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FREE

Ever y

Thursday

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25

Ye a r s

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w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m

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June

6-12,

2019


11

dyertimes:

Torture and abuse at the southern border by Joel Dyer

14

news:

Advocates urge Sen. Gardner to renew U.S. commitment to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria by Angela K. Evans

boulderganic:

19

buzz:

21

Beyond Academia Free Skool revisits ecopoetics in the face of environmental disaster by Angela K. Evans

The Dairy’s Polly Addison Gallery hangs the art of its namesake, shedding light on the person behind the art by Amanda Moutinho

Soul-searching with Nick Murphy by Caitlin Rockett

44

nibbles:

Relationships build hyper-local culinary hub on Lafayette farm by John Lehndorff

49

community table:

Put radish anywhere but salad by Ari Levaux

departments

31 40 41 43 47 55 57 59 61

The Highroad: Should our natural resources have legal rights? Danish Plan: Phoenix can see its future in Mexico (it’s not what you think) Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Arts & Culture: Peter Oundjian wants Colorado Music Festival to be dynamic, exciting, a ‘celebration’ Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘human tweeting’ by Daniel Asher Film: The sound of one hand clapping in ‘Zen for Nothing’ Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: New in Brew: Rosé roundup Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Baby soft Weed Between the Lines: Harry J. Anslinger and the campaign against marijuana Cannabis Corner: Illinois legislature legalizes recreational marijuana

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Adventure Editor, Emma Murray Editorial intern, Lauren Hamko Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Sidni West, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Marketing Coordinator, Lara Henry Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar Bookkeeper, Veronica Turner PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama COVER: ‘MY PETS,’ BY POLLY ADDISON June 6, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 43 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Should our natural resources have legal rights? by Jim Hightower

F

rom the very start of our nation, the most popular forum for debating and shaping our democratic rights was not stately legislative halls, but rowdy beer halls. Indeed, “pub democracy” remains strong across our country, as is now being shown by a hardy group of democracy rebels in Toledo, Ohio. The people of this city on the edge of Lake Erie were literally sickened in 2014 when a toxic algae bloom poisoned the lake, which is the source of their drinking water. People were outraged that state officials, who were in the pocket of the polluters, then did nothing to proI

tect the lake from more poisoning. Mulling this over while quaffing beers in a local pub, the rebels hit upon a novel thought: What if Lake Erie could protect itself by asserting its legal right to “exist, flourish and naturally evolve?” Thus was born the Lake Erie Bill of Rights, which the group proposed as a city charter ballot initiative. They got double the number of signatures required to put the proposition on February’s ballot, mounted a door-todoor people’s campaign to counter a media blitz partially funded by such giants as Coca-Cola and FedEx — and they won! A whopping 61 percent of JUNE 6, 2019

FOR MORE INFORMATION on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

Toledo’s voters said YES to recognizing legally-enforceable rights for the natural world. Supercilious corporate elites, however, refuse to let such a trifling matter as the will of the people interfere with their sense of entitlement to poison for profit. So they’ve now gotten top Ohio officials to assert in a court filing that the state is the “proprietor in trust” of Lake Erie. Therefore, claim the officials, local voters have no power to deny so-called corporate “persons” the permission to pollute real people’s water. Of course, the democracy rebels are not about to back down, so keep up with them at LakeErieAction.org. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. I

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Phoenix can see its future in Mexico (it’s not what you think) by Paul Danish

DRY OR ITCHY EYES?

Springtime is tough on your eyes. Pollen is irritating even for those without allergies. And antihistamines and other allergy medicines can dry out your eyes even more. Tearing along with sniffles are signs that your eyes are trying to cleanse themselves. Over the counter eye drops may not be the best solution. We customize each patient’s treatment based on a careful examination and diagnosis to help you love Spring again.

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n May 12, the planet’s atmosphere hit one of those “grim milestones” we hear so much about. According to data from the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, the concentration of carbon in the atmosphere topped 415 parts per million (415.26 ppm, to be precise), which is higher than it has been at any time in the last 800,000 years. Higher than it’s been since our ancestors came down out of the trees and declared themselves a separate species. “We don’t know a planet like this,” said Eric Holthaus, a meteorologist and climate columnist for the online magazine Grist. “This is the first time in human history our planet’s atmosphere has had more than 415ppm CO2,” Holthaus tweeted. “Not just in recorded history, not just since the invention of agriculture 10,000 years ago. Since before modern humans existed millions of years ago,” he added. The 415.26ppm figure was a oneoff daily reading, but over 415ppm readings seem on track to become the new normal. According to the website CO2-earth, the daily CO2 reading for last Sunday was 414.28ppm — which is 3.62ppms higher than the reading for June 2 last I

year. What’s more, the CO2 monthly average for April 2019 was 413.52ppm, up 3.22ppm from the April 2018 month average. No doubt about it, annual atmospheric CO2 increases are on a tear. And so are global average temperatures. April 2019 was the second hottest month since 1880. (The hottest was 2016). Sounds pretty alarming, huh? But how is it, then, that Maricopa County, Arizona, which includes most of the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale metropolitan area, was the fastest growing county in the country — for the third year in a row? Between July 2017 and July 2018, 81,244 people moved to Maricopa County, raising its population to 4,410,824 residents — keeping it the fourth most populous county in the U.S. But how can this be? Phoenix is hot as blazes in the summer. According to the Wikipedia entry on the place, the city gets 3,872 hours of bright sunlight a year, the most of any major city on the planet. Average high temperatures are the hottest of any major city in the U.S. On average, there are 107 days a year with a high of at least 100 degrees see DANISH PLAN Page 7

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


DANISH PLAN from Page 6

Fahrenheit or more, and 18 days with highs of 110 degrees or higher. And it’s been getting hotter over the last 30 or 40 years, not so much from global warming but from the heat island effect — which is when asphalt and structures soak up heat during the day and release it at night. The larger a city gets, the warmer it stays at night, which runs up its overall average temperatures. You have to wonder if the city is going to get so hot that its uninhabitable. So just how hot might Phoenix get by the end of the century? That’s where an on-line interactive map produced by the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science comes in. It was created using three massive data sets that allow it to show graphically what the average temperature and precipitation in 540 American cities are today (what they were between 1960 and 1990 actually) and what they will most closely resemble in 2080. For instance, assuming CO2 continues to increase at current rates, New York City will feel more like Jonesboro, Arkansas, the San Francisco Bay Area more like Los Angeles, and LA more like the tip of Baja California. The map also shows what the climate will be like if CO2 emissions are dialed back. (The map can be accessed at fitzlab. shinyapps.io/cityapp/) For Phoenix, assuming CO2 continues to rise at current rates, the city it

will most closely resemble in 2080 is Esperanza, Mexico today (Esperanza is just north of Ciudad Obregon, inland from Mexico’s west coast.) And ­— surprise — the typical summer in Esperanza is 0.7 degrees cooler and 165 percent wetter than current summers in Phoenix. This is actually better than what the map shows for a reduced emissions scenario. With a reduced emissions scenario, Phoenix in 2080 will most closely resemble Buckeye, Arizona today, which is 3 degrees warmer and 34.8 percent dryer than Phoenix. Given the kinds of ferocious temperatures Phoenix experiences today, never mind what they might be in 60 years, you would think people would be fleeing the place for North Dakota instead of moving there. But they keep coming anyway. Maybe they think a hotter, sunnier climate is a feature, not a bug. Maybe a lot of Americans in other places — like Buffalo, Cleveland and Chicago — are thinking the same thing about climate change. And maybe, as the Phoenix-Esperanza connection suggests, the changes that higher CO2 levels in the atmosphere will bring won’t be quite as apocalyptic as they are usually made out to be. And maybe we should have a conversation about all that before we buy into a green new deal. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect BW’s views.

Choose plants

to Animals. Did you check the last time you bought food out or at the grocery store if it came from a factory farm? Does it matter to you? It matters to those activists, definitely to the animals you are eating and to the planet your children want to inherit. Have you seen the IPCC report that says we have 12 years to reduce carbon emissions by half to limit the planet from warming greater than 1.5 degrees Celsius and failure to do so will result in food scarcity and mass climate devastation? Have you seen the new IPBES report on biodiversity showing 1 million species are facing extinction? Did you know the biggest

Have you seen the activists on Pearl Street wearing Guy Fawkes masks and holding television screens? Do you know what they’re doing there? Have you had a chance to talk to them? The television screens are showing the numerous ways we exploit animals in our everyday lives for food, clothing, medical testing and entertainment. The footage comes mostly from organic, freerange farms to dispel the myths that there is such a thing as good farms doing it right. Even if you think there are good farms, the reality is 95 percent of animals in the U.S. are raised in factory farms, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

see LETTERS Page 8

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way to reduce one’s carbon footprint is to switch to a plant-based diet? Why didn’t you know these things? Don’t they seem important? Think about it. Now stop thinking and please do something about it. You can make an impactful choice three times a day when you choose what’s on your plate. Do it for the animals, the planet, for your health and your kids. Choose plants three times a day, it’s easier than you think and we all make a difference. Joshua Smith/Boulder

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The movement to engage one’s theosophical engagement in sustainable social behaviors is themed around the plausible power in the meshing of neo-sustainability efforts with the gnosis of wisdom traditions (religions) in an effort to invigorate collective and holistic non-toxic ecological praxis. Well-meaning people sometimes assume that environmental sustainability efforts are innate to the concerns of most wisdom traditions. Therefore, it is often implied that any unsustainable or ecocidal-terroristic acts, of any given wisdom tradition, are the fault of the societal influences the wisdom practice is encompassed by rather than the laissez-faire, spiritual narcissistic, esoteric, non-dualistic or isolationist approaches of some wisdom conventions. The reality may be that a middle-way may exist in which both perspectives hold certain validity. In our time of collective ecological decay we must hold space for, and thresh out, the discussions and actions regarding the place of wisdom traditions in collaborating and supporting of the eco-sustainability global movements already upon us. We ought to begin by establishing the relevancy that the teachings explicit to various text-based doctrines of wisdom traditions may hold for environmental critique efforts, initiating wisdom-tradition sponsored sustainability efforts, encouraging eco-friendliness and sustaining sustainability efforts which already have begun. Next we could suggest how one could actualize theistic, panentheistic, philosophical and wisdom I

ideologies into behaviors which serve to diminish and ultimately abolish ecocide. To conclude we can offer opportunities for people to utilize various wisdom traditions in an effort to actualize a virtuous and sustainable ecology. For example, one could re-present basic tenants of Tibetan Buddhism in a lens which promotes virtuous sustainability. In foundational Tibetan Buddhist tradition there are certain moral standards which are established for all practitioners of the dharma path. The sacred Buddhist doctrine which expresses the moral standards which are relevant to our ecology (relationship with the biosphere) is the “pañcasila” or the five precepts. The first and second precepts are specifically poignant to the discussion around the Buddhist obligation to certain behaviors which may help to sustain health and life on the planet. 1) Panatipata veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami: I undertake the precept to refrain from destroying living creatures. 2) Adinnadana veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami: I undertake the precept to refrain from taking that which is not given. The behavioral suggestions of the pañcasila could be put to action on a global scale through individual ethical efforts inspired by one’s wisdom tradition. In the context of Buddhism, one way to respect the first precept would be to minimize one’s intake of meat and try to eat sustainablesourced, ethically slaughtered and organic livestock, poultry or seafood. One way to abide by the second precept could be to join the anti-fracking efforts and activate against the theft of non-sustainable resources from the environment by supporting the traditional hydro-fracker in finding and securing alternative forms of income to sustain a family. In short, the implications to the sustainability movement which wisdom traditions can serve are great and virtuous. Please intend to continue the necessary work of engaging our community, our faith/spirituality and our culture in the movement to withdraw and allow the earth to save itself (and us!). Anthony Gallucci/Boulder BOULDER WEEKLY


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COURTESY OF OIG

More high crimes and misdemeanors

deaths of people crossing the border as a result of the fence, which back then started a few yards out in the Pacific Ocean and ran east to the edge of the Laguna Mountains. The border fence’s actual purpose then was to make illegal border crossing less visible by moving it from San Diego’s beaches and neighborhoods to the rural lands to the east where it wasn’t so obvious and therefore less politically damaging. Clinton’s version of “the Wall,” albeit short, forced migrants onto new, more dangerous immigration routes through the rugged Laguna Mountains and the Sonoran Desert. As a result, deaths due to exposure while crossing the border quadrupled from 500 a year to nearly 2,000. But statistically speaking, the only men, women and children Clinton’s barrier deterred from crossing into the U.S. were the 1,500 extra folks who died trying to get here because of that damned fence.

Torture and abuse at the southern border

By Joel Dyer

I

t’s hard to believe it’s been 20 years since I last crossed the U.S.-Mexican border illegally and spent a few days making my way through the chesthigh brush of the Laguna Mountains east of San Diego. Unlike the other migrants I encountered on my journey for journalism’s sake, I had nothing to fear if caught by Border Patrol agents. But looking back now, it’s astonishing how much crossing the southern border has changed. I want to say it’s harder now, but it has always been hard, at least since Bill Clinton first started building the border fence back in the 1990s. The whole reason I was in Southern California in 2000 was to investigate the astronomical rise in the

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

IN EL PASO, the So, it’s wrong to Border Patrol is say it’s harder now, throwing away all the personal belongings just crueler. that migrants carried The biggest difwith them for thouference I can see sands of miles currently is the way we treat those trying to enter our country both illegally and even legally via the asylum process. Two decades ago Border Patrol agents rarely carried guns. They’d just round up migrants by telling them to stop and then haul them back to the border where they were returned to the Mexican side to try again the next day. Sure, you can argue this was an ineffective policy as far as keeping people from coming here, but that was never really the goal. Past administrations understood we need migrant labor and that its impact on agriculture alone subsidizes our entire economy. It’s estimated a single head of lettuce would cost more than $7 if not for undocumented laborers. Historically, our government also undersee SOUTHERN BORDER Page 12

JUNE 6, 2019

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SOUTHERN BORDER from Page 11

stood that the hundreds of millions of dollars being sent back to Mexico’s poorest citizens from family members working in the U.S. creates political stability for our neighbor to the south. Several studies have warned that cutting off this flow of cash would likely result in a peasant revolution that would risk the creation of a communist Mexico on our southern border. In short, there were a lot of common-sense reasons for having a national border policy that was intentionally porous. And it made for a kinder, gentler Border Patrol as a result. Having spent weeks riding along in the Border Patrol’s white broncos on numerous occasions 20 years ago, I can attest that the agents I met at that time considered helping migrants to at least survive their attmpeted crossing was a big part of their job. When unexpected snowstorms hit the Lagunas or weaker, slower migrants got left behind by their guides in the desert, it was the Border Patrol agents who worked to find them before it was too late. They, unlike their modern counterparts, didn’t waste their time dumping the barrels of water or confiscating the warm clothing good Samaritans left along the migrant paths to save lives. I didn’t meet anyone back then who thought death was an effective deterrent or a fair price to pay for someone trying to come to this country for a better life. But that was then. Now days it’s hard to know where to point the finger of guilt when it comes to the cruel treatment of migrants. It seems like everyone from rank and file Border Patrol agents to politicians right on up to the millions of U.S. citizens who say they support what’s being done at the border in their name are to blame for the atrocities that are now being committed by our country against these defenseless migrants. And make no mistake, these are atrocities, not some form of law enforcement or justice. There’s a new report out from the Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General (OIG) and it’s one that every American needs to read. And I hope it makes you feel as sick and embarrassed as it made me. 12

