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SUPPORTING AND CONNECTING DIVERSE COMMUNITIES THROUGH COFFEE F R E E E ve r y T h u r s d a y Fo r 2 5 Ye a r s / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / O c t o b e r 1 0 - 1 6 , 2 0 1 9

vote guide 2019:

Our endorsements for everything on your Boulder County ballot by Boulder Weekly Staff

lab notes:

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BEST 28

COFFEE HOUSE COFFEE ROASTER CUP OF COFFEE LATTE / MOCHA

Chasing Arctic ice by Travis Metcalf

boulderganic:

New polling data reveals Republican and Democrat voters in Western states increasingly prioritize the heath of public lands by Emma Athena

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buzz:

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overtones:

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CU’s International Film Series to screen six movies from China to Taiwan by Michael J. Casey

Matt and Kim take a bit of a serious tone with latest album by Alan Sculley

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Film fest celebrates women who champion real Mexican cuisine by John Lehndorff

community table:

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Head to culinary-themed Fort Collins Book Festival for workshops, chats and readings with award-winning food writers by Matt Cortina

departments 7 10 39 41 50 51 53 61 64 65 67 69

Danish Plan: Now playing in the star chamber: The impeachment of Donald Trump Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Arts & Culture: Boulder Phil opens with music by Rock & Roll Hall of Famers Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘Stories from the Marsh Land’ by Kayla Archibald-Hall Film: ‘Biggest Little Farm’ to close Flatirons Food Film Festival Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Dispatches from the 2019 Great American Beer Festival Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Three city swing Weed Between the Lines: Better living through automation Cannabis Corner: Pot drives Tucker Carlson around the bend

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

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Our democracy works best when EVERYONE in the community is represented I am running for City Council because I believe socio-economic diversity and political inclusion matter to the citizens of Boulder. These values are what will make our community stronger than it is today.

AS A CITY COUNCIL MEMBER I WILL: ❒ Find solutions for transit-oriented housing for our workforce, students and seniors while respecting existing neighborhoods

❒ Expedite the long-overdue flood mitigation plan for South Boulder Creek because human safety should be our #1 priority ❒ Be a tireless advocate for under-represented communities and bring socio- economic justice to decision-making ❒ Ensure Open Space is accessible to people of all backgrounds by prioritzing maintenance and by finding the right balance of conservation and recreation so that we preserve this amazing legacy for generations to come

❒ Foster greater government efficiency and accountability ❒ Work to create a Boulder that is powered by 100% renewable energy

WHAT COMMUNITY LEADERS SAY ABOUT JUNIE: I wholeheartedly endorse Junie for City Council. In Junie’s impressive human rights and development career she amassed a vast well of experiences and perspectives that can change Boulder for the better.

Aaron Brockett Current City Council Member

Junie's focus on affordable housing as well as her experience in results based budgeting will be an invaluable asset in prioritizing services for our city's residents.

Junie's past work experience in community outreach will be indispensable in achieving a more equitable and just Boulder.

Junie will bring fresh viewpoints to the issues of affordable housing, inclusiveness, and fighting for those who are under-represented in the public sphere.

David Ensign Planning Board Member Jill Grano Former City Council Member

Jan Burton Former City Council Member

JUNIE IS ALSO ENDORSED BY: KC Becker, Speaker of the Colorado House of Representatives Bob Yates, Current Boulder City Council Member Lesley Smith, CU Regent Will Toor, Former Boulder County Commissioner and Boulder Mayor Ken Wilson, Former Boulder City Council Member and Deputy Mayor Leslie Durgin, Former Boulder Mayor....among many others.

JUNIE'S BACKGROUND: Junie worked for four years in the Human Rights & Development field in the U.S. and abroad, most recently as a UN Human Rights Officer in the Central African Republic. She currently serves as the chair of the Housing & Human Services Citizen Panel Review and is a member of the Community Corrections Board. Junie is studying law at CU and, like many in Boulder, she's a renter.

Learn more at: JunieForBoulder.com

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Publisher, Fran Zankowski Editor, Joel Dyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Athena Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Coordinator, Corey Basciano Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo October 10, 2019 Volume XXVII, Number 8 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Now playing in the star chamber: The impeachment of Donald Trump By Paul Danish

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ccording to a story in the Washington Post, House Democrats want the whistleblower, whose complaint is the pretext for their impeachment inquiry, to testify before their investigating committees as anonymously as a wise guy turning state’s evidence against the mafia. The story, which appeared in the Post’s Oct. 7 edition, says the steps under consideration “include having the whistleblower testify from a remote location and obscuring the

individual’s appearance and voice.” The story cites “three officials familiar with the deliberations” as its sources — all anonymous. “There are lots of different protocols and procedures we’re looking into to find out what works and doesn’t work to protect the identity of the whistleblower. That is paramount,” an (anonymous) official familiar with the talks told the paper. “The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak frankly,” the Post added brightly.

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

Why the need for anonymity? House Democrats are concerned “that without such rare precautions for the whistleblower,” Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee could learn and then leak his name. “In the House, Democrats overseeing the logistics of the testimony for the House impeachment inquiry are leaning toward a staff-only session that would prevent lawmakers from attending and asking questions, according to officials familiar with the conversations,” the Post reported. “Aides have even considered having the whistleblower testify from a separate location via a video hookup in which the camera would obscure the whistleblower’s image and alter his voice, possibly see DANISH PLAN Page 8

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VOTE NOVEMBER 5, 2019

Boulder City Council Election 2019

the coalition

FOR AN

VOTE INCLUSIVE BOULDER

The Coalition is comprised of COMMUNITY groups and individuals

WE SHARE A VISION TO CREATE: Housing opportunities that respect neighborhoods Reduced traffic congestion Accelerated climate action Flood mitigation for South Boulder Creek Greater social justice Improved governance and fiscal managment

2019 ENDORSEMENTS

Aaron Brockett

BENITA DURAN

RACHEL FRIEND

Better Boulder, Open Boulder & South Boulder Creek Action Group Coalition Groups are also endorsing: JUNIE JOSEPH

Mark McIntyre

BOB YATES

BOULDERCOALITION.ORG

© 2019 Paid for by The Coalition. Not affiliated with any candidate or candidate committee

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

DANISH PLAN from Page 7

with modification technology. “Two other possibilities include having the whistleblower sit behind a screen or partition, or conducting audio-only testimony,” according to the Post. Let me see if I understand this correctly. The pretext for impeaching Trump is a complaint from an anonymous whistleblower whose brief is based on second- and third-hand information — also from anonymous sources. Democrats not only want to keep the whistleblower’s identity secret, they want him to testify without any Republicans in the room who might have the temerity to ask him inconvenient questions — like when did he start colluding with Adam Schiff and did he have a working relationship with one of the 2020 Democrat presidential candidates? The whistleblower’s lawyers say the reason they want to keep his identity secret is they are afraid his life might be in danger if it’s made public. More likely it’s his credibility that would be in danger. Once his cover is blown, he can expect his life and everything that happened in it to be scrutinized and dissected down to the molecular level. As well it should be. The guy is trying to get the president of the United States impeached and the results of the 2016 election overturned. It takes a lot of chutzpah to demand anonymity when you’re trying to overthrow the government. But what in the name of sanity are the Democrats thinking? If their inquiry goes forward without T. Whistle Blower testifying under oath in public, and without Republican members of the intelligence committee being allowed to question him, the impeachment inquiry transmogrifies into a latter-day star chamber inquisition. It’s hard to think of a faster and more certain way to delegitimize the investigation in the eyes of the American people. The U.S. has a quaint tradition of allowing people accused of a crime to confront and question their accusers. The secret process Schiff and his fellow witch hunters want to use is a deliberate attempt to deny those rights to Trump — and a brazen attack on the rule of law. But what about the substance on the whistleblower’s complaint — that Trump broke the law during a phone conversation with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky by asking him to investigate Biden and his kid, and

