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F R E E E v e r y T h u r s d a y F o r 2 6 Ye a r s / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / F e b r u a r y 1 3 - 1 9 , 2 0 2 0


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news:

ICE detaining transgender individuals despite widespread call for their release by Angela K. Evans

news:

In light of job vacancies and work-environment issues, new bill would allow Colorado public employees to collectively bargain by Matt Cortina

boulderganic:

More research is needed before CDOT turns waste into roadways by Will Brendza

10 17 19

buzz:

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Margaretta Gilboy retrospective chronicles a beloved life and offers a respite from the cold of winter by Caitlin Rockett

beer:

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Tour de Brew: Travis Rupp, Avery’s Ale of Antiquity rascal, on Monticello by Michael J. Casey

On barbecue... with Georgia Boys Nick Reckinger and Matt Alexander by Matt Cortina

departments 5 6 7 25 27 29 36 37 39 47 49 51 53 54

Danish Plan: Nixon explains why Bernie will clean Bloomberg’s clock Guest Column: Every day’s a holiday for the oil industry in Colorado Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Overtones: The Seldom Scene headlines Midwinter Bluegrass Festival Arts & Culture: Boulder Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Chorale collaborate on Requiem by Luigi Cherubini Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘On holding hands,’ by Nicole Kelly Film: Beauty, defiance and madness in ‘The Lighthouse’ Food/Drink: Food news and what to try this week in Boulder County Nibbles: V-Day tasting opportunity for passionate cacao immersion Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Being dominant isn’t unique to men Weed Between the Lines: Arizona parents of children with autism fight to legally use medical marijuana Cannabis Corner: Prohibitionists want Colorado voters to recriminalize marijuana in November

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Publisher, Fran Zankowski Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Athena Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Coordinator, Corey Basciano Bookkeeper, Regina Campanella Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Editor-at-Large, Joel Dyer

February 13, 2020 Volume XXVII, Number 26 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2020 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Nixon explains why Bernie will clean Bloomberg’s clock by Paul Danish

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e and the Idea Fairy had almost finished airing out the house when there was a knock on the door. It was Richard Nixon, and his case worker Beelzebub, back from covering the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary for Hell TV. They flopped exhausted onto the asbestos Lazy Boys I had acquired after one too many couch fires. I offered Dick a cool one and ’Bub a flaming Dr. Pepper, which they gratefully accepted. I try to be a good host. I

“Let’s talk politics,” I said. “Iowa, New Hampshire, state of the race, who’s hot, who’s not...” “Ask me anything.” “OK,” I said, “Let’s start at the bottom and work our way up. What do you make of Michael Bennet dropping out?” “That’s the wrong question,” the Tricky One said. “The correct question is why did he ever drop in? He brought nothing to the table, no interesting ideas, no interesting personal story, no money, no organization. The only thing he accomplished was getting more than 900 New Hampshire Democrats to waste their votes.” “Well that’s something,” ’Bub interjected, blowing two plumes of sulfurous smoke out of his nostrils. I quickly cranked up the giant shop fan in the front window to Hypersonic. “Let’s move on to Andrew Yang,” I FEBRUARY 13, 2020

said quickly. “What do you make of his candidacy now that it’s over too?” “Yang is a more interesting case,” Nixon said reflectively. “Yang had a lot of interesting ideas. But you know the old saying about no force on Earth being stronger than an idea whose time has come? Yang’s problem was that his big idea — the $1,000 a month guaranteed income for everyone — came before its time. “But I have a feeling it’s an idea that isn’t going to go away,” Nixon added. “Two or three election cycles from now he might be able to get some traction out of it if he chooses to run again. In the meantime, he ought to get himself elected to some sort of a starter office if he wants to stay in politics — governor, congressman or even county commissioner somewhere in flyover country, maybe.” see DANISH PLAN Page 6

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Every day’s a holiday for the oil industry in Colorado by Phillip Doe

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ews surfaced last week that the oil industry has been dodging its Colorado taxes, and not just now and then, but systematically. The tax, called a severance tax, is based on a small percentage of the gross proceeds from oil and gas sales each year. A recent state audit, the source of these revelations, shows that in the years 2015 through 2018 roughly 85% of the 420 active operators in the state failed to turn in the required monthly production reports. In all, over 55,000 reports are said to be missing. Jeff Robbins, the self-anointed “czar” of all things oil and gas in the state, and also the less regally endowed director of the COGCC, expressed surprise the production reports were necessary for tax calculations. This is indeed surprising, since the COCGG’s budget is derived from severance tax revenues. In recent years the COGCC has had to go to the legislature for funding since the severance tax was inadequate to fund its budget of roughly $14 million. Enquiring minds, even those of a czar-like nature, might wonder why an industry that assures us it contributes billions to the state’s economy each year didn’t pay enough in taxes to fund a small agency that primarily keeps the industry’s oil rigs clanging and the oil and gas pipelines flowing to points of use outside the state. Little of it is used here. Colorado is very much an oil colony. Czar Robbins went on to say that he didn’t think that the lost tax revenues could be recovered because of a one-year statute of limitations. Perhaps that is why he showed no interest in how many years this bigtime swindling had been going on. The present severance law has been in effect since 1978. He went on to say that the $308 million the state auditor said could have been collected in non-reporting fines was unthinkable because that isn’t the relationship the state has with the industry. Has a greater understatement ever been spoken, no matter how unintentional and lacking in 6

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irony? As ex-governor Hickenlooper liked to say, the relationship between the state and the industry was more a business partnership based on mutual respect. It was not that of a regulator. That philosophy lives on. Neither did Robbins express much interest in recapturing what was unpaid last year. On this, like so many other things, Czar Robbins is perhaps a little confused. Defrauding the government is considered serious business in most jurisdictions, and the clock doesn’t start running until the crime is exposed. That was last week. We could wait for Attorney General Phil Weiser to intercede, for he promised to be a lion in defense of the people. But his report card is marked with absence after absence. It may be that the people will have to sue both the state and the industry. The audit report also showed that the effective tax rate for the severance tax in Colorado is .54%. But this is old news. A state audit several years ago showed the state’s severance tax rate was the lowest of all Western states. It was 18 times lower than North Dakota’s, which has an effective rate of 9%. Had the state had an effective 9% rate last year, the tax would have been well over half a billion dollars. The actual average tax has wavered around $60 million in the last few years, though in at least one of those years most of the tax was returned to the industry because of a state Supreme Court decision awarding them more subsidies. The grassroots group I belong to, Be the Change, drafted legislation in 2018 in response to the earlier audit report on the severance tax rate. It recommended an effective 9% tax rate. The primary motivation was concern over the closing and maintenance costs of the roughly 100,000 wells in the state, only 40,000 of which are producing. The present bonding is totally inadequate, $100,000 for all wells in an ownership. Noble Energy owns about 7,000 wells and Anadarko about 6,500. The state see GUEST COLUMN Page 8

FEBRUARY 13, 2020

DANISH PLAN from Page 5

“What about Biden and Warren?” “Zombies,” he said. “Dead man and dead woman walking. But with different causes of death. “The only thing Biden brought to the table was his supposed electability, because he had been Obama’s vice president and had been in Congress since the rocks cooled before that. But once he started campaigning it turned out he was an empty suit and kinda dumb. And it didn’t help that the Trump impeachment got him a lot of earned media he could have done without. Finishing fourth in Iowa and fifth in New Hampshire put a spike in the electability argument. After Super Tuesday he’ll be gone, if not before.” “As for Warren, she was campaigning as the thinking voter’s alternative to Bernie Sanders, with well-thought-out solutions to everything. It gave her traction until she couldn’t come up with a plausible way to pay for her wellthought-out health care plan... “But Bernie hasn’t come up with plausible ways of paying for all the stuff he wants to do either, and no one seems to care,” I interjected. “Isn’t this a double standard at work?” “It is, but not the one you think,” the Trickster said. “Bernie is a socialist, so no one expects him to be financially credible. But Warren was running as the adult in the room, so she was asked the adult question: ‘How are you going to pay for all the cool things you want to do?’ If she had a believable answer, she’d probably be the front-runner today. “It doesn’t matter what office you’re running for,” he continued. “You should always say some sensible things about money without having to be asked. It won’t guarantee that you’ll win, but it will improve your chances of being I

taken seriously.” “What about Mayor Pete and Senator Amy?” I asked. “They’re the ones who ate Biden’s and Warren’s lunch in New Hampshire, and maybe even some of Bernie’s,” he said. “But they didn’t win. “It’s anyone’s guess how they’ll do in Super Tuesday in states that have significant black and Hispanic voting cohorts with which they don’t seem to have gotten much traction. But neither has Bernie. “Southern Democrats of all stripes tend to be more conservative than northern ones, which theoretically would favor the non-Marxist candidates, but southern Dems have also had strong populist inclinations — and Bernie is running a populist campaign. So go figure.” “And what are the chances that Bloomberg could swoop in and blow them all away with a shitstorm of money?” I asked. “Like I told you last time,” the Trickster said, “Bernie has gotten six million contributions from more than a million-and-a-half contributors. Bloomberg has gotten all his campaign money from one contributor — himself. “Successful candidates listen to what their contributors have to say. Bernie is listening to contributors spread all over the country. He’s hearing what resonates and what doesn’t from a million-and-ahalf supporters with skin in the game. Bloomberg is listening to himself in the echo chamber of his skull. Who do you think is going to be more in touch with the voters?” He got up abruptly. “Gotta run,” he said. “All Hell is about to break loose in South Carolina, and we’re providing color commentary.” And in a flash they were gone. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


On national park funding

Colorado’s national parks are seeing record visitation, but unreliable funding over the years means their infrastructure desperately needs to be repaired. That’s why I am encouraged by a bipartisan proposal in Congress to address the nearly $12 billion in national parks deferred maintenance. The Restore Our Parks Act (ROPA) would set aside $6.5 billion over the next five years to fix dilapidated trails, buildings, roads, bridges, monuments and historic markers in our parks. Amazingly, 50 U.S. senators — from both parties — are cosponsoring this effort, with 330 representatives supporting a similar measure in the House. With all this support, you would think this would be an easy thing for Congress to get done. You’d be mistaken. Despite all the support for national parks, Congress is still struggling to enact this popular legislation. There is still time, and I hope they can get it done. Sens. Gardner and Bennet are both cosponsors of the ROPA, and Gardner especially is in a key position of leadership to help bring the bill to a vote. We need to see action to ensure our parks stay open, safe and accessible. Please do the right thing in supporting this crucial legislation. Ryan Fitzgerald/Wheat Ridge

Verizon throttled fire fighters’ unlimited data during a 2018 California fire and avoided $21.1 billion in federal taxes between 2007-2015), Google ads, Facebook ads, political ads... the list goes on. I even caught a glimpse of the architect of it all, the shadowy figure

of Rupert Murdoch sitting next to his fourth wife. He was trying to fit in to the crowd but the seats around the two were empty, perhaps the flock of sheep could sense a wolf among them. It was enough to force me back to bed to escape the nightmare of reali-

ty. I’ve been trying to tell myself it was just a bad dream ever since... Anyway, can’t wait for next year’s game! Will Chaney/Boulder

see LETTERS Page 9

Turn Your Miles Into Smiles Donate Your Miles Credit to One of Three Charities at Checkout.

Done with the Super Bowl

While watching the Super Bowl, I came to a realization: this whole thing is disgusting. I finished the game but drifted off to sleep that night with a sick feeling in my gut. Hours later I awoke in a sweat, realizing I had just witnessed a concerted effort to melt the minds of the American public. In my head I catalogued what I had just seen: The U.S. military using the biggest sporting event of the year as a recruiting tool, dozens of grown men willingly and repeatedly giving themselves brain trauma so that they may receive vast sums of money for moving an egg-shaped leather ball over a white line, Verizon ads praising first responders (let’s not forget that BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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GUEST COLUMN from Page 6

closed a few abandoned wells last year, reportedly at an average cost of over $200,000 apiece. Recently, one well in Canada cost about $5 million to close. We recommended the money generated from this tax money be deposited in a trust fund to cover all future closing costs of old wells that are abandoned or need rehabbing. Engineering studies show wells have to be reclosed on an average of every 20 years — cement breaks down and steel corrodes. The legislation called for the establishment of a state green bank to hold and loan these monies out for green projects within the state until needed for well closing. We also recommended that the tax exemption for small producing wells, called stripper wells, be eliminated. Last week, Czar Robbins announced that about 88% of all wells in the state were now stripper wells. By definition they are wells that produce fewer than 15 barrels of oil or 90,000 cubic feet of gas on a daily average over the course of a year. There is much room for gaming in such a formula. Given present oil and gas prices each stripper well could theoretically produce gross revenues in the $300,000 range, provided production for both oil and gas was at the legal maximum for a stripper well. Add to this that the state does not aggregate these wells for tax assessment purposes. Thus, if Noble, out of its 7,000 wells, had even 50% that were strippers that were producing gross revenue of $300,000 each, that would amount to over $1 billion in gross revenue that was escaping just taxation. See if you can get this deal. You don’t pay any income tax on your first $300,000 of income. Your wife can even make $300,000, as can each of your four children through a trust, and none of it is taxed. Only the value of your property would be taxed. Wait for the look of disbelief on the tax man’s face if you even dared trot out such a proposal. Thinking even bigger about the larceny afoot, if 88% of the wells in the state are stripper wells as Czar Robbins declares, all producing to their maximum, and the inventory of all producing wells is 40,000, then the theoretical gross revenues escaping any state taxation might total about $10.6 billion annually. Our legislation would have stopped any severance tax from going 8

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FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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back to the counties of origin or to the state water fund. Yes, some of the severance tax goes to keep water buffalo fantasies alive at public expense. Local governments already tax the industry. Weld County, for instance a few years back, collected about $500 million from the industry in property taxes. The state collected about $45 million in severance tax that year. State law allows the industry to deduct most of these local property tax payments from their state severance tax bill. As a result, oil producers in Weld County have paid nothing in state severance taxes in some years; yet, the county always received severance tax returns from the state. We brought this legislation to the attention of certain legislators in 2018. It was not welcome. The excuse then was SB 19-181 was being pushed, and there was no room for more environmental lawmaking. Had the law been in effect last year and this, perhaps as much as $1 billion would have been deposited in the state trust fund. The estimated cost of closing and maintaining wells abandoned by bankrupt frackers is in the many billions. Now the excuse at the legislature is that the public would never support it. Since the bill is a tax increase, it would have to be referred to the public for approval on the ballot. This excuse may have more to do with the Democratic leadership’s blind hate of TABOR as destructive of good government than it does with public approval. Everybody hates being taken for a ride, but people won’t know about the ride their being take on, for it’s a figurative one, unless you tell them and provide a remedy. Perhaps, the Solons at Colfax and Broadway need a little fireside chat with FDR so they could be reminded that the only thing they have to fear is fear itself — and that the state could achieve insolvency if something serious isn’t done to protect the public from the prospect that many of the frackers will go belly up and leave their poisonous legacy behind for future generations to manage. Lord Acton, often quoted, said, power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. The oil industry is in the absolute quadrant, with much assistance from state government. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. BOULDER WEEKLY


LETTERS from Page 7

Taking the Fifth

The public learned recently that more than 75% of the oil and gas companies operating in Colorado have failed to submit more than 50,000 legally required monthly reports and, in so doing, knowingly cheated Colorado out of millions of dollars in owed taxes. We also learned that the equipment used to measure oil and gas production was not inspected to ensure accurate readings, likely causing a further under-reporting of output and underpayment of taxes. And to add insult to injury, this systematic fraud has been going on for years and the state regulatory agencies didn’t even realize it. Why are these oil and gas companies not held to account like citizen taxpayers are? If a citizen does not file a required tax return and does not pay the taxes that are owed, the citizen has to pay back taxes, additional penalties and can go to jail. The same rules should apply to oil and gas companies. This industry has purposefully swindled the Colorado government and should not be excused from paying the taxes they owe, plus penalties accrued. The IRS does not forgive even honest mistakes like typos, why should the Colorado people let oil and gas corporations off the hook for this deliberate and longstanding cheating? Clearly, this is not a problem that just started in the last two years. The audit only checked the last two years, so this non-compliance and tax evasion has likely been going on since the industry started operations here. Claiming that the statute of limitations has run out and that there is no way to punish the oil and gas compa-

nies for perpetuating this fraud is pitifully weak. Colorado is sending the message that it is OK to cheat and steal from us. Don’t ever again let these oil and gas companies brag about how much tax revenue they pay towards supporting schools and our communities. This industry has not been paying their share for years and yet they use these same arguments against us when they claim that strengthening safety regulations and increasing severance taxes (closer to what other states require) would put them out of business. That is hubris on a massive scale. Caught red-handed, the oil and gas industry now blames the COGCC for not noticing that the industry was hoodwinking them and cheating on its taxes. We must not allow the industry to shift the blame for their own deliberate criminal activity. However, it is astoundingly egregious that the COGCC has for years, failed to enforce its own reporting rules. That is the purpose of this regulatory agency. The COGCC itself should be punished for not doing its job and allowing many millions of severance dollars to go uncollected. The COGCC’s shoddy operations and lack of understanding of their own responsibilities makes it impossible to trust them to do all of their other vital regulatory functions. Why should we trust the COGCC with the far more difficult task of protecting Coloradans’ health and safety when they have such huge procedural lapses in their basic duty of collecting and tracking paperwork? The solution to this problem is not (as the COGCC has promised) to tweak some algorithms and hope that everyone forgets what happened. At the very least, we should require the oil and gas companies to pay their back taxes owed from the last two years covered by the audit and we should enforce the $200 per well, per day fine that these companies incurred. A punishment even more fitting for the crime would be to also prohibit these non-compliant companies from ever again doing business in our state. And going forward, the state legislature must act to ensure that the regulatory agencies enforce the laws already on the books and must impose stricter controls on the corrupt and untrustworthy oil and gas industry. Megan Wilder/Boulder

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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While there is much discussion over the Second Amendment and the rights and limits of gun ownership, we hear less and less about the Fifth, which states that a person sworn under oath to tell the truth is allowed to not answer self-incriminating questions. Underlying this right is a profound respect for both a sworn oath and truth saying. Given the seemingly decaying value of truth in public and political life today, one wishes that all those sworn to uphold the Constitution would take the Fifth rather than proclaiming outright lies. Robert Porath/Boulder

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TRANSGENDER LAW CENTER

ICE detaining transgender individuals despite widespread calls for their release by Angela K. Evans LGBTQ AND MIGRANT RIGHTS activists block an intersection in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in August 2018 to demand justice for for a trans woman who died from medical issues gained during her time in detention.

