a bit like the pet rocks of the plant world. As additions to coffee tales or display cases, succulents seem to be everywhere lately. The Instagram hashtag #succulove, a way for people to share pictures of their artistic succulent arrangements, has 1.1 million posts. On the Dolce & Gabbana 2016 runway, prints of cacti made their way onto suits and sweaters. Perhaps succulents are so popular because keeping them alive without much effort gives us an easily won sense of competence, or maybe they appeal to our biological appreciation of symmetry. Outside of the Peloton condominiums in Boulder, an immense cube with two sides covered in living plants towers over passing residents. The $40,000 succulent landscaping project is there to provide an aesthetic touch of whimsy matched with environmentalism. Finished in June, the wall is Boulder’s first in the large-scale green wall movement, a trend New Jerseyraised landscaper Travis Popiel says reached the East Coast years ago. While other green roofs and walls use perennials and grasses — including the wall at

Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre in Englewood, which features plants arranged to look like sound waves — the living wall at Peloton uses only succulents. Decorated with a colorful mix of ice-plants, sedums and other succulents, the wall is built to withstand the Colorado dry summer heat as well as winter’s subfreezing temperatures. The wall is ever-changing because the different types of plants in the wall bloom at different times and its colors transform throughout the day and throughout the seasons. Even with maximum watering, in the past two months the wall has only used about 18 gallons of water — that’s about as much as is used for a 10-minute shower. When he first moved to Boulder four years ago, Popiel says he expected to see more green roofs and living walls. “There may be some residential things, so smallscale. But you would think in the center of Boulder

there would be a big one, right in the middle of town,” says Popiel, who is in the process of getting his green roof accreditation, which requires passing a two-hour, multidisciplinary exam on green roof design, installation and maintenance. When applied to exteriors, living walls and roofs can help regulate the temperature of buildings, an important concept in the Denver Metro area, given it has the third highest urban heat island effect in the country. Last year, Denver passed a Green Roof Ordinance, which mandated that any building with a floorplan of 25,000 feet or more must include a roof with living vegetation, solar panels or a mixture of the two, to help mitigate rising temperatures. But no green roofs have been built under the ordinance so far. The costliness of implementing the measure raised concerns among developers and the ordinance has been under revision this year. Popiel says cost is always an issue, but he believes the effects of the living walls can have substantial public and private benefits. In addition to regulating temperatures, living walls can improve air quality through photosynthesis and increase biodiversity in urban areas. It’s difficult to tell when exactly succulents became so trendy, but Popiel believes that it has something to do with biophilia — the hypothesis that psychoanalyst Erich Fromm first described in 1973 as “the passionate love of life and all that is alive.” Biophilia suggests that our instinctual attraction to nature is genetic and that being around plants and flowers can make us feel connected and alive. “It’s calming,” Popiel says. “I think the future is green, at least I hope so. With biophilia, it’s a really important psychological component to have something that you can look at and connect with.”

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The language of the people

28 years later, Rocky Mountain Folks Festival still brings the world together by Boulder Weekly Staff

buzz

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n 1990, a lawyer named Craig Ferguson found himself in a and mother tongue. In these divisive times here in the U.S., ON THE BILL: Rocky hotel room in Chicago dreaming of a new phase of his life, Folks Fest is an opportunity to remember there is no “other,” Mountain Folks Festival. one where he would bring together songwriters from around there is only “us,” humanity, together as one, singing to the Aug.17-19, Planet the world for a “summit on the song.” The next year he heartbeat of our Mother Earth. Bluegrass, 500 W. Main St., Lyons, bluegrass.com/ brought the idea to life with the first Rocky Mountain Folks Our coverage brings you stories from the Sahara Desert, folks. Festival. Subsequent years, though fraught with problems in from the concrete jungle of Los Angeles and from “la belle those early days, drew more than 1,000 people to watch lineups province,” Québec, Canada. In French, Spanish, Tamashek including Celtic, Canadian, reggae, jazz and Russian folk acts. and English, these bands tap into the deep well of humaniIn creating a teaser for this year’s Rocky Mountain Folks Festival — the 28th ty to tell stories that circumvent the language barrier to speak directly to — we wanted to highlight Craig’s initial dream by profiling a few of the genrethe heart. blending, polyglottic, international bands on this year’s lineup. We hope the stories on the following pages guide you up to Planet Bluegrass Folk music is the language of the people, one that transcends place and time this year, where there are plenty more stories to hear and tell.

Tinariwen

Sounds of the Sahara by Angela K. Evans

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ome call it desert blues. Others call it West African rock. According to the Recording Academy, it’s World Music. In reality, the music of Tinariwen is a sound all its own. Focused around electric and acoustic guitars, it’s kept in rhythm with an electric bass and local percussion instruments like the tindé drum. The poetic lyrics are often repetitive, sometimes sung by a soloist, but mostly through a rich harmony of voices. They’re hypnotic, especially to Western ears unaccustomed to the band’s native Tamashek language. The band is Tuareg, a nomadic group of about 2 million people that transcend national boundaries, spread throughout Mali, Niger, Libya, southern Algeria and Chad in North Africa. For decades, Tinariwen has used music to share the Tuareg culture and plight with the rest of the world. “We are a small people facing many difficulties because of extremism, globalization and climate change, so we use our exposition to speak out for all the Tuareg people,” guitarist and singer Abdallah Ag Alhousseini says via an email translation. The band was born out of political struggle and has known violence almost their entire lives. As a young boy, Tinariwen’s leader, Ibrahim Ag Alhabib, lost his father, who was executed for helping Tuarag rebels in the newly independent Mali. In the early 1980s the group met in exile, recruited into military training camps by Libyan leader Muammar al-Gaddafi. They connected over music, sitting around campfires and developing their signature sound. Their first shows were weddings and other traditional gatherings, Alhousseini says, a long ways away from the large festival stages they now play. Later, they were part of the Tuareg rebellion in 1990s that led to a peace agreement and the band’s return to Mali. But the region has faced increasing political unrest and extremism in recent years, and with it has come a religious war against music, threatening local culture and cohesion. In 2013, one member of Tinariwen was kidnapped by Islamists and held for 10 days. Despite the Tuareg’s continued struggle for a homeland, or at least political representation, Tinariwen continues to play and record music — winning a Grammy for Best World Music Album in 2011 and another nod in 2017. “As people who have experienced life with violence, we are even more convinced that music is a much better answer,” Alhousseini says. “Things don’t get any better with violence.” Boulder Weekly

Marie Planeille

Their latest release, Elwan, is again set to the backdrop of the Sahara Desert — the sandy dunes, the winds that mold and shape them, the stars that illuminate the night sky. They call their people back to the solitude and power of the natural world; they promise the desert they will always return. “We have chosen music and poetry to promote human freedom and development,” Alhousseini says. “Humanism is our philosophy.” Tinariwen’s music has a universal appeal that reaches beyond their desert homeland and speaks of a unity that applies to all people, regardless of nationality, ethnicity or culture. Tinariwen plays at 5 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 19. see FOLKSFEST Page 24

August 9 , 2018 23


FOLKSFEST from Page 23 Courtesy of Las Cafeteras

Las Cafeteras

East L.A. Chicano folk fusion by Caitlin Rockett

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f you’ve got a little Spanish in your back pocket, you might think Las Cafeteras is a band of all women, what with that “a” there on the end. But the Chicano band from East L.A. is a mixedcompany outfit. The “misspelling,” as it were, is the band’s way of snubbing grammatical gender, a hard “no thanks” to the Spanish language’s predilection for the masculine; acceptance, says vocalist Daniel French, of the feminine energy that exists in us all. “That’s who we are as humans,” French says. “We have this balance of energy in us.” The band got its start nearly 15 years ago at the Eastside Café, a community cultural center in El Sereno, Los Angeles, where, instead of coffee, patrons serve up knowledge in an each-one-teach-one style. “[It was] founded on the idea that you don’t need the government,” French says of the café. “We don’t need to wait for somebody else to come do things for us.” French says his friend and future bandmate, Hector Flores, asked a fellow patron at the café to teach classes in son jarocho, a regional folk music style from Veracruz, Mexico. The patron was game, but there was one stipulation. “She said, ‘You can’t tell me no, meaning I’m going to have you dancing, singing, playing, and you can’t say no to any of those.’” So they didn’t say no, learning to play instruments

central to the son jarocho Afro-Mexican folk style, such as the jarana (an eightstringed tiny guitar), requinto (a smaller version of a classical guitar), quijada (jawbone) and tarima (a wooden platform used for dancing and percussion). They called themselves Las Cafeteras — the coffeemakers — after the “café” that brought them all together. Over the years the band has changed a lot, morphing from a group of dozens of musicians into a core group of just six. They’ve taken many traditional son jarocho songs and modernized them, replacing Spanish colonial era lyrics about sailors and cattle with contemporary tales of being an immigrant in the concrete jungle of Los Angeles. There are notes of rock, hiphop, punk, cumbia and rancheras woven in and out of the foundational folk sounds. “What some people consider folk is often too narrow,” French says. “It’s the music of the people. “People from around the world will continue to mix traditions across tribes, from people down the river and up the river, but now also from around the world,” he says. “You hear it everywhere. Like in [the] Black Panther [soundtrack]. I think the composer is

Les Poules à Colin

Their modern interpretations of traditional Québécois songs incorporate hints of Celtic composition and flourishes of contemporary jazz, glued together with impossibly smooth harmonies, almost exclusively sung in French. For Les Poules, singing in French is an act of preservation. “Where we’re from in Quebec there’s still a lot of tension between the English language and French,” says lead singer and violinist Béatrix Méthé. “We’re encouraged from a young age to play music and sing in French and preserve that part of our culture that some are afraid is going to die.” Often driven along by Colin’s clogging feat — a galloping rhythm known as podorythmie that’s a common feature in Québécois folk music — Les Poules puts a signature touch on the irresistibly whimsical and sometimes noir storylines of many beloved Québécois songs. The five musicians grew up together on the folk scene in Quebéc, honing their craft at house parties with some of Quebéc’s finest folk musicians — which included their parents. Long before the five were even born, their parents played in bands together. There was

Chansons folklorique Québécoises by Caitlin Rockett

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ith four women and one Colin, it seems pretty clear why Quebécquintet Les Poules à Colin settled on their name: “Colin’s hens.” But like the young band’s music, their name has layers, more enchanting and nuanced than one might believe possible from a group of collegeaged musicians. “La Poule à Colin” is a well-known chanson folklorique Québécoises, a traditional folksong from Quebéc, about a hen that gets lost in a neighboring yard and, in a very biblical way, manages to become a meal that feeds an entire parish. The priest of the parish is so enraptured by the meal that he forgets to say mass to the town’s people who so desperately “need” to hear it. Les Poules à Colin seem to share that chicken’s magical ability to feed and beguile the masses, their songs hearty fare for the ravenous musical explorer. 24 August 9 , 2018

Swedish (Ludwig Göransson), but Kendrick Lamar was also working on that soundtrack. There’s a mix of African, hip-hop, trap, violins...” The future of folk music, French says, lies at this indistinguishable intersection between the past and the future, the place where old and young meet, where ideas shift and progress marches forward. “It’s about community,” French says. “In that way folk music goes beyond the artist, so to speak, beyond the person making the noise, to the community that gathers to do something together. I think that’s where we all meet with folk music. To pass time, yes, but also to move into the future through the past, or to move into the past as we walk together into the future. There’s a magic to that. Time isn’t linear. It’s circular. It’s woven together.” Las Cafeteras play at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 17.