threatening to withhold military aid if he didn’t do so? Trump claims he was asking the president of Ukraine only to look into corruption, not — repeat, not — fishing for dirt on Biden. That much is hard to credit. It doesn’t take a genius to see that uncovering dirt on Biden would help Trump’s 2020 campaign regardless of motive. Of course he was looking for dirt on Biden. But that’s different from coercing Ukraine into giving it to him. Trump didn’t threaten Zelensky, and he didn’t offer an arms-for-dirt quid pro quo. He asked for a favor. And since the dirt on Biden was out there in plain sight, Trump wasn’t asking for much of one. Biden is on tape bragging about how he used a threat to withhold aid to Ukraine to get a Ukrainian prosecutor fired; the prosecutor was investigating an energy company that was providing Biden’s son Hunter with a $600,000 a year sinecure to sit on its board and pretend he knew something about the oil and gas business, presumably in exchange for access to Joe. What Biden did is commonly called obstruction of justice. Strip away the phony Ukraine corruption case against Trump, and there is a real Ukraine corruption case underneath, the one against Biden and his kid. Trump’s motives for investigating it may be impure, but Joe’s corruption is real. Once knowledge of the existence of the whistleblower’s complaint was made public, Trump released the transcript of the Zelensky call, even before the complaint itself was made public. The call seemed pretty nonthreatening to anyone who didn’t have an advanced case of Trump Derangement Syndrome, which explains why Schiff and his pals are working overtime to portray it as something sinister. The Democrats’ inquiry isn’t about “high crimes and misdemeanors.” It’s about getting rid of Trump by any means possible. Ukraine is just the latest pretext. The fact that the Democrats need to take the testimony of their star witness in a star chamber speaks volumes about the true nature of their game. A lot of Republicans think the Democrats are trying to pull off a soft coup d’état to undo the outcome of the 2016 election. Me too.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


YES on 2H Protect and Maintain City of Boulder Open Space Preserve Long's Gardens, the city’s last working community farm

The people you trust, trust Susan.

"As an accomplished engineer, environmental visionary, and Boulder resident for 25 years, Susan has made numerous contributions to the community. Join me in putting her creativity, tenacity, and intellect to work for us on Boulder's City Council." - Lisa Morzel, 5-termCity Council Member

Susan’s Top Priorities, based on what she hears from the people of Boulder:

Not a Tax Increase!

• Better management of growth, development & traffic • Getting more serious about climate action • Respecting & protecting Boulder’s natural beauty & environment • Fostering a diverse, vibrant & sustainable community for people of all economic levels • Governance of the people, by the people, for the people

Endorsed by 14 of 15 City Council candidates, Open Boulder, PLANBoulder County, Sierra Club, and Together4Boulder www.OpenSpaceYES.com

Endorsed by: SusanForCityCouncil.com

Paid for by Susan For City Council.

Paid for by Open Space YES 2019

6367 Arapahoe Rd. • Boulder 303.449.0011 McDonaldCarpetOneBoulder.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCT0BER 10, 2019

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Support for Joan Peck for Longmont City Council

Champion for Louisville Past. Present. Future. Fortune 500 Career. Former owner of Louisville’s BOOK CELLER.

Business Retention Environmental Sustainability Economic Inclusion

Barbara Butterworth Louisville City Council Ward 1

www.barbara4louisville.com Paid For By Barbara Butterworth for City Council

Now is the time to talk with your kids. Get tips at

speaknowcolorado.org

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SPEAK NOW, HERE’S HOW.

OCTOBER 10, 2019

I believe Joan Peck is a terrific candidate for Longmont City Council because she cares so deeply about the lives and prosperity of ordinary people in Longmont. Joan was the major force on Council promoting the acquisition of air quality monitoring equipment to monitor our air quality. This was necessary because it has recently become known that our air quality has been negatively impacted by the massive fracking going on in neighboring Weld County. Joan has also been a strong advocate for affordable housing, supporting the affordable housing mandate for new housing recently passed by Council. In further concern for providing better housing, Joan is promoting a new idea to address the homeless issue by investigating the purchase of a parking lot where RVs housing otherwise homeless folks could be safely parked, in a manner protecting public health. Finally, Joan has been a fierce supporter for bringing the promised FasTracks rail to Longmont. She has consistently advocated to RTD, other jurisdictions, and potential investors the proposal of starting first with a less expensive commuter rail during rush hour, called the Peak Plan, as a means of getting the rail going. Joan has been instrumental in keeping the idea of finishing the Northwest Rail both alive and vital. I urge you to join me in voting for Joan Peck for Longmont City Council. Judy Lubow, RTD Director District I

Home ads litter streets of Erie

Ubiquitous, they line streets surrounding the old Town of Erie where developers shill new homes to the burgeoning population. They’re stick-mounted advertising posters, which sprout like weeds in abundance. For me, they are visual pollution disturbing the natural environment and, being flimsy, result in roadside litter as they fall apart. The declarations governing our homeowners association restrict owners from placing ad signs, while these developers drive them into our priI

vate property with impudence. The sharpened wood stakes are proximal to our irrigation lines and sprayheads, where the posters often interfere with water distribution. We spend thousands of dollars each year maintaining our landscape and do not appreciate the ad-sign invasion. When they drive one through the irrigation system, we pay for the repair, as is the case to replace dead turf they can cause. The Town of Erie — per ordinance 4-3 Handbill Distributors — requires advertisers to obtain a license from the town clerk. I wonder whether those placing these signs are properly licensed? This advertising practice has really gotten out of hand. I implore the Town of Erie to put an end to this unsightly, invasive onslaught. For starters, how about we require that developers put signs only on property they own; not on private and public lands. Educating developers — we know who they are because company names are on the signs — about town restrictions would be helpful. That could be followed by fining offenders who poach land without proper license or authorization. Robert Carrier/Erie

Trump sees democracy as empty shell

Donald Trump tried at first to keep his newest law-breaking a little quiet, when he asked Ukraine to intervene in the 2020 campaign. But now he has moved on to committing his crimes in the open, publicly asking more foreign countries (at a minimum recently Italy, Australia and now China) for re-election help. He’s brazenly doing this in plain sight, for every American to see. He is now happily mocking America, committing crimes daily in broad daylight, and totally daring anyone and everyone to do anything about it. He is emotionally desolate and physically desperate. He is a sad loser who is pathetically trying to mask his failures as a human being with lunatic bravado. He narcissistically fills his broken soul with hatred for America and the rest of humanity, wanting everyone else to pay for his deeply felt sense of worthlessness. Having corrupted the Republican Party and BOULDER WEEKLY


turned it into his personal organ, he has gone on to size up our entire democracy as nothing but a weak, brittle, empty shell that’s ready to be crushed. The next few months will tell us all whether he’s right about that, or not. Frank Sanders/Nederland

One nation under slavery

The U.S. Constitution never represented “We The People.” In 1787, 55 wealthy white men, predominantly slaver owners, met secretly to draft a constitution. When 39 men signed it, they excluded 94% of the population from representation, according to Boulder’s election reform group Best Democracy. There were about 3.9 million people in the U.S. in 1787. Now there are 329 million. In 1787, 18% of the population was enslaved. In 1772, Lord Mansfield of the King’s Bench found no legal basis for allowing slavery in England. In 1776, 13 American colonies declared their independence. Seventy-three percent of the men who signed that declaration were slavers. Ten of the first 12 U.S. presidents held slaves. Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence, held over 600 slaves. James Madison, a prime architect of the constitution, held more than 100 slaves. George Washington held over 300 slaves. James Madison said: “Our government... ought to be constituted as to protect the minority of the opulent against the majority.” In a letter to Madison, Thomas Jefferson argued that a constitution should expire within one generation. Corresponding with Samuel Kercheval, Jefferson wrote: “Some men look at constitutions with sanctimonious reverence, and deem them like the arc of the covenant, too sacred to be touched. They ascribe to the men of the preceding age a wisdom more than human, and suppose what they did to be beyond amendment... “But I know also, that laws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind. As that becomes more developed, more enlightened, as new discoveries are made, new truths disclosed, and manners and opinions change with the change of circumstances, institutions must advance BOULDER WEEKLY

also, and keep pace with the times. We might as well require a man to wear still the coat which fitted him when a boy, as civilized society to remain ever under the regimen of their barbarous ancestors.” In 1776, John Adams wrote that a “representative assembly... should be in miniature an exact portrait of the people at large. It should think, feel, reason and act like them.” In 1994, Bishop Desmond Tutu said: “The system of proportional

representation ensures that virtually every constituency in the country will have a hearing in the national and provincial legislatures.” FairVote reports that 89 nations now use proportional representation to secure fair, inclusive representation for diverse populations in their parliaments. Another 34 nations mix proportional representation with some winner-take-all elections. Today, 14 political parties hold seats in South Africa’s parliament

under proportional representation. Only two parties are represented in the United States Congress. We still live under an archaic system of government designed by slaveholders to preserve slavery and exclude people from representation. We are more than 200 years overdue for a new constitutional convention to design a modern system of representative government. Gary Swing/Unity Party candidate for U.S. Senate