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The first thing that hit me when reading it was the dehumanizing titles we have given to these people from south of our border. The report transforms children into “unaccompanied alien children.” Families become “units.” This moniker tweaking is no small thing. It’s how we have always coped with the horrors of war. That’s to say it’s easier to justify abusing, torturing and killing someone when we turn them into “Gooks,” “Krauts,” “Japs,” “Ragheads” or anything other than

ming 155 people into a hot cell made to hold 35 people tops. Making alien units survive in standing room only cages with a single toilet seems more acceptable somehow than the same mistreatment would be for men and women just like us. It is truly government-authored wartime propaganda. At just one Border Patrol facility in El Paso, the OIG found a cell with a maximum capacity of 12 holding 76 people. Another cell built for 8 was housing 41. During a surprise inspecCOURTESY OF OIG

MIGRANT WOMEN are being held in cells so overcrowded they can’t lay down to sleep. And they are forced to wear the same soiled clothes for weeks at a time in some cases.

the men, women, children, fathers, mothers, sons and daughters they are, people who just happen to have been born in

another country. It’s now clear that this administration has declared a war of sorts on the families and individuals crossing our southern border — hence our need to transform needy migrants seeking refuge and opportunity into illegals, units, aliens, rapists, gang members and drug dealers. Otherwise it would be far more difficult to do the hideous things the OIG report says we are doing — like cramJUNE 6, 2019

tion on May 8, the OIG found 900 migrants in a facility with a maximum capacity of 125. Inspectors reported seeing people standing on the cell toilets on multiple occasions in an effort to get enough air to breath above the shoulder-to-shoulder crowding that filled the cell. Inspectors found that women in detention had become overwhelmed by being forced to wear terribly soiled clothes for weeks at a time with no access to anything clean to put on. One reason for this, according to the report; all the personal belongings of those being held, including suitcases full of clothes they had carried from their home countries to the border, had been taken from them by Border Patrol and thrown away in dumpsters. Border Patrol even threw away the I

stuffed toys migrant children had clung to for thousands of miles as they walked toward what they thought would be their new life. Healthy people begged the OIG inspectors to let them sit in the halls away from the sick people who had been placed in their cells, exposing everyone to who knows what from who knows where. Detainees complained to inspectors the temperature in their cells was suffocating and there was no space for anyone to lay down to sleep. Can you imagine trying to sleep standing up or at best sitting shoulder to shoulder for days or even weeks at a time — all the while wondering if your loved ones are OK or being subjected to a similar fate? We now know children have been made to spend the night sitting in vans — some being stuck in vehicles for up to 39 hours. At Border Patrol holding facilities, unaccompanied children are being forced to sleep directly on concrete slabs. No human being should ever be forced to experience such conditions or bear such memories. OIG inspectors warn that due to this inhumane treatment it is only a matter of time until a violent eruption occurs at one of these facilities. People simply cannot be expected to exist calmly under such conditions, especially people who have committed no crime, coming to the U.S. legally to seek asylum. For its part, the Border Patrol claims that the long-term internment of these refugees, many from Central American countries torn apart by extreme poverty, gang violence and government corruption, is the responsibility of the Department of Homeland Security. Border Patrol agents told the OIG that they call and request placement for their overflow of detainees several times a day. But Homeland Security simply tells them they have no room. This is what happens when the greatest nation on Earth is being guided by the most inept administration in possibly its entire history. Make no mistake: What is transpiring at the border is nothing short of torture. It is rooted in racism and it is wrong legally and morally. Can you imagine the United States putting thousands of Australian, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


British, Norwegian and Irish immigrants into such conditions? Would our government ever take white children from their parents and lock them in cages, quite possibly causing some families to become separated forever and even causing some of those children to die alone? Can you honestly envision that at any point in this century we would cage white families in this way, intentionally packing sick people along with the healthy into hot, literally standing-room-only cells without enough air to breath? Cages where a hundred people share one toilet with no privacy? Cells where there is no way to lay down to sleep and people are forced to wear soiled clothing for days even weeks at a time? And would we ever do this to white families knowing that they had not committed a single crime? I can’t imagine that, and I doubt you can either because it would never happen. But that is exactly what our government is doing in our name at the southern border — to brown people — at this very moment. And we are letting it happen because we have allowed government and conservative media propaganda to cause us to view these people as subhuman, as aliens, illegals, rapists, drug dealers and MS-13 members. How else can you explain why the majority of the citizens in this country are willing to just sit back in silence and allow these people to be intentionally tortured? Oh, maybe we occasionally declare what a shame it is or say how sorry we are for those poor families, but we stop short of getting in our cars, driving south and demanding that the torture, abuse and deaths be stopped. We should be descending on Washington, forcing Congress to take immediate action to end these conditions. And we should be holding the people in charge of this inhumane system of torture accountable, demanding those responsible be prosecuted for their actions, including manslaughter when people die. That’s what we should be doing. Focusing on the 2020 election as a solution is an impotent and irresponsible approach to the current crises of intentional abuse unfolding at this very moment. I’m not naïve. I understand this is a complicated issue. In the past nine BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

months, 98,052 people have been apprehended illegally crossing the border or turning themselves in for asylum in the Border Patrol’s El Paso sector alone. That’s compared to just 13,646 for the same period a year earlier. But unlike what politicians so often claim, we don’t have to choose between open borders and torture. We are the world’s wealthiest nation. We take in trillions of dollars in tax revenue every year. Donald Trump spends half his weekends golfing at his Mar-a-Lago property in Florida and it costs us $3.4 million every weekend he spends down there. If we can find tens if not hundreds of millions of dollars for the president’s golf outings then we can surely find the money to create an immigration system capable of properly and humanely handling all the people who want to come here to add their success story to our nation’s rich history of immigrant contributions. And until that system is in place, we have no choice but to let innocent asylum seekers — people who came here legally — roam freely in our country until they have a lawful hearing on their status. That is what our laws call for. That is what everyone who has even a small grasp of what this nation stands for should be calling for. Breaking up families and otherwise torturing innocent and vulnerable people in an effort to dissuade others from coming here is as unAmerican an act as I have ever witnessed in my lifetime. It makes a mockery of American exceptionalism and it is an embarrassing stain on our nation that history can never remove. Democracy cannot exist let alone flourish in a country that no longer believes in equality and freedom for all. We are watching the death of the great American experiment, and ironically, it’s being killed by people who hide their hate and bigotry behind our nation’s flag and other trappings of patriotism. We didn’t spill the blood of our brave soldiers storming the beaches of Normandy 75 years ago so that one day, we too could become a nation that tortures innocent families because of their race. We have to be better than that. I

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ALL PHOTOS BY MORGANA WINGARD/GLOBAL FUND ADVOCATES NETWORK

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oyce Maturu found out she was infected with both HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) in 2004 when she was just 12 years old and living in the Shamva Province in northern Zimbabwe. Two years earlier, her mother and younger brother passed away in the same week from the same diseases. Being diagnosed “was really devastating for me because at that time a lot of people were dying due to AIDSrelated illnesses,” she says. “And psychologically I wasn’t well because of the stigma related to these diseases.” It was the height of the global AIDS epidemic, with a reported 33 million people living with HIV and at least 14 million people having died from AIDS at the turn of the century. Maturu experienced both verbal abuse and ostracization from her family due to the intense stigma associated with HIV, stigma that is especially difficult for young girls, she says. Promiscuity is assumed, she says, and there are plenty of misconceptions surrounding the transmission of the disease. When Maturu was diagnosed, “A lot of people were dying and there was a misconception that if you sit next to someone who’s got HIV or if you eat in the same plate you’d contract HIV,” she says. “When people think that you’re HIV positive, they just think that you’re going to die. They don’t think that you’re going to survive.” There were posters around of “skeleton people” with the disease, based on the assumption that infec-

The story with millions of faces

Advocates urge Sen. Gardner to renew U.S. commitment to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

by Angela K. Evans

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tion ultimately leads to death, she says. If people were losing weight or coughing a lot, they just looked like they had AIDS, she adds, and that lead to further stigmatization. The stigma, “made me feel that I was not worthy living in this world,” says Maturu, who at one point attempted suicide. “Stigma is really the biggest barrier.” But she was connected to the Africaid Zvandiri Programme, a community organization that supports young people in Zimbabwe living with HIV. Maturu was able to get counseling and treatment, completing TB medications and receiving antiretroviral therapy for HIV, which she still takes every day. She also met other young people like her, peers facing the same stigma she was. She soon learned the treatment and support was all thanks to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund), widely recognized as a successful and unique JUNE 6, 2019

global partnership between governments, the private sector, civil society and people affected by the diseases — people like Maturu. “I told myself that I want to share my story and the impact that the Global Fund has meant and also share the stories of my peers who are also living with HIV,” she says. “So that the world can understand how these diseases actually affect people around the world so that we can have better interventions to support adolescents and young people.” Maturu was on a tour of the Mountain West in late May, her first time in the region, sharing her story, advocating on behalf of the Global Fund and urging lawmakers to support funding efforts in Congress. Since its founding in 2002, the Global Fund reports having saved 27 million lives, with a 37 percent decline in TB deaths, a 60 percent decline in malaria deaths and cutting AIDS-related deaths in half I

since the peak in 2005. Since its inception, the organization has asked donor countries to replenish the fund every three years, the last time in 2016. With the 6th Replenishment Conference hosted by France coming up in October, the Global Fund is asking for $14 billion in new investments, including $4.7 or so from the U.S. For the past 17 years, the U.S. has consistently pledged a third of the financing for the Global Fund. There is uncertainty this year, however, says Amanda Beals, global grassroots expansion manager at the anti-poverty campaign RESULTS based in Washington D.C, and who was traveling with Maturu. The Trump administration’s proposed budget cuts funding for global development programs by 33 percent, something he has done each year since taking office. While Congress has been restoring those cuts over the last few years, it’s the administration who has to make the replenishment commitment to the Global Fund in October. “What we’re really asking right now is that the U.S. show that leadership going into the replenishment conference,” Beals says. “What we do determines what other countries do too. So if we step back our support, that’ll have a domino effect.” The funding from donor governments over the next three years comes with the potential for significant results: cut the projected deaths related to the three diseases in half, prevent 234 million cases of the diseases and save some 16 milBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


LEFT PAGE: Loyce Maturu is a peer Counselor for other young people living with HIV. THIS PAGE: Loyce Maturu prepares her weekly pill box of antiretroviral treatment at her home in Zimbabwe.

lion lives by 2023. Through cofinancing commitments, the $14 billion also has the potential to unlock $46 billion in additional funding from the countries most affected by these epidemics. The new cycle of financing is critical, according to Maturu and Beals. There is no middle-ground, they say. The effort to combat these diseases either moves forward, as the world continues to fund prevention and treatment programs, or it regresses, allowing new infections to skyrocket and the diseases to spread. “We need to sustain our gains that we have done over the past years and if we limit the funding,” Maturu says, “it means a lot of people are going to die because there isn’t that much access to antiretroviral therapy because we depend on the Global Fund money for us to procure the HIV, tuberculosis and malaria medication.” As of 2017, more than half the people with HIV around the world are on antiretroviral therapy, according to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). It’s a huge increase over the last decade — 21.7 million people using antiretroviral therapy in 2017 compared to 8 million in 2010. TB is the leading fatal infectious disease in the world, killing roughly 4,400 people each day, according to UNAIDS. What’s more, TB accounts for one in three AIDS related deaths, making it the leading cause of death for people with HIV. Almost half of people living with both HIV and TB aren’t even aware of the coinfection, let alone receiving treatment, according to UNAIDS. “There’s no other partnership like [the Global Fund], working on fighting these diseases. It brings all of those partners and people together BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

to pool our resources to support governments, to put power in the hands of the people who are experiencing these diseases,” Beals says. “Taking funding away from this partnership would have devastating consequences.” A recently published study from Georgetown University shows that countries with Global Fund financing demonstrate better governance, including more accountability when it comes to corruption and the rule of law. Investment is also linked to “improved adult mortality and overall development,” according to the research, which includes data from 112 countries over the course of 15 years. The study specifically cites the I

Global Fund’s structure, which not only requires cooperation from a wide variety of international, national and local participants, but also builds in high levels of transparency and accountability. It’s not all good news, however. Global cases of malaria are on the rise, as resistance to drugs and insecticides is making it difficult to keep the diseases in check. What’s more, at the International AIDS conference in Amsterdam last July, officials from UNAIDS said reaching the goal to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030 is threatened. There were 1.8 million new HIV infections in 2017, with 50 countries seeing a rise in new infections. There are persistent challenges JUNE 6, 2019

to prevention efforts, according to UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé, including a lack of comprehensive sexuality education, access to prevention services and the criminalization of certain behaviors for religious or cultural reasons. “Health is a human rights imperative and we are deeply concerned about the lack of political commitment and the failure to invest in proven HIV programmes, particularly for young people and key populations,” Sidibé said in a press statement. “If countries think they can treat their way out of their epidemics, they are dangerously mistaken.” Still, many are hopeful that international and cooperative financing from the Global Fund can continue to change the course of the fight against HIV/AIDS. Bill Gates has said, “The Global Fund is one of the best and kindest things people have ever done for one another. It is a fantastic vehicle for scaling up the treatments and preventive tools we have today — to make sure they reach the people who need them,” according to RESULTS. Gates also recently touted the organization in the Wall Street Journal for its ability to grow and adapt its strategies to the challenges it faces. In the face of insecticide resistance, for example, the Global Fund now tracks what type of mosquitos transmit malaria and where in order to deliver nets treated with the right insecticides. While the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has given billions to HIV/AIDS prevention programs, Gates writes that private investment will not be enough, as the lion’s share of funding still comes from governments. If even a few of the funding countries, including the U.S., pull see AIDS Page 16

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AIDS from Page 15

funding, it could lead to world-wide resurgence of the diseases, Gates says. There has long been bipartisan support in Congress for the Global Fund. Last October, 18 senators sent Secretary of State Mike Pompeo a letter, asking the Trump administration to make an early replenishment commitment, based on the “impressive results” and “concrete progress” the fund has had in saving lives. It acknowledges the leverage the U.S. commitment has had in eliciting global health funding from other donors and countries, as well as the role of combatting these infectious diseases in national security and international trade. The letter was sent with bipartisan support, signed by senators from both sides of the aisle — Elizabeth Warren along with Lindsay Graham, Cory Booker as well as Marco Rubio. Colorado Senator Michael Bennet also signed on, although Cory Gardner did not. Maturu, Beals and other volunteers from RESULTS met with members of Gardner’s staff while in Colorado, hoping to plead their case and encourage the senator to use his position as a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and his influence in the Republican Party to push the issue. “They seem very open to the issue,” Beals says about Gardner’s staff. “They seem to really understand why this matters here locally and in the D.C. office. The problem has been getting them to prioritize it and take the actions that they need to in order to make a difference and use that leadership.” Gardner’s office did not respond to BW’s requests for comment. For Maturu, financing from the Global Fund not only saved her life, she says, but is essential to the work 16