a special kind of musical chemistry built into their DNA, says Méthé. After nine years and three fulllength albums, the group has traveled through North America, Europe and Australia. “People seem to be very open and interested in a culture that is, I guess, foreign for them,” Méthé says. “When we tour, we are considered in the world music category and people don’t seem to care at all about the language. But our music isn’t exclusively focused on lyrics.” It’s true: there’s no need to speak French to find yourself spellbound by Les Poules’ songs, but the beauty of the music begs you to investigate the yarn Méthé weaves with her velveteen vocals. The band’s newest release, Morose, explores the dark corners of folk music. “We’ve been in the traditional world of Québécois music since we were really young,” Méthé says. “If you take the time to listen to a lot of these songs they are really dark: people being too drunk to take care of their kids, jealousy, strange dark subjects that are forgotten because they are played in an upbeat tempo and they are really fun. We thought it would be interesting to dig up some of these old songs, embrace that darkness.” Les Poules à Colin play at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 18. Boulder Weekly


The Milk Carton Kids Mourning through music by Sara McCrea

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The duo has played Folks Fest once before in 2012, just the two of them and their guitars. Back then they performed in the early afternoon, but this time they will be playing as the penultimate closers to the festival with a full band behind them. “Folk is always, by definition, the stuff of the people. The way the music industry would like to have it is this other wave of Mumford and Sons and Old Crow Medicine Show, the rise of these Americana

hough the two had met only three months before, long after the invitations had been sent, Kenneth Pattengale sat at the family table for Joey Ryan’s wedding. It seemed fitting, as the duo’s connection seemed to Pattengale like musical love at first sight. Now, eight years and four albums later, Pattengale describes the pair’s relationship as folk duo The Milk Carton Kids a lot like a marriage. “It was so apparent from the start, and what’s transpired over the past eight years is every emotion and experience under the sun, including lots of frustration with each other and lots of real success and happiness with each other,” Pattengale says. “It’s deep care and understanding of what we do together and an ambitious desire for what we can do together. It’s not unlike a real deep friendship or a serious relationship. There’s lots of compromise and often lots of tension, and of course, it has to be enduring, it has to be life-giving.” The Milk Carton Kids released their most ambitious album yet, All the Things That I Did and All the Things That I Didn’t Do, in late June. On the album, the duo builds on their Simon and Garfunkel-esque heart-rending harmonies and intertwining guitar melodies by introducing additional instrumentation and bringing in a separate producer for the first time. With a mournful 10-minute song as its centerpiece and other tunes about personal and cultural loss, the album returns to the band’s careerspanning themes of grief, confusion and nostalgia. Pattengale and Ryan begin the writing process separately, but quickly introduce the material to each other for feedback and revision. For All the Things, Pattengale says much of Ryan’s writing came from a place of concern as a new father in today’s cultural and political climate, while much of his own writing came from the end of a seven-year relationship and his journey to overcoming cancer in recent years. “Both he and I have been writing our truths, whatever that is. That’s all you can really do anyways, when you write songs,” Pattengale says. Though they did not set out with an overarching narrative for their latest album, Saturday, August Pattengale sees each of the songs as vignettes that come together to reflect Friday, August 17 the duo’s experience as they undergo self-development, both together and individually.

acts that they like to throw together and wrap up in a neat bow and in a nice little package,” Pattengale says. “The important part is that there is something like Folks Festival, a place where people come together once a year. There’s a community that arises from that, both as musicians, who end up entertaining the people and playing the songs, but equally for the audience, who attends and celebrates them. Music is always a conversation between the people making it and the people listening to it.” The Milk Carton Kids play at 6:45 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 19.

UPCOMING SHOWS

Boulder Weekly

11 – 5:00 pm, Boulder Beer Wilderness Pub, Boulder – 6:00 pm, Liquid Mechanics Brewing CO, Lafayette August 9 , 2018 25


Experience Naropa Aug

Discover. Connect. Engage.

9

Aug

16

Friday, September 21 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Nalanda Campus 6287 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder, CO

For more information and to RSVP visit: Naropa.edu/experience-naropa

On Sept 21, Naropa University will throw open its doors to prospective graduate and undergraduate students from across the country and around the world at Experience Naropa—a whirlwind of activity designed to open minds, spark creativity, and begin to create the bonds of community. Tour campus, attend sample classes, and meet students and faculty who are changing the world for the better. Come for the answers to your questions, and stick around for an engaging afternoon full of lively activities and passionate people. For prospective students, family, and friends.

Aug

28 Sep

6

eTown Live Radio Show Taping:

The War and Treaty & Haley Heynderickx Movie Night:

Blue Heart –

The Fight to Save Europe’s Last Wild Rivers Full Concert:

Amy Helm

Blessed with a commanding, deeply expressive voice and an uncanny songwriting skill that instinctively draws upon a deep well of American musical traditions.

eTown Live Radio Show Taping at Red Rocks Amphitheatre:

Lake Street Dive & Josh Ritter

8/26 The Superheroes: In Concert CO Pops 9/4 Full Concert: GOODING with Me Like Bees and Carter Hulsey 9/9 Movie Night: Isle of Dogs eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce St. Boulder, CO 80302 • eTOWN.org

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact digger@etown.org

26 August 9 , 2018

Boulder Weekly


Magic in the acoustic guitar The famed Andy McKee on hanging with the big(ger) dogs by Dave Kirby

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e don’t know, and wouldn’t ask, if Andy McKee was a churchgoing kind of guy. But preparing for our interview, we came across a YouTube video of the esteemed Doyle Dykes at a music convention a few years ago. Dykes, a lifelong devout Christian and one of the acoustic guitar’s most prolific and astonishing players, was doing a between-song gab with his audience and he asked, “What’s God’s favorite chord?” Gsus. We tell it to McKee; it takes him a second or two, but he gets it and laughs. Then laughs some more. “I like that one,” he says, and laughs some more. Icebreaker out of the way, we can’t help but note that the arc of Andy McKee’s career, and the substance of his playing, eerily mirrors that of Boulder’s own “Acoustic Ninja,” Trace Bundy. Both Midwesterners, both cut their teeth playing coffeehouse gigs to small and relatively sympathetic audiences, both finding their way into highly percussive, exotically tuned acoustic explorations, and both surfed an early and stiff downstream draft from heavily viewed YouTube videos. McKee and Bundy have been friends for years (they last shared the stage locally for Bundy’s holiday special at the Boulder Theater in December), but when we catch up with McKee, he recalls the faintly frustrating first time he encountered Bundy. “I’d gone out to play a show in Denver. I’d brought a friend of mine from New Jersey to play the show with me, and the venue had booked an opening guy, and it was Trace. I didn’t know who he was or anything, but we go in and the place was packed, totally loaded during his show. And he finished his set, and the place totally emptied. Like, there were three guys left,” he says. “We were like, ‘Hey, what are we? Chopped liver?’” Of course, there’s no such thing in the world of solo acoustic guitar as playing in, or struggling to escape from, anyone else’s shadow. Like the solo performer in any genre, it is a solitary enterprise; a one-to-one relationship with the audience, no band or orchestra from which to bank shot or bury oneself in, and as is commonly the case, especially for acoustic guitarists, the player and his arrangements are completely locked Boulder Weekly

ON THE BILL: Guitar Town at Copper Mountain. Friday, Aug. 10–Sunday, Aug. 12, Copper Mountain Resort, 509 Copper Road, Frisco. copperguitartown.com

UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

Courtesy of Andy McKee

Aug

9

overtones into a single identity. The originals are unique and a deeply personal expression of the artist’s strengths, and the covers (and they all play them, as a matter of practicality as well as tribute) reflect compositional and technical inclinations as distinctive as fingerprints. For McKee — whose dazzling technique includes percussive accompaniment on the guitar body, dizzying single note flourishes and deftly fluid chordal melodies — the early days were primarily electric guitar, figuring out Eric Johnson and Joe Satriani runs, until a relative dragged him to a clinic by one of the “new acoustic” masters. “It was Preston Reed. It was actually my 16th birthday. I saw him play, and was totally mesmerized and fascinated by what he was doing with the acoustic guitar,” McKee says. “I had thought the acoustic guitar was sort of a boring instrument, especially the steel string. I had a nylon string and learned a couple of classical things, and that was cool, but I always thought the steel string was... y’know, for strumming around a campfire.” Like Neil Young? (Sorry, Neil) “Yeah, right? I just didn’t have any interest in it. But when I saw [Reed], I couldn’t believe you could cover so many different aspects of music on one guitar. I’d never heard the percussion stuff taken to that level, accompaniment parts on your left hand while doing melodic stuff with your right hand, so he was the first guy who made me want to check it out. I learned a couple of his tunes. But then I discovered Michael Hedges.” Hedges, of course, is the guitarist

who is widely credited with fostering and perfecting this percussion-intensive, genre-defying subgenre of acoustic playing, setting the blueprint for an entire generation of players scaring up new sonic extensions of the ancient instrument. Hedges died in a single car accident in 1997, a few weeks before his 44th birthday. Many guitarists, including McKee, Reed, the FrenchAlgerian guitarist Pierre Bensusan (one of Hedges’ early influences) and Leo Kottke have paid tribute to Hedges. “It wasn’t just really the way he played or the techniques he was using, it was the music itself that I was just moved by,” McKee says. “He was such a powerful composer; the music was really profound for one guitar to do what he was doing. So he became my biggest influence, I think.” McKee comes to Copper Mountain as part of the Guitar Town festival, a collection of some the biggest names in fretboard bedazzlement. Coco Montoya, Robben Ford, Preston Reed, John Jorgenson, and heading up the Saturday acoustic lineup, Al Di Meola. Even for McKee, comfortably seated among the best acoustic players anywhere, this gig promises a little bit of a challenge. “There’s an improvised jam thing that everybody does together. That part actually makes me a bit nervous, more than anything else, because I don’t feel like I’m a really great improviser. There are so many great guitar players.” Like Di Meola? “Yeah, no kidding,” he says with a laugh. “There ya go. I just wanna take cover, man. Al Di Meola. Legend.”

Aug

16

Radio Show Taping Early show 5:45PM

The War & Treaty Haley Heynderickx

Movie Night:

Blue Heart –

The Fight to Save Europe’s Last Wild Rivers

eTown Presents

Aug

28

Amy Helm

American singer-songwriter & daughter of The Band's drummer Levon Helm

eTown Presents

Sep

4

GOODING

With Me Like Bees and Carter Hulsey

8/26 The Superheroes: In Concert CO Pops 9/6 eTown at Red Rocks: Lake Street Dive 9/9 Movie Night: Isle of Dogs 9/14 Amanda Botur, Confluence/Sangam

WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact digger@etown.org August 9 , 2018 27


2 Boulder 0 1 Fringe 8 Festival

August 15-26, 2018 Tickets & Info at

BoulderFringe.com Boulder’s Biggest Performance Festival 12 days, over 100 events, performances, parties and workshops, all in downtown Boulder! Thank You to our Sponsors