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

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WELCOME TO OUR 2019 VOTE GUIDE

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elcome to Boulder Weekly’s 2019 Vote Guide. As always, we are providing our endorsements for every city council race, proposition and issue on Boulder County ballots. Like other years, this process has forced us to make a number of very tough choices between good candidates. Our process for making our decisions this time around has been similar to those of previous election cycles and deserves explanation. We use a pool technique to cover all the candidates running for office in Boulder, Longmont, Lafayette and Louisville. One of our editors conducts an interview with a candidate in person or over the phone. We also attend or watch recordings of candidate forums and debates. Once all the interviews have been completed, we assemble our election board to discuss the pros and cons of each candidate in each race. At that time, we have the option of asking questions, comparing positions or bringing a candidate back in for a second in-person interview in front of the entire editorial staff. It’s not a perfect system, but with more than 40 candidates for city council in our county, it’s the best one we have come up with to guide our endorsement process.

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CITY OF BOULDER

n Council Candidates

Vote for no more than six (6)

❑ ❑

❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑

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So why do we still endorse when so many other news organizations have given up the practice? The simple answer is because it’s one of the most important things we do — important for you our readers and for BW as a news organization. We know that most of you, regardless of your good intentions, don’t have time to have substantive conversations with every single person running for office or attend the many debates and candidate forums out there. So that’s why we believe it is our obligation to do this time-consuming, and therefore expensive, work on your behalf. The reason we endorse instead of just providing printouts of our conversations with candidates is because we think you deserve to know where we stand. Our endorsements let you know things such as how important we believe the environment is to our communities. We believe that by endorsing candidates, we are being transparent, and that is a critical quality for a news organization. But our endorsement does not mean that we agree with every position of every candidate getting a check mark by their name. There are no perfect candidates. For instance, how do we measure a candidate who is great on the issues of homelessness and affordable housing but weaker on the health impacts

Brian Dolan Rachel Friend Junie Joseph Mark Wallach Benita Duran Corina Julca Bob Yates Adam Swetlik Aaron Brockett Andy Celani Nikki McCord Gala Wilhelmina Orba Paul Cure Susan Peterson Mark McIntyre

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Change is coming to the Boulder City Council with six seats up for grabs. What’s more, Mayor Suzanne Jones and Cindy Carlisle aren’t seeking re-election and long-time Councilwoman Lisa Morzel is term limited after serving for more than two decades. That said, we are impressed by the caliber of the candidates who are running. Some became involved because of issues impacting their neighborhoods, others had their interest piqued after serving on various boards and commissions, still others stepped up as a natural evolution of their community activism. But whatever their motivation to run, the new City Council will have a lot to consider such as flood mitigation, especially at the controversial CU South property. There’s also the continuation of the perpetually OCTOBER 10, 2019

of oil and gas extraction? In that example, we’d look at the overall makeup of a potential council. If such a candidate is the only one running in a city with viable solutions to homelessness and affordable housing, and they would be joining a council where the majority is strong on their opposition to oil and gas extraction, we would likely endorse them in order to have a more rounded council better equipped to find solutions to more of the problems confronting all members of the community. We aren’t perfect either and we have certainly endorsed candidates we later regretted. We do the best we can and have no qualms about later admitting we were wrong. With that said, here are our endorsements for the 2019 elections in Boulder County. We hope they are helpful for you, and we thank you for your continued trust and support. Please feel free to send us letters telling us why you believe we are wrong and we’ll make sure they get published in a timely fashion. And a final thought, please vote. We understand that the political world is pretty crazy right now, but you still have the ability to impact what happens locally and that affects each of our lives every day. — Joel Dyer

complex municipalization process, which voters have continued to support since 2011. The continued development of City property at Alpine Balsam presents another challenge, as does development within the opportunity zone. And if that’s not enough, the issues of affordable housing, transportation and homelessness are ever present and deserving of attention. And did we mention growth? While some would like to see a large majority on Council either in favor of growth and infill or of no growth and the preservation of existing neighborhood character, we believe a well-balanced Council with a diversity of opinions on all of the critical issues mentioned above will best serve Boulder residents. We also considered a person’s ability to work well with others as they seek solutions.

We don’t agree with all of the candidates we endorsed on every issue, but we do believe that when our choices for Council are added to the three remaining Council members who will serve with them, Boulder will have a City Council well-suited to address a variety of issues that may arise in the future. Here are our endorsements.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Rachel Friend comes to her election run by way of grassroots activism. A lawyer by trade, she first got involved with Moms Demand Action, advocating for stricter gun control, including Boulder’s assault weapons ban. A resident of Frasier Meadows, she heads up the South Boulder Creek Action Group seeking to get flood mitigation at CU South as soon as


possible to protect the 3,500 residents of her neighborhood. She’s also pressured the City to break its ties with BI Incorporated, an ankle monitor manufacturer owned by GEO Corp, which runs private immigration detention centers, including the one in Aurora, and has taken on pro bono immigration cases. Having spent her fair share of time at City Council meetings over the last few years, she wants better community engagement, fact-based and transparent government and says she isn’t dogmatic when it comes to land use policies. As a former inRachel Friend house counsel at an organization that runs group homes for adults with disabilities, she’s familiar with the frustration of NIMBY arguments and believes being an inclusive community means including everyone, everywhere and anywhere others live and work. She’s also proponent of year-round emergency shelters and providing robust day services for people experiencing homelessness. Affordability, especially housing, is a major issue in the City of Boulder, where the cost of living is almost twice the national average. Perhaps no candidate knows this better than Junie Joseph, a CU law student, who first lived on a friend’s floor, before finding an affordable place in Boulder. Junie Joseph She’s seeking a seat on Council not only to represent the large population of students in town, not all of whom are transient, she says, but also to advocate for more inclusion and diversity in the city overall. Joseph emigrated to the U.S. from Haiti as a teenager and has since BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

been dedicated to a life of service, most recently by volunteering with Boulder Shelter for the Homeless. With a career in human rights, working for U.S.AID, the U.N. and elsewhere, we find Joseph incredibly well informed and experienced beyond her years. And while some have criticized her election bid since she’s a relative newcomer, Joseph appears authentic in her desire to live in Boulder in the future and contribute to her chosen community. Mark Wallach is a bit of an anomaly when it comes to the candidates. Endorsed by the groups supporting slow growth, he’s a former real estate developer whose slogan is “smart not slow growth,” and admits to a friendship with the Chamber of Commerce’s John Tayer. He’s also endorsMark Wallach ing and accepting the endorsement of Councilman Bob Yates. Wallach believes in a more nuanced approach to development, one that takes into account a variety of considerations, including giving preference to net-zero projects, discouraging demolition and perhaps even rezoning the airport to create middleand low-income housing not in a flood zone. He supports the City’s moratorium in response to the opportunity zone designation and doesn’t believe density achieves affordability as most proponents of infill claim. He’d rather see affordable housing built on site instead of allowing developers to pay inclusionary housing fees, but finds the current site review process arcane. Originally from New York, Wallach is practical, willing to consider different points of view and even change his mind in the process, all qualities we I

value in a candidate. When we endorsed Bob Yates four years ago, we argued that he would take a common sense and conservative approach to most issues, and make reasonable decisions on complicated topics, all of which has proven to be true. While we don’t agree with him on some things, principally the muni which he is against, we’ve appreciated his ability to cut through the crap and Bob Yates move issues along. He realizes the City might need to do more for our transportation network outside of the relationship with RTD and wants to work with surrounding cities to create supplemental transit options, while admitting transportation is an area where the City might not make money. He wants to update the site review process to forgo all of the negotiation, while hardwiring community benefits and allowing some discretion. And he believes both Council and City staff need to do a better job of bringing people along in the process. Furthermore, he says his biggest learning curve on Council so far has been homelessness solutions, and he believes we can still do more. He’s worked with Sam Weaver to put forward the middle-income down payment assistance pilot program, which is also on the ballot. He’s proven an effective City leader and we endorse him once again. Someone on Council has to be able to count, and that’s Yates. This is Adam Swetlik’s second City Council run, and we’re impressed by the work he’s done since his first attempt by engaging with the community on a much deeper level and bringing himself up to speed on many issues. OCTOBER 10, 2019