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n Estella’s home country of Cuba, transphobia is rampant, she says. She’s been attacked. She’s been targeted by police. There are no human rights, she says. There is no access to HIV medication. “I preferred to risk my life than continue that way,” she says through her lawyer at the Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network (RMIAN). Estella is a pseudonym. She, like many within the transgender community currently detained at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Aurora Contract Detention Facility operated by the GEO Group, Inc., is hesitant to share personal details about where she’s from or the situation that led her to flee to the U.S. Like many transgender people seeking asylum in the U.S. she fled violent transphobia in her home country only to be prolongly detained by ICE in a system, advocates claim, illequipped to provide for their specific needs and care. Being in detention is “dreadful, ugly,” Estella says, according to her lawyer. “We are here asking for asylum and they’re treating us badly. Some of the officers treat us like 10

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men. They have a phobia. It’s more of a problem with the women.” Estella says that being in detention has affected her physically, mentally, emotionally — “Daily and completely, in every sense of the word.” And she’s not alone. Although the Aurora facility has housed transgender people for some time, the numbers have steadily been increasing since 2019, says Laura Lunn, detention program managing attorney at RMIAN. Then, on Jan. 21, the facility’s trans population more than doubled when several trans individuals were transferred from a correctional facility in New Mexico. The Aurora facility is currently housing about two dozen trans individuals. This number may fall short, however, Lunn says, given that it often takes weeks or even months for lawyers to fully understand how a person identifies, leaving many people without specific services at all. “Sometimes people themselves don’t have the vocabulary to describe how they identify in a way that resonates with us here in the United States,” she says. “So my guess is that a lot of people who are identified as male or female may not actually fall into one of those two boxes so easily and that a lot of that information is not being properly captured through the current process that is in place.” According to a Jan. 27 accountability report from U.S. Rep. Jason Crow (D-Aurora), the transgender FEBRUARY 13, 2020

individuals at the Aurora GEO facility are being held in three different dorms, at least one of which is a dedicated trans dorm. There is no dedicated medical personnel for this specific population, so, for now, ICE and GEO are working with the Denver Health LGBT Center for Excellence to provide both oversight and care of the mostly trans women currently being detained. Many of them require hormone therapy, some of them are HIV positive. Others don’t know their HIV status and would benefit from a test. All of them require specialized mental health care, Lunn says. “Transgender people who are detained have a lot of needs just because there is a mixture of trauma history that is particularly pertinent in these types of cases, and then on top of that most people have profound medical needs,” Lunn says. “Beyond what it means to be detained as a baseline, it is particularly complicated when you have specific social and medical needs.” In Lunn’s estimation, the best solution is releasing transgender people so that they can have ready access to care whenever it’s required. It’s an opinion shared by many within the immigrant advocacy community, as well as Democratic members of Congress who are working to ensure extra protections for detained transgender individuals. ••••

Most of the trans women now being held in Aurora came from the Cibola County Correctional Center in Milan, New Mexico, about 90 miles west of Albuquerque. The trans-specific unit in Cibola was opened in the summer of 2017, after a similar unit was closed in Southern California, and ICE has detained hundreds of transgender and gender nonconforming individuals since. But claims of inadequate medical neglect, lack of mental health care and the use of solitary confinement (administrative segregation, according to ICE) are common, according to the Santa Fe Dreamers Project, a legal advocacy group that has represented about 200 trans women across the country. On Jan. 21, dozens of individuals were unexpectedly transferred out of Cibola, and the unit effectively closed. Allegra Love, executive director of Sante Fe Dreamers Project, estimates about 95% or so of the women are from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico, although there are occasionally women from elsewhere, like Eastern Europe and Jamaica, for example. “They’re facing direct violence from their families, direct violence from their neighbors and their communities, direct violence from law enforcement,” Love says. “We’re talking about deadly transphobia, not just it’s hard to get a job, not just feeling rejected by your society, but your life

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


is in danger when you step out on the der woman from Central America lived have been killed,” she says. “It’s streets.” currently seeking asylum in the U.S. been women near and far to where I But the conditions of detention in who was released from Cibola last live, and especially during their tranthe U.S. also present unique dangers year. “When I was asking for asylum sition process and those involved in and challenges for transgender peoin Tijuana they took away everyactivism supporting the trans comple, Love says. Most of the time peo- thing I used to express myself — the munity, they’ve lamentably been ple are put into dorms according to feminine things. They took away my assassinated. And they are all innotheir gender assigned at birth, creathair extensions, my eyelash extensions cent people.” ing dangerous situations of sexual and my clothes. And [the discriminaJade traveled to Tijuana, crossed harassment and assault. In 2017, tion] was present during my entire the border and claimed asylum with LGBT individuals were victims of journey.” other trans companions she met 12% of reported sexual assaults in Jade, her chosen pseudonym, is along the way. When she first got to ICE detention, according to the only 22. She was kicked out of her Cibola, she says she told officials she Center for American Progress, house after finishing high school. didn’t want to be housed with cisgendespite the fact that they accounted During the day, she worked at a der men. According to ICE, when a for only 0.1% of the overall detained place where she had to keep her person doesn’t want to be held in population. COURTESY DIVERSIDAD SIN FRONTERAS general population for what“They’re at risk for sexual ever reason, administrative assault, physical assault, for bulsegregation is the only lying, discrimination, and when option. So Jade was put in a they don’t want to be in that cell by herself, in “an area detention, what happens is they where there were people could get put into solitary conwho weren’t right in the finement,” Love says. “And when head,” she says. “The rest of they get pushed to the brink my [trans] companions, they being in solitary, then their only sent them to a cell where choice is to go back into general there were 40 men, I think, pop and it’s really two torturous in a big dormitory, and 10 situations.” trans women, small chicas, Transgender folks also need they were sharing space with specified medical attention and men and sharing the bathunique mental health care, room. It’s tough but that’s the truth.” which for the most part has She calls what happened been sub par at best at ICE to her and other trans facilities across the nation, Love women at Cibola “a big says. injustice” and now works as In the last two years, at least an advocate for her commutwo trans women claiming asynity, making sure new arrivlum died in New Mexico. In the als have support and know case of Roxsana Hernandez, a Roxsana Hernandez they are not in it alone. transgender woman from •••• Honduras, an independent autopIn the wake of the deaths sy paid for by the Transgender LGBT individuals were of Hernandez and Leon, as Law Center revealed deep bruisvictims of 12% of reported sexual well as mounting complaints ing, dehydration and complicaassaults in ICE detention ... despite from current detainees, there tions resulting from untreated HIV. Hernandez was last held at the fact that they accounted for only has been a flurry of letters directed at ICE demanding Cibola before being transferred to 0.1% of the overall detained that the agency release all an ICU at a nearby hospital, population. trans men and women curwhere she passed away less than a rently in detention unless it month after claiming asylum in can adequately provide for their care. the U.S. in 2018. About a year later, hair short for fear of losing her job. In recent weeks, Democratic memanother trans woman, Johana Medina On weekends, she worked at a trans bers of Congress in both the House Leon from El Salvador, passed away show, trying to make ends meet and and the Senate, as well as more than four days after being released from afford her apartment. 80 advocacy organizations, have the Otero County Processing Center, “I didn’t have any support from signed onto letters addressed to also in New Mexico. my siblings, my family, my parents, Acting Secretary of the Department In June 2019, about two dozen nothing,” she says through an interof Homeland Security, Chad Wolf, trans women at Cibola signed a letter preter. “Everyone turned their backs and Acting Director of ICE, Matt claiming inadequate medical care and on me in that moment.” Albence, describing the extreme risks subjugation to psychological and verShe began hormone therapy in transgender individuals face around bal abuse by the guards. secret as well, but quickly it became the world and in detention, and ask“They treated us like men from clear this life wasn’t sustainable. ing the agency to honor the reputathe beginning,” says Jade, a transgen“Many of my friends where I

In 2017,

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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FEBRUARY 13, 2020

tion of the U.S. as a place of refuge. What’s more, the letters point to specific direction from Congress, passed as part of the 2020 appropriations bill in December, that only allows the detention of transgender immigrants “in facilities specifically contracted for their care,” according to the office of Rep. Mike Quigley (D-Illinois). “Currently, no ICE facilities meet these standards,” the press release, dated Jan. 14, states. This language is based on a 2015 ICE directive that describes how the agency should accomodate transgender individuals in its care. “This memo that ICE put out in 2015 recommends that facilities contracting with ICE, if they’re going to have transgender immigrants in their custody, adopt a formal contract modification,” says Heidi Altman, director of policy at the National Immigrant Justice Center. “And that’s important because contracts are what provide accountability in ICE’s current detention system. And so [a] facility may be providing X, Y and Z services right now, but if they’re not contractually obligated to do so, there’s nothing holding them to continuing to do so.” Altman, like most others BW spoke with, advocates for a policy of supervised release for transgender individuals, since in almost all cases they don’t present a threat to national security or flight risk. They all, advocates say, have valid asylum claims and have a vested interest in showing up for court. What’s more, multiple studies show this population is particularly vulnerable in prison-like settings. “If somebody doesn’t have any criminal history and they have an extremely strong likelihood of prevailing on their immigration case, one would think that the vast majority of them should be released from detention if not all of them,” Love says. “And especially given how risky it is to detain this population and how intensive their social and medical needs are, it just does not make sense.” In Aurora, Crow’s report says GEO has reached out to community service providers to help with additional and specific mental health support for the transgender population. It also states that Crow’s staff will give GEO a list of community service prosee TRANS Page 15

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The right to have rights

In light of job vacancies and work-environment issues, new bill would allow Colorado public employees to collectively bargain

by Matt Cortina

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or the last eight years, Kristi Griffith has worked at the Colorado Department of Human Services (DHS) helping provide grants to organizations that work with children at risk of domestic violence, drug abuse, income insecurity and more. Her work, and the work done by the 4,000 other employees in DHS, provides a safety net for Colorado residents who encounter insecure and dangerous living situations. But like many of her coworkers at DHS and the 28,000 other employees of the state, Griffith feels like she isn’t empowered to adequately voice her concerns about wages, work environment and workloads. That disempowerment, she says, has contributed to a 24% annual turnover rate in the department. “I think people are frustrated with low pay and not getting paid when there are vacancies for doing extra jobs,” Griffith says. “If we have a high turnover rate, that means you have a high vacancy rate, which means you’re asked to take on additional duties, often doing two or three jobs for months at a time. The [state] hasn’t been great about differential pay ... it’s not something that’s offered very often.” Griffith says many state employees are frequently asked to do more for less. And while new administrations and legislators vow to provide support, nothing seems to change. “I think each administration seems to want to address it; they act like they do,” Griffith says. “We get employee surveys each change of administration, but we don’t see change happening. We get told they’re making changes, and we don’t see 12

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it happen.” Thus, a new bill — the Colorado Partnership for Quality Jobs and Services Act — is circulating in the state legislature and would allow state public employees to unionize and collectively bargain. If passed, the Act would codify an executive order signed by former Gov. Bill Ritter that set the groundwork for state employees to have a union representative, but because it’s not a statute, could be revoked at any time by a future administration and legislature. “Legislation is needed so that state employees’ right to collectively bargain is recognized and secured in our state’s laws,” says Rep. Daneya Esgar (D-Pueblo) who is sponsoring the bill. “While the state always has the best intentions, the people who know the work best are the employees on the frontline. Having a formalized way for their input about the jobs they do and the services they provide to be included in setting the course for state services will result in improvements all the way around.” The key mechanism in the bill is a provision that allows employees to negotiate directly with the state through their union representation about wages, working conditions, benefits and more. It’s a change from the executive order, which didn’t bind the state to such negotiations. “The executive order only allows for there to be partnership meetings, which is in essence a meet-and-confer without any legally binding requirement to do what was agreed upon on in the meeting,” says Hilary Glasgow, executive director of Colorado WINS, the state employee union. FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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For instance, state Department of Corrections (DOC) employees recently stood before a state committee and described how understaffing and hazardous working conditions have contributed to a low employee retention rate in the department. With passage of the bill, Glasgow says, DOC employees will be able to sit down with department heads and the state to negotiate working condition standards — anything from uniforms and schedules to staffing and safety. There is a no-strike clause in the bill, but Glasgow says that’s for good reason: “State employees do the critical background work of the state that can’t go undone. ... You can’t have no one show up to work at a prison.” Glasgow adds that although striking may be used by other unions, it is usually done as a last resort. And Esgar says the bill has language that ensures the state “will act in good faith.” “The state cannot refuse to participate in the partnership process, for example,” she says. Opponents argue the bill would increase costs to the state, but proponents counter that the current cost of retraining individuals and paying overtime costs to fill the one out of five vacant public jobs is higher. Ultimately the bill is about giving power to public employees, to promote direct action in response to their concerns. “Bringing people to the table who do the work to have a voice on how the work is done and how it’s compensated… to have a discussion that both sides are bound to,” Glasgow says, “these things are not rocket science.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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TRANS from Page 11

viders who may be able to help with additional services particular to this population. And the staff of both ICE and GEO, the report states, have had several recent specific training sessions for this population, although ICE was unable to provide any detail as to what that training entails by press time. “I’ve been very impressed by the way that both ICE and GEO have responded to the increased transgender population at GEO,” Lunn says. “Based on our interactions they’re doing everything in their power to make sure that people’s needs are being met.” Still, she points out that GEO’s medical staff does not include a specialist equipped to serve this population, although they have been working on it. Plus, the transfer to Aurora uprooted these women from a strong support system in New Mexico, one that had been developed over many months, even years, and placed them in a much larger prison-like context. “It’s been divisive to the community that they had formed in New Mexico and with one another,” Lunn says. “While it’s very encouraging that they have broader access to medical care here in Colorado, it certainly has had damaging effects to the psyche.” The women are getting ESL lessons twice a week, and the hair styling services already available in the women’s areas will now be offered in the transgender dorm, according to Crow’s report. But in New Mexico, community groups as well as the Transgender Resource Center provided weekly therapy sessions and makeup nights, Love says, forming bonds and a support system for many of the women. She too is hesitant to give ICE too much credit. “I will say that ICE leaning on those things in an attempt to say that detention [is] humane is complete and total bullshit,” Love says. Through RMIAN, every trans person currently at the Aurora facility is either represented by in-house staff counsel or pro bono attorneys. On Wednesday, Feb. 12, advocates and elected officials rallied at the Colorado State Capitol calling for ICE to free Kelly Gonzalez Aguilar, one of the trans women currently BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

detained in Aurora. According to a press release put out by the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), Aguilar has been detained for two and a half years, longer than any other trans women currently in ICE custody. “Kelly’s prolonged detention, including the months ICE held her in solitary confinement, has taken a significant toll on her mental and medical health,” says her lawyer, Tania Linares Garcia, senior litigation attorney at the National Immigrant Justice Center, in an emailed statement. “ICE has the authority to release Kelly, and we hope they listen to the communities in Denver and San Francisco who came out today to demand that they do so.” Aguilar, when released, plans to join her community in San Francisco, much like Jade, who is now in California with her chosen family and friends, and where she’s continued with hormone therapy. “It was like a double-life for a long time, until I got to the U.S. and started medical treatment again with a doctor inside the detention and here outside,” she says. “So now everything is different because I feel more free and I can fully express myself.” For others in Denver, Lunn says, there’s a good chance that once lawyers help secure their release, they will settle in Denver. “The story doesn’t just end with people being detained here,” she says. “The fact that they’ve been brought to Colorado may mean that they will settle in Colorado by virtue of the resources that we do have available in the Denver region.” One individual was just released on Tuesday, Feb. 11, according to AFSC. For the others still detained, a collaboration of multiple immigrant rights organizations are helping to secure sponsorship for the trans individuals currently held in Aurora, rallying a community of welcoming support once they are freed. All while Congress continues to push the federal agencies to find a more permanent solution. “There’s transphobia here [in the U.S.] too, but my hope is to integrate into society, study, be happy how I am,” Estella says. “Not have problems with the police for dressing like a woman.” I

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FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Morning Glory

blooms

Plastic roads?