28 August 9 , 2018

Boulder Weekly


a r t s & culture

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Courtesy of Band of Toughts

very year since 2014, the Edinburgh Fringe Festival has hosted a series called Death on the Fringe, a festival within the festival that explores the notion of dying as well as we live. Morbid? Maybe. But let’s be honest: what’s more fringe than death? In Edinburgh, it’s a full-blown campaign aimed at making death less taboo, an attempt to better equip people to support each other through the hardest times in life, be it the death of a loved one or the end of our own life. And while it may not be listed on their website, the Boulder International Fringe Festival is quietly hosting it’s own series on death, buried (pun intended) within the two dozen shows that will be playing at venues across Boulder from Aug. 15-26. Take former Denver resident Moira Keefe’s newest work, LIFE, DEATH AND NUMBERS, for example. Keefe has been creating memoirs based on her life since 1989: There’s LIFEAFTERBIRTH, LIFE BEFORE SEX, LIFE BEFORE THE CRISIS and LIFE WITH A TEENAGER, all comedies delivered with Keefe’s stripped-down honesty. With LIFE, DEATH AND NUMBERS, Keefe inevitably takes on the other side of life, the story of her mother’s death and the resulting chaos and angst in her large Catholic family. She uses numbers to represent each of her eight siblings — mainly to avoid calling anyone out by name, though she says it’s easy enough to figure out who’s who — as they struggle to navigate the new reality in their lives. “We were raised in the ’50s,” Keefe says over the phone from her home in Montana. “Parenting was tough. There were so many of us ... I don’t’ remember anybody talking about being close to member said, ‘What about Nirvamlet?’” says director their moms. Most of our dads had tempers. Your mom Colleen Mylott. “We started to listen to some grunge music would scream a lot but your dad, you stayed away from him. and while we were just laughing and thinking it was just a I moved away from home at 19 and I never lived at home joke, we suddenly turned to each other and said, ‘That actuagain. It’s hard to have a relationship with a parent when ally has legs.’” you’re so far away.” It turns out, unbeknownst to Mylott at the time, that LIFE, DEATH AND NUMBERS tackles the preconKurt Cobain was “obsessed” with Hamlet toward the end of ceived notions we have about how it’s going to be when our his life, as was his wife, Courtney Love. The Band of Toughs parents die (and, consequently, probably how it’ll be when turned to Cobain’s hand-written journals for some quotes we die). Keefe thought she’d be holding her and source material, with Love’s character mother’s hand when she passed; instead she easily becoming the Claudius figure in the was absent-mindedly cleaning in the hospital remake. room. Only eight of the nine siblings were “Kurt is kind of the haunting presence in ON THE BILL: 2018 Boulder International present at her mother’s wake, where a book this because he’s the ghost,” Mylott says. Fringe Festival. Aug. called The Thing About Life is Someday You’ll “The twist and turns are sometimes 15-26, various locations be Dead mistakenly made its way to the table Shakespeare and sometimes from [Cobain around Boulder. For more information visit of her mother’s most valued possessions. and Love’s story]. There are a lot of conspirawww.boulderfringe.com People can relate, Keefe says, and that’s cies about Kurt’s death, but we’ve been carethe goal. ful about not coming down on a side. The “My pieces always bring you up, they most interesting question is: Should Hamlet bring you down,” she says. “It’s life. My pieces are all about have trusted the ghost?” Hamlet, like Kurt Cobain’s truncated life, offers lessons life.” about human suffering and the mystery of the human expeThe Boulder-based Band of Toughs are also tackling rience. But Mylott says it’s not to be taken quite so seriously: death this year, although it may not read as such on the surthere’ll be beer and live music in an atmosphere of experiface of their multi-disciplinary show Nirvamlet, a mash-up mental theater. of the very real tragedy of Kurt Cobain and the very literary And quite frankly, nobody’s getting out of here alive, so tragedy of Hamlet. it’s best not to take much of anything too seriously. The idea for the show came during a wine-soaked evening at the theater collaborative’s annual retreat. Also catch Michael Burgos’ The Eulogy, an award-win“I will admit, after a few glasses of wine a company ning theatrical parody of a funeral speech.

Death at the Fringe

Several works at the Boulder International Fringe Festival tackle the most important — and terrifying — issue of all by Caitlin Rockett

Boulder Weekly

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY AUGUST 9

PAPER MOONSHINE 8PM FRIDAY AUGUST 10

PINT & A HALF 8PM KYRA GORDON 9:30PM SATURDAY AUGUST 11

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TICKETS $35-55

wellRED Comedy Tour: From Dixie

With Love — with Trae Crowder, Drew Morgan and Corey Ryan Forrester. 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, bouldertheater.com.

see EVENTS Page 32

CREATIVELY SPEAKING: MICHAEL ARCENEAUX (AUTHOR OF ‘I CAN’T DATE JESUS’).

Gardenkitty via Wikimedia Commons

7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

MOMS UNHINGED STANDUP COMEDY SHOW. ADULTOLOGY: DINNER FROM THE GARDEN, AN EXPERIMENT IN UTILIZATION. 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9, Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. If you’re puzzled by how to cook seasonally, using the assortment of veggies that are ready in your garden at any given time, this is the event for you. Seeds Library Cafe staff will demonstrate how to plan and cook a delicious menu using the crops available in the Library’s Edible Learning Garden. This program is part of several Seed to Table events and services at the library that focus on sustainable living. Drop by and figure out what to do with all that squash.

Boulder Weekly

7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, Post Brewing, 2027 13th St., Boulder, 303-249-9637. Let’s just say it: being a mom is a tough gig — rewarding, but tough. There’s crying and stains and ear infections and parentteacher conferences and the end of the private bathroom time you absolutely took for granted in your life before children. But moms, you’re not alone. Join four Colorado moms as they crack jokes about motherhood, midlife crises, marriage, divorce and other things that irritate them. The Moms Unhinged Standup Comedy Show features Stacy Pedersen, Jill Tasei, Andrea Vahl, Jodee Champion and Merit Gest as the emcee and opener. Dads, you’re welcome too. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door.

Michael Arceneaux is the Courtesy of Madison House Speaks author of I Can’t Date Jesus: Love, Sex, Family, Race, and Other Reasons I’ve Put My Faith in Beyoncé. He writes about race, sexuality, politics, religion and, of course, Beyoncé. His work has been referenced everywhere from The Weekly Standard to Jezebel to MSNBC and has even been deemed required reading for courses at Harvard University. Arceneaux has also been featured on NPR, BET, VH1, Viceland, SiriusXM Radio, in addition to various radio interviews on nationally syndicated programs. The Root once named Michael one of the Best Black Bloggers to Know. ESSENCE magazine named him one of the top #BlackTwitter voices to follow. He will read from his work and speak about growing up black, Christian and gay in America.

August 9 , 2018 31


events EVENTS from Page 31

Thursday, August 9 Music

Brandi Carlile. 8:30 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Are emotions our friends or our enemies? Is it possible to free ourselves from emotional conflict? The Buddhist practice of lojong is a way of letting go of attachment to so-called positive and negative emotions. Stop Biting the Tail You’re Chasing provides a set of tools you can apply in daily life to gradually relieve your own suffering and extend that relief to everyone you encounter. Anyen Rinpoche and Allison Choying Zangmo will speak about the book at Boulder Book Store on Tuesday, Aug. 14 at 7:30 p.m.

Campfire Songs and Stories. 7 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8477. FMQB Triple A Conference. 7:30 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Live performances and panels through Saturday, Aug. 11, fmqb.name/triple-a-conference-2018 Jeff & Paige. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 720-864-6460. Katie Herzig (Free Concert Series). 6 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488. Kindermusik — with A Child’s Song. 10 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424.

Courtesy of Boulder Book Store

words

Angélique Kidjo’s Remain In Light and Femi Kuti & The Positive Force. 6:30 p.m. Denver Botanic Gardens, 1007 York St., Denver.

Thursday, August 9 Nathaniel Popkin and Ganzeer — Who Will Speak for America?. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver. Monday, August 13 Lois Levinson — Before it All Vanishes. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Listening Together. 6 p.m. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder, 303-449-4885.

Dr. Linda Backman — Souls on Earth. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Live eTown Radio Show Taping — with The War and Treaty, Haley Heynderickx. 7 p.m. eTown, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696.

Friday, August 10

Lupe Fiasco. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874.

Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Tattered Tales Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Saturday, August 11

Dow Phumiruk — Counting on Katherine. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Raising Cain. 7 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 720-864-6460. Rayland Baxter. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. Wrecking Trains. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Events 40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. More show times at thedairy.org.

Book Battles Trivia Night. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Tattered Tales Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Minor Disturbance Weekly Workshop + Open Mic. 1 p.m. Prodigy Coffeehouse, 3801 E. 40th Ave., Denver. R.O. Kwon — The Incendiaries. 2 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Alfredo Corchado — Homelands. 2 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Sunday, August 12 BAFS Second Sundays Poetry Workshop. 2:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

So, You’re a Poet. 9 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder. Tuesday, August 14

Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers (RMFW) Writer of the Year Panel. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Anyen Rinpoche and Allison Choying Zangmo — Stop Biting the Tail You’re Chasing. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Wednesday, August 15 Linda Backman — Souls on Earth. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Adultology: Dinner from the Garden, an Experiment in Utilization. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Breath. 4:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. More show times at thedairy.org. Conversations in English Thursdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Genealogy: Hiding in Plain Databases. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Great Indian Novel. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Taste Test Thursday. 4:15 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Tom Green. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Q&A with Director Lee Aronsohn and Musician Chris Daniels from 40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-444-7328.

32 August 9 , 2018

Friday, August 10 Music Andrew Bird — with Neyla Pekarek of The Lumineers. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Benjamin Bell. 4 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 720-864-6460. Cat Jerky. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Chris Stapleton’s All-American Road Show. 7 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver, 303-405-1100. Christian Lopez (Adults Only). 7 p.m. Sounds of Simon House Concerts, 1086 East Roggen Way, Superior. Colorado Brazil Fest: Samba on the Mall. 6:30 p.m. Pearl Street Mall, Between 13th and 14th streets, Boulder, 303-960-8972.

Easy Riders. 8 p.m. Ned’s, 121 N. Jefferson St., Nederland. Finding Phoenix Birthday Bash. 5:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. JAVA - Gamelan Music and Dance. 5:50 p.m. Christ Church International, 527 Main St., Longmont, 970-613-0439. Kyra Gordon. 9:30 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Long Road Home. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons, 303-823-6685. Music & Movement. 10 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Nicolas Killeen Quintet. 6:30 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. see EVENTS Page 34

Boulder Weekly


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August 9 , 2018 33


events events

arts

Courtesy of Firehouse Art Center

LIVE MUSIC SATURDAYS

In his exhibit ‘Fuzzy Logic,’ Jordan Vinyard uses sculptures, installations and performances to idolize the concept of fuzzy logic, a computational term that refers to degrees of truth rather than exactness. Vinyard’s work plays with the idea of absurdity as a driving force of life. ‘Fuzzy Logic’ is showing at Firehouse Art Center now through Sept. 1.

8:00pm NO COVER

DON’T MISS THIS

Act On It: Exhibit on CU Student Activism. Norlin Library, STEAM Gallery, 1157 18th St., Boulder. Through Aug. 15.

Honey — by Kristen Hatgi Sink. Museum of Contemporary Arts Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through Aug. 26.

New Territory: Landscape Photography Today. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 16.

Amuse Yeux. Foothills Art Center, Community Gallery, 809 15th St., Golden. Through Aug. 12.

A Light of His Own: Clyfford Still at Yaddo. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver. Through Sept. 19.

Paintings by Vivienne Douglas. National Center for Atmospheric Research, UCAR Gallery,1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through Aug. 31.

Like a Hammer — by Jeffrey Gibson. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 12.

Patrice Renee Washington: Charts, Parts, and Holders. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through Aug. 26.

Lisa Oppenheim: Spine. Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through Aug. 26.

Processing — by Roberto Juarez. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 16.

Mai Wyn Schantz: Magnetic North. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through Oct. 21.

Slow Mover. Boulder Public Library, Canyon Gallery, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Aug. 19.

Nature Photography by Kirk Fry. National Center for Atmospheric Research, UCAR Gallery,1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through Aug. 31.

Transmission — by Derrick Adams. Museum of Contemporary Arts Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through Aug. 26.

Connections — by Imagine! C.O.R.E./Labor Source. Dairy Arts Center, McMahon Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Aug. 19. Echo Trail — by Laura Ahola-Young. Dairy Arts Center, Hand-Rudy Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Aug. 19. Fuzzy Logic — by Jordan Vinyard. Firehouse Art Gallery, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through Sept. 1. Ganesha: The Playful Protector. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through October.

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TheWildGameLongmont.com 34 August 9 , 2018

Highlights from the Collection. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver. Through Sept. 19.

EVENTS from Page 32

Pint & a Half. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

Erik Boa Duo. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Premium Diesel. 8 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 720-864-6460.

Fun on the Farm: Cow-a-Palooza. 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Agricultural Heritage Center, 8348 Highway 66, Boulder, 303-776-8688.

The Fab 4. 8 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 720-864-6460.

Quemando Salsa Dance Party. 8 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

Louisville Downtown Street Faire. 5 p.m. Steinbaugh Pavillion, Front St., Louisville.