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MATURU advocates she continues for the Global Fund to to do helping ensure that people livothers affecting with HIV have the same access to care ed by the disand support she eases. In received. 2009, she returned to Africaid, this time as a peer counselor, providing support for children and young people living with HIV, which includes helping educate parents, relatives and other caregivers about treatment, as well as helping destigmatize the disease. The lack of education about the diseases, often prevents people from receiving the necessary treatment, Maturu says. Around the turn of the century, UNAIDS negotiated with pharmaceutical companies to significantly reduce antiretroviral drug prices for developing countries. For people living with HIV, antiretroviral therapy, a combination of drugs taken every day, can reduce the amount of HIV in a person’s blood to almost undetectable amounts, allowing them to live healthy, longer lives and effectively getting rid of the risk of transmission. The Global Fund has helped countries procure these live-saving treatments, Maturu says, making it essential in the global fight against HIV/AIDS. Along with her work in her home country, Maturu also travels the world, speaking with local communities and government officials, advocating on behalf of the Global Fund, ensuring that the people in her community and around the world living with HIV have the same access to care and support she has received. “Now I’m working, supporting and giving back to the community the same way I was supported,” Maturu says. “My story is not the only one.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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was noticing recently how loud the birds are,” says local poet Samantha Albala. “And I don’t know if that means that they’re just more birds here than usual or I just had missed them in the winter. But it’s good to notice these small things and writing about them helps people notice their relevance or significance.” Poetry is naturally a product of keen observation. It has the power to evoke both emotion and response, putting words to our internal desires, human relationships, social dynamics and the natural world — or a crosssection of it all. Poetry becomes all the more powerful when addressing threats to the very existence of the world as we know it, say, for example, the reality of climate change. “I think it’s really hard for us (poets) not to write about it,” Albala says. “I think anyone that feels able to talk about it should however they can, whether it’s writing or performing or even just sharing it with a friend. I think that has a huge impact.” As such, ecopoetics is a growing genre of poetry, rising out of the late 20th century as a response to impending environmental disaster. It also has somewhat of a legacy in Boulder, says Marcus If, chairperson of the local Beyond Academia Free Skool (BAFS). Some of the first eco-literature classes were taught at Naropa University by the late professor and poet Jack Collom. (If was in Collom’s first eco-lit class in 1989.) Combine that with the tradition of poets like Allen Ginsberg and Ed Sanders, who employed investigative poetics in their work, and you get what BAFS calls “Ecopoetic Activism.” (If describes investigative poetics as “going in and finding out what is the actual issue and [putting] these facts in versified form so maybe they’re easier to ingest by some audiences.”)

ty of our lifestyles, and poetry can really zero in on that emotion,” she says. And BAFS’ workshops in ecopoetic activism are about “using the whole toolbox from physical description to impassioned politics and figuring out where your work lies on that scope,” she says. The hope of the workshops, according to If and Rodriguez, isn’t to add more fuel to the fire, inciting more division in the growing polarization of society. Rather, it’s rooted in the belief that poetry can be a source of unity. “Poetry is a really natural way to circumvent dichotomous thinking. A big part of this political rhetoric is either/or, it’s us or them,” Rodriguez says. “I think through poetics we’re able to say why not both? Why not all of us?” The theme of ecopoetic activism will continue at the annual BAFS poetry camp in July, focusing on a wide range of poets and issues that fall under the title of “Outlaw Poetics/Literary Activism.” After all, it’s what being a poet is all about. “The way I look at it is poets are the therapists of culture and when culture is broken, it’s the job of poets to fix it,” If says. “I’ll take it one step down from Plato. I don’t want to put the poets in charge. We wouldn’t want the job, but I do believe that we should be running our mouths as loud as possible and potentially with the same amount of spin that the politicians are using in order to equalize the issues. We have a responsibility to do that.” Ecopoetic Activism Part 11 will take place at 2 p.m. on Sunday, June 9 at the Boulder Library. BAFS summer poetry camp is July 5-19 at the Love Shovel Ranch in Nederland. For more information visit loveshovelranch.com/bafs/

What power poets hold

Beyond Academia Free Skool revisits ecopoetics in the face of environmental disaster by Angela K. Evans

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Ecopoetic Activism is the latest topic of BAFS’ free monthly Second Sunday poetry workshops at the Boulder Library, hosted with support from the Boulder County Arts Alliance. Founded in 2012, BAFS focuses on what If calls “multidimensional poetics” incorporating academic poetry, slam poetry and everything in-between, and the monthly workshops cover a variety of topics and techniques. For May and June this year, If says the reality of climate change held a certain level of urgency for him, as he watched Greta Thunberg and other kids around the world speaking with world leaders and demonstrating on behalf of the planet. “The idea of ecopoetics is naturally hot in Boulder and it’s a thing that as poets, we are always talking about,” If says. “But I think it’s again time for us to examine just what that role is and what power we hold.” Poetry can become a tool in addressing the issue in a way that draws people in, adds Sarah Rodriguez, BAFS board member and teacher. Even something as seemingly simple as describing the natural world without bias, can lead people to both an emotional response and ultimately some sort of action. “People feel emotionally about our environment, about the way the world is going, about the sustainabiliI

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THE NAME

THE DAIRY’S POLLY ADDISON GALLERY HANGS THE ART OF ITS NAMESAKE, SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE PERSON BEHIND THE ART

ON THE WALL by Amanda Moutinho

A

‘CLIMBING THE MAIDEN,’ BY POLLY ADDISON

s a local artist, an alumna of the University of Colorado and a former board member in the budding days of the Dairy Arts Center, there is a lot to celebrate about Polly Addison. She has a gallery named after her in the Dairy, but who is Polly Addison? Curator Jennifer Kooiman Parker thinks it’s high time people know. A small but moving collection of Addison’s artwork — pastels, pencil drawings, oil paintings and more — are on display through June 16 in The Unknown Polly Addison, displayed in Addison’s namkesake gallery. Addison no longer creates art, but in her work, she drew inspiration from her family life as well as life in Boulder, depicting places including the Flatirons and Pearl Street Mall. The exhibit serves as a small look into the life of an unsung artist who has left a lasting imprint. The catalyst for the exhibit came through a discussion between Kooiman Parker and Jennifer Heath, chair and co-curator of A History of Visual Art in Boulder (HOVAB). Starting in 2014, Heath and others put together a comprehensive show throughout Boulder and Longmont celebrating local artists, including Addison. Kooiman Parker says she was very interested in having the opportunity to create an exhibit as a way to honor Addison, who began displaying signs of Alzheimer’s in 2011. “The idea to showcase an artist’s work in their namesake gallery, to me, sounded really amazing,” Kooiman Parker says. “She wasn’t just a gifted artist; she was also extremely essential to the growth of the Dairy and supporting artists. She curated several exhibits; she put together fundraisers — she was creative in a lot of ways [prior to the disease].” Along with putting together the exhibit, Kooiman Parker created an accompanying catalog. She felt that displaying the artwork wasn’t enough to tell Addison’s story. Kooiman Parker see ADDISON Page 22

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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ADDISON from Page 21 ‘MOTHER WITH HER FATHER, HUSBAND, AND SONS,’ BY POLLY ADDISON

reached out to a dozen of Addison’s friends, colleagues and former professors. In the catalog, folks share stories of Addison’s warmth, intelligence, humor, generosity and talent. By reaching out to collect testimonials, Kooiman Parker also unearthed more of Addison’s art. “This has been a discovery process, which is fun. I was uncovering all these people who admire her so much,” she says. “It was like all these pieces of a puzzle coming together to form just a glimpse of who Polly is.” Foremost, the show commemorates Addison as an artist, displaying a sampling of the work she created in the ’80s. Her art career began back in the 1950s when she earned a bachelor’s of fine art from the University of ColoradoBoulder. She went on to have five children and devote her time to being a full-time mother. A few decades later, in 1980, she went back to art school at CU. “She decided she was going to be a very serious artist, and she became very well equipped. She had her own studio and everything you could imagine,” says Mark Addison, Polly’s husband. “She was picking up the life of the artist. That was her goal.” The art in the Dairy’s exhibit shows Addison’s diverse style from pencil drawings playing with positive and negative space to pastel portraits, oil paintings and sketches. “I find her art very perplexing in a lot of ways,” Kooiman Parker says. “It’s technically done well. The composition and the choices that she makes are really interesting. It’s been making me think about my art history classes, because there’s these decisions that she has made and you’re trying to figure out why she’s has done it that way.” Kooiman Parker points to a painting Addison made of her mother. Her mother was 74 at the time, but didn’t like the original because it made her look “too old.” So Addison made another. This time she painted her mother much younger, surrounded by her mother’s father, husband and sons, all middle-aged. “There’s a lot to unpack. It gives a sense of her mother being ageless in some way,” Kooiman Parker says. “These men in her life that are admiring her, and they’re are aging but her mother is almost having this superpower. You can make a lot of assumptions.” For the last picture in the set, Addison painted her mother as a little girl holding a fish at a lake. Behind her is a cast of men in suits admiring the little girl and looking directly at the audience. Entitled “My Pets,” it captures the story of her mother’s whole life, rather than merely a snapshot of one moment in time. During this creative period, Addison was exploratory with her style and mediums. She approached art with a playful attitude that never lacked depth. “I don’t exactly know what her impetus was,” Mark Addison says. “She did a lot of different stuff. What she was really good at was taking different images and rearranging them, like in [‘My Pets’]. … That was probably one of the things most interesting about her work is that she could make compositions out of many different elements.” 22

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COURTESY OF JENNIFER KOOIMAN PARKER

Frequently, Addison drew inspiration from her surroundings but created something new and interesting. In the catalog, Jennifer Heath admires what she calls Addison’s “alchemical” wit. “Magic can’t happen without love, and it certainly can’t happen without humor… ‘Climbing the Maiden,’ Polly told me, relates to one of her five children’s favorite activities, scrambling up and down the miraculous ‘Maiden’ formation in Boulder’s Flatirons,” Heath wrote. “Again, it is a work embedded with family and memory, sly and cleverly imagined.” Unfortunately, Addison’s artistic career was short lived. “Her career only lasted about five years,” Mark Addison says. “She did produce a paramount of stuff. ... She went through a lot of different media and was great at all of them. But for whatever reason she decided she wasn’t good enough, and she stopped.” But Addison’s love of art continued in other ways. She JUNE 6, 2019

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and Mark curated a sizable art collection in their home. Mark Addison says Polly would give tours and would frequently end up showing her art to friends and explaining her processes. Moreover, Addison went on to become an essential figure in the first few years of the Dairy, which opened in 1992. Through the mid’90s to the early ’00s, Addison did what she could to help the burgeoning art space. Throughout the catalog, many former Dairy employees praise Addison’s efforts, saying that the Dairy wouldn’t have survived without her. “She was active on the board, and her role was varied,” Kooiman Parker says. “Like, ‘Oh, we couldn’t pay our water bill this month,’ and she would pay it. She was known for things like that.” Former Dairy board member and friend Deborah Malden tells a story in the catalog that encapsulates Addison’s attitude. “A few months into our board term, I found Polly outside the Dairy picking up cigarette butts and other trash,” Malden wrote. “I asked Polly what she was doing. After all, the Dairy had paid staff who surely could help keep the place clean. Polly shared that, ‘If board members failed to treat the Dairy as we would our own homes, how could we expect the rest of the community to support it?’” Addison also curated a few exhibits, including one about the internet. “Some of the shows she curated were really cutting edge,” Kooiman Park says. “Net Art was all based on work created about the internet, and this was in 2003, fairly early for technological art to be highlighted. I think that’s really telling about her and her character and how contemporary she was.” For decades, Addison has been an integral member of the Boulder art scene. While the exhibit serves to thank Polly, it has also added to her well-being. Addison and her family attended the opening reception on April 26, and Mark Addison says he continues to see the positive effect it had. “It was a big deal for her,” he says. “And it has carried over to some degree. She remembers there was a show and that she made the art and all the people who attended. I think it was very good for her.” It’s been a mutually beneficial experience for the Dairy as well. “For me it’s being able to honor her and tell her story,” Kooiman Parker says. “She is a really incredible person with a lot of history. ... This just scratches the surface. “It’s important to hear these stories to understand her and showcase how strong her small contributions and dedications really were, and to show the bigger picture of her as a mother and a daughter, as an artist, as a partner to Mark, as a philanthropist,” she continues. “Now when people see work in the Polly Addison, they can say that the know who she is.” Top: A painting of Polly Addison’s mother Bottom: Polly Addison talks with guests at the opening reception of ‘The Unknown Polly Addison.’

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


WILLY LUKAITIS

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f we are what we read, then Nick Murphy is a soul on a journey — a shaman in training. Like most voracious readers, the Australian singersongwriter and multi-instrumentalist (formerly known as Chet Faker, but we’ll get to that later) likes to juggle several books at once. Anna Karenina was a surprisingly quick read, he says, and he’s almost finished. But it’s slower going with some other works he’s got on rotation. Like Robert Henri’s The Art Spirit. Henri saw creativity as a collective, timeless undertaking, with each artist building upon that which came before them and, likewise, leaving their mark. (“...as stones for step[ping] on or stones to avoid,” Henri wrote.) Murphy’s also reading Dylan Thomas’ Death and Entrances, a beloved poetic study of London’s trauma

Dancing with the chaos Soul-searching with Nick Murphy

by Caitlin Rockett

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

in the aftermath of World War II that at points finds Thomas anxiously wondering how his art can help. But it was Joseph Campbell’s work on mythology and the role of the artist in society that sent Murphy down a path of self-reflection over the past few years and helped him flesh out what would become his first full-length collection of music in five years, Run Fast Sleep Naked. “Once you read Joseph Campbell, you never really look at the world the same way again,” Murphy says. Run Fast Sleep Naked is a product of Murphy’s globe-trotting, with bits and pieces recorded on the fly wherever Murphy happened to be, whether that I

was in a hotel in Tokyo or in his grandmother’s living room in Melbourne. It’s a soothing record full of texture and warmth, lush with orchestral flourishes but never overwrought. It’s the next step in a subtle sound evolution for Murphy: softer than the electro-rock of his 2017 EP Missing Link, and less R&B driven than his 2014 record Built on Glass, while still feeling and sounding like a natural product of Murphy’s mind. Murphy dives deep into his psyche for the lyrical content but never loses sight of universal truths. He opens the album with a “manifesto” on “Hear it Now”: I’m not made of stone/I was put here with a bleeding heart / To help somebody else’s start “That’s literally what I do and who I see MURPHY Page 26

JUNE 6, 2019

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MURPHY from Page 25

am,” Murphy says. “I could put that on my forehead. That’s why I’m alive. That’s just how it is.” The song is as close to a political statement as Murphy is likely to make: I seen a generation come/Putting flowers in my ears/They made us fight amongst ourselves/It’s OK to hate your fear “It depends on your definition of political,” Murphy says. “I think politics is kind of a keyhole of a much, much bigger picture, which is just your attitude towards individuals and other human beings.” He shifts back to philosophy. “In an essay concerning spirituality in art, Kandinsky wrote that the artist is the spiritual guide of the masters. And Joseph Campbell said that artists are the new mythmakers, or the shamans. Kurt Vonnegut had this whole theory about the role of the artist in society, the canary in the coal mine, which is to say artists are far more sensitive, they let you know bad times are coming. So I don’t think that it’s about so much about needing to have political stances [in art] as it is just saying how you’re feeling at any point. Artists are the open wound of society, the extended finger, the antenna.” Murphy grapples with this role because, frankly, being sensitive is hard. It’s not his job he struggles with — music is natural — but with how the world wants him to produce that music. Society wants art, but Murphy, like countless artists before him, wonders if people under26