More research is needed before CDOT turns waste into roadways

by Will Brendza

A

COURTESY OF UCSD

t the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) campus, there is a 250-foot stretch of road that’s unlike any other in the U.S. It’s made with asphalt that uses recycled plastic waste instead of conventional fossil fuel bitumen — and you probably wouldn’t even notice the difference if you were standing on it. “It’s flat and black and smooth,” says Gary Oshima, the constructions commodity designer at UCSD. “If you happen to be an asphalt installer, there’s a little bit of a sheen on the asphalt they can notice, but no way that regular people would know the difference.” The plastic asphalt offers a new way to reuse plastic waste, while reducing the replacement/maintenance costs of conventional roads by making them stronger. The company that installed the UCSD road, MacRebur Plastic Road Company, claims that, “After years of tests and trials all over the world,” the method results in “enhanced and more durable roads” made from 100% plastic waste material that does not leach plastic or toxic fumes into the environment. While places like the U.K. and the City of Los Angeles are enthusiastically pursuing pilot project programs for plastic roads, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) remains hesitant to adopt this new sustainable solution too quickly. “CDOT is generally proactive with advancing new technology wherever possible with roadway construction,” Bob Wilson, a CDOT regional communications manager, says. “However, implementing new technology is risky especially when there are many unknowns in the field of plastic roads.” Conventional asphalt is made

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

from 95% aggregate (rocks, gravel and sand) and 5% bitumen (the tarry black “glue” that bonds it all together). MacRebur’s plastic asphalt uses that same recipe, only the bitumen is recycled plastic waste instead of a new petroleum product. Currently, plastic roads are more expensive to build than conventional roads, at least for now, Oshima says. Once production of recycled plastic bitumen is domestic, the cost will likely go down, he says. But that isn’t the case yet. Wilson also points to a number of other unknowns with the use of recycled plastic roads, including: the variability of plastic types and how that might affect the consistency of long-term use; unknown performance when it comes to cracking or rutting; a lack of construction guidelines; no long-term research on how temperature variances might affect durability or what impact studded tires and chains might have on the product “Much of the early work with plastic roads has been in areas with nowhere near the severity in climatic changes as we have in Colorado,” Wilson says. “Cold temperature performance of any type of plastic road, or plastic modified asphalt would be essential for it to be a viable tool here in Colorado.” Oshima acknowledges that the UCSD road has only been in place for a year and a half, which is not an I

adequate period to draw conclusions. But he points to MacRebur’s studies in Saudi Arabia and the U.K., where plastic asphalt has been used on motorways, roundabouts and airport runways for just over six years. “So far, those roads have performed very well in both of those environments,” Oshima says. Both the colder, wetter environment of the U.K. and the hot and dry climate of the Middle East have proven suitable for plastic asphalt, he says. Still, a six-year testing period really isn’t adequate to draw conclusions from either, according to Wilson. Most asphalt roads have a lifespan of 20 to 25 years, and the top layer is often milled and resurfaced only every 10 to 15 years — which is to say, the reality of plastic asphalt is that it still has a half decade of testing before conclusions can be drawn. Still, Oshima maintains that the plastic road on the college campus in California has held up extremely well. “There is no known downside,” he says. “We’ve got plenty of waste plastic, we got plenty of bad roads. It’s really kind of a win-win.” And while that might be true, for that particular road in that particular climate, CDOT will need a lot more convincing before it starts putting recycled plastic into Colorado’s roads. As Wilson says, “For plastics in roadways to be a viable option, significant national and state specific research would need to be conducted regarding long-term performance before it is ready for widespread use.” Considering the long lead time and the potential environmental benefits, perhaps now is the time to start testing plastic roads in Colorado. FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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n a ridge overlooking the Escalante River, nine people — seven teenagers, two adults — huddled together screaming, “I am human!” into the open space that had been carved over the millennia. One by one, we roared into the expansive system of red rock monoliths, delicately cut arches and ancient veins rising up from the desert floor — an impeccable aesthetic for a “barbaric yawp,” as Walt Whitman would say. We were small, that was obvious, but we felt infinite. We had been stalked by coyotes, battled our way through quicksand and faced an endless assault of low-lying branches and high-standing brush as we made our way to the ridge via a nearby wash. We had laughed, cried, grown and argued our way through thick and thin for the past four days, and now we stood at the climax of our adventure, in a moment of complete acceptance of space and time. There on the ridge we surrendered ourselves to the universe. We conjured all our pain, suffering and sadness, bringing forth suppressed feelings by meditating on our individual experiences — experiences that kept most of the teenagers in a constant state of anxiety and fear. I was working as a guide for a wilderness therapy program in Utah. The screaming was actually a ceremony of sorts. As guides, we worked eight days on, six days off, and for those eight days we would go on a variety of trips doing activities such as rock climbing, mountain biking, canyoneering or backpacking. We tended to use ceremonies like this once or twice during a trip to celebrate major accomplishments or to bring the group together, igniting feelings of unity with one another through emotional vulnerability in a safe and supportive environment. Most of the students I was guiding that week with my co-guide, Emily, struggled with different forms of anxiety, depression or substance abuse. On other trips, guides might work with students with Oppositional Defiance Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder or, as they say, “failure to launch” — the inability to make responsible decisions to progress one’s life. Students come from all over the world, but mainly the U.S., to stay for eight to 12 weeks on average, returning from their trips to a basecamp once a week to meet with a

those rolling edges. As daylight faded and night settled in on the first day, the students, reluctant to go to bed, demanded we keep walking. Eventually, Emily and I caved, giving our students agency to decide. Wilderness therapy is all about fostering healthy coping mechanisms, building trust in yourself and others, and allowing students the ability to choose for themselves. Because their desire was grounded in enthusiasm, we let them continue. Nine tiny circumferences of light guided our way as our world quickly turned into a tunnel of brush, dirt and fallen trees. We pushed away sticks and leaves, leaping across the river from time to time, always determined to stay out of it. When the banks of the river began to rise and the canyon narrowed, we had no choice but to take the more direct, wet route. Barely 10 minutes after stepping into the river, one of my students suddenly dropped to his waist in quicksand. As a guide, I have many roles, but three of them overpower the rest. The most important role is to keep the students safe. The second is to have fun. The third is to advance their therapeutic process. Some people will argue about the order of the latter two, but I believe that therapeutic progress is dependent on fun. Keeping them safe, however, carries the most weight. After making sure he wasn’t still sinking and the rest of the group was safe and accounted for, I got to work. Asking two other students to help me, we laid down three sleeping pads on top of the quicksand in order to expand the surface area and prevent ourselves from sinking in with him. It took us two hours before I finally managed to tie paracord to the loops on the back of his boots. The two boys helping me were now standing, ready to pull as I freed up the little space I could above his heels. Quicksand is a lot like liquid cement, a constant suction holding you in, immediately filling any space available. The best way to get a foot out is via the same motion you would pull your foot out of a shoe. “Thank goodness,” I cried, almost collapsing into the river as his left and then his right leg popped out of the muck. The rest of the group, although slightly panicked, cheered and welcomed their fellow hiker back to dry ground.

Quicksand and barbaric yawps Wilderness therapy and the power of experience

Story and photos by Laurenz Busch

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

therapist. They sleep and live outside the entire time. We’d been sent to Glen Canyon Recreation Area near Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument for our trip and had made our way down a little-known wash as we headed toward the Escalante River. The Escalante is a pristine, meandering tributary in the midst of an endless plain of canyons and desert only contained by the high reaching aspens of Boulder Mountain to the north, Lake Powell to the south and the Kaiparowitz Plateau to the east. It’s one of the most remote areas in the United States; unmatched beauty with little tourism. Wilderness therapy is often a last resort and difficult decision for many families. By removing them from their home environments, students are given the ability to spend a couple months solely focused on therapy. Often forced into the program by their parents, students frequently told us they didn’t want to be there. This week, however, the boys were all enjoying themselves. They’d never seen anything like this place and felt like they were exploring a whole different world. We’d started our hike three days earlier at a small trailhead an hour’s drive into the desert from where Hole in the Rock Road breaks off Highway 12 near Escalante, Utah. What had been a dry wash on a level desert floor with emerging rock formations slowly began to transform. The walls began to rise, water began to flow, and trees grew more dense, lush and full of blooms. At 200 feet tall and 150 feet wide, the wash had turned into a canyon. We followed it, isolating ourselves from the great big world that existed somewhere beyond I

FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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“Hey! Where’s your boot?” one student asked. Looking down at one boot and a wet sock, the newly liberated student looked at me and then back at where he had been. Murky water stared back at us. We realized his boot was still two feet deep. Quicksand, it turns out, is everywhere during certain seasons. We were there in July after it had rained the week before. Because we couldn’t hike without his boot, we called it a night and went to bed. The next day we got up, built a dam, diverted the water just enough to dry out the quicksand and started digging. After reaching the boot, the student dumped out the sand, and we filled in the hole, scattered the dam, and got on our way, several miles behind schedule. Although this was just one of many experiences that scared us to varying degrees, it was an important one for the group. Only eight hours after leaving the trailhead we were all shaken by the reality of our current environment. The darkness, the isolation, the student stuck in quicksand — it all brought up emotional responses, fear from a lack of control. The student was scared because he was stuck and couldn’t get out. Emily and I were scared because we were responsible for him and at times felt like he might never get out. The rest of the students were scared because it could have been them and they had no clue what to do. Understanding that they were

scared was important, but understanding why they were scared is what they came to learn. It’s the ability to learn from an emotional response instead of merely reacting to it that often helped students create awareness the next time similar feelings came up. That awareness often allows people the ability to recognize the emotions behind their behavior and amend that behavior in the future. Transformative experiences differ from person to person. For one student, worried about a pack of howling coyotes, it was learning to trust his group that made the difference. For the student stuck in quicksand, learning to breathe and attack the situation from a place of calm made the difference for him. During that trip, I saw people change and self-confidence grow. Together we indulged in bandana-filtered mud water and hiked sandy river banks in mud-caked boots and 50-pound packs. I’ll never know if they remember this trip, but I certainly do. I remember it because I saw seven ragged, dirty, wild-looking, kind-hearted, struggling teenagers take hold of their own agency. They came to Utah to address real struggles preventing them from living up to their full potential. I will remember because I watched them acknowledge, one by one, that although they were seemingly small and powerless compared to what surrounded them, they were still human.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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Spring in winter

ON THE BILL:

Margaretta Gilboy: ‘Flying in the Hands of Time: A Retrospective.’ Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through May 25.

Margaretta Gilboy retrospective chronicles a beloved life and offers a respite from the cold of winter

STORY AND PHOTOS by Caitlin Rockett

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alking into Margaretta Gilboy’s retrospective, Flying in the Hands of Time, at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (BMoCA), it’s easy to pretend — despite the biting cold and dirty piles of plowed snow outside — that it’s spring. Inside, there are flowers everywhere, fruit, babies, birds, young lovers in skimpy clothes sharing a kiss in dappled sunshine. Gilboy, who passed in 2017, was a longtime practitioner and teacher of Qigong (pronounced chee-guhng), a centuries-old practice combining posture, movement, breathing and meditation to promote healing, both spiritually and physically. In traditional Chinese medicine, qi is energy, the force that drives living things, and Qigong is the practice of cultivating and balancing this energy. For more than a decade, Gilboy studied Qigong with FaXiang Hou, a fifth generation Chinese Qigong master. Gilboy, who was born in Philadelphia but spent much of her adult life in Colorado, taught a therapeutic class in Boulder for many years called Spring in Winter Qigong. “[Spring] is a heady, invigorating, sometimes disturbing season with wild fluctuations of energy surging throughout nature as birth, arousal and movement,” writes practitioner Ron Davis for the Shambala Mountain Center. “The momentum created by spring qi gives structure and impetus to the world: young trees thrusting skyward, icy rivers flooding valleys, babies everywhere screeching with the joy of life. In humans, Qi rises like a slow tide coming up from its winter storage in the lower abdomen and moving into the chest where it stimulates the liver with fresh vitality.” This is the energy Gilboy cultivated in her artwork: a constant sense of rebirth, optimism in the face of life’s difficulties, new perspectives on the mundane. Her work holds all the hallmarks of still life — fruit, bowls, flowers, trinkets of all shapes and sizes — but it skews far from the traditional work of the Dutch masters who popularized the form in the 16th century. Gilboy’s love of Asian art, particularly Japanese wood22

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block prints, mingled with her proclivity to blend the real and the surreal, the significant and the common place. The influences found in Gilboy’s work are varied, if sometimes inconspicuous. “Maggie loved cubism,” says Gilboy’s friend Simon Zalkind, who curated the BMoCA retrospective. “She loved something about the postmodern aesthetic, which gives free rein to the pairing or the coupling of objects that are dissonant or from different periods, different times. She was actually very, very contemporary within FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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a context that mined the possibilities of traditional genres. I think of her as a very contemporary artist.” Zalkind met Margaretta Gilboy (Maggie to her friends) sometime in the mid-’80s after he moved to Colorado from New York. A curator for several museums in New York and Colorado, as well as an independent curator and art advisor for private collections, Zalkind found Gilboy rather naturally through his work when Standard Oil (which at the time had an office on 17th Street in Denver) requested Zalkind acquire one of Gilboy’s paintings for its office. “I remember looking at one [of her paintings] and having one of those profoundly disorienting experiences of beauty,” he writes in the introduction to the book he helped produce about Gilboy’s retrospective. “They were tenderly and expertly painted and brimming with a seemingly incongruous and occasionally off-kilter deployment of objects and art-historical references, both Western and Eastern. In them, the most quotidian of domestic tchotchkes could find itself in an oblique dialog with a canonical, art-historical masterpiece.” In Gilboy’s piece “Gone, Gone” (oil on canvas, 2009), a vase of mixed flowers — pink begonias and yellow Mai flowers — sits atop a table, a mirror just in front of the vase. In the mirror’s reflection is Vermeer’s “Girl With a Pearl Earring.” Here Gilboy nods to new beginnings (as well as Asian culture) with the yellow Mai flowers, which are traditionally associated with celebrations of Tet, the Vietnamese Lunar New Year. The mirrored image of the Vermeer opens the painting up both spatially — giving the viewer a sense of the world outside the painting’s frame — and metaphorically — allowing the viewer to wonder how Vermeer’s masterpiece relates to the work. Mirrors abound in Gilboy’s art, often fracturing the perspective in a way that can be disorienting and exciting. “I think the use of mirrors in some ways also implies the reflection of the person looking [at the painting],” Zalkind says. “I think that was one way that people are sort of drawn in, but I do think she was interested in reflective surfaces and in the way that they can fracture a picture, but even the images that are kind of fracBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Top: A detail of Gilboy’s watercolor and charcoal “Conversation” (2004). Below: A close-up of a doll “Conversation” was modeled after.