Ravin Wolf. 7 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont, 303-485-9400.

Rigid Heddle Weavers Meet-Up. 11 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Trevor Andries Quintet. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette.

Saturday, August 11

Victor Wooten. 6 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Events 16th Street Fair. 11 a.m. 16th Street Mall, Downtown Denver, 720-272-7467.

Music 6-Million Dollar Band. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Alessandro Penezzi Brazilian Guitar Concert. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Mennonite Church, 3910 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-960-8972.

Globalsound Studios Rock School Show. 4:30 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4820. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339. Interstate Stash Express. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons, 303-823-6685. The Invasion. 6 p.m. The Barrel, 1710 29th Street, Suite 1048, Boulder. Kronen — with The Wild Gnomes. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Lucas Swafford. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Art Night Out. 5 p.m. Old Town, Public Road, Lafayette.

Andrew Bird — with Neyla Pekarek of The Lumineers. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Conversaciones en español. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Bonnie and the Clydes. 6:30 a.m. Oskar Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont, 303-485-9400.

Outdoor Party: Free event Second Saturdays (Verde & Tilt). 2 p.m. Tilt Pinball, 640 Main St., Louisville, 303-997-9548.

Conversations in English Fridays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Sloan’s Lake Art & Music Festival 2018. 10 a.m. Sloan’s Lake Park, 1700 N. Sheridan Blvd., Denver.

Phish Merriweather Post Pavilion: Livestream Webcast. 5:30 p.m. Gunbarrel Brewing Company, 7088 Winchester Circle, Boulder, 800-803-5732.

Evening at the Museum: History of Colorado Railroads. 7 p.m. Nederland Mining Museum, 200 N. Bridge St., Nederland, 303-258-7332.

Easy Riders. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Monocle Band. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914.

see EVENTS Page 36

Boulder Weekly


Thursday augusT 9

daily Bread B2B arTifakTs sOld OuT!

w/ MeMBers Of The PreTTy lighTs live Band: alvin fOrd Jr, BOrahM lee, Chris karns, wax fuTure & Mikey Thunder

friday augusT 10

friday augusT 10

BiPul CheTTri & The Travelling Band

w/ Jaanvi gurung & shuvanzan dwa

saTurday augusT 11

w/ granT farM

Thursday augusT 16

w/ dJ Tigg, dJ CerTified, dJ sTyle & dJ Blaze1; hOsTed By eClasserrwerr & infaMOuz age

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Tuesday augusT 14

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Thursday augusT 16

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feaT MarC BrOwnsTein & arOn Magner (disCO BisCuiTs), adaM deiTCh & BOrahM lee (Break sCienCe) w/ TnerTle

wednesday augusT 15 re: searCh

Breaking BisCuiTs friday augusT 17

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feaT dOMiniC lalli (Big giganTiC), dave waTTs (The MOTeT), JOey POrTer (The MOTeT), garreTT sayers (The MOTeT) & dan sChwindT (kyle hOllingswOrTh Band) w/ lyle divinsky’s sOul survivOrs feaT MeMBers Of Thievery COrPOraTiOn, The MOTeT & analOg sOn

sunday augusT 19

lil BaBy

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Thursday augusT 23

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friday augusT 24

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w/ MysTiC grizzly, nOTOriOus COnduCT (laTe seT), gOdlazer, dOzier & in MOTiOn

wednesday augusT 29

ski Mask The sluMP gOd w/ danny TOwers & BandhunTa izzy

friday augusT 31

Phish diCk’s afTer ParTy wiTh TransPOrTaTiOn PrOvided By Bus TO shOw

CyCles

friday – sunday aug 31 – sePT 2

ride The Bus TO Phish saTurday sePTeMBer 8

rOCk fOr a Cause feaT The OriginaTOrs

friday sePTeMBer 21

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friday sePTeMBer 28 dual venue!

COlOr red launCh ParTy: MaTadOr sOul sOunds feaT MeMBers Of The new MasTersOunds, sOulive, PiMPs Of JOyTiMe & OrgOne w/ QuanTiC dJ seT, analOg sOn (alBuM release), COngO sanChez & COlOr red all sTars feaT MeMBers Of sunsQuaBi & Thievery COrPOraTiOn

saTurday sePTeMBer 29

Chelsea wOlfe & russian CirCles sunday sePTeMBer 30

MOd sun

MOnday OCTOBer 1

denzel Curry friday & saTurday OCTOBer 5-6

Jeff ausTin Band

August 24-26, Nederland, Colorado

saTurday augusT 11

The MOTher hiPs sunday augusT 12

ride The Bus TO JOe russO’s alMOsT dead

NedFest.org

kaTasTrO

w/ TyrOne’s JaCkeT, alOha radiO

The viCTOr wOOTen TriO feaT dennis ChaMBers & BOB franCesChini w/ rOOsevelT COllier

www.

Thursday augusT 9

grass fOr ThaT ass PresenTs

graTeful Bluegrass BOys w/ BOris garCia & On The PaTiO: arkansauCe & ley line

10/5: dead winTer CarPenTers 10/6: PiCkin’ On dead Phish feaT Jeff ausTin & MeMBers Of deadPhish OrChesTra (laTe seT)

feaT g-nOMe PrOJeCT w/ Ben silver (OrChard lOunge), Mikey Thunder & JOrdan POlOvina Thursday augusT 16

grass fOr ThaT ass PresenTs

Tk & The hOly knOw nOThings w/ liver dOwn The river & On The PaTiO: david BurChfield, The fire guild & shOvelin sTOne friday augusT 17

The OrCasTraTOr

w/ Mass relay, unexOTiC, alex BOwMan, lfO & sPark kenT B2B garCia Jr

saTurday augusT 18

BOOgie MaMMOTh

w/ wOnderliC, henry & The invisiBles

Tuesday augusT 21

reggae Tuesdays

feaT JOn wayne & The Pain w/ denver reggae sOCial CluB duB sessiOns feaT dan afriCanO (JBB), Jeff franCa (Thievery COrP), TOdd sTOOPs (raQ), sCOTT flynn (Odesza), ryan JalBerT & drew sayers (The MOTeT) & The grOOve Thief (PaTiO & inside)

wednesday augusT 22 re: searCh

feaT skydyed w/ sPeCTaCle (dJ seT), nOBide, Mikey Thunder & JOrdan POlOvina Thursday augusT 23

grass fOr ThaT ass PresenTs

40Oz TO freedOM – PiCkin’ On suBliMe w/ evil dave feaT shawn eCkels (andy frasCO & The un), TOdd sMallie & shaun gilMOur (JJgrey & MOfrO), On The PaTiO: daniella kaTzir Band & gaBe Mervine, feaT MeMBers Of eufOrQuesTra & ghOsT TOwn drifTers friday augusT 24

dirTy dOzen Brass Band w/ aMOraMOra, 2 faT 2 skydive (PaTiO seT)

saTurday augusT 25

rOCky MOunTain graTeful dead revue

feaT rOB eaTOn (dsO) Playing The BesT Of eurOPe ’72 & BeyOnd

Thursday augusT 30

dJ williaMs shOT’s fired

feaT JereMy salken (Big giganTiC), TOdd sTOOPs (raQ), niCk gerlaCh (MiChal MenerT), andre (sTevie wOnder), sCOTT flynn (PreTTy lighTs/Odesza), eddie rOBerTs (new MasTersOunds) & aarOn JOhnsTOn (Brazilian girls)

friday augusT 31

hOMeMade sPaCeshiP

w/ COfresi, lyfTd, krushendO & avry

MOnday sePTeMBer 3

saTurday OCTOBer 13

aBsTraCT, ryan Oakes & dylan reese

w/ PrOJeCT 432, rasTasaurus & wriTe Minded

larry keel exPerienCe

lOng BeaCh duB all sTars

friday sePTeMBer 7

w/ OakhursT & wesT king sTring Band

TexT CervanTes TO 91944 fOr TiCkeT giveaways, drink sPeCials, disCOunTed TiCkeT PrOMOTiOns & MOre

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

Boulder Weekly

August 9 , 2018 35


events HONDA • SUBARU • TOYOTA • ACURA

events EVENTS from Page 34

Rebirth Brass Band and Slim Wednesday featuring JoJo of Widespread Panic. 6 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488.

Serving Boulder Since 1984

folsom & spruce 303.449.6632 www.hoshimotors.net BEST OF BOULDER 2017, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005

Smaklig Måltid! — 2018 FOD. 6 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599. The Victor Wooten Trio featuring Dennis Chambers and Bob Franceschini — with Roosevelt Collier. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Vista Village Community Gathering + Music & Movement Meditation. 2 p.m. Boulder Airport Conference Room, 3327 Airport Road, Boulder. Wash Out Fest 2018. 1 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Yelawolf. 9 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Events Art Stop. 10 a.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. Boulder Comedy Show (2 shows). 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863.

THURSDAY AUGUST 9

Cherry Creek North Food & Wine. 6 p.m. Cherry Creek North, Fillmore Plaza, Denver, 303-606-7332.

10:00 AM

Demolition Derby. 5 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont.

2:00 PM

Full STEAM Ahead: Light Up Squeeze Toys. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

SOLAR SUPERSTORMS SUPERVOLCANOES 7:00 PM

WE ARE STARS 8:30 PM

LIQUID SKY MICHAEL JACKSON FRIDAY AUGUST 10 8:00 PM

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY 9:30 PM

LASER BOB MARLEY 11:00 PM

LASER FLOYD: THE WALL

Off The Chain Comedy Showcase. 8 p.m. Endo Brewing Company, 2755 Dagny Way, Suite 101, Boulder, 303-552-6693.

LIQUID SKY: RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS 10:30 PM

LIQUID SKY: DARK SIDE OF THE MOON SUNDAY AUGUST 12

Western Views Book Club. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Sunday, August 12 Music Alex and Reid. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

1:00 PM

CKY. 8 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666.

2:30 PM

Colorado Brazil Fest: BBQ and Samba Jam. 1 p.m. Boulder Beer, 2880 Wilderness Place, Boulder, 303-960-8972.

4:00 PM

Corb Lund. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

Country Touch. 11 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 720-864-6460.

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002

Cowboy Dave Band. 2 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 720-864-6460.

WE ARE STARS / PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA STARS AND LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY WE ARE STARS (Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

36 August 9 , 2018

Disney’s The Little Mermaid. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Sept. 8. Guys and Dolls — presented by Equinox Theatre. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through Aug. 18. Lend Me a Tenor. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through Aug. 19.

Newsies. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Aug. 26.

2:30 PM 9:00 PM

Cyrano de Bergerac — presented by Colorado Shakespeare Festival. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, 277 University Ave., Boulder. Through Aug. 11.

ROBIN: The Ultimate Robin Williams Tribute Experience. 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075.

Tom Green. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637.

STARS AND GALAXIES

CryBaby. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through Aug. 18.

Love’s Labour’s Lost — presented by Colorado Shakespeare Festival. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, 277 University Ave, Boulder. Through Aug. 12.

1:00 PM

LIFE OF TREES / PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA

Al Lewis and Willie Clark were top-billed vaudevillians for more than 40 years. When CBS requests them for a “History of Comedy” retrospective, a young theatrical agent works to re-unite the pair, who haven’t spoken in 12 years. The grudging reunion brings them back together, along with a flood of old memories, miseries and, of course, laughs! See The Sunshine Boys at Vintage Theatre in Aurora through Sept. 9.

Red Rock Ramblers Square Dancing. 7 p.m. Lyons Elementary School, 338 High St. (in back of School), Lyons, 303-823-5925.

Storytime Break: Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

SATURDAY AUGUST 11

theater

Thank You Boulder!

Rose & Iris Poetry Reading and Concert. 7 p.m. Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette.