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stand the emotional work it takes to make the art. “The artist’s role is to go into the unknown and bring something back,” he says. “But what does someone going into the unknown look like? They look crazy.” He tackles this disconnect — the need for art and the distaste for what it takes to create it — in the song “Sanity.” He presents it both lyrically and visually in a fever-dream of a video directed by London-based, Swedish-born co-directors BabyBaby. A couple of years ago, Murphy decided to drop his stage name — Chet Faker, an homage to his love for jazz trumpeter Chet Baker — and release music under his birth name. He’s certainly not the first to have made such a move mid-career (Cat Stevens, Puff Daddy, Snoop Dogg), but it elicited the usual questions: What prompted the change? Was this “new” Murphy the real Murphy? Murphy shrugs it all off. It was just time. And Kurt Vonnegut, he points out, once went by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. for the exact same reason Murphy took up a stage name: someone else was doing the same job with the same name. But Murphy would be lying if he didn’t admit to feeling self-conscious through some of the process. “I changed my name and I started working on new things and pushing in new directions and I experienced a lot of I

resistance,” he says. “The resistance was new because from the beginning everyone kind of loved what I was doing. So there was a lot of friction for me, to experience people not wanting you to explore the unknown, even though it’s my job.” While it’s tough to carve out time for other artistic-self-care-intellectual endeavors while he’s committed to his journey with music, Murphy manages to find time for — and solace in — photography. The cover art for Run Fast Sleep Naked is a self portrait Murphy took in the Northern Sahara in Marrakesh, Moracco. Just a man running shoeless... in a suit... in the desert. “Photography for me is one of the few art forms where you can be faithful, introspective, but still connect directly with the world,” Murphy says. “Because music, at least for me, can often take me away from the external — and I love that. But I have a love-hate relationship with the external world. I think my gut instincts are to move towards sort of shutting that stuff out. But the older I get the more I realize that’s really not an option and you need to dance with the chaos.” ON THE BILL: Nick Murphy (fka Chet Faker) — with Beacon. 8 p.m. Friday, June 21, Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave, Denver. Tickets are $31-$33, axs.com

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Beethoven’s path to the future

ON THE BILL: The full summer schedule and ticket information for the 2019 Colorado Music Festival may be found at coloradomusicfestival. org/festival/

Peter Oundjian wants Colorado Music Festival to be dynamic, exciting, ‘a celebration’

by Peter Alexander

V

DALE WILCOX

iolinist/conductor Peter Oundjian served as artistic advisor of the Colorado Music Festival (CMF) for the 2018 season, a position halfway between giving advice and being responsible for the season’s programming. He conducted three of the six weeks of orchestral concerts and invited some of the guest artists, in a season that featured works by American composers. Now, he has been appointed the CMF’s fourth-ever music director, making 2019, in a way, “his” festival. “I guess you’re right,” he says thoughtfully about that observation, and then goes on to talk in general terms about what he would like CMF to be under his direction. “A festival should be a celebration,” he says. “I want it to be really dynamic, really exciting, with artists from all over the world, making concerts really appealing and building larger audiences.” He is still conducting about half of the orchestral concerts, but he has shaped the programming of the entire 2019 festival and given the orchestra series an explicit theme. In anticipation of the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth in 2020, the 2019 season is an exploration of Beethoven’s influence on music that came after him, from the 19th through the 20th centuries. If Beethoven seems a conventional starting point for a classical music festival, Oundjian doesn’t deny it, but he is quick to point out, “There’s not much Beethoven on the program! The subject is Beethoven, but it’s

Beethoven’s path to the future.” That means that programs will feature music reflecting the ways Beethoven’s music pointed to later styles. For example, the opening night concert, titled “Beethoven’s Path to Romanticism,” features Beethoven’s Overture to Egmont, followed by stylistically Romantic works that were influenced by Beethoven’s example: Verdi’s Overture to La Forza del destino, Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto with pianist Natasha Paremski, and Respighi’s Pini di Roma (Pines of Rome). Other orchestral concerts have similar design: a work by Beethoven sharing the program with works reflecting Beethoven’s influence. “Beethoven’s Path to Modernism” on June 30 features the Grosse fuge (Great fugue) for string quartet, a work so in advance of its time that Stravinsky once said it would always be modern, alongside works by Berlioz, Mendelssohn and Richard Strauss. On July 14, “Beethoven’s Path to Neo-Classicism” will feature the Haydn-esque Symphony No. 1 on the same program with early 20th-century neo-classical works by Stravinsky and Prokofiev. And “Beethoven’s Path to Minimalism” on Aug. 1 pairs the “Pastoral” Symphony with Philip Glass’ Violin Concerto No. 1 from 1987, played by Robert McDuffie. “The whole idea,” Oundjian says, is to ask “was Beethoven actually a classical composer? What is he? I

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think that if you assume that people aren’t prepared to challenge their imaginations, you’re letting them down in a way. Give people an opportunity to see underneath the surface of things.” The theme of Beethoven’s influence is found outside the concerts that have “Beethoven’s Path” in the title. “We’re doing a lot of pieces that are related to Beethoven,” he says, listing Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique, written only three years after Beethoven’s death, on a concert to be performed twice July 25 and 26; and Mahler’s Third Symphony, the last movement of which reflects Beethoven’s final string quartet, on the Festival Finale concert Aug. 3. Oundjian’s other theme is, if anything, more conventional than Beethoven’s ongoing influence. “We’ve also started a mini-Mozart festival,” he says. “I did a lot of different festivals in Toronto, and people would come to the new creations festival, and they would come to the Mozart festival and they would love both. So it’s a balance. “I don’t deny the programming is little bit safer than last year, and than it will be going forward. This season is about consolidating things and preparing for next season that’s going to be much more daring. We’ll have a mini-festival of living composers within the festival, starting in 2020.” In other words, Oundjian doesn’t want people to judge his vision of the CMF from this one season. “People love to reach conclusions without full evaluation,” he says. “[We will be] getting new works commissioned, dedicating ourselves to new music, particularly from the U.S.” Beyond that, he won’t — or can’t — tell you what the future will bring. “I never like to be rigid about visions,” he says. “Each season has a new vision, and you plan a season a year and a half ahead. I don’t know in two years what I will want to do a year and a half after that! ”When somebody says ‘What is your goal for the next five years?’ I say, ‘I’m not telling you!’ I don’t even know myself yet.”

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THE PRESSED FEST. JUNE 8-9, THOMPSON PARK, 420 BROSS ST., LONGMONT, 970-765-6170.

Hard cider is making a comeback in the U.S. Taste what all the fuss is about at The Pressed Fest. Grab an unlimited tasting pass and sample some of Colorado’s best craft ciders, enjoy games and a bite to eat from local food trucks. TICKETS ARE $30, VISITLONGMONT.ORG

see EVENTS Page 32

events BASH ON BOURBON STREET.

6:30 p.m. Friday, June 7, Lionsgate Event Center, 1055 S. 112th St., Lafayette, 303-652-3663. KEN30684 - FLICKR

Gather with your neighbors and Community Food Share for a night of dinner, dancing, cocktails, jazz music, tarot card readings and a silent auction, all accompanied by a live performance from the Royal Street Ramblers. This benefit aims to bring awareness to hunger within the community while giving attendees the opportunity to provide food to those in need. Help Community Food Share hosts a night of jazzy excitement to support its mission to eliminate hunger in Boulder and Broomfield counties. Formal attire is recommended. Admission tickets are $125. —Lauren Hamko BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

LIVE ETOWN RADIO SHOW TAPING — WITH CITIZEN COPE AND ANNA TIVEL. 7 p.m. Friday, June 7, eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696.

In early May, Clearance BULLDOGMEDIA707 Greenwood, aka Citizen Cope, dropped his first album in seven years, ‘Heroine and Helicopters,’ delivering his signature blend of blues, soul and roots, bolstered by sharp, socially aware lyrics. For this iteration of eTown’s live radio show taping, Greenwood will be joined by up-and-coming folk singer/songwriter Anna Tivel, whose quiet, raw songwriting evokes images of the rain-soaked Pacific Northwest she calls home. Don’t miss this intimate evening of music and stories. I

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GIRL PAINTERS WEST FARM TO CANVAS ART SHOW. 2 p.m. Sunday, June 9, Smith Farm, 10261 Arapahoe Ave., Lafayette. FIR0002 VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Girl Painters West is a group of women artists in and around Boulder County who are dedicated to spreading the idea that inspiration can be found everywhere. Their art show, ‘Farm to Canvas,’ features paintings of barns, landscapes, flowers, animals and other aspects of the environment. With a passion for color and with a compassionate lens, Girl Painters West have prepared a vibrant and beautiful show, including refreshments, music and children’s activities. A portion of the proceeds from the event will benefit the Growe Foundation, a group educating children on the benefits of healthy eating and environmental stewardship through gardening. —Lauren Hamko I

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THURSDAY, JUNE 6

DO OUR SOULS know each other before we’re born? Does the universe send us signs through license plate numbers? What’s the acceptable number of napkins to take at Taco Bell? Does God care if I swear? What is God? These are the questions one perplexed woman — Julie Rasmussen — asks after a spontaneous online date leads her on a spiritual odyssey that includes motorcycles, drag queens, psychics, orgasms, aliens, a frozen dead guy and a cow named Helen. Rasmussen will speak about her new book, ‘I Didn’t Believe any of this Hippie Dippy Bulls**t Either: A Skeptic’s Awakening to the Spiritual Universe,’ at 7 p.m. on Saturday, June 8 at Inkberry Books in Niwot.

Open Improv: Long Form. 7 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Expires 7/15/19

Authentic NYC BAGELS in Colorado LAFAYETTE 489 US Highway 287 303.665.5918 LONGMONT Prospect Village 1940 Ionosphere, Ste. D 303.834.8237

GOLDEN on Route 93 303.279.1481 BOULDER at Meadows Shopping Center 303.554.0193

Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver. Peter Marcus — Traveling Towards Daylight. Noon. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Julie Rasmussen — I Didn’t Believe any of this Hippie Dippy Bulls**t Either: A Skeptic’s Awakening to the Spiritual Universe. 7 p.m. Inkberry Books, 7960 Niwot Road, Suite B-3, Niwot.

SUNDAY, JUNE 9 Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver. Rick Reilly — Commander in Cheat. 5 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

MONDAY, JUNE 10

1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, JUNE 11 Kathleen Caster Mace. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. The Living Poets Society Poetry Bookclub Meeting — Bright Dead Things. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater,

Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Blake Crouch — Recursion. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 Kim Roberts — Toward a Secret Sky. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 31

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 *Full line-up & tickets available at

RIVERFRONT CONCER T SERIES A T COMMONS PARK

FREE! 6:00-8:00pm 97.3 KBCO presents

BRETT DENNEN — 06.15

2101 15th Street • Denver, CO 80202

THURSDAY, JUNE 6 Music Boulder Drum Circle. 7 p.m. The Root Kava Bar, 1641 28th St., Boulder, 707-599-1908. Circus No. 9 and Fireside Collective — with Bunch Of Strangers. 7:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side 2637 Welton St., Denver. Cyrille Aimée. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Joe Johnson. 6 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. LittleWolf, Sydney Wright. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Nice Work Jazz — with Heidi Schmidt. 6:30 p.m. St Julien Hotel, 900 Walnut St., Boulder, 720-406-9696. Phamaly 30th Anniversary Concert. 7 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-365-0005.

JACOB JOLLIFF BAND

JUN 15

ZACH HECKENDORF W/ JETT KWONG

Reverend Deadeye. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Talib Kweli. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Tsuruda and Esseks — with GrymeTyme, Kavsko. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

JUN 22

Vocal Journeys Student Concert. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Events

For a full list of all upcoming concerts and events, visit

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swallowhillmusic.org I

A Cappella Summer Camp SVVSD. 10 a.m. Sunset Middle School, 1300 S. Sunset St.,

JUNE 6, 2019

Longmont, 720-365-3080. Through June 7. Second session July 15-19, summeracappella. com. Bear Cubs Camp. 10:30 a.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. BoulderReads New Tutor Orientation. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Brian Posehn. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through June 8. Craft Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-4413100. Garden Work Hour. 5 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Open Mic with Tony Crank. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Amoramora and Pickin’ On Hippies — A Bluegrass Tribute to Phish, Panic, Allmans, moe., Dead and more — with Ruby Hill, Shovelin Stone. 8 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Bash on Bourbon Street. 6:30 p.m. Lionsgate Event Center, 1055 S. 112th St., Lafayette, 303-652-3663. Billy Shaddox. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Born To Run Live — Bruce Springsteen Tribute. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Crystal Swing Band. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Espresso! Gypsy Jazz & Swing. 5:30 p.m. Cheese Importers, 103 Main St., Longmont, 303-875-7514. Guilty Pleasures. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Boulder. 7 p.m. 2132 14th St., Boulder.

Heavy Diamond Ring. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

Spirit Nia Dance. 9 a.m. Unity of Boulder, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411.

Joey DeFrancesco Trio — with Billy Hart & Troy Roberts. 6:30 p.m. Dazzle at Baur’s, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5100.

Aerial Summer Camps (ages 12-18, ages 8-11). 9 a.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E. Sterling Circle, Suite 150, Boulder, 303245-8272. Sessions through July, frequentflyers.org.

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Music Ivory Circle, String Quartet. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

I

John Nilsen in Concert. 7 p.m. Christian Promise Fellowship, 503 Terry St., Longmont, 720-651-0067. Johnny Long. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Live eTown Radio Show Taping — with Citizen Cope & Anna Tivel. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Los Fear of Shrimp. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


theater JENNIFER M. KOSKINEN

WHEN VIOLA FINDS herself shipwrecked and her brother drowned (or so she thinks), she begins to dress as a man named Cesario. Meanwhile, her twin, Sebastian, very much alive and a near spitting image of Viola/ Cesario, also makes his way into town with the help of a friendly outlaw. The Colorado Shakespeare Festival presents ‘Twelfth Night,’ with original live music from Rinde Eckert, June 7-Aug. 11.

Beauty and the Beast. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Sept. 21. Be More Chill — presented by Equinox Theatre Company. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Opens June 7. Through June 29. Bull in a China Shop. Benchmark Theatre, 1560 Teller St., Lakewood. Through June 29. Discount Ghost Stories. Trident Booksellers and Cafe, 940 Pearl St., Boulder. Open June 8. Through June 29. Disney’s Tarzan: The Stage Musical. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Aug. 25.

Hay Fever — presented by Germinal Stage. John Hand Theater, 7653 East First Place, Denver. Through June 8. Jack and the Beanstalk. Chautauqua Picnic Shelter, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Weekends only through June 30. The Language Archive. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through June 16. Magnets on the Fridge. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Shows the first Wednesday of the month from February-June.