For the last two years, he’s served on the Housing Advisory Board, most recently serving as its chair, and is dedicated to finding housing solutions based on the philosophy that housing is a human right, not an investment. To that end, he wants to pump more resources into homelessness solutions including providing temporary shelter year-round, installing more public restrooms and lockers, providing sharps containers and further supporting the City’s needle program. While he admits the City is prohibited from doing certain things because of Adam Swetlik state law, he wants to push the boundaries of what’s possible and testified at the State House to repeal the moratorium on rent control in the state. At the same time, he’s supportive of neighborhoods wanting to keep their character and believes the City could do much more to engage the community. Instead of focusing on increasing density, he’d rather see the City shift its focus and resources to transportation infrastructure and options to mitigate the growing number of people that live here and commute in from other towns. He also wants to help small businesses through a permanently affordable business program. Incumbent Aaron Brockett has proven he puts his money where his mouth is. Before he was elected to Council four years ago, Brockett served on the Planning Board and was identified as a pro-growth candidate. He lives in the Holiday neighborhood, a mixed-use development that allows him to walk to work and bike to City Council, and he’s supported similar projects while on Council. He’s a strong proponent of securing funding see VOTE 2019 Page 14

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for the Transportation Master Plan, particularly providing bus rapid transit on Highway 119 and creating more micro-mobility options to create an independent transportation future that complements RTD. When it comes to affordable housing, he wants to develop the transit corridors while also creating guidelines for HOAs in the affordable housing program, recognizing that many communities really aren’t that affordable because of extra costs associated with those organizaAaron Brockett tions. He also wants to pilot affordable commercial space and believes development projects with clear community benefits could be expedited through the site review process without forgoing the public’s ability to comment. If re-elected, Brockett says he wants to shift his focus to more social issues, being one of only two Council members who attended the vigil for people experiencing homelessness who have died, and is proud of Council’s work with such things like the assault weapons ban. Brockett is nuanced and thoughtful, while also engaging with the community. We support his re-election. n City of Boulder Ballot Issue 2G Tax on Tobacco Vaping Products ❑ Yes/For No/Against

Starting Jan. 1, 2020, this measure would allow the City of Boulder to impose a sales and use tax up to 40% on all electronic smoking devices, including any refill, cartridge or component of such a product. Any revenue generated by the tax would go toward a licensing program for nicotine retailers, health promotion and education, as well as enforcement. The warnings and research coming out about vaping is concerning to be sure. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now saying there is an outbreak of lung diseases relating to vaping, with more than 1,000 confirmed cases and 18 deaths. Colorado leads the nation in teen vaping use, and officials around the state have been taking action to prevent the use of e-cigarettes. Boulder City Council recently banned the sale of flavored vaping products and increased the purchasing age to 21 in an 14

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effort to curb use. This tax is seen by many as another step in the process to stop people from using the products. However, Boulder Weekly rarely supports sin taxes, believing that they generally tax a small segment of the population in order to benefit the community as a whole. If the reason the City wants to tax vaping products is because they’re dangerous, then they should be ban them altogether, and not just impose a sin tax. n City of Boulder Ballot Issue 2H Sales And Use Tax Extension For Open Space And Long’s Gardens Yes/For ❑ No/Against

This measure would continue the existing $0.15 sales and use tax the City already collects for its open space program through 2039. (Currently, the tax is set to expire at the end of this year.) The first year of revenue (estimated at $5.3 million) would go toward a conservation easement at Long’s Gardens on North Broadway. The land is home to the famous iris gardens and has been farmed by the same family for more than a century. The conservation easement would prevent it from being sold for nonagricultural use in the future. The revenue for the remaining 19 years of the tax would go toward the purchase, acquisition, restoration and maintenance of more open space within the city. There is no question that one of the primary drivers of Boulder’s amazing quality of life is our continuing support for an aggressive open space program. For decades the residents of Boulder have voiced support of the program by continuing to pass this sales and use tax. And while we know the future City Council may have to ask for other increased taxes to fund important programs like transportation and affordable housing, maintaining our open space program is essential to the Boulder way of life. n City of Boulder Ballot Issue 2I Imposition of a Middle-Income Housing Program Yes/For ❑ No/Against

Housing prices in Boulder started outpacing income growth long ago, resulting in many people being priced out of living here. As a remedy, the City has worked diligently over the OCTOBER 10, 2019

years to increase its stock of affordable units (currently 7.5% with a goal of 15%) for low- and moderate-income families. But there remains a gap for middle-income earners. This measure would allow the City of Boulder to borrow through bonds or lines of credit up to $10 million to fund down payment assistance, basically in the form of a second mortgage, for middle-income individuals and families. In order to qualify, borrowers have to have worked in Boulder for at least two years, bring a 5% down payment and have incomes that fall below 120% of Area Median Income (AMI) ($95,520 with $140,000 in assets for an individual or $122,760 for a family of three with $170,000 in assets). For people who qualify, the City will lend up to $200,000 toward either a singlefamily home with a maximum purchase price of $919,525 or a condo or townhome at $435,000. In return, the property will be deed-restricted with an allowance for capital improvements to create additional equity, and 15% will be set aside for City employees. Additionally, participants will pay the City back with interest over 10 years, with profits going back into the program to help additional people with down payments. This pilot program is a possible replacement for the current down payment assistance program which has $800,000 in the fund but hasn’t been used for a year or so according to City staff. The measure was put forward by City Council members Sam Weaver and Bob Yates, who say they already have buy-in from local banks and credit unions, and that the program has the possibility to ensure housing affordability well into the future. Boulder Weekly fully realizes that this pilot program, even if successful, has limited ability to alleviate Boulder’s affordability problems. While it may help around 100 families at first, thousands of families will still find it difficult if not outright impossible to live in Boulder, and it’s a drop in the bucket toward Boulder’s goal of creating 1,000 middle income, deedrestricted units in the next decade. It also assumes those families will see their incomes rise in the future in order to either sell or afford the 10-year balloon payment to pay the City back. While there are obvious limitations to the program, in the end we agree that anything the City can

do to help more middle-income workers afford to live closer to their work is a step in the right direction, both for our affordable housing and greenhouse gas emission goals. Every little bit helps.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

CITY OF LONGMONT Over the past two years, Longmont has continued its transformation into one of the premier cities in Boulder County and the state for that matter. And the vision and guidance of the current City Council has played no small part in that evolution. While much good work has been done, there are still a number of important issues that need to be addressed. We believe that the current Council is still making a mistake when it comes to its Windy Gap water project and the city’s future water needs. Water usage in Longmont continues to remain flat or even falling thanks to conservation efforts and technology even as the city has grown. The best excuse for supporting Windy Gap and spending tens of millions more in tax-payer dollars is because we have already invested millions in the project. It reminds us of the gambler who has lost half his paycheck and feels compelled to keep gambling because he has to win back his losses. Sometimes the right thing is just walking away. When it comes to water, it really comes down to your worldview. If you know that diverting water from the Colorado River Basin to Windy Gap is going to permanently alter and damage the Colorado River and you don’t care so long as Longmont gets its water, then Windy Gap might make sense. But if you believe, as Boulder Weekly does, that Longmont has a responsibility not to let its local decisions and actions cause harm to the environment outside of its City limits, then Windy Gap is a shortsighted idea. Some scientists believe that global warming over the next decade could drop the flows in the Colorado River to the point where only the lower basin states — those with senior water rights to Colorado — could take all of the Colorado River’s water, leaving Windy Gap reservoir empty in perpetuity. Therefore, we believe Longmont’s see VOTE 2019 Page 16