RDG Photography

Dave Honig. 3 p.m. Bru, 5290 Arapahoe, Boulder, 720-638-5193. Sloan’s Lake Art & Music Festival 2018. 10 a.m. Sloan’s Lake Park, 1700 N. Sheridan Blvd., Denver. Drum Circle. 7 p.m. Unity of Boulder Spiritual Center, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. Erik and Carter. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. John Fullbright, Blake Brown & The American Dust Choir, The Talbott Brothers. 4 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488. Mmmwhah! Gathering. 2 p.m. Chuck Ceraso Studio & Gallery, 1294 Doric Drive, Lafayette. Phish at Merriweather Post Pavilion: Livestream Webcast. 5:30 p.m. Gunbarrel Brewing Company, 7088 Winchester Circle, Boulder, 800-803-5732. Raging Fyah. 8 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030. Ryan Hutchens. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Once Upon a Mattress. 7:30 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Sept. 2. The Producers. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont, 303-682-9980. Through Sept. 30. Richard III. University Theatre Building, University Theatre, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Through Aug. 11. Sleeping Beauty — presented by Miner’s Alley Children’s Playhouse. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through Aug. 18. The Sunshine Boys. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Sept. 9. You Can’t Take It With You — presented by Colorado Shakespeare Festival. University Theatre Building, University Theatre, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Through Aug. 12.

Events Beer & Art: T2. 2 p.m. Upslope Brewing, 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 703-981-3951. Boulder Market. 11 a.m. Central Park, 1236 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, 720-272-7467. Moms Unhinged Standup Comedy Show. 7 p.m. Post Brewing, 2027 13th St., Boulder, 303249-9637. NSPA Truck & Tractor Pull. 4 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Old Fashioned Playdate. 10 a.m. Walker Ranch Homestead, 8999 Flagstaff Mountain Road, Boulder. Pet-A-Palooza: A Furry Family Fun Fair. 9 a.m. Rocky Mountain Kung Fu, S. Public Road, Lafayette, 720-648-8788. Reynolds Teen Advisory Group (TAG) Meeting. 2:30 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Romeo and Juliet: Liceu Opera. 1 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Boulder Weekly


David Boye. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Ian Gerrard. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Jazz Jam at the Muse. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. Karaj Lost Coast. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

The Truth about Food, Film Screening and Discussion with the Filmmakers. 6 p.m. eTown Hall, 1877 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 720-220-4142. Beggars of Life (1928) — with Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Boulder Arts Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Vocal Play Group. 6 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110. OF

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BOULD

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Storytime and NoBo Programs Break: Mis Pininos/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Tuesday, August 14 Music Boulder Ecstatic Dance: Conscious Dance. 7 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-449-4410. Espresso! 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Folk Dancing on the Plaza. 7 p.m. Plaza beside Dushanbe Teahouse, 1770 13th St., 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-499-6363. The Gipsy Kings featuring Nicolas Reyes and Tonino Baliardo. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Italian Opera Masterclass — with Anthony Michaels-Moore. 2 p.m. The Studio, 3550 Frontier Ave., Suite A2, Boulder, 970-379-7539. Events Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Tuesdays. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

KS & RECR

Creatively Speaking: Michael Arceneaux (Author of I Can’t Date Jesus). 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Here Lies a Manic Pixie Dream Girl. Noon. Boulder International Fringe Festival, The Parlour, Pine Street Church, 1237 Pine St., Boulder, 217714-1752.

Storytime Break: Lego Storytime. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Storytime Break: Open Play. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Storytime Break: Wobbler Playtime. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

E

Central Park West at the Civic Area • 1056 Canyon Blvd.

CONCERTS

MOVIE

Creekside Concerts bring together the community with exciting live bands, food vendors and local craft beer.

Pre-movie entertainment from The Goonies (80s Cover Band)

Friday, Aug. 17: 5:30 - 9:30 p.m. Funkiphino (Funk/Soul/R&B) The 13 members of the high-energy funk band infuse explosive horn lines, old-school Hammond organ sounds, and pumpin’ bass with intoxicating vocal harmonies.

Friday, Aug. 24: 5:30 - 9:30 p.m. Paa Kow (Afro-Fusion / World) Recognized as one of the most remarkable drum set players to tour in Africa, Europe, and America. Paa Kow’s deep groove and prodigious talent reveal a unique ability to speak to listeners with his drums inspiring a deeply spiritual conversation.

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Storytime Break: Open Play. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

PA R

AT I

Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Romeo and Juliet: Liceu Opera. 1 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Creekside Concerts & Movie

ON

Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

FREE

E R

Chess Club. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

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Events

Pages and Paws. 3:45 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

side Creeokv ies M

PA R

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Music

Events

events

The Cakemaker. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

AT IO

Monday, August 13

Shafer. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons, 303-823-6685.

CIT

wellRED Comedy Tour: Trae Crowder, Drew Morgan, Corey Forrester. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

KS & RECR

E

Friday, Sept. 7: 5:00 - 9:30 p.m. Movie: The Goonies (PG) Bring your friends, chairs and blankets for a night in the park! You won’t want to miss this free showing of Goonies in Central Park West.

More info at BoulderParks-Rec.org

Storytime Break: All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Wednesday, August 15

Lexi Weege. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

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Beach House. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874.

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Music

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Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. Grossenbart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave Unit A, Longmont. Songwriters in the Round — with Danny Boulder Weekly

August 9 , 2018 37


Magnolia677 via Wikimedia Commons

Summer Time by Martin Soosloff

I can’t think about summer enough. The gooey melancholy warm inside me like FAT Krinkle-Kut French Fries dipped in ketchup In between pool games and juke box stuffing at Marcel’s drive in. First flirtations confusing me, “second base, outside?” as the tired as only tired from swimming all day can be, “Hey you have to wait 30 minutes after lunch before you go back in the water.” wraps me into a screened porch Euchre game around a dusk mosquito Twi-light. Contented warmth from a day long, face full of sun and water Arcade competition, BINGING, taunting bells and whistles, flipper mania stimulation Baseball games nervously anticipated – thrilled competition at catcher, action, control, tenacious. Walking journey into an abandoned coyote bone stripped silo, on a trip for souvenir personalized pocket knives still in a dresser drawer to this day. Scuffling with farm boys “Hey watch where you’re walking, where you from??” evolves into a lob league pick-up baseball game full of new friends. Skateboard speed wobbles, road rash crash Rainy moisture scented monopoly marathon mornings Nostalgia as sticky as barbeque ribs follows me around the solstice Jupiter, star bright Venus, cobalt fading, special light sky. Summer camp romances evaporating to clouds even before they begin. 10 speed Schwinn cruising, girlfriend on the handlebars Crickets and cicadas sing in the mesmerizing County fair humid hazy fog of a carnival night lights flash, Bells ring, Carney’s BARK, the water pistols hissssssssss, the Demolition Derby ROARS. Enveloping me in all the innocent honey dipped funnel cake sweet memories blend into the mind’s eye. A loop of 8-millimeter home movie celluloid forever ingrained in me. I can’t think about summer enough. Martin Soosloff, from Lyons, prides himself on being a keen observer of the Human Condition, continuing to explore through words, the irony, nostalgia and emotions that make life interesting, unique and beautiful.

38 August 9, 2018

Boulder Weekly


Like clarifying history with lightning

‘BlacKkKlansman’ collides with cinematic history by Michael J. Casey

I

t’s a famous shot from one of the most widely seen movies in the history of cinema: Scarlett ON THE BILL: O’Hara searching desperately for a doctor in a BlacKkKlansman. Opens sea of wounded and dead soldiers. As Scarlett Aug. 10. Century Theater, 1700 29th St., Boulder, searches, the camera cranes high into the sky; so 303-444-0583. high her dress blends into the rows of men dying in the dust. The music swells, a bugle sounds and the camera reveals a tattered Confederate flag waving in the wind. These are the men who fought to ensure the rights to enslave human beings. Gone With the Wind wants us to feel sorry for them. Nearly 80 years later, that image still has the power to take our breath away. Spike Lee knows that. He knows images are key to understanding and shaping the world around us. That’s why he opens BlacKkKlansman not with the image of his hero Ron Stallworth ( John David Washington) or his villain David Duke (Topher Grace), but with Scarlett O’Hara lost in the aftermath of the Civil War. And we’re still there, wandering among the carnage. How did we get here? Lee has a few ideas. But, we’re getting ahead of ourselves. First, the story: Based on the memoir, Black Klansman by Ron Stallworth, the film revolves around Stallworth, Colorado Springs’ first black police officer. When Stokely Carmichael, aka Kwame Ture (Corey Hawkins), comes to town, Stallworth is assigned an undercover gig to infiltrate the Black Panthers. While at the rally, Stallworth meets Patrice Dumas (Laura Harrier), an activist with nothing but contempt for the police, and for good reasons. Without revealing his identity, Stallworth and Dumas begin a relationship; Stallworth was born to go undercover. Then, almost as a lark, Stallworth infiltrates the Ku Klux Klan’s local chapter. Using his real name, Stallworth communicates with the KKK over the phone while Detective Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver) poses as Stallworth for face-to-face meetings. The two Stallworths quickly work their way up the ranks, all the way to the KKK’s Grand Wizard himself, David Duke. Duke isn’t the only character familiar to modern audiences. Neither are the slogans and chants KKK members whisper in secret or scream with emphasis. This story is not so long ago, and Lee easily breaks from conventional narratives to make his point. In one sequence, Lee crosscuts between KKK members watching Birth of a Nation’s infamous finale — itself a virtuosic display of crosscutting and profound racism — and a Black Panthers meeting with Harry Belafonte recounting the lynching of Jesse Washington. When both stories reach their climax, Lee cuts between two images of arms outstretched in salute: one with fist closed, the other with palms outstretched like knives. Lee allows these images to collide with one another. And collide they do, reverberating in our minds well after the lights come up. After watching Birth of a Nation in 1915, President Woodrow Wilson is alleged to have said, “It’s like writing history with lighting. My only regret is that it’s all so terribly true.” Those words are applicable here, but in a much, much different context. As the saying goes: “All power to all the people.” Boulder Weekly

STATE OF THE ART FULLY EQUIPPED REHEARSAL STUDIOS. Monthly or hourly rentals, Marshall, Fender, Mesa Boogie, Aguilar, Ampeg, Sonor, Yamaha. Rehearse where Elvis Costello, Pixies and Joe Cocker rehearse. The best studio complex between N.Y.C and L.A. 525 Courtney Way, Lafayette, CO 80026 303.664.1600 • doghousemusic.com August 9, 2018 39


SI M P L E

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L O C A L

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FA R M

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TA B L E

BEST RESTAURANT THANK YOU for voting for us!

578 Briggs Stre e t Erie, CO 80516 303.828.1392

www.24carrotbistro.com www.24carrotbistro.com

40 August 9 , 2018

BRUNCH

S AT & SU N 9 AM - 3 PM

L U N C H TUE-FRI 11AM-3PM

DINNER

TUE-THR 5PM-9PM

F R I & S AT 5PM-10PM

S U N D AY 5PM-9PM

Boulder Weekly


Four courses to try in and around Boulder County this week

menu THE TASTING

Photos by staff

The Superfood Bowl

Yaki Udon

Vitality Bowls 2525 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, vitalitybowls.com

Yurihana Sushi Bar and Pan-Asian Cuisine 6525 Gunpark Drive, Unit 330, Boulder, yurihanaboulder.com

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Breakfast Burrito Chickee’s Lil’ Kitchen 4340 Zuni St., Denver, 720-329-3980

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’ll have the beans and eggs, chorizo and cheese burrito, please,” we asked the woman at the small window on the side of a house in North Denver. “It automatically comes with green chile, is that OK?” Who in their right mind would say no? It was a question we contemplated as we sat waiting for our food on the cute side patio that accompanies this hole-in-the-wall place. Chickee’s Lil’ Kitchen offers everything from “authentic Louisiana Cajun gumbo,” to red beans and rice, to made-to-order breakfast burritos that can’t be beat. You can stuff as many fillings into a slightly grilled yet delightfully chewy tortilla as you want: there’s the aforementioned red beans and rice, along with chorizo, egg, potato, bacon, cheese and guacamole. The green chile adds just the right amount of spice to whatever combination you choose. And the price can’t be beat. $4.86.

his healthnut hotspot only opened a few weeks ago, but, if we’re being honest, we’ve already visited the superfood cafe half a dozen times. Our favorite, so far, is the signature Superfood Bowl: a thick, creamy base blend of açai, graviola, acerola, their signature “VB blend” (an immunity booster made from mangosteen, aronia berry, camu camu, moringa, açaí, blueberry, pomegranate), plus almond milk, kale, bananas and strawberries. On top, granola, banana, blueberries, goji berries, cacao nibs and honey round out the bowl with a delightfully sweet-but-not-too-sweet crunch. Hangovers and sickness be gone. $13.49.