tured, so to speak, I think will leave you with a sense of their wholeness.” “I orchestrate objects on the table in a composition until the arrangement clicks inside of me,” Gilboy said in an artist’s statement from 2010. “My paintings explore the experience of being human. Connection, love, impermanence, loss, joy and mystery within the context of art and artifacts are my subject matter.” Gilboy’s home, Zalkind says, also reflected this sense of “unconscious curation of objects.” “I was always envious because everything looked like it had found the place it should be without any contrivance,” he says. “In a way, her home was a lot like her paintings — there were a lot of unlovely things that she made lovely simply by valuing them.” Everything in Gilboy’s art seems of BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

the moment, timeless even. Her portraiture comes alive on the canvas, often taking on a blurred aesthetic like that created by a camera’s narrow aperture in low light. She presents humans — and often dolls — as “earthbound,” Zalkind says, “not as ciphers for some hidden transcendental abstraction.” A Chinese acrobat — clad in cherry blossom pink, surrounded by orchids in bloom, her smile as beguiling as the Mona Lisa’s — greets you as you step into the retrospective. Her smile says it all: Here in this make-believe spring you are allowed to feel hopeful, joyous, connected... reborn. “I wouldn’t call her uplifting in any simplistic kind of uplift way,” Zalkind says. “She was just a person with tremendous libido, by which I mean she had a lot of life force and it radiated and suffused the experience of everyone she encountered.” I

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Endless Scene

Iconic bluegrass band the Seldom Scene headlines a 35-year Colorado tradition

ON THE BILL: Midwinter Bluegrass Festival. Feb. 14-16, Ramada Inn, 10 E. 120th Ave., Northglenn, midwinterbluegrass.com

by John Lehndorff CUMBERLAND MUSIC COLLECTIVE

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luegrass music is meant to be heard while sitting on a grassy field at a sunny summer festival. That’s the belief of fair-weather bluegrass fans whose mandolins and banjos go into hibernation between Labor Day and Memorial Day. Colorado’s hardcore bluegrassers will emerge for the 35th annual Midwinter Bluegrass Festival. They don’t care that it takes place at a suburban hotel ballroom instead of a pretty mountain town. These folks are there for the music — to listen, mingle and to play. Rather than a creek to jump in, there is a swimming pool at Northglenn’s Ramada Inn. There will be no wind, rain, sunburn or dust clouds kicked up by dancers. Instead of campfire sessions, groups in the lobby will be pickin’ the heck out of “Sally Goodin.” This is a perfect place to appreciate a legacy band like the Seldom Scene, which appeals to traditionalists and progressives alike. The Seldom Scene was originally formed in 1971 in Bethesda, Maryland, by guys who worked professional jobs and only performed on weekends. Founded by John Starling, John Duffey, Mike Auldridge (all of whom have passed), Ben Eldridge and Tom Gray, the band was devoted to multi-part harmonies, soulful singing and expert musicianship in the Bill Monroe tradition. However, their song choices veered from country music to rock, folk and pop. Their extended acoustic, psychedelic excursions on songs like “(I Know You) Rider” essentially launched the modern progressive bluegrass sound that now features bands like The Infamous Stringdusters and Yonder Mountain String Band. The Seldom Scene were a breath of fresh air to a stodgy genre. Over the decades the Seldom Scene has been home to a string of notable pickBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ers who eventually replaced the original members. Lou Reid (not to be mistaken for Lou Reed, of Velvet Underground fame) was a fan long before he became a member, contributing vocals, mandolin and guitar. “In 1972 I was on a tour bus and we put on an 8-track tape of the first Seldom Scene album. I’ve always loved their music from that time. This was really smooth bluegrass with great singing,” Reid says, calling from his home near Union Grove, North Carolina. “When I joined the band for the first time in 1986, it was pretty easy to sing with them because I already knew a lot of the songs,” Reid says. Besides Reid, the Seldom Scene also features guitarist Dudley Connell, Ron Stewart on banjo and fiddle, dobroist Fred Travers, and Ronnie Simpkins on bass — all pickers with decades on their resumes. “The band members and the music has changed over the years, but it always sounds like the Seldom Scene. Folks seem to think we’re doing a good job at keeping the spirit going,” Reid says, noting that three or more generations come out for shows. Reid likes the contained nature of indoor winter bluegrass festivals because of the proximity with the fans. “A lot of people and their families get involved in these festivals and pass along the love of playing and singing. When I I

was coming up, I was shy and waited until the end of the line to meet my heroes. So we’re always happy to meet people at the merch table or in a workshop,” he says. At the Midwinter Bluegrass Festival, Reid and friends will lead a workshop. Audience members usually ask questions, often about how to play specific licks. “Some things we know how to do but we can’t explain it, so we just play or sing it,” Reid says. For their three sets over two days, Seldom Scene has 25 albums of originals and covers to draw from, including favorites such as “Walk Through the World With Me,” “110 in the Shade,” “Muddy Water” and the signature tune, “Wait a Minute.” The band continues to record, including 2019’s Changes. “We looked at folk songs from the ’60s and early ’70s. There was real poetry in those lyrics,” Reid says. On the album they reinvent Fred Neil’s “Everybody’s Talkin’” and James Taylor’s “Sweet Baby James” plus tunes by Dan Fogelberg, Phil Ochs and John Prine. “We always try to bring folks up and then bring ’em down with the sad songs,” Reid says. Three Days of Twang in Northglenn The Midwinter Bluegrass Festival features a fiddle contest, band scramble, gospel music sets, instrumental and vocal workshops and a jam for pickers under age 20. Niwot banjoist Pete Wernick will lead a beginners’ jam workshop. Featured bands include two recent Colorado-born winners of the Telluride Bluegrass Band Competition, Wood Belly and Bowregard, plus the Price Sisters Band, the Canadian Slocan Ramblers, Savage Hearts, Ft. Collins’ Bluegrass Patriots, Songs From The Road Band and Durango’s Bar D Wranglers. FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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Luigi Cherubini is a gem

Boulder Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Chorale collaborate on Requiem by the overlooked composer

by Peter Alexander

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aria Luigi Carlo Zenobio are out there that would fit the stage that Salvatore Cherubini just may we perform on. Additionally our mission be the most influential classihas always been to bring little gems in cal composer you have never music into our audience’s ears. After lisheard of. tening to this piece I recommended it to As director of the Paris Conservatoire Vicki [Burrichter] and she was very enthufor 20 years (1822-42) and author of an siastic about performing it.” important textbook on counterpoint, he The Requiem was first performed in influenced a generation of younger musi- 1817 for a mass in memory of King Louis cians. His many operas and his church XVI, who was executed at the height of works were widely performed PUBLIC DOMAIN and admired in his lifetime. In particular his Requiem in C minor — which will be performed Saturday, Feb. 15, by the Boulder Chamber Orchestra and Boulder Chamber Choir — was admired by Beethoven, who asked that it be performed at his funeral. “It’s a beautiful, beautiful piece,” says Vicki Burrichter, director of the Boulder Chamber Choir who is preparing the chorus for the performance. “Cherubini’s really extraordinary and was admired by Beethoven and Schumann and Brahms. I think he should be performed a lot more often.” Bahman Saless, the conductor of the Boulder Chamber Orchestra who will lead the performance, agrees. He writes by email from Prague, where he is travel- the French Revolution in 1793. It is a ing as a conductor, “What I would like our unique work in that it is for chorus only, audience to take away from this concert with no soloists. “It is highly unusual not is that there were many contemporaries to have soloists in a Requiem,” Burrichter of Beethoven and Mozart who were over- says. “I can’t even think of another one.” shadowed by the presence of these For Burrichter, that is more of a featitans. Some of them deserve some light ture than a shortcoming. “It is a fantastic to shine on them.” opportunity for the chorus to do everyFor the Boulder Chamber Orchestra, thing with the orchestra and have that the selection of the Cherubini Requiem opportunity to shine,” she says. “And a was partly practical because the ensemchorus can do anything, right? I’m sort of ble is not large enough to perform larger joking but not really.” scale works including the Brahms Cherubini wrote for the chorus to proGerman Requiem or the Verdi Requiem. vide the contrast and lyrical moments that “We have had so much success perform- soloists often create in large choral ing Mozart’s Requiem, and to me the works. For example, the Dies Irae (“Day marriage between orchestra and choir in of wrath”) movement has one of the most many ways is the perfect union,” Saless dramatic texts of all choral music. That writes. movement, Burrichter says, “is extremely “I was very curious what other pieces dramatic, as only a big chorus can do, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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ON THE BILL: Luigi Cherubini: Requiem in C minor, presented by Boulder Chamber Orchestra with the Boulder Chamber Chorale. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder, boulderchamberorchestra.com

and then there are sections where he puts just the men or just the women singing these long beautiful solo-type lines.” Elsewhere, “There’s a lot of contrast. There are movements like the opening Kyrie that is mostly pianissimo and piano and very, very hushed, very moving. So there’s a lot of drama in this piece,” she says. That is the other aspect of the Requiem that Burrichter finds compelling: it reflects the composer’s operatic sense of drama. Cherubini was, from the beginning, a very successful opera composer. “It’s got a real story, and he’s a dramatic storyteller,” she says. “That comes through very clearly, which is very exciting. This is what we love about Italian opera, so if you love Italian opera, you will love the Cherubini.” Written in 1817, the Requiem falls in between the restrained classical style of Haydn and Mozart and the more emotional 19th-century Romantic style, and it can be performed either way, with large, powerful Romantic forces or a small, transparent Classical ensembles. “Because this is a chamber orchestra and chamber choir of around 35 singers, we’re heading more toward the classical style of performance,” Burrichter says. “Then we’re going to put in elements of the Romantic period, with big drama in the movements where it fits. We’re coming up with our own interpretation out of that.” She sees the Cherubini score in the context of other dramatic settings of the Requiem. “I think that the piece has resonances with all of those [other works] — the Mozart Requiem, the Verdi Requiem, the Brahms Requiem. If an audience member loves any of those pieces, then this is a piece that they should hear, because it’s going to become their new favorite Requiem. “I can guarantee that.” FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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OZOMATLI

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PIFF THE MAGIC DRAGON

SARAH JAFFE

THUR. MAR 12

SUMMER SALT

OKEY DOKEY, BREAKUP SHOES FRI. MAR 13

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FEBRUARY 13, 2020

.................................................................... GRIEVES + THE HOLDUP .............................................................................................. ORGONE ............................................................ GHOSTLAND OBSERVATORY ............................................................................................... SHLUMP ........................................................................... DYLAN & THE DEAD

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2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


MIGUEL ‘M.I.G.’ MARTINEZ

see EVENTS Page 30

OZOMATLI. 9 P.M. SATURDAY, FEB. 15, FOX THEATRE, 1135 13TH ST., BOULDER, 303-447-0095. LET THIS BE A LOVE LETTER VALENTINE’S BURLESQUE SHOW.

8 p.m. Feb. 13-15, Wesley Foundation at CU, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

BOULDER BURLESQUE Nothing’s quite as romantic as a love letter, and Boulder Burlesque wants to share some with you. Showcasing beginner debuts, advanced troupe performances, audience engagement and different acts each night, a portion of the proceeds will benefit Out Boulder County, a nonprofit specializing in educating, advocating and providing services, programs and support for Boulder County’s LGBTQIA community. Tickets are $20-$75 at eventbrite.com.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Hailing from Los Angeles, Ozomatli are fluent in a number of musical languages, from classic to modern Latino, urban, hip-hop and other world styles. The “Dioses del Baile,” or “Gods of Dance,” are known for their frenetic live shows. Their latest record, ‘Non-Stop: Los Angeles? Mexico? Kingston,’ is a collection of classic Mexican hits reimagined with a reggae feel.

LE FRENCH AFFAIRE.

FACE VOCAL BAND.

This Valentine’s Day, spend the night in a 1920s Paris cabaret. Boulder Opera — featuring Elizabeth Hayes, Dianela Acosta and Phoenix Gayles with pianist Jordan Ortman — shares a sultry evening of French classics by Bizet, Berlioz, Hoffman, Poulenc and Massenet. Enjoy desserts and sip on sparkling libations while artists perform in feathers, pearls and sequins. Comedy, tragedy, lust and drama are all part of the intoxicating romance. Tickets: $22 general admission, $20 students/seniors, $18 members at longmontcolorado.gov.

SCOTT MALONSON Catch Boulder’s beloved acapella band Face before they head off to perform at Carnegie Hall in March. At this postValentine’s Day performance, Face will team up with the Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra to present an evening of different styles and eras of revered tunes. The night will include songs from Simon and Garfunkel, The Turtles, Alice Merton, Leonard Cohen and lots of traditional American and European folk songs. Expect infectious energy, stunning vocals, brilliant beatboxing and complex harmonies. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit boulderphil.org.

7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14, Stewart Auditorium at the Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont.

FEBRUARY 13, 2020

7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, Macky Auditorium, 0285, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423.

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arts Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (BMoCA), 1750 13th St., Boulder: ‘Night Reels: The Work of Stacey Steers,’ through May 25; Margaretta Gilboy: ‘Flying in the Hands of Time: A Retrospective,’ through May 25.

Adam Sloat

BMoCA at Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., University of Colorado Boulder: Paul Gillis: ‘When Kingship Ascends to Heaven,’ through May 1.

Your Boulder Real Estate Expert and Music Guy

Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Maker Made,’ Canyon Gallery, through March 30; Bill Vielehr: The Artist Behind ‘The Vielehr,’ Arapahoe Ramp, through March 22.

Broker/Owner

I was born and raised here, and I’m proud to call Boulder County home. When it comes to finding a real estate pro, you need someone sincere, skilled, and trustworthy, with character to match. I’m your guy! Who am I? Before becoming a Realtor, I negotiated both artist contracts and the treacherous waters of the music & entertainment business. Before that it was the wild rapids of Westwater Canyon as a teenage river guide on the Colorado. I bring those navigation talents to real estate, along with a dedication to serving my clients throughout the real estate process and beyond with friendship and support. I’m also honored to serve my community as a volunteer music programmer for a handful of events. Call, text or email anytime… or send smoke signals, carrier pigeons, owl post… whatever works for you so that we can connect, talk real estate and meet up to plan!

Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder: ‘Brutal Realities,’ featuring Natascha Seideneck and Regan Rosburg (Hand-Rudy); Michael Theodore (Polly Addison Gallery); Annette Isham (MacMillan); and theTECHNE Lab with Déesse, Jon J. Satrom, Laura Hyunjhee Kim, Melanie Clemmons, Ryan Wurst, Rick Silva, Nicholas O’Brien and Mariana Pereira Vieira (McMahon), through Feb. 23. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver: ‘Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection,’ through July; ‘EYES ON: Anthony McCall,’ through May 31; The Light Show, through Nov. 29. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont: Chelsea Gilmore, artist in residence, South Gallery. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont: ‘Terry Maker: Because the World is Round,’ through May 17; ‘Front Range Rising,’ permanent exhibit.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13 Music 300 Days. 7:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Banshee Tree. 7:15 p.m. Longmooxnt Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Concert Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Ensemble ll. 7:30 p.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder.

Foxfeather Duo. 5:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

720-466-8212 www.adamsloat.com 30

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MARY MATTINGLY is the CU Art Museum’s 2020 artist-in-residence. Her artwork combines Earth sciences, ecology and utopian ideas to communicate information about the Earth’s changing climate and human response to our physical environment. Her installation, ‘Last Library,’ includes designs for an Ecotopian Library created by undergraduate students in the Program in Environmental Design and artifacts, specimens and other materials.

Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons: ‘40 years/40 artifacts’; ‘All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons’; ‘Lyons Newspapers: A History,’; ‘125 Years of Distinctive Cameras’; ‘Tiny Stories: Art of the Dollhouse’; ‘The Flood of 2013’; ‘Native American Artifacts,’ and more, lyonsredstonemuseum.com. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Archive 75: Multilayered Stories Told Through a Boulder Lens,’ through June 15; ‘Our Living Landscape: Exploring Boulder’s Watershed,’ through March 30; ‘Leaving a Mark,’ through March 14. Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver: ‘Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation,’ through April 5; ‘Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler: Flora,’ through April 5; ‘Stacey Steers: Edge of Alchemy,’ through April 5.