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elected leaders should be guiding the City’s growth in such a way as to be limited by its current water supply. The once seemingly feasible dream of perpetual growth and prosperity has been rendered impossible by the realities of global warming and its impact on water supplies in the West. All Front Range communities must quickly begin to wean themselves from their dependence on the diversion of Western Colorado water to the Front Range. The same principle must also apply to oil and gas development. Pushing wells outside City limits and out of neighborhoods is a good thing. But oil and gas extraction from horizontal drilling and fracking under property within the City’s control still adds to the region’s lousy air quality and high ozone levels as well as furthering global warming. The fight to ban all oil and gas extraction within its jurisdiction must remain a goal for the next City Council and if necessary, lawsuits should be brought under the newly passed SB-181, which clearly states its intent to make human health and the environment superior to oil and gas extraction when issuing permits. To date, however, Governor Polis and his appointed head of the COGCC are ignoring SB-181 and moving full speed ahead on well permits with no regard for human health or global warming. Hence the need for City Council to take up the fight on these important issues within it jurisdiction. The days when City Council’s most important priorities were potholes, new housing additions and getting the traffic lights timed right are unfortunately behind us. Mass transportation is another critical issue and sadly, we didn’t hear many realistic fixes for Longmont’s sad dependence on the ever incompetent RTD. Perhaps the potential lawsuit proposed by some on Council will help at some point, but for the person trying to use the bus to get to work or to shop it’s still a ridiculously long and ineffective alternative. Walking is faster in some cases. Affordable housing is still a critical problem for Council to address. We’d like to point out that research has shown that allowing developers to pay money into affordable housing funds rather than actually being required to 16

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build affordable units into their projects actually forces up the overall price of housing and does little to create new housing. And lastly, the issue of homelessness and the people living on our streets in RVs need compassionate solutions that put people first. It’s a lot to think about, Longmont, but with the great collection of candidates who have thrown their hats into the ring this year, along with those still on Council, we are confident this great community will continue to thrive and solve its problems. As always, we don’t agree with all the positions of all the people we are endorsing. While positions on the issues are a priority, so too is experience and the ability to communicate and to work through heated issues with respect for those with whom disagree with you. Here are our choices: n City of Longmont Mayor

Brian Bagley Schuyler Trowbridge

Bagley’s vast experience as Council member and as mayor was a large consideration in our endorsing him. Running a city with a seven-figure budget takes more than being on the right side of all the social justice issues, which Bagley isn’t. While the mayor has made some significant Brian Bagley compromises with the oil and gas industry, which have resulted in pushing extraction operations outside city limits — a very good thing — we do not believe he opposes oil and gas extraction in general and he stated that he is skeptical of the science that projects that we only have 11 years to radically diminish our greenhouse gas emissions or we will pass the point of no return to stop climate change. Bagley has also worked to garner commitments for a zero-carbon footprint for the City by 2030. We hope that works out but note that such promises made by utility companies in the past often accomplish little to nothing in the real world and result in new politicians making new promises with dates further down the road when the old effort fails. We hope Longmont’s goals will be reached and appreciate the mayor’s efforts in this area. OCTOBER 10, 2019

We disagree with Bagley’s position on Windy Gap and hope that he will become more engaged with the science regarding the Colorado River Basin and global warming rather than relying on the tainted information being put out by the entities who stand to profit through the diversion of Western Slope water to the Front Range. And we’re not wild about his views on affordable housing either ,though no candidate in the county has truly found a workable solution to this troubling issue. But all that said, we do believe Bagley is the best choice for mayor at this time.

n City of Longmont Council Member Ward 1 Tim Waters (uncontested)

Tim Waters is running unopposed. We believe he’s done a good job so far. We say give him your vote again, even if it doesn’t really matter. Tim Waters

n City of Longmont Council Member Ward 3 ❑ Regan Sample Susie Hidalgo-Fahring

n City of Longmont Council Member At Large Joan Peck ❑ Jeff Moore ❑ Ron Gallegos ❑ Mather Garret

Joan Peck’s time on Council has not been without drama. But we feel confident that the lessons of doing City business in a transparent fashion have been learned and applied. Peck is on the right side of the Windy Gap issue and she is doing perhaps more than any other council member to challenge RTD to give Longmont what it Joan Peck is owed and what it has already paid for — aka a train or anything else that will be workable before we’re all using Star-Trekian transporters to get around. We wish her luck with that fight. Joan came into office in a push by voters to make environmental issues a higher priority for the City and she has helped Longmont to move forward in this critical area. For these reasons we believe she deserves another term. With the City moving forward successfully in so many ways, we see no need to try to turn back the Council to days gone by, which is how we see her opponents in this race. We endorse Joan Peck.

We liked both of these candidates but were extremely impressed with Hidalgo-Fahring. She is a teacher who is skilled in negotiating at the management level. She has a heart for people who are struggling and she is a Susie HidalgoFahring doer, a problem-solver with a successful track record for getting things done and creating positive change. She was well equipped to answer our questions on the most pressing issues facing Longmont, and we believe she will be a great fit on the current Council. We strongly endorse Susie HidalgoFahring. n City of Longmont Ballot Issue 3B No recommendation

The City of Longmont wants to increase sales and use tax by .18% to pay for a competitive pool and ice rink. The proposal will consist of a standard Olympic-sized pool (10, 50-meter lanes) that can be converted into an NHL-regulation-sized ice rink. The projected cost will not exceed $72,260,000. If the debt from said pool/rink is paid off by Jan. 1, 2040, the sales and use tax increase will decrease to .03%, which will be collected in perpetuity for maintenance of the facility. The benefits of a competitive pool and rink are numerous to the City of Longmont. If the citizens of Longmont agree, then they should vote yes. However, a sales and use tax spans the entire populace, and it is unlikely the entire populace of VOTE 2019 from Page 18

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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MARK McINT YRE

Boulder City Council

EnDORSEMEnTS ElECtEd OFFICIaLS aaron Brockett andrew Shoemaker andy Schultheiss Angelique Espinoza Bob Yates Francoise Poinsatte George Karakehian Jan Burton Jill Grano KC Becker Ken Hotard leslie durgin Leslie Smith Linda Shoemaker lynn Guissinger Macon Cowles Matt applebaum Richard Polk Robin Bohannan Suzy ageton Will toor

COMMunITY LEaDERS Betsey Martens Bill Briggs Bryan Bowen Claudia Hanson thiem David Barrett Judy Amabile Kevin Bracy Knight Michelle Estrella Richard Foy Sue Prant Shelley Dunbar ORGanIzaTIOnS Better Boulder Boulder Progressives FIDOS Open Boulder South Boulder Creek action Group

#LookForwardBoulder

Mark is thoughtful and fair, and his background as a small business owner, a champion for affordable housing and an open space advocate will give us the balanced voice we need on Council. -Leslie Durgin, Former Boulder Mayor Mark brings an open-minded, solution-oriented approach to city problems. He is a strong advocate for bicycle infrastructure, community wide EcoPasses and supports diverse housing options. On the muni, he is focused on the goal of carbon reduction now, rather than the muni as a goal in itself. -Will Toor, Former Boulder Mayor and County Commissioner

Among the candidates for Council who bring joy and optimisim to the work—banishing grimness to the margins and supporting the work of talented staff—Mark McIntyre is a standout. Let’s put a joyful effective leader on Council -Macon Cowles, Former City Council Member

anD SCORES MORE GREaT FOLKS...

I appreciate Mark’s dedication to understanding the complexities around Open Space and transportation. Mark brings a practical approach that will help the entire Council operate more efficiently. -Jan Burton, Former City Council Member

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McINTYRE

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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markforcouncil.com

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Longmont will use the facility they paid for. In that interest, a no vote will deny the tax, and those who wish to bring a competitive pool/ rink to Longmont will have to seek other financing.

CITY OF LAFAYETTE City Council (Choose 5)

❑ ❑

n City of Longmont

❑ ❑

Ballot Issue 3C Yes/For ❑ No/Against

The current extension of the sales and use tax of 0.75% that maintains roads is set to expire in 2026. Longmont voters have approved this extension five times over the past 30 years, and a yes vote will extend the 0.75% sales and use tax indefinitely, removing it from the ballot in future elections. A no vote will cause the 0.75% tax to sunset in 2026, but only if future Longmont voters decide not to extend the tax. We say yes. n City of Longmont Ballot Issue 3D ❑ Yes/For No/Against

City of Longmont Home Rule Charter section 12.4 sets Cityowned property leases at 20 years. Ballot Issue 3D wants to increase that term to 30 years, matching standard mortgage terms. While a 30-year-lease could make the City’s property more attractive to educational and performing arts facilities, it could also cause the City of Longmont to lose out on 10 years of property value increase. A no vote allows the City of Longmont to examine future current market values before extending leases. n City of Longmont Ballot Issue 3E Yes/For ❑ No/Against Should municipal Judge Robert J. Frick be retained in office for two years? BW endorsed Frick’s retention in 2017, as did 72% of Longmont voters. Vote yes.