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big, steaming bowl of udon noodles, drenched in soy and sriracha and stir-fried with veggies — as far as comfort food goes, it doesn’t get much better than that. Yurihana is Gunbarrel’s go-to spot for Asian noodle, curry, rice and sushi plates. The yaki udon bowl brings together thick, chewy udon noodles with crunchy peppers, sweet onions, steamed baby bok choy and earthy, sautéed mushrooms. Yurihana nails this classic comfort dish. $10.95.

Green Chile Burger Cafe Blue 5280 Spine Road, Unit 103, Boulder, cafebluegunbarrel.com

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here’s a lot to like about Cafe Blue. Its expansive menu spans a few continents, the staff is ultra-friendly, and the dining room and bar area are cozy. The food, too, is as good as it’s ever been there, and out of their menu of salads, sandwiches, pastas and entrees, we opted for the green chile burger because, well, it’s green chile season, and that’s reason to celebrate. Cafe Blue’s take includes a grilled, open-faced Angus patty smothered in green chile, pepper jack cheese and sautéed mushrooms. The star is the smoky, thick beef, while the chile and mushrooms add depth to the flavor. $12.50.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday Boulder Weekly

Thank You for Voting us Best Asian Fusion

Restaurant

LAFAYETTE

2016

August 9 , 2018 41


FINE INDIAN DINING IN THE HEART OF BOULDER!

Catering for local offices. Delivery & Pickup available for parties, lunch & dinner HAPPY HOUR $1 OFF Drinks • Bottled Beer dine-in only 1/2 OFF APPETIZERS

Jaipur Vegetarian Thali $11.95 DINNER SPECIAL! Now Serving Avery Craft Beer Avery Draft $3 all day, everyday

1214 Walnut Street, Boulder, CO • 303-442-0999 JaipurIndianRestaurant.com

Fresh Authentic New York Pizza

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Boulder Weekly


an appetite for noise IF YOU SEARCH online sources for Boulder/

Denver restaurants, you’ll find eateries labeled as “paleo-friendly,” “kid-friendly, “vegetarianfriendly,” “dog-friendly,” “Earth-friendly” and the ever-popular “beer-friendly.” No matter how hard you look you’ll locate none touted as “earfriendly.” That absence of quiet eateries is surprising since surveys by Zagat and Consumer Reports note that excessive noise is the No. 1 complaint of diners year after year. Diners rated noise as a more critical factor to dining bliss than food or service. Not that long ago most Boulder restaurants had a smoking section, but it was only separated by air. You and your children could be eating your meals when a Marlboro cloud wafted over you. Imagine: You could not eat there without inhaling secondhand smoke. There are those who suggest that secondhand noise may be as damaging as second-hand smoke. The thing is: You don’t need smoke to dine, but you do need some sound to make a restaurant feel alive.

Restaurants

ponder increasing requests for

‘ear-friendly’ dining

nibbles BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

see NIBBLES Page 44

Boulder Weekly

August 9 , 2018 43


NIBBLES from Page 43

“Quiet” is not “cool,” and can be the kiss of death if there is no buzz — no life — in the room. You don’t want it so quiet your voice echoes in the room. You need that cloud of background sound so you feel like your conversation can’t be overheard. If you find a restaurant that reviewers deem “quiet” they are almost always “expensive” restaurants — fancy padded places that focus on special occasions. It’s not just cranky old folks complaining about those loud young people. Restaurants actually are fundamentally louder than they were 25 years ago. Open kitchens, background music,and problematic acoustics in small, old spaces with hard floors and brick walls have contributed to the sound impact. Restaurateurs spend a lot of time, money and energy trying to get it to a just-right Goldilocks noise level that will never please everyone. I know that most people choose fun, even if they can’t hear each other. It’s like going to a party. Restaurants are also loud because, frankly, people get noisier as a meal progresses. Before I knew it had a name, I observed the Lombard Effect in action as a dining critic. As background noise increases, people talk louder and louder until it is so cacophonous that nobody can hear. They stop talking and the room returns to normal volume, but not for long. The problem is usually that celebratory table for six in the corner that is downing a lot of wine. Americans tend to be loud in restaurants anyway, at least according to foreign-born diners I talked with. The truth is that younger people generally have better ears and tolerance

for noise. It doesn’t last. Baby Boomers like me are reaping the rewards of their lifestyle choices in the 1970s. For instance, I blame some of my hearing loss on one ear-bleeding Emerson, Lake and Palmer concert at the Montreal Forum. That’s why I now like less sound in my dining soundscape. No matter how stupendous the food and drink may be at a particular destination, if I have to experience aural assault to taste and sip, then I decline. Loud, thumping EDM at the front door is like a flashing neon sign warning: This place is not for you. I go out to eat to talk, not to end up hoarse from shouting. There are some quiet dining solutions that are often recommended. You can eat on off days or at off hours when the dining room is quiet. Oh swell. The Seattle-based Lend an Ear group has come up with an alternative approach by creating a certification program for “ear-friendly” restaurants. It evaluates restaurants for their commitment to using noise-reducing design features, a willingness to turn down music on request, and availability of quiet rooms... or at least a quieter table. I wonder what would happen if restaurants started kindly offering Quiet

Hours in addition to their Happy Hours? Perhaps a Quiet Night once a month where everything is identical, just quieter? Would all the folks who complain to me about too-loud restaurants come out and dine?

For tomato lovers only

Boulder’s OAK at fourteenth hosts its second annual tomato dinner Aug. 16. The six-course tomato-centric menu showcases famous tomatoes from New Jersey and Longmont’s Red Wagon Farm. The latter even grows a tomato named after chef Steve Redzikowski: the “Steverino.” Details: oakatfourteenth.com. Attention tomato gardeners and lovers: The annual Taste of Tomato Aug. 25 at Boulder’s Growing Gardens features dozens of varieties of Lycopersicon Esculentum in four types — cherry, beefsteak, paste and slicing/salad — competing to be named Best of Show. Taste them all and vote. Tomato entry rules: harlequinsgardens.com.

Local food news

The Colorado Mycological Society’s 41st annual Mushroom Fair Aug. 12 at Denver Botanic Gardens is a fungi nerd’s paradise with freshly collected wild mushrooms on display and

folks who can tell you whether the mushrooms you bring in are good for soup or for a psychedelic experience. Details: cmsweb.org. ... Plan ahead: Palisade Peach Festival, Aug. 17-18, palisadepeachfest.com; San Luis Valley Potato Festival, Sept. 8, Monte Vista, pagosachamber.com; and, the Chile & Frijoles Festival, Sept. 21-23, Pueblo, pueblochamber.org

Taste of the week

I got my first Rocky Ford cantaloupe of the season and cut into it with low expectations. You’re never quite sure if melons are ripe. You can try pressing the ends and seeing if it has a sweet melon-y perfume. I chose my cantaloupe using the scales of (cantaloupe) justice approach. I stood there in the produce aisle with one cantaloupe in each hand moving them up and down to find the melon that is the heaviest relative to its size. I’m not sure what the other shoppers thought as they watched but it worked. This Rocky Ford melon was exquisite and perfectly ripe with a beautiful aroma. From the first bite to the last it was a mouthful of juice and sweetness. This, friends, is why we eat local produce in season.

Words to chew on

“Watermelon — it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.” — Opera legend Enrico Caruso. (The annual Watermelon Day featuring free watermelon for everyone is Aug. 18 in Rocky Ford. arkvalleyfair.com) John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles on KGNU. Listen to podcasts at: news. kgnu.org/category/radio-nibbles.

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he Colorado Brewers Guild likes to call us “The State of Craft Beer,” and they’re not far off. According to the Brewers Association — the not-forprofit trade association dedicated to small and independent brewers — Colorado is home to 348 craft breweries, 8.4 breweries per capita (100,000 adults over 21). That ranks us third in the nation for total number of breweries — right behind Washington and Oregon, but still ahead of Michigan and Alaska — and fifth per capita. Well, time to add another to the list: Redgarden Restaurant and Brewery in Louisville. The original plan was to call the joint Pau Hana (Hawaiian for “Work is done”) but a potential trademark dispute prompted the owners to change the name to Redgarden after an iconic rock-climbing wall in Eldorado Canyon. But what’s in a name when beer is involved? Redgarden’s India pale ale, Work is Done, pays tribute to the spirit of pau hana with a West Coast sensibility: pale amber color, a full-on bitter profile and a good deal of fleshy, almost savory fruits, thanks to prominent Mosiac hops. In total, Redgarden features eight house brews ON THE BILL: Redgarden Restaurant on tap — Work is Done IPA, Mexican Lager, Ol’ and Brewery. Denty Pale Ale, Yellow Spur Pale Ale, D&D Pub 1700 Dogwood St., Ale, 1700 Double IPA, Burnwater Brown and Louisville, 303-927-6361, redgardenbrewery.com Raim’s Stout — and its best offerings are the styles people tend to skip when they read down a tap list. Take Ol’ Denty Pale Ale, for example. It’s a little bit of everything: well-balanced hop bitterness with fruity esters, a lovely color of hazy grapefruit with a bright nose of citrus and even a hint of malt. You could also try the Yellow Spur Pale Ale, which has a slightly lighter body and muted carbonation compared to Ol’ Denty. Of course, not all beers need be judged by their carbonation; D&D Pub Ale is a soft and smooth special bitter made with Fuggles hops, an old English bittering standby. The beer is rustic and robust, an easy and thoughtful drinker. Burntwater Brown also keeps life on the lighter side of things. There’s a good deal of roast in the glass, but not so much as to overpower hints of milk chocolate. For those who need a step up, 1700 Double IPA clocks in at 9.5 percent alcohol by volume and brings a wallop of malt to balance out the uptick in bitterness and hops: Centennial, Citra, Mosiac and Columbus. Seasoned Double IPA drinkers might find 1700 a little on the lean side, but Redgarden is just as much a restaurant as it is a brewery, so you’re better off with something lighter anyway. That’s where Ol’ Denty and D&D Pub Ale really shine. Try them with the lemongrass pork curry with fries, and you’ll see why. Boulder Weekly

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community

TABLE

‘You just can’t do mashed potatoes all the time’

Seeds Library Cafe’s Matt Collier on his ever-changing menu and career by Matt Cortina Matt Cortina

I

t makes sense that Matt Collier runs Seeds Library Cafe. Seeds sources produce and meat only from the state of Colorado, and mostly from the Boulder County Farmers Market, which co-operates the cafe. That means Collier has to make menus out of a supply list that changes weekly. That perpetual change meshes with Collier, who’s worked at more restaurants than you Courtesy of Seeds Library Cafe can count on two hands, many right here in Boulder County. From Chautauqua Dining Hall to Bradford Heap’s restaurants; a foray to Chicago sandwiched between stints at The Kitchen... Collier’s career changes as often as the crops are rotated on a local farm. So what exactly attracts Collier to new beginnings? Consider his time in Chicago, where he helped launch several restaurants including the wellreceived The Publican and Big Star. “It was a lot of fun because it’s like crisis management,” Collier says. “You get a lot of issues... how do I make it work? How do I make it seamless, as fast as possible? How do I create programs and methods to doing everything so it’s easy for me and other people? It got the blood pumping a lot.” When he returned from Chicago, Collier worked as sous-chef at OAK at fourteenth and head chef at The Boulder Weekly