Arapahoe Campus, 2130 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Mystery and Beauty,’ by Mark Brasuell, The Lincoln Gallery, through March 15. NCAR/UCAR Community Art Program, National Center for Atmospheric Research Visitor Center, 1850 Table Mesa Drive: Acrylic paintings by Lisa Lynch; Glass mosiac by Delcia Litt through March 28. University of Colorado Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder: ‘Persuasive Prints,’ through March 21; ‘Body Language: Picturing People,’ through June; Mary Mattingly: ‘Last Library,’ through July 18.

Naropa University Galleries: Nalanda Campus,6287 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Cathedral,’ by Kevin Sloan, The Cube Gallery, through Feb. 28; ‘Haven,’ by Kelly Duffield, The Nalanda Gallery, through Feb. 28.

University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado Henderson Building,1035 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Ross Sea; The Last Ocean;’ ‘Genomics: Observing Evolution;’ ‘Fossils: Clues to the Past,’ Paleontology Hall, ongoing exhibit; ‘Ground Level Ozone,’ McKenna Gallery, ongoing exhibit; ‘Life in Colorado’s Freshwater,’ ongoing traveling exhibit; and more.

RE:Search featuring Goldroom. 8:30 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452.

Swing Night — with Chez Coucou. 8 p.m. Waterloo, 809 S. Main St., Louisville, 303-993-2094.

Intermediate Genealogy Series: Research Like a Pro @ Meadows. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

EVENTS from Page 29

Finn O’Sullivan. 8:20 p.m. East Simpson Coffee Company, 414 E. Simpson St., Lafayette, 720-502-7010.

357 S. McCaslin Blvd, Ste 200 Louisville, CO 80027

MARY MATTINGLY, ‘STUDY FOR THE LAST LIBRARY,’ 2019, DIGITAL C-PRINT

Nick Of Time — A Tribute to Bonnie Raitt. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Piff The Magic Dragon. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

FEBRUARY 13, 2020

Tubby Love & Amber Lily + The Reminders. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. The Vegabonds — with Hang Rounders. 8:30 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Events Adultology: Sweet Treats. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Art & Sip: Lovers in the Rain Painting. 6:30 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Chocolate Rhapsody with Noelle. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Dance For Parkinson’s Program. 11:30 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-506-3568. Every Tuesday and Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $5.

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John Heffron. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Feb. 15. Left Hand Love Letters Type-In. 6 p.m. Left Hand Brewing, 1265 Boston Ave., Longmont, 720-982-9237. Lemon Sponge Cake Contemporar y Ballet presents: SERIOUSLY SOLO (World Premiere). 7:30 p.m. BoulderJCC, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 720-352-2903. Let This Be a Love Letter Valentine’s Burlesque Show. 8 p.m. Wesley Foundation at CU, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder. Through Feb. 15. Magic the Gathering. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Boulder. 7 p.m. 2132 14th St., Boulder.

WE RELY ON AI every day for recommendations, for translations and to put cat ears on our selfies. We also trust AI with matters of life and death, on the road and in our hospitals. But how smart is AI really, and how does it solve problems, understand humans and control self-driving cars? ‘You Look Like a Thing and I Love You’ is a smart, often hilarious introduction to the most interesting science of our time, showing how these programs learn, fail and adapt — and how they reflect the best and worst of humanity. Janelle Shane will speak about and sign her new book on Wednesday, Feb. 19 at 7:30 p.m. at Boulder Book Store.

Phil Hanley. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. The Pollinators. 6:30 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 393-776-7930. Ralphie’s Cooking Basics: Valentine’s Day Macarons. 5:30 p.m. Village Center Dining and Community Commons, Base of the stairs, 500 30th St., Boulder, 303-492-6325. Spirit Nia Dance Class. 9 a.m. Unity of Boulder Spiritual Center, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. Touchy-Feely Technology Time: CrossStitch. 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Valentine’s Day Pajama Party and Stuffie Sleepover. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

THURSDAY, FEB. 13 Boulder Mural Sip & Stroll — with And Art Space. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14

Meet at Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe on The Hill, pick up a coffee or tea in a Vessel mug, then walk down to the Boulder Creek Path and head east on Pearl Street learning about the murals facilitated and/or mapped by Boulder’s And Art Space. The walk will end where it started on The Hill. Visit innisfreepoetry.com for more information.

Music

FRIDAY, FEB. 14

18th Annual World Sound Healing Day. 5 p.m. The Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-443-8181.

Evening of Brazilian Jazz featuring Barbara Paris & the Keith Waters Trio. 7 p.m. Inkberry Books, 7960 Niwot Road, Niwot.

Abear Acoustic Trio. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

SATURDAY, FEB. 15

Wobblers and Walkers. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

Boulder Contra Dance. 7 p.m. Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 303-440-8303. Dakota Blonde. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Garden Bros. Circus. 4:30 p.m. Denver Coliseum, 4600 Humboldt St., Denver. Through Feb. 16. Hip Hop Is My Valentine. 8 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Jacoti Sommes (Album Release Party). 8 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. KBong, Mike Love, Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad — with Sensi Trails. 8 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Lauren Joy — with Derek Weiman. 8 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 303-931-5856. Laurie & Lorrie. 6 p.m. Sweet Spot Cade, 585 W. Dillon Road, Louisville. Le French Affaire. 7:30 p.m. Stewart Auditorium at the Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Ley Line. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Live Music Fridays. 7 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Lovers Disco — with DJ Elise Zanotti. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

LIVE MUSIC!

words

Mike and the Moonpies + The Vegabonds. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Patti Ashley — Letters to Freedom. 7 p.m. Inkberry Books, 7960 Niwot Road, Niwot.

Ethan Mindlin Jones The Tune Up at Full Cycle Friday, February 14 6:30-8:30 PM - NO COVER Happy Hour till 7pm

1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tuneupboulder.com

SUNDAY, FEB. 16 Ethan Mindlin Jones. 2 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

TUESDAY, FEB. 18 Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Karen Sherman — Brick by Brick. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19 Janelle Shane — You Look Like a Thing and I Love You. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 13 7:00 PM

UPDATE FROM JUNO: LOVE LETTERS FROM JUPITER 8:30 PM

LIQUID SKY GRATEFUL DEAD ON THE DOME FRIDAY FEBRUARY 14 7:00 PM

Lucas Wolf, The Moonlit Wild. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Winter Folk: Music & Photography Showcase. The St Vrain, 635 Third Ave., Longmont, 720-534-2635. Through March 1.

The Marcus King Band: El Dorado Tour. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Yesterday: The Beatles Tribute. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214.

Mr Big Bear. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Events

Opera on Tap — Songs Sweets Love. 6:30 p.m. Chocolaterie Stam, 103 N. Public Road, Unit B, Lafayette, 303-900-3430. Palace: The Life After Tour. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Ravin’wolf Valentine’s Day Bash. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 720-606-1733. The Song Is You: Music for Lovers — with Elaine Dame and the Annie Booth Trio. 6 p.m. Dazzle at Baur’s, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5100. Tribal Seeds — with The Expanders. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Valentine’s Dinner & Dance — with the Hazel Miller Band. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Valentine’s Swing Dance. 7 p.m. Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 217-299-6035.

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3rd Annual ‘Sweethearts of the Rodeo.’ 8:30 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Aerial Day Off Camp. 9 a.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E. Sterling Circle, Suite 150, Boulder, 303-245-8272. Be My Baby Valentine’s Day Party. 5:30 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. Coeur de la Creme Date Night — with Champagne. 6 p.m. The Art of Cheese, 505 Weaver Park Road, Suite E, Longmont. 303-579-9537. Colorado Acro Fest. 9 a.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 N. 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110. Fri-Yay Night: Heart Opener Yoga & Chocolates. 5 p.m. Student Recreation Center, Outdoor Program Classroom, First Floor, Boulder. Friday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. see EVENTS Page 32

FEBRUARY 13, 2020

UPDATE FROM JUNO: LOVE LETTERS FROM JUPITER 8:30 PM

LASER BEATLES 10:00 PM

LIQUID SKY COLD PLAY 11:30 PM

FISKEDM LIQUID SKY ODESZA SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15 1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: WE ARE STARS & LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 2:30 PM

STARS AND GALAXIES 10:00 PM

LASER QUEEN 11:30 PM

LASER FLOYD DARK SIDE OF THE MOON SUNDAY FEBRUARY 16 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: CAPCOM GO! THE APOLLO STORY & INCOMING! 1:30 PM

STARS AND LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 3:00 PM

SOLAR SUPERSTORMS

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 I

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FILMS She lives in Astoria, but she works in the City. That means the company car picks her up long before the sun has a chance to crack the horizon. And like most administration assistants, she’s the first in, last out, day after day. Her job: Print the day’s schedule, hand out the lunches, mix up her bosses’ protein shakes and scrub out those unsightly stains on his couch. Written and directed by Kitty Green, ‘The Assistant’ is about Harvey Weinstein. Maybe not in name, but certainly in spirit. The mogul — heard, but never seen — owns two offices in one of Manhattan’s tonier districts, another in Los Angeles and one in London, and everyone but his assistant (Julia Garner), seems to know what he’s up to. None of them approve, but everyone is complicit. It’s a gross feeling, and cinematographer Michael Latham takes care to make the images match. The movies they may be working on at this production company are no doubt glamorous; the day-to-day of the office is anything but. Strong stuff and not one to miss. —MJC

BOULDER:

Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., 303-441-3011: ‘Lonelyhearts,’ 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, 303-441-3100: ‘Detective Pikachu,’ 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14 Century Theatre, 1700 29th St., 303-444-0583: ‘1917’ ‘The Assistant’ ‘Birds of Prey’ ‘Blumhouse’s Fantasy Island’ ‘Dolittle’ ‘Downhill’ ‘The Gentlemen’ ‘Just Mercy’ ‘Knives Out’ ‘Little Women’ Oscar Shorts 2020 ‘Parasite’ ‘The Photograph’ ‘Ride Your Wave,’ 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19.

‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., 303-444-7328: ‘The Disappearance of My Mother,’ Feb. 12-15. ‘In Search of Beethoven,’ Feb. 16-17. ‘The Lighthouse,’ 8:45 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14. ‘Long Strange Trip: The Untold Story of the Grateful Dead,’ 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14. Oscar-nominated Live Action shorts, Feb. 19-22. ‘Pariah Dog,’ Feb. 19-22. ‘The Song of Names,’ Feb. 12-15. International Film Series, University of Colorado Boulder, Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 Colorado Ave., 303-492-8662: ‘After Dark, My Sweet,’ 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18. ‘Deep Red,’ 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19. ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,’ 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15. ‘Mr. Klein,’ 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16. ‘Purple Rain,’ 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, 303-449-3464: ‘When They See Us,’ 3 p.m. Sundays in February. Neptune Mountaineering, 633 S. Broadway St., Unit A, Boulder, 303-499-8866: Backcountry Film Festival, 7:15 p.m., Feb. 13, tickets required: neptunemountaineering.com

DENVER:

Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., 303-744-9686: ‘Amazon Adventure 3D’ ‘Apollo 11: First Steps’ ‘Dinosaurs of Antarctica 3D’ ‘Hidden Pacific 3D’ ‘Into America’s Wild 3D’ JCC Mizel Arts and Culture Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver, 303-316-6360: Denver Jewish Film Festival, 5:30 p.m. Sie Film Center, 2510 E. Colfax Ave., 303-595-3456:

‘Citizen K’ ‘Crash,’ 9:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14. Oscar-nominated Documentary Shorts ‘Our Lab, Our Labor’ presented by Process Reversal, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19. ‘Parasite’ ‘Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project’ ‘Scream Queen! My Nightmare on Elm Street,’ 7 p.m. Feb. 12, 15, 16, 20.

LONGMONT:

Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., 720-494-4673: Free screening: ‘The Pollinators,’ 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13. Regal Village at the Peaks 12, 1230 S. Hover Road, 844-462-7342: ‘1917’ ‘Bad Boys For Life’ ‘Birds of Prey’ ‘Blumhouse’s Fantasy Island’ ‘Dolittle’ ‘Downhill’ ‘The Gentlemen’ ‘Gretel & Hansel’ ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ ‘Little Women’ ‘The Photograph’ ‘The Rhythm Section’ ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ ‘Uncut Gems’

LOUISVILLE:

Regal Cinebarre Boulder, 1164 W. Dillon Road, 844-462-7342: ‘1917’ ‘Birds of Prey’ ‘Dolittle’ ‘Downhill’ ‘Ford v Ferrari’ ‘Jojo Rabbit’ ‘Knives Out’ ‘Little Women’ ‘Parasite’ ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’

NEDERLAND:

Backdoor Theater, 243 W. Fourth St., 303-258-0188: ‘1917’

EVENTS from Page 31

Jack Box Games. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. KYGO Valentines Day — with Eli Young Band. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. Love Improvised: A New Romcom Ever y Friday. 9 p.m. Grafenberg Sketch Comedy And Improv Theatre, 70 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-803-8894. Moksha Chocolate Valentine’s Party. 8 p.m. J&L Distilling Company, 4843 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-648-8893. Music & Movement. 10 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2020

Neruda & Nibbles — Valentine’s Day The Riverside Way. 7 p.m. The Riverside, 1724 Broadway, Boulder, 720-443-2322.

Valentine’s Skate at the Ice Pavilion. 12:30 p.m. Longmont Ice Pavilion, 725 Eighth Ave., Longmont.

No Pressure Chocolate Pairing + Bottle Release. 3 p.m. Waldschänke Ciders, 4100 Jason St., Denver.

Valentines Day at Dicken’s Opera House. 8 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

The Sandman. 7:30 p.m. The Performing Arts Complex at PCS, 1001 W. 84th Ave., Denver.

Winter Bike To Work Day Happy Hour at Endo Brewing Company. 3 p.m. Endo Brewing Company, 2755 Dagny Way, Suite 101, Lafayette, 720-442-8052.

TVunscripted presents Dungeons & Dragons — Music, Comedy, Prizes. 9 p.m. Voodoo Comedy, 1260 22nd St., Denver, 719-659-7845. Valentine’s Day Cupcake & Beer Pairing. 5 p.m. Baere Brewing Company, 320 Broadway, Unit E, Denver.

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15 Music Abear Acoustic Trio. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


theater

Boulder Opera Presents Le French Affaire. 7:30 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327.

SHAKESPEARE’S GREATEST CLOWNS — the popular mechanicals from ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ — take center stage in a riotously funny imagining of life behind the scenes during rehearsals for ‘Pyramus and Thisbe.’ Complete with Shakespearean verse, clowning, vaudeville, slapstick, farce and standup comedy, ‘The Popular Mechanicals’ is an unhinged feast of wit and profanity sure to leave you in stitches. Presented by CU-Boulder Theatre & Dance Feb. 13-16.

Brett Dennen, Sun Jr., Ashlei Brianne. 6 p.m. The St Vrain, 635 Third Ave., Longmont, 720-534-2635. Cherubini Requiem. 7:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-554-7692. Coop and the Chicken Pluckers. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. The Custom Shop Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Dair y Comedy featuring headliner John Novosad. 8:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-444-7328. Devotchka. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Elliot Moss. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. FACE Vocal Band. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 0285, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423. Finn O’Sullivan. 10 p.m. The No Name Bar, 1313-1325 Broadway, Boulder. Laser Queen. 10 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Legendar y Women’s Voices: An Evening with Cynthia Erivo. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Lionel Young Band. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Live Music — The Front Range Band. 6 p.m. Spirit Hound Distillers, 4196 Ute Highway, Lyons, 303-823-5696. Lloyd Cole. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. The Lonesome Days. 7:30 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 303-666-4361. Longmont Symphony: The Force of Destiny. 7:30 p.m. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-772-5796. LYSO / LSO Side-by-Side Concert and Silent Auction. 7:30 p.m. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-651-0401. The Marcus King Band: El Dorado Tour. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Martin Sexton. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Mattiel. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Meadow Mountain. 8 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Mesmerica 360 Boulder: A Visual Music Journey. 5 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Mike Massé Band (’80s & ’90s Classic Rock). 7:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 303-834-9384.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee: The Musical. Imig Music Building, 1020 18th St., Boulder. Feb. 13-15. Bloomsday — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through March 1. Bubble Boy The Musical. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through Feb. 15. Disney’s Beauty & the Beast (youth production). Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Feb. 16. Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through March 1. Jekyll and Hyde. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through March 29. Mamma Mia! BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Feb. 22.