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❑ ❑ ❑ ❑

Andrew J. O’Connor Anne Borrell Stephanie Walton Clifton Smedley Patricia Townsend Timothy Barnes Marty Feffer JD Mangat Tonya Briggs Doug Conarroe Jenna Tullberg Katherine Huth - Withdrawn Nicole Samson Brian Wong

The next slate of Lafayette City Council members will assume positions on a board that has experienced turnover (three vacated seats in the last two years), and that is poised to make key decisions about the community’s growth. The issues of affordability, oil and gas, growth and transportation came up in almost every conversation we had with the candidates. For many, one of these issues was the primary factor in their decision to run for City Council. Five candidates — Anne Borrell, Patricia Townsend, Marty Feffer, Tonya Briggs and Jenna Tullberg — are running as Community Rights Advocates, a movement born out of the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund, which provides legal and organizational assistance to people and communities interested in banning fracking, factory farming, water privatization and more. Several candidates expressed an interest in banning fracking within City limits, while others suggested enforcing strict regulations and working to bend existing legal framework so as to effectively ban fracking in Lafayette. When it comes to growth, the City of Lafayette has some guardrails in place to ensure development of residential and commercial spaces are done with intention — every six years, only 1,200 building permits can be accepted, with an additional 50 affordable housing units able to be built. Still, there were discussions about where Lafayette should build out in the future. And there is robust discussion about the state of traffic in Lafayette. OCTOBER 10, 2019

While some candidates suggest undertaking construction projects, others want to use technology to make traffic flow better. There were suggestions of expanding Highway 7, working with RTD to make bus travel easier and more affordable, and integrating better bike and pedestrian pathways. And almost every candidate spoke of a desire to retain Lafayette’s “smalltown” feel. We chose five candidates who bring a diversity of thought to addressing these issues. Timothy Barnes is a science educator at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). He served in the Navy, has a degree from CU in communication and served on the advisory board of the Boulder County Community Action Program for 10 years. Timothy Barnes Barnes brings an understanding of climate issues and a unique ability to communicate that will be useful when working with nearby cities, counties and the state to address the impacts of oil and gas operations out east, and to prevent the industry from entering the City of Lafayette. Barnes is committed to increasing access to affordable housing in Lafayette and will seek to be an effective voice for underprivileged communities in the City. Stephanie Walton is the only candidate running that has served a fouryear term. We think her experience will be valuable as the City undergoes major changes in personnel and develops new building, sustainability and transportation plans. Walton is a long-time community organizer who hopes to provide greater support for Lafayette’s senior citizens and mobile home owners. Her self-proclaimed biggest issue is transportation, and she hopes to fix problems on major arterial roadways caused by Stephanie poor planning and inteWalton grate the trail system into the greater map of transportation options in the City. On oil and gas, Walton supports the community’s decision to ban fracking, but would want to be a good steward of taxpayers’ money if and when the City’s oil I

and gas regulations are challenged. Jenna Tullberg is one of two Community Rights Advocates we’re endorsing. Tullberg’s education and experience in social work inspired her to run for office, and we think it has helped her develop a well-rounded platform that addresses many of Jenna Tullberg the needs in Lafayette. Tullberg says she would support limiting or eliminating in-lieu fees developers pay instead of providing affordable housing, and wants to be sure units are better distributed throughout the city so as not to overburden certain neighborhoods and schools. Tullberg supports putting the Climate Bill of Rights into the City Charter so it can be better used to defend a ban on fracking. The other Community Rights Advocate we’re endorsing is Tonya Briggs. A local small business owner, Briggs brings a unique perspective to Lafayette’s management and growth. She would seek to prioritize transportation improvements over Tonya Briggs development; adjust traffic lighting and try to add turn lanes to expedite traffic; and be mindful of the placement of affordable housing units. Briggs says she would also seek to develop a better working relationship with the Town of Erie, promote sustainability measures, ban fracking and consider suing Weld County for its emissions that affect local air quality. Lastly, we’re endorsing JD Mangat, a Lafayette native who has served on City Council over the last year after filling a vacancy. We appreciate Mangat’s passion for improving the lives of residents and JD Mangat making it a more welcoming place for visitors and those looking to live in Lafayette. Mangat says, “There should be no drilling whatsoever happening in our City limits,” and would seek to work with nearby governments and the state to ensure oil and gas operations don’t see VOTE 2019 Page 20

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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DEBBY FAHEY Louisville City Council | Ward 2 39-year resident of Louisville 2017 Louisville Chamber of Commerce Volunteer of the Year What I bring to our City: Experience on City commissions Board leadership Fresh & informed perspectives Forward-looking decision making Dedication to our residents

www.faheyforlouisville.com

VOTE 2019 from Page 18

enter Lafayette. He would seek to require operators and/or municipalities to track emissions from oil and gas operations east of the City. And Mangat would push for an expansion of accessory dwelling units (ADUs), and seek to prioritize affordable and senior housing, while being mindful of how to appropriately welcome and place commercial development. n City of Lafayette Ballot Question 2A Yes/For ❑ No/Against

Lafayette’s Ballot Question 2A asks voters if the City’s outdated rules regarding recall elections should be brought in line with state regulations via a charter amendment. The amendment would not change the minimum number of signatures required to prompt a recall election (25% of votes cast for that office). Elected officials must serve six months before they can be removed by recall. n City of Lafayette Ballot Question 2B Yes/For ❑ No/Against

Boulder’s Best Days Lie Ahead. Rachel Friend

Attorney, Educator, Activist, Mom

Priorities

Endorsements Steve Fenberg, KC Becker, Lesley Smith, Jim Martin, Will Toor, Michael Dougherty, Matthew Applebaum, Leslie Durgin, Aaron Brockett, Bob Yates, Suzy Ageton, Jan Burton, Angelique Espinoza, Jill Grano, Richard Lopez, Francoise Poinsatte, Andrew Shoemaker, Judy Amabile, Benita Duran, Junie Joseph, Mark McIntyre

Vote Rachel Friend Boulder City Council

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n City of Lafayette Ballot Question 2C Yes/For ❑ No/Against

Health & Safety - Good Governance - Social Justice

Complete list at Friend4Boulder.org

Three Lafayette City Councilors vacated their seats before the end of the last term. A yes vote on Ballot Question 2B extends the timeline in the City’s charter for filling future City Council vacancies. If approved, 2B would require any vacancy on City Council before 180 days of an election be filled in 45 days. The old timeline required Council vacancies 90 days before an election be filled within 30 days.

OCTOBER 10, 2019

A yes vote on Ballot Question 2C will bring the City’s laws regarding municipal initiative and referendum procedures in line with state law via a charter amendment. It would retain existing provisions about minimum number of signatures required (10 percent of registered voters at the time notice of an initiative or referendum is filed by the clerk). After the City Clerk determines a petition is sufficient, the City Council will decide within 30 days whether to adopt, repeal or send to a vote the ordinance in the petition. I

CITY OF LOUISVILLE As in the rest of Boulder County, how to manage growth and development is the biggest issue facing Louisville. The City has long grappled with how to fill large, vacant properties, namely the 388-acre P66 Project (often referred to as the ConocoPhillips parcel) along U.S. 36 near Northwest Parkway, and the nearly 45-acre “Parcel O” within the McCaslin corridor. These properties present Louisville with opportunities to spur tax revenue, create jobs and open up new housing options. While each of this year’s candidates for Louisville City Council has slightly different ideas for how the City can best utilize these properties, each stressed the importance of maintaining the Louisville’s small-town character. Affordable housing is also a part of the growth and development issue, and Louisville, like the rest of Boulder County, is often too expensive a place for low- and middle-income earners of all stripes — civil servants, the elderly, young adults in their first jobs — to live. Louisville will be voting on whether to allow retail marijuana cultivation facilities within City limits. The City could have done this without voter approval, but both current Council members we interviewed said they felt public opinion on the matter was too varied to give a strong impression of the majority, so they sent it to the ballot. Louisville has made great strides in lowering its carbon footprint, with its Sustainability Action Plan providing goal posts in waste management, clean energy development, transportation, agriculture and water. In 2017, Louisville reduced its electricity usage by 3.2% and natural gas usage by 1% from the 2015 baseline. The City entered a partnership with Xcel Energy last year to focus on clean energy options. As in all council races in the county, we’ve endorsed candidates we believe will advance a climate-focused agenda. We believe the mix of candidates we’ve endorsed will create robust yet balanced discussions around all of Louisville’s key issues, helping the City remain one of the best places to live in the United States. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


n City of Louisville Mayor At-Large (4 Year Term) (Vote for One) Ashley Stolzmann ❑ Don Brown