Kitchen. He then helped launch T|aco, Matt Collier uses only hypercreating an expansive local ingredients for his fare at Seeds Library Cafe in the menu of innovative Main Branch of the Boultacos. His move to der Public Library. Above, toast with mushrooms and Seeds proved that he sausage. Left, beet-glazed is a product of all his donuts. culinary experiences — making high-end, local food accessible is a virtue he likely got from OAK; his initiative to lead a restaurant in a public library from The Kitchen; and his commitment to responsibly sourced food from Heap. Using only local, in-season ingredients while trying to live up to those ideals might seem cumbersome for some, but for Collier, the experience has been revelatory. “In fact, it’s been enlightening and eye-opening. I’ve worked for chefs who’ve won James Beard awards and been featured in Wine Spectator, [but] I’ve never worked in [a kitchen] where you get food from just one state. If you look at global warming, you look at everything that’s going on, and think about, ‘How far does this food have to go to get to me?’ whether it’s tropical fruits or avocados. “It’s been nice to cook with what you’re presented with and not what you want. I’ve found my creativity is pushed harder. I don’t feel limited. I’m encouraged and see COLLIER Page 50

August 9 , 2018 49


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COLLIER from Page 49

pushed to do different things,” he says. There are challenges, Collier says. One is the ability to Collier says pay his staff enough money for them to live — it’s a probusing local ingredients is a lem facing many of the same restaurants at which Collier challenge, and once worked. his creativity usually pays off “As far as challenges go, it is interesting,” he says. “The with customers. only main one for me is how do we keep our costs really low while still being able to provide our employees with a livable wage?” Seeds receives regular shipments of ingredients from a handful of local farms — Aspen Moon, Red Wagon, Toohey and Sons, Ollin Farms, Oxford Gardens and more. But every Wednesday and Saturday, Collier will head down to the Boulder Farmers Market with a wad of money and a trailer and buy directly from farmers the produce he’ll need for the week. “We just try to bounce around” between farmers, he says, in order to ensure Seeds is supporting the largest amount of local producers it can. “Every Saturday, we pull a giant cart over to the market and just load it up with whatever looks good, then Wednesday we kind of fill in,” Collier says. Using local produce means that, in winter, Collier has to think outside the box to keep customers happy. When beets, carrots, potatoes and greenhouse greens are the only local items available, Collier has to keep the menu fresh using new recipes. The rotating doughnuts at Seeds are a hidden gem — the pastry isn’t necessarily the type of food on which you’d expect to find local beet glaze. “[Patrons] seem to enjoy it as long as we’re being creative,” Collier says. “You just can’t do mashed potatoes all the time. You have to have fun with it. You have to think about it.” Collier has also been running several farm dinners every year over the last few growing seasons. He’ll be cooking at Ollin Farms in Longmont on Aug. 25 at 6 p.m. Collier says [and he would know] that this year has been exceptional for Boulder County producers, with produce coming up early and often on area farms. That makes it the right time to check out Seeds or one of Collier’s farm dinners. Who knows, maybe the perpetual creative challenge offered by Seeds will finally let this mobile chef take root. Boulder Weekly


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astrology ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19:

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Palestinian American writer Susan Abulhawa writes that in the Arab world, to say a mere “thank you” is regarded as spiritless and ungenerous. The point of communicating gratitude is to light up with lively and expressive emotions that respond in kind to the kindness bestowed. For instance, a recipient may exclaim, “May Allah bless the hands that give me this blessing,” or “Beauty is in the eyes that find me beautiful.” In accordance with current astrological omens, I propose that you experiment with this approach. Be specific in your praise. Be exact in your appreciation. Acknowledge the unique mood and meaning of each rich exchange.

look like “piglets and kittens.” If she were alive today, she’d be pleased that nose jobs in the U.S. have declined 43 percent since 2000. According to journalist Madeleine Schwartz writing in Garage magazine, historians of rhinoplasty say there has been a revival of appreciation for the distinctive character revealed in an unaltered nose. I propose, Libra, that in accordance with current astrological omens, we extrapolate some even bigger inspiration from that marvelous fact. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to celebrate and honor and express pride in your idiosyncratic natural magnificence.

SCORPIO

TAURUS

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: “Maybe happiness is this: not feeling

astrological omens, you need this advice from mythologist Joseph Campbell: “Your sacred space is where you can find yourself again and again.” He says it’s “a rescue land ... some field of action where there is a spring of ambrosia — a joy that comes from inside, not something external that puts joy into you — a place that lets you experience your own will and your own intention and your own wish.” Do you have such a place, Taurus? If not, now is a great time to find one. If you do, now is a great time to go there for a spell and renew the hell out of yourself.

SAGITTARIUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: According to my analysis of the

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: When he was 20 years old, future

U.S. President Thomas Jefferson had an awkward encounter with a young woman who piqued his interest. He was embarrassed by the gracelessness he displayed. For two days afterward, he endured a terrible headache. We might speculate that it was a psychosomatic reaction. I bring this up because I’m wondering if your emotions are also trying to send coded messages to you via your body. Are you aware of unusual symptoms or mysterious sensations? See if you can trace them back to their source in your soul.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: There’s a zone in your psyche where selfishness overlaps generosity, where the line between being emotionally manipulative and gracefully magnanimous almost disappears. With both hope and trepidation for the people in your life, I advise you to hang out in that grey area for now. Yes, it’s a risk. You could end up finessing people mostly for your own good and making them think it’s mostly for their own good. But the more likely outcome is that you will employ ethical abracadabra to bring out the best in others, even as you get what you want, too.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: You probably gaze at the sky enough

to realize when there’s a full moon. But you may not monitor the heavenly cycles closely enough to tune in to the new moon, that phase each month when the lunar orb is invisible. We astrologers regard it as a ripe time to formulate fresh intentions. We understand it to be a propitious moment to plant metaphorical seeds for the desires you want to fulfill in the coming four weeks. When this phenomenon happens during the astrological month of Leo, the potency is intensified for you. Your next appointment with this holiday is August 10 and 11.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: In her poem “Dogfish,” Virgo poet

Mary Oliver writes, “I wanted the past to go away, I wanted to leave it.” Why? Because she wanted her life “to open like a hinge, like a wing.” I’m happy to tell you, Virgo, that you now have more power than usual to make your past go away. I’m also pleased to speculate that as you perform this service for yourself, you’ll be skillful enough to preserve the parts of your past that inspire you, even as you shrink and neutralize memories that drain you. In response to this good work, I bet your life will open like a hinge, like a wing — no later than your birthday, and most likely before that.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Libran fashion writer Diana

Vreeland (1903-1989) championed the beauty of the strong nose. She didn’t approve of women wanting to

Boulder Weekly

like you should be elsewhere, doing something else, being someone else.” This definition, articulated by author Isaac Asimov, will be an excellent fit for you between now and September 20. I suspect you’ll be unusually likely to feel at peace with yourself and at home in the world. I don’t mean to imply that every event will make you cheerful and calm. What I’m saying is that you will have an extraordinary capacity to make clear decisions based on accurate appraisals of what’s best for you.

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: I’ve compiled a list of new blessings

you need and deserve during the next 14 months. To the best of my ability, I will assist you to procure them. Here they are: a practical freedom song and a mature love song; an exciting plaything and a renaissance of innocence; an evocative new symbol that helps mobilize your evolving desires; escape from the influence of a pest you no longer want to answer to; insights about how to close the gap between the richest and poorest parts of yourself; and the cutting of a knot that has hindered you for years.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: “It has become clear to me that I must

either find a willing nurturer to cuddle and nuzzle and whisper sweet truths with me for six hours or else seek sumptuous solace through the aid of eight shots of whiskey.” My Capricorn friend Tammuz confided that message to me. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were feeling a comparable tug. According to my assessment of the Capricorn zeitgeist, you acutely need the revelations that would become available to you through altered states of emotional intelligence. A lavish whoosh of alcohol might do the trick, but a more reliable and effective method would be through immersions in intricate, affectionate intimacy.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Not even 5 percent of the world’s population lives in a complete democracy. Congratulations to Norway, Canada, Australia, Finland, Ireland, Iceland, Denmark, New Zealand, Switzerland and Sweden. Sadly, three countries where my column is published — the U.S., Italy and France — are categorized as “flawed democracies.” Yet they’re far better than the authoritarian regimes in China and Russia. (Source: The Economist.) I offer this public service announcement as a prelude to your homework assignment. According to my astrological analysis, you will personally benefit from working to bring more democracy into your personal sphere. How can you ensure that people you care about feel equal to you, and have confidence that you will listen to and consider their needs, and believe they have a strong say in shaping your shared experiences?

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PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Mystic poet Kabir wrote, “The

flower blooms for the fruit: when the fruit comes, the flower withers.” He was invoking a metaphor to describe his spiritual practice and reward. The hard inner work he did to identify himself with God was the blooming flower that eventually made way for the fruit. The fruit was his conscious, deeply felt union with God. I see this scenario as applicable to your life, Pisces. Should you feel sadness about the flower’s withering? It’s fine to do so. But the important thing is that you now have the fruit. Celebrate it! Enjoy it!

HOURS Mon-Sat 9am-9pm • Sun 10am-5pm 1750 30th Street, Suite 7 • 720.379.6046 www.boulderbotanics.com August 9 , 2018 53


icumi

(IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world

SEATIN (OR PUTGAL), THE LATEST PORTMANTEAU CRAZE Steven Seagal is known for his many talents — a regular jack of all trades, we’d say. The martial arts aficionado has the good-guy-CIA-operative-with-feelings character down. He’s also known as a bad-ass hit man who won’t take no shit from nobody. Sometimes these characters even appear in the same film (yes, his movies deserve that pretentious title.) Seagal is the perfect action hero to take down anyone and everyone seeking revenge, justified or unjustified, in that slambang thriller kind of way. And the ponytail. We can’t overlook the ponytail. That beautiful specimen of dead cells Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons deserves the adjective swashbuckling all on its own. It should also have its own part in the movies, along with its own line in the rolling credits. “Seagal’s ponytail played by Seagal’s ponytail.” We can see it now. So it should come as no surprise in this new fantasy world we find ourselves living in to hear that Seagal just got the biggest role of his career to date. (Whoever says ageism is a real thing affecting white men in their 60s is dead wrong.) Coming soon to a New World Order near you, Seagal will be the “special representative for Russian-U.S. humanitarian ties,” according to the Facebook page for the Embassy of Russia in the U.S. (Yes, the Russians use Facebook for important, and perhaps clandestine, government tasks, if you haven’t heard.) But what does this new role entail, you ask? “The task is to facilitate relations between Russia and the United States in the humanitarian field, including cooperation in culture, arts, public and youth exchanges, and so on,” the announcement says. And so the plot thickens. Will the Russian citizen Seagal (yes he really is one) risk life and limb to preserve his new homeland? Or will he pledge allegiance to the only country that has given him life, liberty and the relentless and rewarding pursuit of glory, money and fame? You’ll have to keep watching to find out. We can hardly handle the suspense.