44th Ave., Denver. The Popular Mechanicals — presented by CU Theatre & Dance. Loft Theatre, University Theatre Building, 261 University of Colorado, Boulder. Feb. 13-16. The Secretary. Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through Feb. 22. Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through April 19. Shockheaded Peter. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Feb. 15-March 7. When We Were Young and Unafraid. John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Feb. 15-March 14. You Lost Me. Denver Center for Performing Arts, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through Feb. 23.

Mortified Live: Doomed Valentine’s. 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13, Oriental Theater, 4335 W.

Ozomatli. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. The Rhythm Allstars. 8 p.m. 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont. Roddy Ricch: The Anti Social Tour. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. A Solo Acoustic Evening with Mindy Smith. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Stillhouse Junkies. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Stone Temple Pilots. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. Van Cruelin: A Tribute to Van Halen & Motley Crue. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Velvet Compass. 8:30 p.m. Lakewood Grill, 8100 W. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-237-8051. Women in Song hosted by Shanna in a Dress. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Events 2020 Mile High Grilled Cheese & Beer Fest. Noon. Runway 35, 8863 E. 47th Ave., Denver.

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Double Feature: ‘We Are Stars’ / ‘Laser Galactic Odyssey.‘ 1 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Family Day with Tinker Art Studio. 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Jeff & Paige’s Valentine’s Day Party. 10 a.m. and noon. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Metal Embossing. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Myster y Science Theater 3000 Live. 7 p.m. Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Buell Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver, 303-893-4100. Red Thread Playback turns Your Valentine’s Stories into Live Theatre! 7:30 p.m. Theatre O, 5311 Western Ave., Suite 120, Boulder, 303-916-4927. Reynolds Reading Pals: Saturday Session. 4:30 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. see EVENTS Page 34

FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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OPEN MIC

EVENTS from Page 33

Sango. 8 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

Thursday, Feb. 13 Gunbarrel Monthly Blues Jam. 7 p.m. Gunbarrel Brewing Company, 7088 Winchester Circle, Boulder, 800-803-5732.

Swing Dance — A Sweetheart’s Ball. 7 p.m. The Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 720-317-3946.

Open Mic. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Valentine’s Cuddles at the Sanctuar y. 2 p.m. Good Life Refuge, 13759 N. 95th St., Longmont. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16 Music Beer and Hymns Cheesy Love Songs Edition. 5:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Brett Dennen, 300 Days, Kingdom Jasmine. 5 p.m. The St Vrain, 635 Third Ave., Longmont, 720-534-2635. Celebrating Our Voices of Histor y — Black Histor y Month. 1:30 p.m. Second Baptist Church, 5300 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-523-4547. Delta Sonics Duo. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Denver Brass & All That Jazz. 2 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-832-4676. Hembree. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. The High Kings. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. A Million Hearts concert. 2 p.m. The Church, 1160 Lincoln St., Denver, 303-893-1493. Motherfolk. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Nick Boeder, Rob Riccardo. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Pictures at an Exhibition | Side-bySide with Colorado Symphony. 2:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Wah! Healing Concert. 7 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Young Songwriter Showcase. 11 a.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Events Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Boulder Comedy Show (2 shows). 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863. Double Feature: ‘CAPCOM Go! The Apollo Stor y’ & ‘Incoming! Hard Hitting Stories of Our Cosmic Origins.’ Noon. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Scotty Wiese: ‘Mile High Magic.’ 7 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver, 303-758-4722. Yarn Social. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

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Saturday, Feb. 15 Comedy Open Mic Saturday Night. 6:30 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Sunday, Feb. 16 LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17 Music Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623. Meat and Potatoes. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Speed Rack Charity Female Bartending Competition. 6 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Young Dolph. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Events Chinese New Year Celebration. 10 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18 Music Anna p.s., Girl Named Tom. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Discover y Days: Music. 9:30 a.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Second City. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Events Around the World Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. BoulderReads Reading Buddies. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Tuesdays. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Monday, Feb. 17 Open Mic. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Playground Ensemble, The Space Program. Noon. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Reynolds Reading Pals: Tuesday Session. 4:30 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19 Music The CBDs. 7 p.m. Rosalee’s Pizzeria, 461 Main St., Longmont, 303-485-5020. Jazzetr y Night! featuring Von Disco. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Molly Tuttle. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Events 2020 Fly Fishing Film Tour. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Boulder Arts Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. BoulderReads Reading Buddies. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Code for Boulder. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Flatirons Mineral Club Junior Geologists Group. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Heritage Lecture Series: Boulder’s Early African American Histor y. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Lap Babies. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group - Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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ISMAEL NERY, ‘NAMORADOS’

Thursday February 13 re: search

Goldroom

w/ dynohunTer & luke The kniFe (laTe seT)

Friday February 14 - dual venue!

kbonG, mike love & GianT Panda Guerilla dub squad w/ PoliculTure & sTylie

saTurday February 15 sold ouT

roddy rich

monday February 17

sPeed rack chariTy Female barTendinG comPeTiTion Thursday February 20 re: search

sTeve darko & worThy

saTurday February 15

ThouxanbanFauni x TeeJayx6 wednesday February 19

sonGs From The road band & laney lou and The bird doGs w/ suGar moon

Thursday February 20

cris Jacobs band & della mae

w/ Jon sTickley Trio & lindsay lou

Friday February 21

PassaFire

w/ ProJecT 432, beTaray & dJ naysayers

saTurday February 22

Tauk & Friends

(dirTybird) w/ lucaTi

w/ aaron kamm & The one droPs

Friday February 21

mark Guiliana: beaT music

alo & Tea leaF Green w/ The red PeTals

Thursday February 27 re: search

ulTrasloTh (kll smTh/ duFFrey/biolumigen) w/ Jon1sT & shield (live)

Friday February 28

dance ParTy Time machine roberT randolPh, marc brownsTein, aron maGner, allen aucoin, mike GreenField, JenniFer harTswick, naTalie cressman & JeFF Franca Tuesday march 3

marc e. bassy w/ Gianni & kyle

Thursday march 5 - dual venue

russ liquid & marvel years

w/ FunksTaTik visuals by android Jones

saTurday march 7

Z-TriP & dJ qberT

w/ The dirTy Gems FeaT Jordan Polovina

Thursday march 12 - dual venue re: search

JanTsen & ProTohyPe

w/ G-sPace + sPicybois Takeover FeaT meso

Friday march 13 sold ouT

Phab4

(PhoFFman & anders beck) FeaT william aPosTol & Todd herrinGTon

saTurday march 14

manic Focus

w/ suPervision, midicinal, lwky & FlaTs sTanlie

wednesday march 18

younG m.a.

Thursday march 19 re: search

chrisTian marTin w/ daTeless & c.h.a.y.

Friday march 20

robaG wruhme & leaFar leGov

below radar 2 year anniversary

saTurday march 21

evanoFF

w/ The ParTy PeoPle

wednesday march 25

rod wave

Thursday march 26 re: search

daily bread

w/ meGan hamilTon, moTiFv & Jordan Polovina

saTurday march 28

yulTron - rave Prom Tour Thursday aPril 2 - dual venue re: search

sunday February 23

w/ dandu & chronoloGue

Tuesday February 25

FaT Tuesday mardi Gras ParTy

eddie roberTs, kim dawson, casey russell & more wednesday February 26

dusTy Green bones band FeaT Tyler GranT & black river revue

Thursday February 27

The lovinG hour

FeaT members oF The main squeeZe, Tauk & karl denson

Friday February 28

dJ craZe & sFam w/ Jon casey

saTurday February 29

kendall sTreeT comPany & cbdb w/ dylan kishner band

wednesday march 4

ramireZ

Friday march 6

nauGhTy ProFessor & The burrouGhs w/ sarah mounT & The rushmores

saTurday march 7

The nTh Power & broTher maker FeaT members oF TurkuaZ w/ diJon musTanG

wednesday march 11

GroovesaFe allsTars FeaT members oF loTus, doPaPod & maGic beans

Friday march 13

con brio

w/ sixTy minuTe men & smirk

Tuesday march 17 sold ouT

bbno$ w/ lenTra

Thursday march 19

new orleans susPecTs w/ armchair booGie

Friday march 20 sold ouT

ciTy morGue

w/ Tokyo’s revenGe & kai

monday march 23

sob x rbe

w/ TheycallhimaP

wednesday march 25

GraTeFul blueGrass boys Thursday march 26 re: search

deTroiT swindle

break science

w/ ross kiser & reid Golden (laTe seT)

Friday aPril 3

monoPhonics

FeaT virTual rioT, shiverZ & akeos

billy FailinG band

mile hiGh sound movemenT Takeover FeaT ProJecT asPecT

bass inFerno Thursday aPril 9 re: search

PhuTurePrimiTive

w/ liquid bloom & PoTions (laTe seT) visuals by android Jones

sunday aPril 19

livwell PresenTs meThod man & redman x acTion bronson monday aPril 20 - aT red rocks

livwell PresenTs ice cube x meThod man & redman w/ acTion bronson Thursday aPril 23 re: search

secreT headliner Tba

saTurday march 28 wednesday aPril 1 FeaT Jarrod walker

Friday aPril 3

old salT union

w/ ParT & Parcel & Ponder The albaTross

saTurday aPril 4

amoramora & chomPers w/ slidewok

Friday aPril 10 - dual venue

The denver Pancakes & booZe arT show saTurday aPril 11

The Green house band & indie Jam 500 band

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

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by Nicole Kelly

I want to tell you: that this part will be simple, that you’ll always know what happens next, that the first one you let cross the threshold of your heart will be your only, and that they will tread with perfect care. I’d be lying, child of mine. The next part is half magic and half held breath, part mind reading and part closed eyes. It is a blind lean into a most delicious thing that you won’t know the shape of at all. Fall into uncomfortable silences. Sometimes they are followed by the sweetest ones. Don’t let fear close you off to the spaces of possibility. Enter the great practice of the world. The one I am still studying, even now. Move your hand an inch closer, feel that electric pulse of joy. Lift up your face to those sweet eyes, the ones that are always nervously catching yours, and find yourself in a whole new world. Be true, first and always to yourself. Don’t ever hold too tightly to this precious beast. Stay sweet, especially in the endings. I promise you, even when your heart comes out different it is just becoming the right shape for the one who will jump with you and hold on for the whole wild fall. Don’t rush on to the next thing: love is learned. but it is also a long book, and a great, big, messy pile of joy. Jump in.

w/ ZolTan

wednesday aPril 15

w/ arTiFakTs, swum & Jordan Polovina Jesse royal TexT cervanTes To 91944 For TickeT Giveaways, drink sPecials, discounTed TickeT PromoTions & more

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On holding hands

FEBRUARY 13, 2020

Nicole Kelly holds a master’s degree from the Yale School of the Environment, and primarily writes poetry inspired by the natural world and her community. Her grandparents met at a CUBoulder fraternity dance in the 1930s, and this poem was written for all the young hearts still falling in love in the shadows of these mountains. I

BOULDER WEEKLY


‘Why’d ya spill yer beans?’

Beauty, defiance and madness in ‘The Lighthouse’

by Michael J. Casey

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s the story goes, the Greek titan Prometheus so loved man that he stole fire from Mount Olympus and brought it to Earth for all to use. For that theft, the allfather Zeus chained Prometheus to the rock and commanded an eagle to eat his liver for all

ON THE BILL: ‘The Lighthouse,’ 8:45 p.m. Friday, February 14, Boedecker Theatre, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., 303-444-7328.

eternity. Ephriam Winslow (Robert Pattinson) is also bound to the rock: A desolate, primeval island off the coast of Nova Scotia circa 1890. Winslow has come to this wasteland for a fourweek stint of hard labor as a wickie’s assistant. But the arrival of Winslow’s ship through the dense fog says otherwise. Only a ride from Charon would seem more foreboding. “Wickie” is parlance for a lighthouse keeper — a protector of the flame — and on this island, that man is Thomas Wake (Willem Dafoe). Wrinkled, bearded and full of flatulence, Wake looks a little like Sterling Hayden’s character, Roger Wade, in The Long Goodbye: An alcoholic writer in the vein of Ernest Hemmingway. There’s more than A24 a touch of Papa Hemmingway in Wake — from the ability to recite passages at the drop of a hat to constant, almost compulsive, drinking. At one point, a storm strands Wake and Winslow on the island, and they go to unearth provisions buried for just such an occasion. Does Winslow find life-sustaining food buried underground? No: just a crate of grain alcohol. There’s a bit of Hemmingway in the way director Robert Eggers tells the tale of The Lighthouse. From masculine relationships to the ability to weave old myths through new images, Eggers presents The Lighthouse as a long-lost artifact. Jarin Blaschke’s black and white cinematography is stunning, as is the constricting 1:19 aspect ratio, further isolating Winslow. Only the seagulls are there to keep him company. Wake believes each gull is the reincarnation of a deceased sailor. Be this purgatory? Possibly. Sitting atop this desolation is a glistening beacon of light. Winslow is never allowed near the light — Wake forbids it. Yet, like a moth to the flame, Winslow cannot deny his attraction. The Sufi mystic Mansur Al-Hallaj used a similar metaphor for describing God. For Al-Hallaj, the beloved was a flame that would engulf him and quench his spiritual thirst. Yes, a death sacrifice must be paid. Such is the cost of enlightenment. First, Winslow must atone. That’s what he came here for, though he probably didn’t know that when he boarded the ship. Wake might have. Like Father Zeus, Wake may be as old as time itself. But, unlike Al-Hallaj, Winslow lacks humility. His thirst will never be quenched. Back on the rock, Hermes told Prometheus that if he were to apologize, Zeus would show compassion and let him go. To which Prometheus replied: Tell Zeus I despise him. But Winslow is no titan. He is a mortal man made of flesh and blood, and his punishment is painful. He can no more spit in the eye of Zeus than he can pull in Leviathan with a fishhook. And, like all those old tales, Winslow is just another who learns his lesson a minute too late.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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S I M P L E

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L O C A L

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FA R M

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TA B L E

EAST COUNTY’S BEST KEPT SECRET! Only 12 miles from Boulder

5 7 8 B r i g g s S t re e t E r i e, C O 8 0 5 1 6 303.828.1392 www.24carrotbistro.com

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BRUNCH

S AT & SU N 9 AM - 2 PM

L U N C H TUE-FRI 11AM-3PM

FEBRUARY 13, 2020

DINNER

TUE-THR 5PM-9PM

F R I & S AT 5PM-10PM

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S U N D AY 5PM-9PM

BOULDER WEEKLY


MATT CORTINA

FRYBREAD PLATE AT RIVER AND WOODS, $14. 2328 Pearl St., Boulder, riverandwoodsboulder.com

TRY THIS WEEK:

Dr. Red Elk’s Frybread Plate @ River and Woods

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TUCKED

next to a towering, modern condo complex sits the little blue house that holds fast to a strong culinary lineage. The former site of the esteemed John’s Restaurant, the building has been home for the last few years to Chef Daniel Asher’s excellent River and Woods, which serves elevated comfort food often culled from recipes donated by community members. One such borrowed recipe is Dr. Red Elk’s frybread plate, which is simply heaven. Short ribs are braised for eight hours until they’re succulent and life-affirming. They’re then shredded and topped with a savory-spicy green chili, cotija cheese and tangy sour cream. And it’s all assembled on doughy, fatty, crispy, chewy, wonderful frybread. It’s the food equivalent of sweatpants and a big blanket — familiar, comfortable and irresistible.

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n Chili cook-off in Longmont

n Denver Restaurant Week returns

n Craft beer fest on leap day

GROSSEN BART BREWERY will host the sixth annual Chili Chili Bang Bang cookoff on Saturday, Feb. 15 from 1-5 p.m. at its taproom and brewery (1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont). Enter your own chili for $20 and get the first Grossen Bart pint (excluding specialty brews) on the house. Or, don’t bring chili and get a $10 ticket, which provides unlimited chili tastings and the right to vote for your favorite. Proceeds benefit HOPE and the LeftHand Artist Group. Tickets at: eventbritecom/e/6th-annual-chili-chili-bang-bangcook-off-tickets-92580389437.