GOOD LUCK RACERS! $4 DRAFT BEER AT THE TUNE UP TAPROOM! BIKES, BIKE GEAR, BIKE SERVICE, BIKE RENTALS! 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tunupboulder.com

Queen of Conspiracy. Miners Alley, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through June 23. Sanctions. Curious Theater Company, 1018 Acoma St., Denver. Through June 15. Twelfth Night. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, Boulder. Opens June 7. Through Aug. 11. Wicked. DCPA Broadway, Buell Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through June 9. The Wizard of Oz. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through July 7.

THURSDAY JUNE 6 12:30 PM

INCOMING! 2:30 PM

SOLAR SUPERSTORMS 7:00 PM

Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840.

NeoRomantics, Tolstoy, Big Paleo, Blue Mesa. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840.

Sock Hop lunch featuring The Responders oldies band. 11:30 a.m. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8411.

Cat Jerky. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Ramaya & The Troubadours. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720201-3731.

Spanish Modern Literature Club. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Reverie. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Teen and Tea Time. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

My Life With The Trill Kill Kult. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Western Standard Time Ska Orchestra — with The Dendrites. 6 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488. Events Arabian Nights. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 720-938-3030. Through June 8, thedairy.org. Barley-Har-Har Comedy Open Mic Night. 7:30 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Comic Books & Graphic Novels (Ages 13-16). 4 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 693B S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Conversations in English Fridays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Little Feat. 8:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106,. Matroda. 9 p.m. Temple Nightclub, 1136 Broadway, Denver, 303-309-2144. Playtime Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Music The ‘Cats in Louisville! 8 p.m. Por Wine House, 836 1/2 Main St., Louisville, 720-6661386. ALTAS (Album Release). 8 p.m. Syntax Physic Opera, 554 S. Broadway, Denver, 720456-7041. Arrowleaf — with Mirrors and Lights (Free Concert). 7:30 p.m. Burns Family Artisan Ales, 2505 W. Second Ave., Denver, 720-693-9099. Austin Haynes. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Bodies We’ve Buried. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Boney James. 7 and 10 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303830-9214. Bravo Delta, Flahoola, Polaroid Antarctica, Heaven N Hell. 7 p.m. Herman’s

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The Crystal Method — with Special Guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. The Delta Sonics. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Disco Ball ’70s Disco and Funk Party, hosted by DJ Jason Heller and Gary Givant. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Erik Boa Duo. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Espresso! Gypsy Jazz. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-875-7514. Ethan Mindlin Jones. 12:30 p.m. The Stone Cup, 442 High St., Lyons. Favor Fest featuring JT Runninman and Vision. 8 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Ghost Revue w— with Evil Dave featuring Shawn Eckels (Andy Frasco & The UN), Todd Smallie and Shaun Gilmour (JJ Grey & Mofro), Groovement. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Girl Painters West Farm to Canvas Art Show. 2 p.m. Smith Farm, 10261 Arapahoe Ave., Lafayette. see EVENTS Page 34

JUNE 6, 2019

LIVE TALK: SCIENCE & SOCIETY SCIENCE FOR THE PEOPLE 8:30 PM

LASER BEATLES FRIDAY JUNE 7 8:00 PM

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY 9:30 PM

LASER BOB MARLEY 11:00 PM

LIQUID SKY THE WALL SATURDAY JUNE 8 1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES & HABITAT EARTH 2:30 PM

STARS AND LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 7:00 PM

SOLAR SUPERSTORMS 8:30 PM

LIQUID SKY DAVID BOWIE 10:00 PM

LIQUID SKY PRETTY LIGHTS SUNDAY JUNE 9 1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: WE ARE STARS & LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 2:30 PM

STARS AND GALAXIES 4:00 PM

INCOMING!

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 I

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arts ‘CLIMBING THE MAIDEN,” POLLY ADDISON, C. 1985 All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons.

POLLY ADDISON has a long history with the Boulder art scene and was dedicated to supporting The Dairy Arts Center in its early years and beyond. The exhibition in her namesake Polly Addison Gallery is a small selection of paintings, drawings and etchings that she produced in the 1980s. See page 21 for more about the exhibit, now showing through June 16.

Colorado’s Most Significant Artifacts. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit. Discarded Jewels: Found Object Art by Susie Biehl. Bricolage Gallery, at Art Parts Creative Reuse Center, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder. Through July 6. Eyes On: Erika Harrsch. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17.

The Incubation Effect. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 9.

Evan Cantor, New Work (oil paintings). Seeds Cafe (Boulder Public Library), 1001 Arapaho Ave., Boulder. Through June 26.

EYES ON: Jonathan Saiz. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17.

First Friday Artwalk — featuring the art of Aneesha Parrone. 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 7, Inkberry Books7960 Niwot Road, Suite B-3, Niwot.

Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18.

Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway Boulder. Ongoing exhibit. Front Range Rising. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Google Garage. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing, but activities change.

The Light Show. Denver Art Museum. 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through May 2020. Mothers, Fathers, Sons & Daughters. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16. Nicole Banowtz: Concerning Plants. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16. Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 23.

Otto Kuhler: Designing the Future. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through June 10. Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1. Poveka: Master Potter Maria Martinez. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), Anthropology Hall, 1035 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 8.

Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 25. Small Works. R Gallery, 2027 Broadway, Boulder. Through July 7. Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through January 2020. The Unknown Polly Addison. Dairy Arts Center, Polly AddisonGallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16. Vance Brand: Ambassador of Exploration. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Vibrant Femmes: Suspended Devotions. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through June 8. World War II Diary Transcribed at the Museum. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit.

EVENTS from Page 33

Grant Farm (Album Release), Andy Sydow Band. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

Loud Krazy Love — with Special Guest “Head” of Korn. 6 p.m. The Church, 1160 Lincoln St., Denver, 239-270-0020.

Junior Ranger Adventures: Summer Kickoff Event. 11 a.m. Betasso Preserve, 377 Betasso Road, Boulder.

Gun Street Ghost (Album Release). 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

Ludovico Einaudi. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1385 Curtis St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Karaoke. 8 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 303-444-1562.

The Soundpost Sessions: Clandestine Amigo & Kyle Donovan. 7:30 p.m. La Vita Bella Cafe, 471 Main St., Longmont.

Nia 52 Moves Dance Playshop. 10 a.m. Unity of Boulder Spiritual Center, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411.

Strings & Stories — with Josiah Johnson: A Retrospective in Reverse. 6:30 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Through June 9.

The Pressed Fest. 2 p.m. Thompson Park, Longmont, 970-765-6170.

Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303543-7339. Homevibe & eTown present Courtney Hartman Album Release Show — with Alexa Wildish. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Jasmine Bailey & Kevin Erskine. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Little Feat — 50th Anniversary. 6:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Charlie Don’t Surf. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Unit A, Longmont, 720-600-4875. Live Music/Food Truck. 5 p.m. Spirit Hound Distillers, 4196 Ute Highway, Lyons, 303-823-5696.

34

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JUNE 6, 2019

Ultralowfi. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. The Well Intentioned. 7 p.m. Collision Brewing Company & Restaurant, 253 Wadsworth Circle, Longmont. Events BoulderReads Tutor Workshop. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. DirtyBird BBQ. Noon. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360.

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Summer of Discovery: Eunice Embodiment. 11 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Summer of Discovery: Fiske Infrared Cameras. 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Summer of Discovery: Herbal Remedies to Relieve Stress. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. see EVENTS Page 36

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


EVENTS from Page 34

Western Views Book Club. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

FILMS

SUNDAY, JUNE 9 Music Andrew Leahey & The Homestead House Concert, (Adults Only). 3 p.m. Mile High Iceberg Rooftop Shows, 1200 Vine St., Denver. Beer and Hymns Songs of Summer. 5:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY JUNE 6

LITTLEWOLF 8PM SYDNEY WRIGHT 9PM FRIDAY JUNE 7

RAMAYA & THE TROUBADOURS 8PM SATURDAY JUNE 8

AUSTIN HAYNES 8PM JASMINE BAILEY & KEVIN ERSKINE 9PM SUNDAY JUNE 9

KENNA 8PM BRIANNA STRAUT 9:30PM MONDAY JUNE 10

ALICIA STOCKMAN 8PM THE RIGHTLY SO 9PM TUESDAY JUNE 11

TIM OSTDIEK 8PM OLD FUSS & FEATHERS 9PM

Blues & BBQ Series: Taylor Shae Duo. 2 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Bootstrap LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Brianna Straut, Kenna. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. City Park Jazz 2019. 6 p.m. City Park, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, 720-402-5033. Ekonovah. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Food For Syria Benefit (Free Show). 4 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Gloryhammer. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030. Immersive Theatre Pop Up at the Denver Public Library. 1:30 p.m. Denver Center for the Performing Arts, 1101 13th St., Denver, 303-893-4100. J.I.D — with Saba, Mereba, Deante Hitchcock. 7:15 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Making Movies. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-8309214. McKay Brothers. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Rainbow Girls. 6 p.m. The Star House, 3476 Sunshine Canyon Drive, Boulder, 303-245-8452. Strings & Stories — with Josiah Johnson: A Retrospective in Reverse. 6:30 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 12

Woodshed Red. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

THURSDAY JUNE 13

Boulder Comedy Show (2 shows). 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863.

RABBLEFISH 8PM

PAPER MOONSHINE 8PM FRIDAY JUNE 14

JOSEPH CUTSHALL & THE NIGHT ANIMALS W/ TREVOR MCCORD 8PM Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 36

Bellhoss (EP Release). 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

I

A STILL FROM ‘AMAZING GRACE’

Thursday, June 6 ‘Amazing Grace.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. ‘J. T. Leroy.’ 2 and 7 p.m. Boedecker. Friday, June 7 ‘Amazing Grace.’ 2 and 6:45 p.m. Boedecker. Film Night. 6:30 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Friday Family Film: ‘Cars.’ 2 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. ‘J. T. Leroy.’ 4 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Schlock.’ 8:45 p.m. Boedecker. Saturday, June 8 ‘Amazing Grace.’ 4 and 8:15 p.m. Boedecker. ‘J. T. Leroy.’ 6 p.m. Boedecker.

Sunday, June 9 Exhibition on Screen: Van Gogh and Japan. 1 p.m. Boedecker. Wednesday, June 12 Exhibition on Screen: Van Gogh and Japan. 1 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Non-Fiction.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Zen for Nothing.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker.

303-441-3120.

Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

Spanish/English Storytime. 12:15 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

KGNU’s Youth Radio Workshop for Teens (Ages 12-19). 10 a.m. KGNU Community Radio, 4700 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-449-4885. Through June 14, kgnu.org.

Summer Heritage Morning: World’s Fair. 10 a.m. Walker Ranch Homestead, 8999 Flagstaff Mountain Road, Boulder, 303-776-8848.

Lany. 6:30 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360.

MONDAY, JUNE 10

MXMS. 7 p.m. Moon Room, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Music Alicia Stockman, The Rightly So. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Rob Thomas. 6:30 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488. Summer Music Camps. 9 a.m. Kutandara, 5401 Western Avenue, Suite B, Boulder, 303443-2969, kutandara.org.

Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623. Can’t Be Satisfied: Blues Night. 9 p.m. Hi-

see EVENTS Page 38

staff PICK

Events

The Brewery Comedy Tour. 7 p.m. Colorado Technical Center, 657 S. Taylor Ave., Louisville, 303-604-6675. Double Feature: ‘We are Stars’ / ‘Laser Galactic Odyssey.’ 1 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Go Club for Kids & Teens. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007.

LITTLE FEAT – 50TH ANNIVERSARY.

WARNER BROS. RECORDS VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 8, Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

On tour to celebrate their 50th Anniversary, Little Feat will perform next to the Boulder Flatirons. Little Feat’s music has pushed boundaries since the band’s formation in 1969. Featuring a combination of folk, blues, rock, jazz and country, the band’s unique and upbeat sound is unmistakable. With a lineup that has undergone very few changes and a catalog that is as deep as it is wide, audience members can expect to

enjoy classics and deep cuts alike. Sing along with the band as they celebrate 50 years of success. —Lauren Hamko

Reynolds Teen Advisory Group (TAG) Meeting. 2:30 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder,

JUNE 6, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Love trumps

hate

TRUMP PARODY TOYS! Pet’s Republic of Boulder

TM

Farfel’s Farm & Rescue is proud to rescue hundreds of dogs from high-kill shelters each year. Thank you for helping to support our rescue efforts!

906 Pearl Street • 303-443-7711 • farfels.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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In Search of the Next Great Employee Boulder’s most exciting and dynamic publisher is in search of an outstanding bookkeeper. Due to retirement, this part-time position is becoming available. Would prefer someone great at customer service as this person interacts not only with in-house staff but also with vendors and advertising clients.

Skills and talents necessary to be successful. • Self-motivated • Highly organized • Exceptional at detail work • Solutions driven • QuickBooks proficient

JUNE 6, 2019

Send resume and cover letter to:

bbyer@boulderweekly.com No phone calls please.

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EVENTS from Page 36

Events

UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Babies and Board Books. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

Jun

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eTown & Homevibe Present

Courtney Hartman & Alexa Wildish

"Distinctive guitar stylist ... and a songwriter that delights and disturbs." - Acoustic Guitar Magazine

Chess Club. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Colorado Shakespeare Festival Classics 101: As You Like It. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Internation Ocean Film Tour. 7 p.m. The Mayan Theater, 110 Broadway, Denver, 303-744-6799.

Nick Forster's Jun Hippy Bluegrass Church

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"Guilt Free Gospel" at eTown Hall! 10 AM – 12 PM

Jul

7

Over the Rhine & more TBA

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Pete Holmes: Comedy Sex God. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637.

Your Life, Your Legacy: Planned Giving with Crist Mortuary. 5:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

TUESDAY, JUNE 11 Music Betty Who. 8 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Junoflo. 8 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Mono. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Jul

Radio Show Taping

Waifs 30 The & Jim Lauderdale 6/13 Jaipur Literature Festival Fundraiser 6/23 Radio Taping: Anders Osborne & more 6/26 Flatirons Chamber Music Festival

Old Fuss & Feathers, Tim Ostdiek. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Open Mic. 3 p.m. Vic’s Espresso, 1055 Courtesy Road, Louisville. Events

6/29 UndocuMonologues w Robert Johnson

All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302

Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

TICKETS: eTOWN.org

Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact jenny@etown.org 38

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STRINGS & STORIES — WITH JOSIAH JOHNSON: A RETROSPECTIVE IN REVERSE.

SHERVIN LAINEZ

6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 8, Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Through June 9. Josiah Johnson is best known as a founding member of indie folk band The Head & the Heart. Realizing he needed to learn to work through his issues with addiction, Josiah took a break from the band a few years ago. His solo work puts lyrics and voice first, focusing on universal themes of love, loss and transformation. This Strings and Stories performance will highlight Josiah’s career in reverse, beginning with songs from his recent solo work and culminating with favorite tunes from The Head & The Heart, along with stories of how these songs came to be. Tickets at fafcolorado.org.

Monday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Radio Show Taping

staff PICK

Mis Pininos/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500.