RELIVING HIGH SCHOOL Those of us who flew under the radar in high school could seek comfort in the knowledge that those with popularity did not always have the highest quality hearts. Well, we strongly suggest you call up the cheerleaders and football players from your school days and tell them to tune in to the 2019 Academy Awards. With ratings tumbling in recent years, the Oscars have decided to do what it takes to gain popularity, not unlike Lindsay Lohan in the under-decorated but nonetheless popular film Mean Girls. Yes, to help boost television ratings the Oscars announced that it will be adding a category for “outstanding achievement in popular film,” a motion that raised quite a bit of confusion. Does this mean that a film has to be unpopular to be the best picture of the year? What if a film was a box-office smash for a good reason, like in the rare circumstance that it was actually technically impressive? Or is this just another move to vindicate film-festival-attending Brooklyn hipsters that the films they watch deserve a completely different category from us lowlifes who watch what could be considered “popular?” An Academy spokeswoman later clarified that a film could be considered in both the “popular” and “best” categories, easing the nerves of at least some Black Panther fans. But as the Oscars fight to stay relevant in ratings, one has to wonder if they will pair their effort to be more accessible with an effort to actually nominate a racially and socioeconomically diverse spread of artists, as well as appoint a more diverse array of Academy members. Boulder Weekly

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Dear Dan: I’m part of a nonhierarchical polycule. In a few months, one of my girlfriends will be marrying her fiancée. I’ll be attending as a guest with my other girlfriend. What are the guidelines or expectations for purchasing a gift for your girlfriend’s wedding? Surprisingly, the other advice columnists don’t have guidance on this one. —Wedding Etiquette Dilemma Dear WED: Get the couple something nice, something you can afford, maybe something from their gift registry. Or give them a card with a check in it so they can spend the money on whatever they might need for their household or use it to cover the expense of the wedding itself. In short, WED, wedding-gift guidelines are the same for people in nonhierarchical polycules as they are for love-muggle monocules. I’m not slamming the poly thing for overprocessing and overthinking — most people process (aka communicate) too little, and it’s often better to overthink than to under-think or not-think — but not everything needs to be dumped into the poly processor and pureed. Congrats to your girlfriend (the one who’s getting married) and her fiancée! Dear Dan: While on vacation, I went for a full body massage. The first half of the massage — me on my stomach — was great. When the masseuse asked me to flip on my back, things took a turn. She uncovered one of my legs and began massaging my thigh. As she worked on my inner thigh, her finger grazed my scrotum. Then it happened again. And again. She was working on my thigh, but it felt like I was getting my balls caressed. I began to worry I was getting a visible erection. Then I started to panic when I felt like I might actually come. (I have always had issues with premature ejaculation.) I tried hard to clamp down and think about baseball and senior citizens, but I wound up having an orgasm. She eventually moved to my arms, shoulders, etc., but meanwhile I’m lying there with jizz cooling on myself. Am I guilty of #metoo bad behavior? Should I have said something or asked her to stop? Is it possible she didn’t have any clue? (My penis was never uncovered and I didn’t create an obvious wet spot on the sheet.) I tipped her extra, just in case she was mortified, though I didn’t get the sense she was because nothing changed after I came in terms of her massaging me. (She didn’t hurry away from my legs or rush to finish my massage.) I still feel really weird about the whole thing. I get massages frequently, this has never happened before, and I certainly didn’t go into it looking for this result. —Lost Opportunity At De-escalation Boulder Weekly

SAVAGE

Love

by Dan Savage

Dear LOAD: If it all went down as you described, LOAD, you aren’t guilty of “#metoo bad behavior.” It’s not uncommon for people to become unintentionally aroused during a nonerotic massage; it’s more noticeable when it happens to men, of course, but it happens to women, too. “Erections do hap-

before, LOAD, I don’t think you should waste too much time worrying about it happening again. But if you’re concerned this one massage created a powerful erotic association and you’re likely to blow a load the next time a masseuse so much as looks at one of your thighs, go ahead and have a quick wank before your appointment. Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visit ITMFA.org. On the Lovecast, the kink phenomenon of “sub drop”: savagelovecast.com.

pen,” a masseuse told me when I ran your letter past her. “So long as guys don’t suddenly ask for a ‘happy ending,’ expose themselves, or — God help me — attempt to take my hand and place it on their erection, they haven’t done anything wrong.” Since this hasn’t happened to you

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weed between the lines

by Sidni West

Where not to smoke weed

F

or the past decade, cannabis has played a significant role in shaping the sociopolitical landscape and quality of life in Colorado. We’ve become the role model for legalization, and the rest of the nation is taking note. Dozens of states have legalized medical marijuana, and recreational marijuana is legal in nine states plus Washington D.C. A recent Gallup poll showed that 64 percent of Americans favor federal legalization, and even a majority of Republicans back it. But while weed is new and novel in places like Oklahoma, which became the 30th state to legalize medical marijuana earlier this summer, it’s so ingrained in our culture in Colorado that it’s easy to forget it still carries a stigma (and legal implications) outside state lines. Times are changing and laws are progressing, but some state marijuana laws remain shockingly strict. Summer is a prime time for traveling, so it’s important to be cautious of local laws where possession can lead to being arrested, fined or thrown in jail. If you value freedom and ganja, it’s probably best to stay away from the following states because they have, like, no chill:

Arizona There have been two attempts to legalize recreational cannabis in Arizona and both have failed. Even though they implemented a medical marijuana system in 2010, this state still enforces some of the toughest marijuana laws in the country. If you’re not a qualified medical patient, possession of less than two pounds (or even getting caught with paraphernalia) is a felony punishable by a minimum sentence of four months behind bars and a $1,000 fine, or a maximum sentence of two years in jail.

Florida Not sure why people still visit Florida considering all of the weird headlines to come out of that state, but I guess paying a small fortune to sweat in line for hours at Disney World still has its appeal. While voters legalized medical marijuana in 2016, legal access is limited to patients who suffer from a selective list of conditions. Getting caught with 20 grams or less carries a maximum sentence of one year in prison and a $1,000 fine.

Boulder Weekly

If you’re charged with possession of more than 20 grams, it’s considered a felony and you’re lumped into the same category of people caught with up to 25 pounds of cannabis, which is punishable by a maximum sentence of five years in jail and a $5,000 fine.

Texas If there’s anything that living in Colorado has taught me, it’s that people here have some weird, ongoing beef against Texans. Not sure how many of you will be using your vacation days to visit the Lone Star state this summer, but that’s probably for the best. Of the 531,000 marijuana arrests reported nationwide in 2016, 12 percent were in Texas. Under state law, misdemeanor charges for possession of two ounces or less carry a sentence of up to 180 days in prison and a $2,000 fine. Possession of one gram or less of concentrates such as cannabis wax is a felony punishable by up to two years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Racial disparity also plays a role in the high arrest rate since black people were arrested twice as frequently as white people for simple marijuana possession. Although black people make up about 12 percent of the population, they accounted for over 25 percent of the individuals who faced marijuana possession charges in 2010.

Utah One of the best parts of living on the Front Range is our proximity to Utah. Not only does it offer access to some of the best climbing, skiing and paddling in the country, but the road trip there is easy to manage and absolutely gorgeous. Unfortunately, the danger of driving around Utah with Colorado licence plates is real, so be extra careful because the police may profile you. Possession of less than an ounce is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum sentence of six months imprisonment and a maximum fine of $1,000. Like Texas, and everywhere else for that matter, minority and low-income communities in Utah are disproportionately the ones who face these penalties. The ACLU found that black Utahans are more than 3.75 times as likely to get arrested for marijuana possession as their white neighbors.

West Virginia It’s wild, wonderful and the birthplace of our nation’s current opioid epidemic, so these marijuana laws feel especially backwards. All first-time possession charges are misdemeanors with a penalty of up to 6 months in jail and a $1,000 fine. Everything else is a felony, including trafficking any amount into West Virginia.

Wyoming From Jackson to the Wind River Range, Wyoming offers a ton of outdoor recreation, so it feels like a personal attack that I’m not allowed to get stoned after a long day of climbing in one of our most beautiful states. Possession of under three ounces is a misdemeanor that can be punished with up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine; possession of over three ounces is a felony. A person in possession of more than 3 ounces of marijuana faces a potential five-year prison sentence and a $10,000 fine. Those same penalties apply to the sale or distribution of any amount of marijuana. These archaic laws don’t just extend to the plant. Just last week, a woman driving through the state with CBD oil was charged with a felony, while local stores are reporting that cops have recently demanded that they remove all CBD products from their shelves within seven days. The Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation said that they’ve been collecting samples of these products since last year, claiming that many of them tested positive for THC. Although CBD is legal in the state, it is still a felony in the state to sell, buy or possess any CBD product that contains more than 0.3 percent THC content. Laws are constantly changing and this list is just a guideline, so make sure to do your own research. Other states with harsh punishments for stoners include Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, North Dakota, South Dakota and Virginia. The Marijuana Policy Project, which has been responsible for most of the major state-level marijuana policy reforms enacted in the past 15 years, has an interactive map of current cannabis laws at mpp.org/ states.

August 9, 2018 59


cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

Finding out how pot does its thing — it’s complicated

A

ll alcoholic beverages have one thing in common — alcohol. With marijuana, well, it’s complicated. The female pot plant contains at least 113 separate cannabinoids, compounds that can attach themselves to receptors on cells in the brain/or and other organs. THC and CBD are just the best known. Most of them have psychoactive or medicinal effects individually or in combination, some of which are known and a lot of which aren’t. Those effects can vary depending on the percentages of different canabinoids in a combination and the strength of the dose. Additionally there are more than 100 terpenes — oils produced by a pot plant’s resin glands that can modulate and moderate the effects of the cannabinoids. (Terpenes are what gives different strains of marijuana their unique odors.) Dr. Raphael Mechoulam — the Israeli chemist who discovered THC, the receptors in the brain for both THC and CBD, and the body’s naturallyproduced cannabinoids (called endocannabinoids) — called the synergistic interactions between combinations of cannabinoids and terpenes the “entourage effect.” But with so many cannabinoids and terpenes, there can be millions of different “entourages.” Make that billions or gazillions, or some number that needs to be written in scientific notation. Anyway, someone needs to sort out what at least some of the more commonly encountered entourag-

es can do. Which bring us to ebbu, a company in Evergreen that is trying to do just that. According to a piece about ebbu by Tobias Coughlin-Bogue for the website Herb.co, for the past two years ebbu has been experimenting with different blends of extracted cannabinoids and terpenes, trying to determine exactly which mixes of compounds will produce which experiences; relaxation or stimulation, for example, on the recreational side, or which can best treat what conditions on the medical side. Eventually the company intends to offer the recipes they’re developing to cannabis companies wanting to market products that reliably produce the same results and products that have unique effects. “Really what we’ve been doing is proving exactly how the entourage effect works,” ebbu CEO Jon Cooper told Herb. “The synergistic effects of how these compounds work in concert with each other in order to create the desirable sensation, feeling, or medicinal benefit that someone’s looking for.” Ebbu’s approach is to chemically separate and purify various cannabinoids and terpenes of interest from marijuana, and then create precisely reproducible combinations of them for testing, and hopefully future commercialization. However, what really sets the company apart is how it is analyzing the effects of its formulations. Ebbu’s researchers have developed the ability

to grow human endocannabinoid receptors like those found in the brain in the lab. This allows them to look at which receptors are activated or suppressed by different formulations. This gives them crucial information on what effects the formulations are producing at the cellular level. When the company starts running trials on humans, it will have a way of relating subjects’ reported experiences to what is physically going on in their brains. That sort of rigor and precision could revolutionize both marijuana research and the cannabis industry. First, it will allow the industry to offer products whose effects are reliably reproducible, something that the industry hasn’t been able to do very well up to now. Most pot is differentiated by strains, but there can be a lot of variation in cannabinoid content between individual plants in a strain, or even within single plants. Creating formulations blended from purified cannabinoids gets around that problem. Second, the ability to create those precision formulations will give additional impetus to the movement away from smoking weed and to vaping and edibles. Third, the information ebbu is developing will allow growers to develop strains that produce increased yields of both common cannabionoids like THC and CBD, as well as rare cannabinoids — like CBG, CBC and CBDV, according to the company’s website. It will also allow them to offer more consistency within strains. (So maybe smoking weed will survive.) Fourth, and most important, it will allow the industry to produce offerings to produce a whole panoply of different highs, something the alcohol industry, which is stuck with a product that has one psychoactive active ingredient, can’t do. Talk about a competitive edge.

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May We Suggest Some Gelato with that Wedding Cake

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