Ashley Stolzmann has been serving Louisville’s Ward 3 since 2013. Stolzmann graduated with honors from Colorado School of Mines with a degree in chemical engineering, and she’s a go-getter in every sense of the word, acting as the Louisville Sustainability Board liaison and finance committee chair during her time on Council, and serving on the executive committee of the Denver Regional Council of Governments, Ashley as well as the regional Stolzmann transportation committee. She maintains a day job with a Boulder start-up company. Stolzmann supports maintaining the “character of the community,” and not changing the “built environment” of downtown Louisville. Where affordable housing is concerned, Stolzmann knows there’s no easy answer, but is committed to reaching the county-wide goal of ensuring 12% of housing inventory will be permanently affordable to low-, moderate-, and middle-income households by 2035. She made specific mention of looking for ways to enable mobile home park residents to purchase the land under their homes. She’s in favor of the City purchasing existing housing stock and integrating affordable housing throughout the city, rather than placing all affordable units in one area. While some believe that Louisville is completely out of residential space, Stolzmann points to zoned residential areas at the north end of Steel Ranch that are still undeveloped. She says her constituents have made it clear they don’t want increased height or density. However, Stolzmann believes commercial properties need to be the City’s main focus in development. Regarding Parcel O, Stolzmann supports Ascent Church (which currently takes up part of the building) in its recently submitted proposal to buy the building and divide the property into retail space that would include things such as a food hall, artistic space, teen activity space and the like. The end result would be a walkable retail space in a parcel that has been all but vacant BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

(save the church) for nearly a decade. She’s not in favor of rezoning the development for residential use. Stolzmann helped Louisville adopt its first Sustainability Action Plan in 2016, which increased the municipal share of energy from renewable sources to more than 50%. She would like to work on policy that would implement healthy soil practices in parks and open space to aid in carbon sequestration and would also like to put a question to voters about a plastic bag tax like the one Boulder implemented in 2012. Where marijuana cultivation is concerned, Stolzmann was in favor of putting the issue on the ballot so that Louisville residents could make the decision for themselves. She directly supports both the recreation tax and the Louisville Fire Protection District Ballot Issue 6A.

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n City of Louisville City Council Person Ward I (4 Year Term) (Vote for One) ❑ Barbara Butterworth Caleb Dickinson ❑ Gordon Madonna

Caleb Dickinson was born and raised in Boulder, and received a degree in finance from the Leeds School of Business. He has lived in Louisville since 2010 with his wife and children, and is co-owner of Fox Property Management. He is the current vicechair for the Louisville Historic Preservation Commission, a director of the Louisville Caleb Dickinson Chamber of Commerce and vice-president of the Louisville Downtown Business Association. Dickinson makes charitable donations to local organizations as a founding member of Guys Who Give. Dickinson is clear that he’d have a lot to learn on Council, but that his years of working as an entrepreneur in the city have given him an intimate familiarity with the community. He’s keen on listening and learning and fostering collaboration. He’s skeptical about the benefit of residential units at Parcel O or P66. He’s interested in creating a “threepronged vision” between residents, City staff and Council that can help developers deliver a project that satis-

for Boulder City Council sensible informed leadership Mark’s endorsers include:

see VOTE 2019 Page 22

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fies as much of the community as possible. He’s in support of 2D, 2E and 2F, but would like to see more data from the Fire District that shows need for more funds. n City of Louisville City Council Person Ward II (4 Year Term) (Vote for One) ❑ Sherry Sommer Deb Fahey

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This is Deb Fahey’s second run for Council, and we believe it’s her turn to serve. Fahey, a nearly 40-year resident of Louisville, says she’s been going to City Council meetings for about 10 years now and it shows in her knowledge of the City’s issues. She has been on the Boulder County Aging Advisory Council, the Louisville Deb Fahey Senior Advisory Board, the Louisville Historic Preservation Commission and more. She currently volunteers at the Senior Center every Friday morning and volunteers at the local museum every Friday afternoon. Sensible development and environmental sustainability are her top priorities. Fahey calls Ascent Church’s proposal to rent out and develop part of Parcel O “pretty close to being reasonable,” the only issue being too many housing units, though she does say she believes some housing units need to be included in the development. Fahey would like to see any housing units included in Parcel O be carved out for “workforce housing ... our local teachers on a single income could afford to live in.” Again, she supports the addition of some housing units in the P66 Program, namely multiple family units that reduce the amount of infrastructure the City would need to install to accommodate them. Where the environment is concerned, she would like to see the City add more solar panels, namely to the new recreational center expansion and on public works buildings, and continue its work with Xcel to buy into renewable energy sources. She supports the marijuana cultivation issues, as well as the retention of the recreation tax and the Fire District mill levy increase. I

n City of Louisville City Council Person Ward III (4 Year Term) (uncontested) Dennis Maloney

Dennis Maloney is running unopposed this year, but we support his level-headed approach to economic vitality and a continued high quality of life in Louisville. As the current chair of the finance committee, economic vitality is first on Maloney’s list of priorities for the City. He believes in focusing on Dennis Maloney those two critical pieces of property — Parcel O and P66 — to revitalize the City’s revenue streams, and he’s open to looking at a mix of retail and residential space on these properties. Like other Louisville City Council candidates we spoke with, Maloney believes there are gaps in housing available for middle-class seniors and middle-class wage earners, and he would like to focus City efforts on making sure these populations, which include teachers and firefighters and other civil servants, have options to live in Louisville. He notes pride in the work City Council did in developing the City’s Sustainability Action Plan, which increased the city’s use of renewable energy sources. He supports retail marijuana cultivation in the city. n City of Louisville Ballot Issue 2D Retail Marijuana Cultivation Facility Excise Tax Yes/For ❑ No/Against

Here’s the meat and potatoes: This proposed tax is 5% of the average market rate of marijuana, which City Council can increase to 10% without further voter approval. Revenue can be used to pay for the cost of training, enforcement and administration of marijuana laws and regulations, to support drug and alcohol programs and facilities, and for other general purposes. Based on averages from other cities, Louisville City staff estimates that five facilities will open in the first fiscal year, with an estimated tax increase between $100,000 and $200,000 (this number is dependent on the number of facilities that open). Get that tax revenue, Louisville, and vote yes on 2E.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


n City of Louisville Ballot Issue 2E Retention of Recreation Tax Revenues Yes/For ❑ No/Against

Not a new tax, nor an increase in taxes, Issue 2E asks residents to allow the City to retain revenues collected via 2016 voter-approved ballot issues that authorized a .15% sales and use tax to expand the recreation center, the senior center and Memory Square Park pool. If approved, this tax will allow the City to continue to collect sales and use tax for operating and maintaining the recreation and senior centers, as well as the pool facilities at Memory Square Park. It would also allow the City to keep revenue collected in 2018 that exceed the estimates that were included in the election notice mailed to voters in 2016. We say vote yes to Ballot Issue 2E.