JUNE 6, 2019

Conversations in English Tuesdays. 12:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Festival Plaza Storytime. 10 a.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. InterNACHI 2019 Inspector Fair. 4 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Through June 14. Lap Babies. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-4413100; 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777. PEARL iZUMi’s Tuesday Night Thunder Criterium Racing Series. 5:45 p.m. Colorado Technology Center, 101 S. Taylor Ave., Louisville, 800-328-8488. Summer of Discovery: Fiske Planetarium MiniDome. 1 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 Music Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Bourbon & Blues with Deborah Stafford & The State of Affairs. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Boz Scaggs: Out of The Blues Tour 2019. 6:30 p.m. Denver Botanic Gardens — York Street, 1007 York St., Denver, 720-865-3500. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Enanitos Verdes & Hombres G. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

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Midday Music Meditation. Noon. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-3100. MoJazz Duo. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Open Mic Night. 6 p.m. Longtucky spirits Distillery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 970-214-1447. Rabblefish. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Taylor Shae Duo at Bands on the Bricks. 6 p.m. Pearl Street Mall, 1200-1400 Blocks of Pearl Street Mall, Boulder, 720-204-8767. Events Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Cosmology and Modern Physics. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Lap Babies. 11:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Midday Music Meditation. 12 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Musical Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Pages and Paws. 3:45 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. STEAM Storytime: Constellation Lamps. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Summer of Discovery: Snap, Crackle, Pop. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Wobblers & Walkers. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303441-3100; 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Open Range Competition Teams Summer Day Camps Classes & Private Lessons

Target & Hunting Full Service Retail Pro Shop & Service Recurve & Compound

High Altitude Archery 455 Weaver Park Rd #500 Longmont, CO 80501 720-491-3309

Billions of batteries are improperly disposed of each year – making their way to landfills or recycling facilities where they present harm to environments and people. Instead of tossing batteries into your trash or recycle bins, take them to the Boulder County Hazardous Materials Management Facility, located at 1901c 63rd Street in Boulder. Residential Drop-Off: Wednesday – Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,

no appointment necessary. Free for all Boulder County, City and County of Broomfield, and Town of Erie residents.

Homevibe & eTown present:

Jun

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battery over 9-volts with clear tape on the positive battery terminal to prevent a fire.

Visit boco.org/batteries for more information.

720.564.2220 resourceconservation@bouldercounty.org BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Resource Conservation I

with Alexa Wildish

“Distinctive guitar stylist... and a songwriter that delights and disturbs.” Acoustic Guitar Magazine

eTown Live Radio Show Taping:

Business Drop-Off: Tuesdays by appointment only. Disposal fees apply. PLEASE TAPE all lithium batteries and any other

Courtney Hartman

Jul

Presented by 105.5 The Colorado Sound

The Rhine 7 Over & more TBA

6/16 6/13 6/26 6/29 7/3 7/19 7/30 8/1 8/15 8/31 9/5

Nick Forster’s Hippy Bluegrass Church Spotlight on JLF! Jaipur Literature Festival Fundraiser Flatirons Chamber Music Festival: Souvenir de Florence UndocuMonologues Performances with Jazz Great Robert Johnson Boulder In-the-Round Homevibe & eTown present: Seth Walker w Ezra Bell eTown Live Radio Show Taping: The Waifs & Jim Lauderdale Homevibe & eTown present: The Accidentals & LVDY eTown Live Radio Show Taping: Damien Jurado & more eTown Live Radio Show Taping: Darrell Scott & Kaia Kater Full Concert: eTown at Red Rocks Amphitheatre with The Wood Brothers, Fruition, and Steep Canyon Rangers

eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce St. Boulder JUNE 6, 2019

Tix at eTOWN.org I

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ESO/A FITZSIMMONS VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Thursday June 6

Tsuruda & esseks w/ GrymeTyme & kavsko

Friday & saTurday June 7 & 8 @CenTral CiTy

CenTral Jazz

dumpsTaphunk, The new masTersounds, GeorGe porTer Jr. & runnin’ pardners, melvin seals & JGB, miChal menerT Trio, new orleans suspeCTs & The Color red all sTars

saTurday June 8

The CrysTal meThod w/ mikey Thunder & avry

sunday June 9

sold ouT!

J.i.d.

w/ saBa, mereBa & deanTe hiTChCoCk

Friday June 14

lonG BeaCh duB allsTars & The aGGroliTes

w/ Tomorrows Bad seeds & Beyond BridGes

Thursday, Friday, saTurday & sunday June 20-23 @ humminGBird ranCh

soniC Bloom GramaTik, opiuo, emanCipaTor ensemBle & more Friday June 21

Bass inFerno

Thursday June 6

oFFiCial BrewGrass musiC & Beer FesTival pre-parTy

CirCus no. 9 & Fireside ColleCTive (paTio seT) w/ BunCh oF sTranGers (paTio seT)

Friday June 7

amoramora & piCkin’ on hippies – BlueGrass TriBuTe To phish, paniC, allmans, moe. & dead w/ ruBy hill & shovelin sTone (paTio seT)

saTurday June 8

GhosT revue

w/ evil dave FeaT shawn eCkels (andy FrasCo & The un), Todd smallie & shaun Gilmour (JJ Grey & moFro), GroovemenT & lasT humans (aCousTiC paTio seT)

wednesday June 12 re: searCh

Borahm lee (oF preTTy liGhTs live Band / Break sCienCe) w/ TyCoon & Jordan polovina

Thursday June 13

Jon sTiCkley Trio

w/ The rainBow Girls, The wreCklunds (paTio seT), Tara rose & The real deal (paTio seT)

saTurday June 15

avenharT

w/ Taarka (laTe seT), ley line (laTe seT), hazel hue & emery adeline

wednesday June 19 re: searCh

proJeCT aspeCT

w/ he$h & Bommer, sweeTTooTh & kleavr B2B TanTrum

w/ mzG, unFold (laTe seT) & Jordan polovina

saTurday June 22

oFFiCial umphrey’s mCGee rrx pre-parTy

w/ oTis, reasonaTe, sCroGGinsallday & a.w.a.r.e.

FeaT ryan sTasik (umphrey’s mCGee) w/ Funk you

dizzy wriGhT Friday June 28

new orleans suspeCTs

FeaT John “JoJo” herman (widespread paniC), eriC mCFadden (parliamenT FunkadeliC) – widespread paniC red roCks aFTer show

saTurday June 29

Thursday June 20

doom FlaminGo Friday June 21

The eleGanT plums & poliCulTure

w/ pixie & The parTyGrass Boys (paTio seT) & FeelFree

Tuesday June 25

Chris Travis

Bass ConTrol

w/ ransTeez, swizzy J, sysCo yola, pivoT & prinz spadez

wednesday July 3

amp live & niCo luminous

FeaT phaseone, G-rex, slimez, m-porT & BaCe venTura

polo G

Thursday July 11

Common

Friday July 12

This musT Be The Band (TalkinG heads TriBuTe)

wednesday July 24

orChard lounGe Friday July 26

amon ToBin presenTs

Two FinGers dJ seT saTurday July 27

BuTCher Brown w/ dirTy revival

wednesday June 26 re: searCh

w/ maChine dreams (laTe seT) & Jordan polovina

Thursday June 27

The Funky knuCkles w/ GraTeFul BlueGrass Boys (2 seTs on The paTio)

saTurday June 29

proJeCT 432

w/ rasTasaurus & p-nuCkle

Thursday July 11

GhosT Town driFTers

w/ ThaT damn sasquaTCh (paTio seT), kris laGer Band (laTe seT) & deer Creek sharp shooTers (paTio seT)

Friday July 12

Travers BroThership

sunday July 28

2 seTs: Travers BroThership eaTs a peaCh & oriGinal seT w/ kessel run

(early show)

oFFiCial reGGae on The Grass pre parTy

Friday, saTurday & sunday auGusT 2-4 @ sunrise ranCh in loveland

w/ GianT walkinG roBoTs, red saGe, Bloodpreshah

doBre BroThers live arise musiC FesTival Friday auGusT 16

40oz To Freedom

(suBlime TriBuTe) w/ lil’ ween (ween TriBuTe) perForminG “The mollusk”

Thursday & Friday sepTemBer 12-13

suiCideGirls BlaCkhearT Burlesque Friday sepTemBer 20

Balloon pop

Friday & saTurday oCToBer 11-12

The new masTersounds w/ GhosT-noTe

saTurday oCToBer 19 CyCles presenTs

The Game show

saTurday July 13

earThkry

wednesday July 17 re: searCh

superTask (laB Group) + poTions (laB Group) w/ dillard & Jordan polovina

Thursday July 18

wood & wire

w/ Jay roemer Band & The oFTen herd (uk) (paTio seT)

Friday July 19

evol inTenT, heavyGrinder & mC dino saTurday July 20

los ColoGnes w/ shawn nelson Band & Flash mounTain Flood

human tweeting by Daniel Asher

going through your instagram feed desperately trying to reconstruct your history artfully revealing yourself through clever angles and snapchat filters. what happens when children lose sight of themselves via the anti social amplification of apps and social media causation coupling their anxiety and self hatred cutting through layers of dermis acting out in so many little ways show me your arms is what a parent should never have to say desperately hoping to never again find fresh scars through the darkness we walk with our backs to the light we are all alone surrounded by everyone staring at screens unaware missing connections swiping left or maybe right all we will eventually know through neural links and nano bot pathways chained to our slave labored devices illuminating our expressionless faces

designed to make us more social we are unable to speak with those around us stepping into traffic unaware of intimate human interaction situational awareness constantly confirming we don’t care people are screens blurring past break light trails at night lucid hallucinations unnoticed apparitions in a virtual reality environment of disconnection we all lie down with our devices at night and tie off our arms in bed chasing likes for dopamine hits seeking validation from ai algorithms designed to make us emotionally engaged we pledge allegiance to our tribes providing clicks recalibrating data for profit our phones defining our lives we are the singularity manifesting augmented reality replacing ourselves with avatars escaping everything we have already forgotten

sunday July 21

The homeGrown CapiTol Tours launCh parTy

FeaT sTonewall - an inTeraCTive ConCerT Blvd, kalysT, people & Game show experienCe CorrupTinG people, sunday novemBer 17 Trip, FvnCiisavaGe man, hillTop hoods dillonJ, yoda pops w/ adrian eaGle & anomalous TexT CervanTes To 91944 For TiCkeT Giveaways, drink speCials, disCounTed TiCkeT promoTions & more

Daniel Asher is a writer and poet.

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


TRADITIONAL VIETNAMESE PHO HOUSE

Life without an operation manual

HAPPY HOUR

The sound of one hand clapping in ‘Zen for Nothing’

by Michael J. Casey

A

s the reality of summer blockbuster season sets in, ON THE BILL: ‘Zen For a simple truth becomes all too clear: Moviegoing can Nothing.’ June be quite stressful. Death and destruction abound on 12–15, Dairy Arts the silver screen, sometimes from monsters raging Center, The Boedecker Theater, for alpha dominance, other times from mutants and 2590 Walnut St., space warlords who can eradicate our very existence with Boulder, 303-440the snap of their fingers. Sometimes it’s even a jacked-up 7825, thedairy.org former pro-wrestler who can pull helicopters from the sky. Not even children’s movies offer sanctuary, what with that hyperactive bunny in the superhero suit yelling at everyone and everything. Why does going to the movies have to be this anxiety-inducing? Thankfully, some movies can function as counter-programming, a tonic for all that sound and fury emanating from the multiplex. Zen for Nothing is such a movie: 100 minutes of stillness, calm, peace and, if you’re lucky, a little enlightenment. Directed by Swiss filmmaker Werner Penzel, Zen for Nothing takes place in a small Antaji Zen monastery on Japan’s western coast Though you wouldn’t know that from the movie — there is little context about the monastery and the German-born man who runs it, Abbot Muhō. Our main character, if the movie has one, is Sabine Timoteo, an actress from Switzerland who has come to join the monastery for an indefinite amount of time. The monks welcome Timoteo, and she learns the procedures and rituals of the monastery on the job. But there is no pretense to this process. In one instance, Timoteo is so transfixed by her egg roll she fails to notice that everyone around the table has assumed a posture of prayer. A companion gently nudges her, smiles and she gets it. She gently puts down her bowl and chopsticks, and the prayer begins. No monk admonishes her for lack of attention; no Roman Catholic strictures are handed down. Just patience. Watching Zen for Nothing also requires patience, but once you fall into the movie’s rhythm, you’ll be just fine. The camera barely moves, the soundtrack is negligible and we learn little of the people at the monastery. But you realize you don’t need it about halfway through. Penzel also peppers the movie with quotes from an early 20th-century Antaiji abbot, Kodo Sawaki. With a movie this lean on exposition, each quote explodes with significance. These quotes address the contradictory nature of Zen, some humorously, some challengingly. The best ones are the riddles. Zen For Nothing is not a movie for everyone. The press notes describe the movie as a documentary, but you could easily watch it as a scripted narrative. It is an immersive experience, one that suggests much and answers little. If you are going to see it, do so in a darkened theater where distractions are minimal. You might find something that soothes rather than stimulates, relaxes rather than riles. Who knows, you may even find yourself looking around for a monastery afterward. Every pilgrimage has to start somewhere. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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4PM - 6PM WINE, BEERS & SAKE Hours: Mon - Sun 11am-9pm 2855 28th Street, Boulder, CO 80301 • 303-449-0350 DINE IN - TAKE OUT • www.boulderpho.eat24hour.com

“The Boulder Mountainbike Alliance ran ads recently in the Boulder Weekly to promote our annual Membership Party and Colorado Gives Day. The campaign was a huge success and BMA raised $34,320 - all going towards improving Boulder County’s trail system! The Boulder Weekly ads led to additional awareness of BMA and played an important part in this extraordinary fundraising campaign. Thanks Boulder Weekly!” Wendy Sweet President, Board of Directors Boulder Mountainbike Alliance

JUNE 6, 2019

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BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF Gyoza

Cowboy Burger

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AOI Sushi and Izakaya 3303 30th St., Boulder, 303-449-5394

PHOTOS BY STAFF

Eureka! 1048 Pearl St., Boulder, eurekarestaurantgroup.com

OI Sushi and Izakaya is a new sushi and Japanese restaurant that recently popped up in North Boulder next to the Cork and the banished Walmart. It’s a West Coast-style sushi spot — it feels plucked out of LA or Seattle — with modern décor and inventive sushi rolls and Japanese dishes. We sampled some of the sushi, which was fresh and expertly assembled, but the gyoza was irresistible. Steamed pork dumplings with herbs, served alongside soy sauce, the gyoza were the ideal balance of texture, temperature and flavor. $7.

Barbacoa Burrito

Nopalito’s 2850 Iris Ave., Suite H, Boulder, 720-720-4015

I

f you’ve ever been to one of those fast-casual, assembly-line-style burrito joints, then Nopalito’s will feel very familiar. The new tenants of a restaurant spot next to the DMV driver’s licence office in the Diagonal Plaza serve quesadillas, flautas, burritos and more with your choice of rice, beans, protein, salsa — you get it. But what’s uncommon is how good every element is. We tested out Nopalito’s burrito by selecting white rice, black and pinto beans, barbacoa, hot salsa, fresh guacamole and a side of fresh green chile. It doesn’t taste like the burritos you get at other fast casual places, let’s put it that way. The barbacoa is deeply flavorful and tender, the rice and beans are well spiced and the salsas are out of this world. $8.50.

ureka! is an infectiously fun spot in downtown Boulder, but what keeps the place packed, in addition to the ambiance, is its menu of unique burgers. It’s hard to pin down just one to order — the 28-day dry-aged burger, the bone marrow burger and the Fresno fig all were tempting, but in the mood for something smoky, we chose the Cowboy burger. Shoestring onion rings are piled high atop a grilled patty, thick bacon, sharp Cheddar and a beer barbecue sauce. $15.