THE 10-DAY-LONG Denver Restaurant Week returns Feb. 21, providing diners the chance to eat at hundreds of the area’s best restaurants at three price points: $25, $35 and $45. Head out of Boulder County for special menus at Atelier by Radex, Coperta, Il Posto, Old Major, Safta, Tupelo Honey and more. Or, stop in at one of the participating Boulder County restaurants: 740 Front, Boudler Cork, Boulder Chophouse, Dagabi Tapas Bar, Jill’s, The Melting Pot, Riff’s, Salt and Via Toscana. More info at denver.org/ denver-restaurant-week.

SUMMERTIME NEED not hog all the craft beer fests. De-ice yourself and head to the Balch Fieldhouse at Folsom Field in Boulder on Feb. 29 (Leap Day) from 1-5 p.m. for the Winter Craft Beer Festival. A $45 general admission ticket includes unlimited samples, a souvenir glass and entry to the silent disco. A $65 VIP tickets tacks on a “unique gift” (what could it be?!) and entry an hour early (at noon). This year brings a partnership with the Colorado Brewers Guild, and you’ll spot local favorites like Upslope, Twisted Pine, Odd13, Asher, Sanitas, Uhl’s and Wibby, along with welcome visitors like Bell’s, Loveland Aleworks and Prost. Tickets at wintercraftbeerfestival.com/tickets.

BOULDER WEEKLY

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PHOTOS BY MICHAEL J. CASEY

n DRINK OF THE WEEK

tour de brew: Ale throughout history

Travis Rupp, Avery’s Ale of Antiquity rascal, on Monticello

Endo Brewing Co.’s Comfortably Numb

by Michael J. Casey

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ith 30 beers to choose from, a visit to Avery Brewing Co.’s taproom can be either a daunting proposition or an endless array of excitement — depending on your point of view. And if the choice is too much, just ask for what’s new. You could end up with a stout aged on malted milk balls, a hazy IPA loaded with pears and peaches, or a barrel-fermented persimmon wheat ale inspired by an early 19th-century recipe found at Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia estate. Bearing the name of the historic home, Monticello is the 10th release in Avery’s Ales of Antiquity series, a line of historical recreations helmed by Travis Rupp, Avery’s resident “beer archeologist.” Rupp kicked off Ales of Antiquities in 2016 with Nestor’s Cup: A Mycenaean-inspired beer brewed with 6-row barley, einkorn wheat, acorn flour, figs and elderberries. The recipe was recreated both from extensive archeological research — Rupp is a professor of Classics at CU-Boulder — as well as Rupp’s academic scrutiny of “art history and the anthropology.” “What do we actually know of these people?” Rupp says of his process. “What was important to them? What’s readily being mass-produced, agriculturally, that we know they actually give up to make a beer?” The results spoke for themselves — Nestor’s Cup was phenomenal: loads of fruit leather and a mouthfeel unlike anything else — and Ales of Antiquities was off and running. Rupp has traversed great distances and eras to recreate beers from Egypt, Peru and Scandinavia, to name three. Recently, he spent time researching the 18th and 19th centuries to produce an IPA inspired by George Hodgson’s exported brew of 1752, an English-style por-

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

B ter favored by George Washington, and now Monticello, the second in the Presidentale [his emphasis] series. Thanks to Jefferson’s extensive archives, Rupp was able to reproduce the ale faithfully. “I want to make it as authentic as possible,” Rupp says. “I don’t want to deviate from the historical record.” That starts with the name, Monticello: This was not the beer brewed by Jefferson, but for Jefferson and his estate by Jefferson’s slave, Peter Hemmings. “The recipe for this is from 1822,” Rupp explains. “We know for a fact that Peter Hemmings had been trained to be the estate brewer in 1821. ... This is 100% most certainly his recipe.” Brewed with wheat and persimmons, Monticello is fruity and tart — think apples and tomatoes — with a full, creamy mouth that is rich and filling. According to Rupp, it’s similar to the persimmon bread baked at the time. Monticello will be released at Avery’s taproom on Monday, Feb. 17, and Rupp will host a beer dinner on Feb. 19 to commemorate the launch (tickets are currently sold out). Rupp will also be talking Ales of Antiquity, 6-8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 24 at Denver’s History Colorado Center in conjunction with the center’s exhibit, Beer Here! Brewing the New West. Tickets and information at historycolorado.org.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2020

rewing a big beer can be a tricky thing. You could double the malt and produce more fermentable sugars, dumping in a ton of hops to balance out the sweetness. Or you could use candied sugars to goose the alcohol without turning the brew into a syrupy sludge. In the right hands, both work wonderfully. But all too often, drinkers end up with a glass that smells of fusel and drinks like motor oil. Neither is the case at Lafayette’s Endo Brewing Co. In the past, we’ve sung praises for the brewery’s spectacular bocks, but their expertise in strong ales is just as commendable, to wit: the recentlyreleased Russian imperial stout, Comfortably Numb, is a thing of beauty. Clocking in at 9.8% alcohol by volume, Comfortably Numb is pitch black with a quickly dissipating soft brown head. The nose has a nice, subtle roast, but the mouth is an explosion of dark chocolate, coffee, roasted barley and molasses. It hides its booze between sweet and creamy flavors and a lingering bitter finish. Drink during a snowstorm, and pair with a roasted vegetable soup and garlic bread. — MJC

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BOULDER WEEKLY


MATT CORTINA

On barbecue...

with Georgia Boys Nick Reckinger and Matt Alexander

A

by Matt Cortina

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The recipes on the menu today at Georgia Boys haven’t changed from what they learned growing up and tasting around Georgia... for the most part. “It’s exactly the same,” Reckinger says. “I mean, burnt ends, you still won’t find down in Georgia, but everything else, we’re pulling from family recipes, popular recipes down South. All of our sides are scratchcooking.” Banana pudding, sweet potato casserole and green bean casserole are direct replications of family recipes while other sides like mac and cheese, smoky baked beans and chicken corn bread dressing are the amalgamations of their experiences eating barbecue on the regular growing up. That commitment to staying true to Southern cooking is likely why Reckinger and Alexander outgrew their first Longmont operation (in a shack) and expanded to Frederick, with tentative plans for more restaurants. They’ve developed their own kitchen secrets — each meat has its

own rub, which differs from other barbecue spots that tend to use one universal rub for every meat. It’s understandably hard to pry the trade secrets from the Georgia Boys, but here’s one: the brisket is rubbed with cocoa. Of course there are a million other secrets to figure out if you want to replicate Georgia Boys barbecue; maybe ask Day Hayward at Savory Spice Shop, who provides the restaurant with all its spices and herbs, but it’s doubtful he’ll tell you either. Besides, what might be the real secret to Georgia Boys’ success is their commitment to hospitality. Reckinger says he passed on the “five and 10 rule” to staffers: if someone’s within 10 feet of you, smile, if they’re within five, say hello. Reckinger and Alexander believe the key to transplanting not only Southern cooking but Southern hospitality is by keeping the staff happy: They’re one of the few restaurants in the county that provide full benefits to staff members. “We’ll take care of the employees, and that kind of translates to the customers as well,” Alexander says.

Wed n esd ay

ove is time,” says Georgia Boys co-founder Nick Reckinger. He’s talking about meat. If that’s not obvious, he continues: “Love is good spices and good seasoning.” We’re talking over a plate of burnt ends at Georgia Boys’ Longmont outpost. It’s the fatty end of a brisket and after sitting in a dry rub and being smoked for hours, it’s fallapart tender, and the crispy, smoky bark is undeniable. “The brisket we’re eating today, we started that two or three days ago,” says Matt Alexander, the other Georgia Boy. Brisket was a late addition to the Georgia Boys’ lineup. It wasn’t cooked in the smokehouses and backyards of Georgia, where they grew up and learned to barbecue. Smoked meats in the Peach State borrow from a Memphis dry-rub tradition, and you’ll find mostly pork, chicken and sausage at barbecue joints down there. “People out here weren’t used to dry rub,” Reckinger says of coming to Colorado over a decade ago. “We’re doing traditional Southern, where the meat’s got nothing to hide. It’s why the sauce is always on the side.”

From Georgia to the Rockies lexander and Reckinger met as frat brothers at the University of West Georgia. They independently moved to Colorado, but stayed in contact and eventually moved into an apartment together in Gunbarrel. When they were both laid off during the Great Recession within weeks of each other, they turned to their roots in meat to make ends meet. “I certainly miss the excitement in the beginning days,” Alexander says, looking back. “It was working 14 hours… didn’t even feel like you worked 14 hours. It was super exciting.” For three years, Alexander and Reckinger stealthily built a barbecue business, cooking batches in the courtyard of their apartment complex, setting up shop at Left Hand in Longmont and Upslope in Boulder, and dropping off bagged sandwiches to workplaces at lunch time. Eventually they drew the eye of Boulder County code compliance, but by then they had built a reputation and were able to invest a paltry (by today’s standards) $16,000 to lease and outfit a shack in Longmont. “That was all in… by the end of the day we had $500 left,” Alexander says. They spent that $500 on food, and thanks to some luck and the reputation they had built, there was a line out the door on day one. They borrowed picnic tables from a business up the street until they could afford their own. They relied on friends and part-timers to keep meat smoking on their days off. They found innovative solutions in the “gray area” of code compliance until they could get in line. They were quintessential bootstrappers. “Black market barbecue turned into real barbecue with a ask for forgiveness, not for permission approach to things,” Reckinger says. “That would never work now,” Alexander adds.

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1 8-lb bone-in pork butt Salt Brown sugar Black pepper Onion powder Garlic powder Paprika Apple cider vinegar and wood chunks (for smoking)

1. Rub the pork butt with salt, pepper,

spices and brown sugar — “Coat it on there,” Reckinger says. Place in refrigerator for 24 hours.

2. “Start early in the morning. Have a

couple of beers… not too many because it’s a long day,” Reckinger says.

3. Soak wood chunks (Georgia Boys

uses apple and hickory wood) for a couple hours and place in smoker. Wait until smoker reaches 225 degrees.

4. Place pork butt in smoker and don’t

open the lid. Cover any holes emanating smoke with tin foil. “Invest in one of those little thermometers that’ll go in the smoker,” Alexander says, so you don’t have to open the lid.

5. When meat reaches 198 degrees,

pull it from the smoker, put it fat side down on a chopping block and give it a good whack, and “it should just break apart and then you’re good,” Reckinger says.

TIPS FROM THE PITMASTERS • Use wood chunks instead of wood chips. • Move the smoker vent to the side opposite of where the smoke enters the chamber — this ensures the smoker stays an even temperature as it moves through the tub. • Start your foray into smoking meat with pork butt, ribs or chicken — save brisket for when you have a few smokes under your belt. • Bone-in meat keeps the pork butt together and adds flavor. • Don’t inject the meat, keep it simple. • Even the cheap smokers for less than $100 will do. • Really, don’t open the smoker while the meat’s in there. • Even though the pork will be cooked at 165 degrees, let it go to 198, as it’ll be much easier to pull. • Soaking the wood chunks in apple cider vinegar or water increases the smoke in the chamber. I

BOULDER WEEKLY


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how to eat chocolate V-Day tasting opportunity for passionate cacao immersion

By JOHN LEHNDORFF

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ou might think that tasting chocolate is the one life skill you’ve fully mastered, but chances are you’re doing it wrong. For one thing, there is no chewing involved. You’ll need a nuanced approach if you attend the Valentine’s Day chocolate fair at the Boulder Book Store because the universe of high-end cacao art will literally be on the tip of your tongue. This genuinely rare event brings together 30 outstanding chocolate producers offering tastes of at least five different bars or candies. Well-known chocolate names like Vosges and Neuhaus will be joined by Ritual, Hu Chocolate, Lamourette, White Label and many U.S. and global chocolates not commonly available in Boulder. These are serious chocolatiers who source sustainable, fairly traded singleorigin cacao beans they roast and grind themselves. Some press their own pristine cocoa butter. The bean-to-bar chocolates being sampled come in white, rose, milk and dark bars, and many are organic, vegan and non-GMO. THE 101 ON TASTING CHOCOLATE You don’t have to take notes, but if you like good chocolate this tasting is a priceless way to find bars you love without breaking the bank. You can train your palate in the process. Don’t arrive hungry. Eat some protein, veggies and grains before you bomb your body with chocolate and sugar. Trust me on this as a retired chocolate dessert contest judge. To start, go dark. Save the bonbons, truffles, caramels and bars with fruit and nuts for “dessert.” Begin with the simple dark chocolate at a percentage that’s palatable. Taste 10 60% chocolate bars in a row and you’ll notice vast flavor differences between them. You’ll get different hints of sweet, salty, bitter, sour and savory in bars plus sub-flavors — perhaps floral, fudgy, nutty, fruity or citrusy. Open your nose. Smell the chocolate before putting it on your tongue. The warmth of your fingers on the square should release some of the complex aromas. The room will be charmingly cacao-infused anyway with all those warm bodies and exposed chocolate. Melt a square in your mouth. Let it melt completely. Slowly spread it throughout your mouth and appreciate the bud-coating texture. There’s no chewing in chocolate appreciation. Restrain yourself. If you really mean to sample dozens of types of chocolate in a couple of hours and survive, be cautious. To try more types, think tiny bites. Be sure to check out local Boulder County chocolatiers including Boulder’s Chocolove and Piece, Love & Chocolate, Longmont’s Robin Chocolates and Lafayette’s Chocolaterie Stam. And there are two must-taste Denver chocoBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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latiers as well: Cultura Craft Chocolate and Dar Chocolate. Cultura Craft Chocolate offers 70% Haiti, 70% Guatemala, 75% Belize, and other single-origin, bean-to-bar chocolates. Among Cultura’s best-sellers are a bar with Deerhammer American Single Malt and cacao nibs. Dar Chocolate does the same with single origin bars plus the eye-opening 90% Ecuador cacao with ground Conscious Coffee beans. Other companies sampling their wares include Soma (Canada), Manoa (Hawaii), Marou (Vietnam), Mirzam (Dubai) and Madecasse (Madagascar). BOULDER No doubt sustainable, bean-to-bar chocolates are much BOOK STORE more expensive that Hershey’s or Cadbury’s, but these are is the place on sweets you can feel good about eating and giving. Valentine’s Day to eat your heart out.

END OF A CHOCOLATE ERA A legendary Colorado chocolate experience will go away in 2021. Russell Stover Chocolates, born in 1923 in Denver, will shutter its 305,000-square-foot factory and store in Montrose. This is not like the exquisite experience described above. Entering the huge discount warehouse is like walking into a cloud of cocoa and sugar. There are free candy samples everywhere. Brightly lit stacks of marked-down candy from seasonal holidays long past mingle, from cheap chocolate hearts to chocolate Santas and bunnies. Best of all are the mystery boxed “Bloopers,” the less-than-pretty bonbons. You leave the place totally Wonka-ed and the kids will be totally wired for the rest of your road trip. It’s the Casa Bonita of chocolate. TASTE OF THE WEEK The Thongsoontorn family dishes memorable, traditional fare at Julie’s Thai Kitchen, a tiny spot in Lyons. On a recent visit I loved the thin crispy eggrolls filled with bean thread noodles with house-made sweet chile sauce and cashew-packed pad Himmaphan stir fry. The menu’s crown jewel is roasted chicken panang with steamed basmati rice. Bone-in fresh bird is simmered until fork tender in an exceptional, complex and fiery red curry. If you mistakenly order pad see ew (or anything else) “Thai hot,” try the palate-cooling trio of coconut ice cream, fresh mango and sticky rice. WORDS TO CHEW ON “All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.” — Charles M. Schulz John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (kgnu.org). FEBRUARY 13, 2020

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LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: In the course of your life,

BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Now that she’s in her late forties, Aries

comedian and actress Tig Notaro is wiser about love. Her increased capacity for romantic happiness has developed in part because she’s been willing to change her attitudes. She says, “Instead of being someone who expects people to have all the strengths I think I need them to have, I resolved to try to become someone who focuses on the strengths they do have.” In accordance with this Valentine’s season’s astrological omens, Aries, I invite you to meditate on how you might cultivate more of that aptitude yourself.

how many people and animals have truly loved you? Three? Seven? More? I invite you to try this Valentine experiment: Write down their names on a piece of paper. Spend a few minutes visualizing the specific qualities in you that they cherished, and how they expressed their love, and how you felt as you received their caring attention. Then send out a beam of gratitude to each of them. Honor them with sublime appreciation for having treasured your unique beauty. Amazingly enough, Libra, doing this exercise will magnetize you to further outpourings of love in the coming weeks.

colored paint on canvases. He said he approached his work in the same way he made love: “a total embrace, without caution, prudence thrown to the winds, nothing held back.” In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to invoke a similar attitude with all the important things you do in the coming weeks. Summon the ardor and artistry of a creative lover for all-purpose use. Happy Valentine Daze, Taurus!