Hopped Apple Cider

Stem Ciders 1380 Horizon Ave., Unit A, Lafayette, stemciders.com

W

e’re a cider county now, and that’s a good thing. Regional producers are distributing in our stores, our restaurants are putting them on tap, and cideries are popping up all over. Stem Ciders, which has an immaculate taproom in Lafayette (Acreage), is one of the burgeoning scene’s pioneers, and these ciders run the gamut from sweet to herbal to dry. The hopped apple cider is particularly alluring. Comprised of apple juice and a healthy dose of Cascade and Citra hops, you get all the crisp refreshment of cider with just a kick of texture and flavor from the hops. It’s a great drink. Prices vary.

The BEST East Indian Food this side of New Delhi Dinner:

Monday - Thursday: 5pm-9:30pm Friday & Saturday: 5pm-10pm Sunday: 5pm-9pm

5BOEPPSJ

Lunch Buffet: Everyday from 11:30pm - 2:30pm

619 S. Broadway • Boulder, CO 80305 • Table Mesa Shopping Center 303-543-7339 • TandooriGrillBoulder.com BOULDER WEEKLY

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SUSAN FRANCE

N

atalie Condon and Natascha Sherman Hess never met when they were growing up near each other in Connecticut, but as they talk on the loading dock at Isabelle Farm on a summer afternoon, it almost seems inevitable they would collaborate around food. After each migrated to Colorado, their paths intersected six years ago because of fresh, organic produce.

than being a farmer is [being] a chef,” Condon says. “Being a CSA customer reignited my love of cooking,” says Hess who ditched her law career, apprenticed in a restaurant and launched Boulder’s Ginger Pig. The food truck focuses on the fresh, intensely flavored foods Hess discovered as a student living and traveling in Asia. After more than a year of visiting a different brewery tasting room every day, Ginger Pig is now dishing blissful char sui pork, karaage chicken and red curry Wednesdays through Saturdays in the Isabelle Farm Store parking lot. For East County foodies, it’s like a great new Asian eatery has been added to the list of dining options. For Hess, on her fourth transmission and third truck engine, it’s an opportunity to take up residency. But she only did it because of the right relationships. “This is the only farm I wanted to partner with because of their philosophy. I knew how they were growing the food,” Hess says. “We have been approached by dozens of food trucks who wanted to set up in the parking lot but I wasn’t comfortable with them. When Natascha asked me it sounded like a perfect match,” Condon says. “People who come here are very much loca-

The social food network

Relationships build hyper-local culinary hub on Lafayette farm

by John Lehndorff “I met Natascha when she and her husband became CSA members here. She was a very unhappy lawyer at the time,” says Condon, who opened Isabelle Farm with her husband, Jason, in 2005 in Lafayette, just west of U.S. 287 on Baseline Road. “When she told me she wanted to cook for a living, I said she was crazy. The only thing harder 44

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THE GINGER PIG vores who seek out food truck, with its local food and a lot live Bangkok balls, unique salads and more, sets in the neighborhood. up shop Wednesday They are the ones who through Saturday in wanted this land saved the Isabelle Farm Store parking lot. from development. They didn’t want townhouses or more Open Space. They wanted a working organic farm.” Isabelle Farm produces asparagus, spinach, arugula, radishes and more than 80 other organic crops on 500 acres within five miles of the farm store. The distinctive barn on Thomas Open Space near Waneka Lake is owned by the City of Lafayette and leased to the farm. The sustainable food network webbing outward from the Isabelle Farm Store reaches to other farms, bakeries, artisan food and drink producers as well as food activist organizations like Slow Food. The crops go to CSA members and are sold to customers and to a few restaurants including OAK at Fourteenth and Fresh Thymes as well. “It’s better to deal with restaurants that really walk the talk,” Condon says. Louisville’s Moxie Bread Co. will be supplying Isabelle Farm’s CSA program with heirloom wheat bread loaves this summer. “We’re selective with BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


SUSAN FRANCE

where we bring our baked goods. To be a part of the amazing local food community at Isabelle is exciting for us,” says Moxie owner Andy Clark. Unlike seasonal farm stands, Isabelle Farm Store is open all year. Condon says they intended to only sell their own produce, but customers started asking for more. The cases and shelves of the store are packed with crops and foods produced by locals including pastured, allnatural beef and lamb, cage-free farm eggs, milk, organic produce from other Colorado organic farms, hothouse produce in the winter, local snacks, beverages and gifts. Familiar local food product names include Ozuke, Haystack Mountain, Hazel Dell and Savory Spice Shop. The store is the rare location where you can purchase breads baked at Boulder’s Mediterranean Restaurant rather than at the company’s eateries. It also features other collaborations: “We have Cristina’s Gluten-Free Quiche, which uses our produce. It’s a great collaboration,” Condon says. Parked at this agricultural oasis in a suburban sea, Hess is already using Condon’s greens in a salad with jackfruit. After a long wet spring on the farm, she is looking forward to using cucumbers, shishito peppers and other vegetables. “Just wait ’till August when I get sweet roasted corn for street corn with sriracha aioli,” Hess says. Because Condon has leased land to some of the farm’s Hmong workers, Hess will even have access to hard-to-source organic Asian greens. Hess is offering a discount for customers who bike over and eat on the store’s shaded veranda. Some grab food and take it blocks away to notable tasting rooms like Liquid Mechanics, Cellar West and Odd13, where they got to know Hess BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ISABELLE FARM OWNER Natalie Condon (left) and Ginger Pig food truck owner Natascha Sherman Hess have created a tasteful partnership.

and Ginger Pig’s fare in the first place.

LOCAL FOOD NEWS Opening soon: Mojo Taqueria, 2785 Iris Ave., former location of Arugula, Ristorante Laudisio and A La Carte; Teocali Cocina Tequileria,1335 South Boulder Road, Lafayette. ... LoCo Gastropub has opened in Longmont in the former Breaker’s Grill space. ... Sample authentic island dishes and tunes at the Taste of Puerto Rico, June 9, Civic Center Park in Denver. ... Restaurants can be part of Colorado’s most important culinary event by putting a Taste of Slow Food Nations dish using a food product facing extinction on their menu June 19-July 19. slowfoodnations.org/taste-of-nations

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TASTE OF THE WEEK Boulder’s Green Belly — known for its authentic Guatemalan hot sauces at farmers’ markets — also crafts the classic condiment chirmol. While tomatoes are part of the recipe and it looks like chunky salsa in the jar, one taste sets it in a different category. Made with fire-roasted tomatoes, hierbabuena (spearmint) and onions, chirmol is more like an herbaceous Middle Eastern relish without the chile heat. It’s a refreshing change on grilled meats, over potatoes and on eggs. WORDS TO CHEW ON “You worry too much about what goes into your mouth and not enough about what comes out of it.” — Leah Chase, New Orleans’ restaurateur and civil rights activist (1923-2019) John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:25 a.m. Thursday on KGNU: news. kgnu.org/category/radio-nibbles I

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New in brew: Rosé roundup

Think pink when you shop for summer drink

by Michael J. Casey

R

osé: you’ll find it on brunch tables everywhere, wine shops have rearranged their stores to give the pink drink prominence, and you can snag a #RoséAllDay T-shirt at Target. It’s more than a beverage; rosé is a state of mind. And though the marketing is as of-the-moment as it gets, there’s nothing new about rosé. The wine dates back to the earliest vintners of ancient Europe, and Kay Thompson demanded we “Think pink!” back in 1957’s Funny Face. No doubt Wes Anderson movies, Paddington 2 and the popularity of Millennial Pink helped contribute to the popularity of rosé drinks, but that might be overlooking the obvious: Rosé is delicious. Fresh and fruity, vibrant and juicy, rosé wines derive their name from their color, a soft pink hue which the COURTESY OF AVERY BREWING juice picks up from the red grape skins. Unlike red wine, where the juice macerates on the skins and deepens in color, rosé spends a minimal amount on the skins. This not only lightens the color, it also keeps the juice from picking up too many tannins. Instead, the wine balances tart acid alongside fruity sweetness to produce something that pairs beautifully with leafy greens, soft cheeses and flaky fishes. Brewers, never ones to look a gift horse in the mouth, know a trend when they see one and have started rosé-ifying any number of beer styles. But, unlike wine, beer rosé isn’t a style so much as it is a suggestion. An indication that what’ll end up in your glass will be pink, soft and slightly sweet. Take Station 26 Brewing’s Brut Rosé IPA: Brewed with Azacca, Citra, El Dorado and Mosiac hops, the India pale ale is dry and floral with no sugary sweetness and subtle malt characteristics. The beer’s pale pink complexion comes from the addition of hibiscus (dominating the nose) and raspberries (dominating the mouth). As rosés go, Station 26’s is more Provence, less D’Anjou. Avery Brewing Company also uses hibiscus in its stellar Barrel-Aged Cucumber Hibiscus Sour, and here the deep hue of pink really pops. In addition to cucumber and hibiscus — both shine beautifully — the brew sports a combination of Saccharomyces, Brettanomyces, Lactobacillus and Pediococcus to give the beer a sour edge, a funky flavor and a bright and bouncy acidity. The oak adds hints of vanillin, but it doesn’t weigh the beverage down with cloying sweetness. It’s a bouncy beer through and through. Moving in a saltier direction: Anderson Valley Brewing Company’s Framboise Rosé Gose — a beer that’s just as fun to drink as it is to say. Thanks to an infusion of raspberry puree and rose hips, Framboise Rosé Gose has a deep, rich color of magenta, a vibrant nose and a flavor that is fresh and tangy thanks to the gose-requisite addition of salt. It’s also spectacularly light, just the beer you need after a long run or while enjoying a bowl of breakfast yogurt topped with granola. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BOULDER WEEKLY


ARI LEVAUX

A

radish sends mixed messages. They can look like something designed by Willy Wonka, but taste like mustard gas. In perhaps the ultimate bait-and-switch of the vegetable world, eating a radish can feel like leaning in for a kiss and getting slapped. Too often, radishes are sliced into salads, which doesn’t offer enough contrast to let them shine. The company of other raw plant parts brings out unflattering sides of a radish, and likewise, it can make the entire salad too harsh.

Put radish anywhere but salad by Ari LeVaux

But it doesn’t take much to let a radish shine. Just a little fresh baguette, and a lot of butter. For hundreds of years prior to the advent of avocado toast, French chefs have laid thin slices of salted radish upon heavily buttered bread. It’s a simple recipe, but not at all plain. The radish’s watery, pickle-like crunch adds texture to the yeasty, crusty medium. Disarmed by salt and harnessed by butter, the root’s pungency is put to work,

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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without the slightest foul whiff to be sniffed. I make radish toast on sourdough, with a few thin slices of onion. The key is to not skimp on the butter, and don’t forget the salt. Indeed, salt alone makes a big difference with a radish, countering its feisty flavor with an equal but opposing force. On cut radish, a pinch of salt pulls droplets of radish water from the white faces. The slices become translucent, like pieces of sushi, and deliver a brief, salty, wasabi-like hit. A simple plate of salted radish makes a great palate cleanser between courses. Or soak off the radish water and salt in water. They crisp up a little, but stay mild. Another way to tame a radish is with heat, in both the temperature and spicy senses of the word. Radishes get mellow with cooking, their pungency replaced with sweetness. Spicy heat, meanwhile, fights fire with fire, building a spicy bridge between a radish and the rest of a meal. In the Himalayas, they employ all of the above radish tactics. Phagshapa is a pork and radishbased dish that uses not only chile but also ginger and onion to create a convention of pungency. Phagshapa was one of my favorite dishes during a brief time I spent in Bhutan. Thanks to sadomasochistic levels of hot pepper and ginger in a properly prepared rendition, this is not a dish for the faint of

IT DOESN’T TAKE MUCH to let a radish shine, if you know what you’re doing.

see RADISHES Page 50

JUNE 6, 2019

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ARI LEVAUX

RADISHES from Page 49

heart, mouth or belly. If I gave you the recipe I would feel responsible for your safety. But don’t blame the radish for that drama. It is sweet and mellow by serving time, thanks to the cooking. Next to the chile and ginger, the radish is a refuge from the more intense flavors, while contributing a subtle layer of umami. Whatever a radish is cooked in or on, be it pizza, stew, or frittata, it has a way of quietly making food taste better without being obnoxious. Radish frittata is my new world answer to phagshapa (it even rhymes!), with chopped bacon taking the place of boiled pork. And in a nod to France, my frittata contains butter. It consists of a crispy matrix of bacon and potato, embedded with radish slices and whole radish leaves and other select flavorings, all topped with a fried egg — or impregnated with a beaten egg. We use the radish leaves because they are tender and tasty, contain more nutrients than the roots, and because there is not a single reason not to. Some radish varieties are grown specifically for their leaves, though any radish leaf is worth eating. But not in salad, as some radish leaves can be fuzzy if eaten raw. In the radish frittata, they add to the matrix, and are a welcome splash of green. My radish frittata may not measure up to a French radish sandwich or Bhutanese phagshapa in terms of pure elegance or cultural importance, but it’s an American-style way to eat radish that borrows from the best, and tastes good with coffee.

RADISH FRITTATA

Quantities are for a solo portion: one egg and a single slice of bacon. Adjust accordingly depending on hunger and the size of the breakfast party.

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Per egg: 1 piece of bacon, sliced crosswise into pieces of less than a half-inch 1 golf ball-sized potato, peeled or not 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 pinch salt 2 pinches pepper 2 radishes: roots trimmed and sliced, leaves rinsed and separated 1 clove garlic, minced An appropriate amount of jalapeno or other hot pepper, chopped or crushed 1 teaspoon butter 1 egg, beaten or sunny-side up Add the chopped bacon to a heavy pan on medium heat, and then the grated potato (which I grate directly into the pan as it heats, because I’m in a hurry and hate dirty dishes). Unless the bacon is super fatty, add the olive oil. Stir at a medium pace, allowing crust to form and brown but not burn on the bottom before scraping it off the pan. Cook for about 10 minutes, until it looks like a splintered bird nest. Beat the egg, if going the beaten route, with a tablespoon of milk, cream or water. Push the potato matrix to the side of the pan, and add the butter, garlic and radish parts. When the radishes are wilted and soft and you can smell the garlic, about 2 minutes, stir everything together and spread it out. Make a little dimple in the pile, like a nest, to catch the egg. Crack or pour the egg into the dimple, and allow it to cook, unstirred, for about 2 minutes, uncovered. If the egg is sunny-side up, add a teaspoon of water to the side of the pan and put a lid on, to steam the top. If using beaten egg, give it a few stirs to break it up and turn it over, so all the egg cooks. Serve hot. BOULDER WEEKLY


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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BOULDER OWNED BOULDER GROWN

BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: “I don’t think we were ever meant to

LIBRA

hear the same song sung exactly the same way more than once in a lifetime,” says poet Linh Dinh. That’s an extreme statement that I can’t agree with. But I understand what he’s driving at. Repeating yourself can be debilitating, even deadening. That includes trying to draw inspiration from the same old sources that have worked for you in the past. In accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest you try to minimize exact repetition in the next two weeks: both in what you express and what you absorb. For further motivation, here’s William S. Burroughs: “Truth may appear only once; it may not be repeatable.”

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: How many languages are you fluent it? One? Two? More? I’m sure you already know that gaining the ability to speak more than one tongue makes you smarter and more empathetic. It expands your capacity to express yourself vividly and gives you access to many interesting people who think differently from you. I mention this, Libra, because you’re in a phase of your cycle when learning a new language might be easier than usual, as is improving your mastery of a second or third language. If none of that’s feasible for you, I urge you to at least formulate an intention to speak your main language with greater candor and precision—and find other ways to expand your ability to express yourself.

TAURUS

SCORPIO

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Peter Benchley wrote the bestselling

book Jaws, which was later turned into a popular movie. It’s the story of a great white shark that stalks and kills people in a small beach town. Later in his life, the Taurus author was sorry for its influence, which helped legitimize human predation on sharks and led to steep drops in shark populations. To atone, Benchley became an aggressive advocate for shark conservation. If there’s any behavior in your own past that you regret, Taurus, the coming weeks will be a good time to follow Benchley’s lead: correct for your mistakes; make up for your ignorance; do good deeds to balance a time when you acted unconsciously.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Some birds can fly for days without

coming down to earth. Alpine swifts are the current record-holders, staying aloft for 200 consecutive days as they chase and feed on insects over West Africa. I propose we make the swift your soul ally for the next three weeks. May it help inspire you to take maximum advantage of the opportunities life will be offering you. You will have extraordinary power to soar over the maddening crowd, gaze at the big picture of your life, and enjoy exceptional amounts of freedom.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: “I think gentleness is one of the most disarmingly and captivatingly attractive qualities there are,” writes poet Nayyirah Waheed. That will be emphatically true about you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Your poised, deeply felt gentleness will accord you as much power as other people might draw from ferocity and grandeur. Your gentleness will enable you to crumble obstacles and slip past barriers. It will energize you to capitalize on and dissipate chaos. It will win you leverage that you’ll be able to use for months.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Is the Loch Ness monster real? Is there a giant sea serpent that inhabits the waters of Loch Ness in Scotland? Tantalizing hints arise now and then, but no definitive evidence has ever emerged. In 1975, enterprising investigators got the idea to build a realistic-looking papier-mâché companion for Nessie and place it in Loch Ness. They hoped that this “honey trap” would draw the reclusive monster into more public view. Alas, the scheme went awry. (Lady Nessie got damaged when she ran into a jetty.) But it did have some merit. Is there an equivalent approach you might employ to generate more evidence and insight about one of your big mysteries, Leo? What strategies might you experiment with? The time is right to hatch a plan.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Earlier in your life, you sometimes wrestled with dilemmas that didn’t deserve so much of your time and energy. They weren’t sufficiently essential to invoke the best use of your intelligence. But over the years, you have ripened in your ability to attract more useful and interesting problems. Almost imperceptibly, you have been growing smarter about recognizing which riddles are worth exploring and which are better left alone. Here’s the really good news: The questions and challenges you face now are among the finest you’ve ever had. You are being afforded prime opportunities to grow in wisdom and effectiveness.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Here’s Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano from The Book of Embraces: “In the River Plate basin we call the heart a ‘bobo,’ a fool. And not because it falls in love. We call it a fool because it works so hard.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I hope that in the coming weeks, your heart will indeed be a hard-working, wisely foolish bobo. The astrological omens suggest that you will learn what you need to learn and attract the experiences you need to attract if you do just that. Life is giving you a mandate to express daring and diligent actions in behalf of love.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: When he was twenty years old, a German student named Max Planck decided he wanted to study physics. His professor at the University of Munich dissuaded him, telling Planck, “In this field, almost everything is already discovered, and all that remains is to fill a few unimportant holes.” Planck ignored the bad advice and ultimately went on to win a Nobel Prize in Physics for his role in formulating quantum theory. Most of us have had a similar experience: people who’ve tried to convince us to reject our highest calling and strongest dreams. In my view, the coming weeks will be a potent time for you to recover and heal from those deterrents and discouragements in your own past.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Not all, but many horoscope columns

address your ego rather than your soul. They provide useful information for your surface self, but little help for your deep self. If you’ve read my oracles for a while, you know that I aspire to be in the latter category. In that light, you won’t be surprised when I say that the most important thing you can do in the coming weeks is to seek closer communion with your soul; to explore your core truths; to focus on delight, fulfillment, and spiritual meaning far more than on status, power, and wealth. As you attend to your playful work, meditate on this counsel from Capricorn author John O’Donohue: “The geography of your destiny is always clearer to the eye of your soul than to the intentions and needs of your surface mind.”

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AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Aquarian biochemist Gertrude Belle Elion shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1988. She was instrumental in devising new drugs to treat AIDS and herpes, as well as a medication to facilitate organ transplants. And yet she accomplished all this without ever earning a PhD or MD, a highly unusual feat. I suspect you may pull off a similar, if slightly less spectacular feat in the coming weeks: getting a reward or blessing despite a lack of formal credentials or official credibility.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Today Mumbai is a megacity with 12.5

million people on 233 square miles. But as late as the eighteenth century, it consisted of seven sparsely populated islands. Over many decades, reclamation projects turned them into a single land mass. I foresee you undertaking a metaphorically comparable project during the coming months. You could knit fragments together into a whole. You have the power to transform separate and dispersed influences into a single, coordinated influence. You could inspire unconnected things to unite in common cause.

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Dear Dan: I’m a 27-year-old, male, adult baby/diaper lover (AB/DL). I’ve been in the closet about my fetish basically since puberty. As a consequence, I never dated or became romantically involved. I thought if I buried my kink with enough shame, it would go away and I would somehow turn normal. It obviously didn’t work, and for the past year, I’ve been trying to find healthy ways to integrate this into my life. I play around with the kink in the privacy of my home and otherwise lead a normal life. My depression issues have let up, I’m more confident day-to-day, and even work has begun to improve. I want to start dating. I went on a normal date, and I felt very inauthentic trying to be engaged when my kink wasn’t present or at least out in the open. I just wasn’t excited by the idea of a vanilla relationship. I would like to date women, but there’s such an imbalance between men and women with this particular kink that I don’t feel like I’ll ever meet someone who is compatible. I feel like I’m doomed to be lonely forever with my kink or sexually unfulfilled and terrified of being found out. —Boy Alone Basically Eternally Dear BABE: “It’s OK to not reveal every aspect of your sex life on a first date,” said Lo, a kink-positive podcaster

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

BY DAN SAVAGE and AB/DL whose show explores all aspects of your shared kink. “Besides, saying, ‘I like to wear diapers,’ on the first date is a surefire way to scare someone off. A better strategy is to establish a connection with a person, determine whether or not they’re trustworthy, and then open up about AB/DL. That takes time.” Lo also doesn’t think you should write off vanilla people as potential partners. “BABE should know that it’s possible to convert someone to the AB/DL side,” said Lo. “I see it happen all the time. That’s the focus of Dream a Little, my AB/DL podcast. Most of the people I feature are men who have turned their female partners on to AB/DL, so the odds are in your favor.” Lo herself is happily partnered with a vanilla guy who embraced her kink. That doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed success the first time you disclose your kink to a partner, BABE. But you’ll never find someone with whom you’re

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compatible — or with whom you can achieve compatibility — unless you’re willing to risk opening up to someone. “BABE is more likely to be doomed to the #foreveralone club if he gives up entirely out of fear,” said Lo. “Being an AB/DL poses some unique challenges in the dating world, but thousands of other AB/DLs have found a way to make it work, and he can too.” Now, before people start freaking out (and it may be too late), it’s not just AB/ DLs who “convert” or “turn” vanilla partners to their kinks. There are two kinds of people at any big kink event (BDSM party, furry convention, piss splashdown): the people who were always kinky, i.e., people who’ve been aware of their kinks since puberty (and masturbating about them since puberty), and the people who fell in love with those people. So Lo isn’t telling BABE to do anything that people with other kinks aren’t advised to do all the time: date, establish trust, and then lay your kink cards on the table. “BABE has come a long way, and it’s

JUNE 6, 2019

great that he’s building confidence. But he still views his kink as an impossible obstacle, and it doesn’t need to be that way,” said Lo. “It’s so important that you learn how to accept your kink, because then you will know you’re capable of and deserving of love.” And finally, BABE, if and when you do meet a woman who is willing to indulge you — or maybe even embrace AB/DL play — don’t neglect her sexual needs. I answered a letter years ago from a frustrated woman who was preparing to leave her AB/DL husband because he never wanted to have vanilla sex and, as much as she’d come to enjoy AB/DL occasionally, she no longer felt like her needs mattered to her husband. Don’t make the same mistake that guy did — or you could, after a long search for a compatible partner, find yourself miserable and alone again. You can follow Lo on Twitter and Instagram @daddyiwantthis. Her podcast and AB/DL self-acceptance programs can be found at thelittlelounge.com. On the Lovecast, what do we do now that Tumblr is dead?: savagelovecast. com. Email questions to mail@savagelove.net; Follow Dan on Twitter @fakedansavage and visit ITMFA.org

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Harry J. Anslinger and the campaign against marijuana By Sam Qam DONKEY HOTEY

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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annabis is the most commonly used illegal drug in the world. Despite its current legal status it only became criminalized within the last century, before which it was both a regularly used recreational drug as well as a medically prescribed drug for dealing with a wide range of ailments from glaucoma to cancer and multiple sclerosis. So if merely a century ago marijuana was a widely used and medically acknowledged drug ,how did it manage to reach the criminalized status that it now holds? In America the criminalization of cannabis began as a relatively slow and understated process with certain states outlawing its use starting in the District of Columbia in 1906. A couple of states followed this example and outlawed the use of cannabis throughout the 1910s and ’20s but it wasn’t until the 1930s that the criminalization of cannabis became a major issue. The reason that cannabis became such a huge issue was the launch of a massive smear campaign against marijuana led by Harry J. Anslinger from 1930 to 1937. Harry J. Anslinger started his career as the assistant prohibition commissioner in the

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Bureau of Prohibition before he was promoted to the position of commissioner in the newly created Federal Bureau of Narcotics in 1930. Anslinger held this position for 32 years, but it is his campaign against marijuana, which dominated the first seven years of his tenure, that he is most widely remembered for. Anslinger made heavy use of the mass media in order to spread his anti-cannabis message. Anslinger notoriously fabricated a number of stories tenuously linked to police reports that he published in his “Gore File” and used to turn the public against the drug and gain backing for its criminalization. Among the accusations he levied were “There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others.”; “Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men.”; “You smoke a joint and you’re likely to kill your brother.” These accusations were designed to pray on the worries

JUNE 6, 2019

that many American’s had about the number of immigrants entering the country. A more interesting point relating to this is that Anslinger wanted the growth of all marijuana plants outlawed; including those that yield no intoxicating chemicals and can only be used to produce the extremely versatile textile hemp, and cannabis oil, which can form a cheap and effective base for fuels, paints and plastics. Anslinger and his primary supporter, William Randolph Hearst, both had considerable interest in the petrochemical industry and it has been suggested that the anticannabis campaign was primarily designed to eliminate hemp as a competitor. No matter the reasons it is clear that Harry J. Anslinger and his anti-cannabis activism played an enormous role in the national criminalization of the drug, something which is still strongly debated to this day. Sam Qam a keen collector of mandala seeds and cannabis seeds. This article first appeared at: www.articlebiz.com/ article/441816-1-harry-j-anslingerand-the-campaign-against-marijuana/

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Illinois legislature legalizes recreational marijuana by Paul Danish

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ood news. A state legislature has finally gotten a recreational marijuana legalization bill across the finish line this year. After failures in three “New” states (New Jersey, New York, and New Mexico), the Illinois legislature made it happen. A successful vote in the state House of

have a transformational impact on our state, creating opportunity in the communities that need it most and giving so many a second chance.” Of the 10 states that previously legalized marijuana, only Vermont did it through action by the state legislature. In the rest it was legalized by a citizen initiative. However, Vermont legalized possession and home cultivation but not commercial sales. The Illinois legalization bill is the first passed by a legislature to do so. According to a summary of the Illinois bill’s main provisions put out by the Marijuana Policy Project, Illinois legalized personal possession of 30 grams of marijuana, cannabis-infused products containing no more than 500 milligrams of THC, or five grams of cannabis product in concentrated form. Non-residents will be able to purchase half those amounts. In this respect the Illinois bill was roughly similar to Colorado’s Amendment 64, the country’s first recreational marijuana measure, which was passed by the voters in 2012. Illinois’ pot taxes will be based on the relative potency of the pot and the type of product. There will be a 10 percent tax on flower and products with less than 35 percent THC, a 20 percent tax on edibles and other cannabis infused products, and a 25 percent tax on any product with a THC concentration above 35 percent. In all cases the state’s 6.25 percent sales tax would apply, as would local taxes up to 3.5 percent. The original bill would have allowed home cultivation of recreational marijuana, but that provision had to be scaled back to medical pot, with a cap of five plants per household in order to secure enough

Representatives last Friday sent the bill to the governor’s desk. The vote was 66 to 47. Two days earlier the bill was approved by the state Senate 38 to 17. Illinois Governor JB Pritzker, who had made legalization part of his campaign last year, said he would sign the bill. When he does, Illinois will become the 11th state to have legalized recreational marijuana. “The state of Illinois just made history,” he tweeted, “legalizing adult-use cannabis with the most equity-centric approach in the nation. This will

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votes for passage. It sucks, but politics is the art of the possible. Sales will begin on Jan. 1, 2020, with existing medical marijuana dispensaries leading the way until additional licenses can be issued. A place where the Illinois bill differs from Colorado’s is that it provides for the expungement of hundreds of thousands of marijuana possession convictions. Colorado didn’t get around to expungements until recently, and only then in some communities. Illinois convictions for possession of up to 30 grams will be automatically expunged. For amounts of 30-500 grams, the state’s attorney or the individual can petition a court to vacate the convictions. Around 770,000 cases would be eligible for expungement. And then there are the “social equity” provisions, which among other things, provide a pathway into the commercial marijuana business for people with prior marijuana convictions. The bill provides “additional points” persons applying for business licenses (presumably like the additional points veterans have gotten on civil service applications). It also gives them access to financial resources for start-up costs, and provides resources to communities that were hardest hit by the war on pot. Also, local colleges could obtain licenses for training programs to help residents prepare for cannabis industry-related jobs. The state Department of Agriculture and Community College Board will create up to eight pilot programs to train students to work in the legal cannabis industry. At least five of the eight programs must be for school where at least 50 percent of the students are low income. It’s no secret that blacks and Hispanics were disproportionately busted for pot during the drug war. Giving some of those who were targeted preferential access to the new pot industry is a form of reparations, and in a good way.

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