GEMINI

SAGITTARIUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Taurus artist Joan Miró loved to daub

MAY 21-JUNE 20: In 1910, Gemini businessman Irving

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: The poet Virgil, a renowned author in ancient Rome, wrote three epic poems that are still in print today. His second was a masterpiece called the Georgics. It took him seven years to write, even though it was only 2,740 lines long. So on average he wrote a little over one line per day. I hope you’ll use him as inspiration as you toil over your own labors of love in the coming weeks and months. There’ll be no need to rush. In fact, the final outcomes will be better if you do them slowly. Be especially diligent and deliberate in all matters involving intimacy and collaboration and togetherness.

CANCER

CAPRICORN

the same woman. Our first time around, we were less than perfectly wise in the arts of relationship. After our divorce and during the few years we weren’t together, we each ripened into more graceful versions of ourselves; we developed greater intimacy skills. Our second marriage has been far more successful. Is there a comparable possibility in your life, Cancerian? A chance to enhance your ability to build satisfying togetherness? An opening to learn practical lessons from past romantic mistakes? Now is a favorable time to capitalize. Happy Valentine Daze!

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: In 1911, the famous Russian poet Anna Akhmatova and the famous Italian painter Amedeo Modigliani were in love with each other. Both were quite poor, though. They didn’t have much to spend on luxuries. In her memoir, Akhmatova recalled the time they went on a date in the rain at the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris. Barely protected under a rickety umbrella, they amused each other by reciting the verse of Paul Verlaine, a poet they both loved. Isn’t that romantic? In the coming weeks, I recommend you experiment with comparable approaches to cultivating love. Get back to raw basics. Happy Valentine Daze!

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: [Warning: Poetry alert! If you prefer your horoscopes to be exclusively composed of practical, hyper-rational advice, stop reading now!] Happy Valentine Daze, Virgo! I hope there’s someone in your life to whom you can give a note like the one I’ll offer at the end of this oracle. If there’s not, I trust you will locate that person in the next six months. Feel free to alter the note as you see fit. Here it is. “When you and I are together, it’s as if we have been reborn into luckier lives; as if we can breathe deeper breaths that fill our bodies with richer sunlight; as if we see all of the world’s beauty that alone we were blind to; as if the secrets of our souls’ codes are no longer secret.”

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Seery was 20 years old. One evening he traveled to the Metropolitan Opera in New York City to see an opera starring the gorgeous and electrifying soprano singer Maria Jeritza. He fell in love instantly. For the next 38 years he remained a bachelor as he nursed his desire to marry her. His devotion finally paid off. Jeritza married Seery in 1948. Dear Gemini, in 2020, I think you will be capable of a heroic feat of love that resembles Seery’s. Which of your yearnings might evoke such intensely passionate dedication? Happy Valentine Daze!

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SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: [Warning: Poetry alert! If you prefer your horoscopes to be exclusively composed of practical, hyper-rational advice, stop reading now!] Happy Valentine Daze, Scorpio! I invite you to copy the following passage and offer it to a person who is receptive to deepening their connection with you. “Your healing eyes bless the winter jasmine flowers that the breeze blew into the misty creek. Your welcoming prayers celebrate the rhythmic light of the mud-loving cypress trees. Your fresh dreams replenish the eternal salt that nourishes our beloved song of songs. With your melodic breath, you pour all these not-yet-remembered joys into my body.” (This lyrical message is a blend of my words with those of Scorpio poet Odysseus Elytis.)

TAURUS

INDULGE & UNWIND

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: [Warning: Poetry alert! If you prefer your

horoscopes to be exclusively composed of practical, hyper-rational advice, stop reading now!] Happy Valentine Daze, Capricorn! I invite you to copy the following passage and offer it to a person who is ready to explore a more deeply lyrical connection with you. “I yearn to earn the right to your whispered laugh, your confident caress, your inscrutable dance. Amused and curious, I wander where moon meets dawn, inhaling the sweet mist in quest of your questions. I study the joy that my imagination of you has awakened. All the maps are useless, and I like them that way. I’m guided by my nervous excitement to know you deeper. Onward toward the ever-fresh truth of your mysterious rhythms!”

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AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Aquarian author Derek Walcott had a

perspective on love that I suspect might come in handy for you during this Valentine season. “Break a vase,” he wrote, “and the love that reassembles the fragments is stronger than that love which took its symmetry for granted when it was whole.” I urge you to meditate on how you could apply his counsel to your own love story, Aquarius. How might you remake your closest alliances into even better and brighter versions of themselves?

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Piscean poet Saul Williams wrote

a meditation I hope you’ll consider experimenting with this Valentine season. It involves transforming mere kisses into SUBLIME KISSES. If you choose to be inspired by his thoughts, you’ll explore new sensations and meanings available through the act of joining your mouth to another’s. Ready? Here’s Saul: “Have you ever lost yourself in a kiss? I mean pure psychedelic inebriation. Not just lustful petting but transcendental metamorphosis, when you became aware that the greatness of this other being is breathing into you. Licking your mouth, like sealing a thousand fleshy envelopes filled with the essence of your passionate being, and then opened by the same mouth and delivered back to you, over and over again — the first kiss of the rest of your life.”

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BY DAN SAVAGE Dear Dan: My boyfriend and I were having relationship issues until we tried something new: pegging. He wanted to try it, but he was afraid and sometimes said the idea disgusted him. Then we tried it, and it was better than normal vanilla or even kinky bondage sex. It was the most emotionally connected sex we’ve ever had. I actually pegged him three times in 24 hours. He says now he wants to be “the girl” in our relationship. He doesn’t want to transition to become a girl, but to be more “the girl” sexually and emotionally. I see this as sexy and loving. I’ve always taken care of him in a nurturing way, but this adds so much more. I feel bad about sending this long story just to ask a simple question, but… how do I be more “the guy” for my boyfriend who wants to be more “the girl”? Not just sexually, but in everyday life? —The Boyfriend Experience Dear TBE: “It’s amazing these two found each other,” said Key Barrett, a trained anthropologist. “They communicate and obviously create spaces to be vulnera-

ble together and explore.” Barrett has studied female-led relationships (FLR) and written books — fiction and nonfiction — about them, TBE, and his first concern was your boyfriend succumbing to “sub-frenzy,” or a burning desire to realize all his fantasies at once. You guys aren’t new to kink — you mention bondage — but you’ve found something that taps into some deep-seated desires, and you don’t want to move too fast. “Pegging opened up a huge box of shiny new emotions and feelings,” said Barrett. “That’s great, but they should take it slow, especially if they want this dynamic to be a part of the day-to-day relationship.” You also need to bear in mind that pegging, while wonderful, won’t solve your underlying (and unspecified) “relationship issues.” Unless, of course, the issue was your boyfriend feeling anxious about asking you to peg him. If he was worried about walking back his previous comments, or worried you would judge, shame, or dump him over this, that could have been the cause of your conflict, and the pegging — by some miracle — was the solution. But, hey, you didn’t ask about those other issues — you didn’t even name them — so let’s focus on your actual

question: you being “the guy” and your boyfriend being “the girl.” “The boyfriend wants TBE to be ‘the guy’ in the relationship to reinforce his desire to be ‘the girl,’” said Barrett, “and she seems okay with this, although she does acknowledge that this would require more than the nurturing and caretaking she’s already showed toward him. That’s a valid concern. His desire to take the kink out of the bedroom and merge it with the day-to-day risks turning her into a kink dispenser. There’s also the aspect of the boyfriend’s gender stereotyping. Being dominant isn’t unique to men, and being submissive isn’t a ‘feminine’ trait. There are a lot of alpha men in FLRs who shine in support roles for the women they trust. Female-led relationships don’t rely on stereotypes. Indeed, they often flout them by relying not on stereotypical behaviors but on what is a natural dynamic for the couple. In that sense, each FLR is unique.” While it’s possible that “I want to be the girl” are the only words your boyfriend has to describe the dynamic that turns him on, for some men, sacrificing their “male” power and privilege is an intrinsic part of the eroticism of submitting to a dominant woman. And that’s okay, too. “If he legitimately wants to take on a role of supporting her and being her ador-

ing submissive partner while thinking of that role as ‘feminine,’ it could work for them,” said Barrett. “He might really enjoy supporting her decisions and being more of a domestic partner. She might enjoy the support and validation that comes from having a partner who revels in her successes and strength. This could fulfill the ‘caring for him as if I were the boyfriend’ portion (what a loving a statement!) while still feeling natural for TBE.” So how can you get started as “the guy” in this relationship? “They should, again, start small,” said Barrett. “Maybe delegate a few tasks that were ‘hers’ to him, and she can tell him how she wants them done,” whatever it is (dishes? laundry? cocksucking?), “as this will help ensure the outcome they both want. I would also recommend they both read about what FLRs are and aren’t. FLRs are often kink-friendly, but kink is not required. And they need to remember the key word in ‘female-led relationship’ is ‘relationship.’” Follow Key Barrett on Twitter @ KeyBarrettMSc. On the Lovecast, spanking is for grown-ups! With Jillian Keenan: savagelovecast.com. Send emails to mail@savagelove.net, follow Dan on Twitter @FakeDanSavage, and visit ITMFA.org.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Arizona parents of children with autism fight to legally use medical marijuana by Seymour

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n Arizona, parents of children with autism are currently unable to use medical marijuana to treat their children’s symptoms, but House Bill 2049 may change that. The legislation, introduced by Diego Espinoza and Lorenzo Sierra, would add autism spectrum disorder to the list of qualifying conditions for a medical marijuana card. According to reporting from ABC15 out of Phoenix, Arizona, the state currently has 186

minors who can legally access medical marijuana with qualifying conditions such as epilepsy and cancer. The scientific research around marijuana’s potential to alleviate symptoms of autism is, unsurprisingly, scant. A 2017 Chilean study found that oral cannabis extracts were “dramatically more effective than conventional medicines” at inhibiting autism spectrum disorder symptoms. Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of

the Negev and Soroka University Medical Center in Israel — once again highlighting Israel’s dominance in the arena of cannabis research — published a paper in Scientific Reports (an offshoot publication from the prestigious journal Nature) last year that looked at the link between the use of medical cannabis and “autism behavioral improvements in children with autism, who are 18 years old and under, and found cannabis to be a well-tolerated, safe and effective option to relieve symptoms including seizures, tics, depression, restlessness, and rage attacks,” according to Health Europa. The Israeli team’s research found 80% of participants reported “some level of improvement.” Health Europa interviewed Dr. Victor Novack, one of the researchers, who said, “While this study suggests that cannabis treatment is safe and can improve [autism spectrum disorder] symptoms and improve … patient’s quality of life, we believe that double blind placebo-controlled trials are crucial for a better understanding of the cannabis effect on [autism] patients.” Amen. And it’s clear that research teams in the States understand the importance. In September of last year, CNN reported on a new clinical trial at Montefiore Medical Center in New York that’s examining the effect of cannabidivarin — CBDV, a non-psychoactive compound that doesn’t cause a high — on irritability and repetitive behaviors in children with autism. For parents in Arizona who are currently fighting to have autism spectrum disorder added to the list of qualifying conditions for medical mari-

juana, the research can’t come fast enough. “My son was banging his head 75-150 times a day on hard objects all over the house,” Brandi Williams told ABC15 about her son’s issues with autism. She provided the television outlet with video and pictures of her son’s behavior, including damaged walls and windows. Since her son also has epilepsy, Williams is able to legally provide him with medical marijuana — extracts in the form of a paste, no smoking, vaping or edibles,­which she says has positively changed her son’s behavior, allowing him to socialize and focus more, not to mention a reduction in self-harm from repetitive behaviors. But not all children with autism have a second qualifying condition. Regardless, some parents choose to seek medical marijuana treatment for their autisic children, despite being subject to felony drug charges under Arizona state law. Opponents, rightfully, cite the lack of scientific research and fears about marijuana’s effects on developing children. However, the amount of medical marijuana necessary to provide relief, according to reports from mothers who spoke with ABC15, is tiny, the size of a grain of rice, according to Brandi Williams. Such a small dose of marijuana isn’t insignificant to a developing brain, but when viewed in context with the alternative — a child who is repeatedly hitting their head on hard surfaces or struggling to develop speech — most parents would likely be sympathetic to using anything to help their child find some relaxation and joy in their life. On April 2, 2019, World Autism Day, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signed a bill into law adding autism spectrum disorder to Colorado’s list of qualifying medical marijuana conditions. Colorado is currently one of 14 states that include autism on their list of approved medical marijuana conditions, according to MAMMAS, Mother’s Advocating Medical Marijuana for Autism.

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Prohibitionists want Colorado voters to recriminalize marijuana in November by Paul Danish

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ike rust, marijuana prohibitionists never sleep. Earlier this month a couple of anti-pot activists filed a proposed initiative to amend the Colorado Constitution to repeal the constitutional Amendment that legalized recreational marijuana in 2012. Fortunately, the pair seems pretty clueless and

their proposal may have a hard time getting to first base, in its present form at least. Still, it is important to take this sort of thing seriously. The proposed amendment consists of just four sentences: The people of Colorado declare that the recreational use of marijuana is a matter of statewide concern. Article XVIII, Section 16 of the Colorado Constitution (Personal Use and Regulation of Marijuana) is repealed. Laws regarding medical marijuana and industrial hemp are not changed.

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This amendment is effective upon the official declaration of the vote hereon by the Governor pursuant to Section 1(4) of Article V of the Colorado Constitution. Before petitions for a proposed initiative can be circulated, the backers have to submit it for review and approval by the Legislative Council. The latter body has already raised a number of issues that the anti-pot proposal’s backers need to address, several involving failure to specify the changes in state law that would be required if the measure passes. For instance, the proposal doesn’t change state statutes regarding industrial hemp even though it would strike the constitutional provisions that allow it. A similar issue involves state statutes governing retail dispensaries. The proposal would leave the laws intact. “Do the proponents believe that a person would still be able to purchase marijuana at a licensed entity and use small amounts of marijuana,” the reviewers asked. The proposal’s supporters have until March 20 to submit a revised proposal. If the measure is approved for circulation, the proponents will have to collect 124,362 valid signatures from registered voters. That will require an army of volunteers or several hundred thousand dollars to hire paid petition circulators. Moreover, a minimum number of the signatures have to be collected in each of Colorado’s 33 State Senate districts. At least 2% of the registered voters in each district have to sign the petition before it can get on the ballot. The latter provision was added to the state constitution in 2018 in order to make it harder to amend the constitution by initiative. Initiatives adding new amendments to the state constitution have to pass by a 55% majority. However initiatives to repeal existing amendments

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require only a 50% majority to pass. Since the marijuana recriminalization amendment seeks to repeal the 2012 amendment that legalized marijuana in Colorado, it probably needs only simple majority support. Getting the amendment onto the ballot would be a huge job, but it might not be the mission impossible proposition that it first appears to be. Although the measure is sponsored by two private citizens, Mary Lou Mosely of Denver and Willard Behm of Rocky Ford, Colorado Christian University and the Centennial Institute have been organizing anti-marijuana activity for several years. It’s unknown if either of these organizations is currently involved with the re-crim initiative, but if they choose to get involved they could provide money and volunteers. However, the biggest problem the initiative would face is that there isn’t much evidence Colorado citizens are interested in re-criminalizing marijuana. Matthew Schweich, the deputy director of the Marijuana Policy Project, the group that drafted Colorado’s legalization initiative (Amendment 64) and led the fight to pass it in 2012, told a reporter for the Marijuana Moment website that it viewed the repeal initiative as “a deeply misguided and futile attempt to roll back a successful legalization policy that Coloradans firmly support.” “We are confident that Colorado voters would firmly reject it,” he added. “But we will not be complacent. If this initiative qualifies for the ballot, the marijuana reform movement will make sure that there is a strong and well-funded campaign to defeat it.” Colorado was the first state to legalize marijuana. Amendment 64 passed with 55% support. A 2016 poll taken for the Marijuana Policy Project, the most recent survey on the question, found that the number of Coloradans opposed to legal marijuana had declined to 36%.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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