mills to improve response times and enhance emergency services. The Louisville Fire Department has three stations, but currently only one fulltime crew. The voter-approved mill levy would be used to address the following needs: a second, full-time engine crew; one EMS captain to oversee the EMS division; personnel needed to provide community paramedicine services; improved recruitment and retention of firefighters and paramedics; scheduled replacement of emergency equipment and apparatus

to maintain reliability and protect first responders. The fire district’s average response time is currently six minutes, which is two minutes slower than the National Fire Protection Agency’s benchmark of four minutes. Save lives and property and vote yes on Ballot Issue 6A. BOULDER VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT The Boulder Valley School District Board of Education has been rebuilding the last few years, hiring a

new superintendent and dealing with a variety of issues from controversial charter school applications, to providing air-conditioning in classrooms, to tackling the achievement gap, especially at Lafayette’s Alicia Sanchez International Elementary School, which received the state’s lowest rating of turnaround status at the beginning of the year. (In the most recent state report, it received a priority improvement rating.) The district also faces see VOTE 2019 Page 24

n City of Louisville Ballot Question 2F Allowing Retail Marijuana Cultivation Facilities Yes/For ❑ No/Against

Because of TABOR, this measure will only pass if Issue 2E is approved. As aforementioned, we believe allowing retail marijuana cultivation is a nobrainer for Louisville, if only to generate tax revenue. The City (with solid examples from surrounding communities to model themselves after) has already done front-end work, like adopting an odor-emission ordinance back in February. All licensed retail marijuana cultivation facilities in Louisville will be limited to 150,000 square feet of building area. At a City Council meeting in July, Mayor Bob Muckle expressed concern about an increase in crime if cultivation facilities were allowed, but the City already allows dispensaries, which haven’t increased crime in the city, so it’s hard to see a connection between crime and cultivation facilities. Plenty of research indicates that with a clear system of laws and regulations, like the ones Colorado has had in place since 2013, legalized marijuana operations are safe. With surrounding cities already allowing cultivation, Louisville only stands to gain from supporting Ballot Question 2F.

• I am Boulder raised and familiar with local issues. • I will help protect what is valued and unique about Boulder. • I will advocate for the entire community and foster inclusivity. • I am a decisive leader that will drive unifying solutions.

n Louisville Fire Protection District Ballot Issue 6A Yes/For ❑ No/Against

This measure asks voters to approve a mill levy increase of 3.9 BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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national education challenges, such as school safety and mental health support in the wake of continued mass shootings, not least of which includes the STEM School shooting in nearby Highlands Ranch, where one student was killed and eight others injured in May 2019. Four seats are up for grabs this year, although three of these seats are uncontested. Both Kathy Gebhardt and Richard Garcia are seeking a second (and final) term. Stacey Zis is seeking to replace former Board President Sam Fuqua, who is term limited. Zis, with a son at Boulder High, is a long-time parent volunteer, at the local school, district and state level. She’s also a senior consultant with the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems. All of that means the only contested race at BVSD is in District D to replace Shelly Benford, who is also term limited.

more emotional and social supports for students and families, believing that this increases overall school safety without a need for metal detectors or arming teachers with guns. She wants to specifically focus on helping lowincome and bi-lingual students receive the additional help they need to succeed, including hiring more social workers at specific schools. She also believes the Board needs to be more willing to hear parents’ concerns in a responsive manner, although that doesn’t necessarily mean District policies will change as a result. And, she says, she’s committed to open communication and transparency as a Board member. For these reasons, we endorse Lisa Sweeney-Miran for BVSD Director District A. n Boulder Valley School District RE-2 Director District C (4 Years) Kathy Gebhardt (uncontested)

n Boulder Valley School District n Boulder Valley School District RE-2 Director District A (4 Years)

Jai Rajagopal Lisa Sweeney-Marin

Boulder Weekly values a board with diverse viewpoints and priorities, and we believe healthy debate and disagreement is essential to responsible management of the District. That being said, the candidates in this race are aligned pretty evenly on most issues with both saying mental health support and tackling the achievement gap are top priorities. And although Jai Rajagopal is capable, thoughtful and eager to contribute, Lisa Sweeney-Miran stands out. (Sweeney-Miran’s Lisa SweeneyMiran name was certified incorrectly on the ballot. However, all votes cast for the candidate will be counted, according to Colorado law.) A life-long resident of Boulder, Sweeney-Miran attended BVSD from kindergarten on and has three children currently attending BVSD schools. She’s also a graduate from the University of Colorado School of Law and is the executive director of Mother House, a women’s shelter in Boulder helping mothers struggling with addiction, domestic violence and poverty. As a BVSD Board member, she would prioritize 24

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RE-2 Director District D (4 Years) Stacey Zis (uncontested)

n Boulder Valley School District RE-2 Director District G (4 Years) Richard L. Garcia (uncontested) n BALLOT MEASURES Proposition CC (Statutory) Yes/For ❑ No/Against

Colorado voters approved the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) in 1992, which required voter approval on new taxes and put a cap on the total amount of money the state could collect in a given year. That number has risen over time using a calculation based on inflation and population growth, but any amount over the cap has been refunded to taxpayers. It’s happened nine times in the last 26 years. But a yes vote on Proposition CC effectively removes the TABOR cap — any money the state collects over the limit would be spent on public schools, higher education and transportation projects. The state would hire an independent agency to conduct an annual financial audit of the money collected above the TABOR cap. Colorado Legislative Council staff estimated the State figures to collect $310 million above the TABOR cap in 2019-20, and $342 million in 202021. If Prop CC passes, those sums OCTOBER 10, 2019

would be divied equally among public schools, higher education and transportation projects in the next two years. If Prop CC fails, taxpayers would receive a refund of about $26 to $90 per year, depending on the tax bracket, and double if joint filing, according to the state Blue Book. Prop CC does not affect refunds of overpaid income tax. The argument for Prop CC is that the state’s education and transportation systems need money, and retaining funds above the TABOR cap is a way to pay for improvements without raising taxes. Colorado ranks in the bottom one-third of states for per pupil spending on K-12 and higher education. The Colorado Department of Transportation estimates being short $8.8 billion over the next six years for necessary roadwork and highway expansion across the state. Currently, the State can’t retroactively keep funds above the TABOR cap to make up for previous years when the TABOR cap is not met. Some supporters of Prop CC see that as unfair, and so an argument for Prop CC is that the State is able to make up for years of lower tax revenue by collecting above the TABOR cap. There are several arguments against Prop CC — there’s no guarantee in the future that funds collected above the TABOR cap will be spent on education and transportation; the state budget has grown by more than $1 billion annually in recent years and that the lawmakers should prioritize education and transportation by more conventional means; and Prop CC removes the TABOR cap forever. Supporters of Prop CC have raised $1.85 million so far, and include Pat Stryker and the National Education Association. Opponents include the Koch brothers affiliated Americans for Prosperity as well as the Independence Institute, which have raised a little more than half a million dollars. Prop CC isn’t perfect — despite the annual audit, opponents are right to be concerned about the direction and accountability of funds collected above the TABOR cap. But we recommend a yes vote to begin addressing critical education and transportation needs, and we think foregoing a personal tax refund in boom years, and letting that money pool with the rest of the state’s taxpayers, will produce a greater good. I

n Proposition DD (Statutory)

Yes/For

No/Against

Boulder Weekly has been writing about Proposition DD for a while now. So this will be a short recap of why you should vote no on this proposition. Here is the Prop DD wording on the ballot: Shall state taxes be increased by twenty-nine million dollars annually to fund state water projects and commitments and to pay for the regulation of sports betting through licensed casinos by authorizing a tax on sports betting of ten percent of net sports betting proceeds, and to impose the tax on persons licensed to conduct sports betting? Translation: Voting yes will make it legal to bet on sports in Colorado. The licensed casinos and online gaming sites that will profit from sports betting will be taxed to the tune of $29 million, most of which will go to fund state “water projects and commitments.” We don’t care if you gamble on sports. We might have even supported this proposition if it were a standalone betting on sports proposition. If you want to lose your money betting the Broncos are about to turn their season around, be our guest. All we ask is that you don’t destroy Colorado’s fragile natural environment in the process. And that is what Prop DD will do if passed. Ask yourself this: What is a water project or a water commitment? We don’t know either because that is dangerously vague language. Could be anything, right? The TV commercials would have you believe Prop DD is some kind of fundraiser for open space and saving our pristine lakes and rivers. But Prop DD is actually a plan to build more dams on our rivers and more reservoirs that can be used to support more development, more suburban sprawl and more wasteful green lawns in subdivisions. And worse yet, some if not most of these water projects will involve diverting dangerous amounts of water from our last great rivers for commercial purposes including the Cache la Poudre and the badly endangered Colorado River Basin, which may already be doomed by global warming in the next few years. At a time when see VOTE 2019 Page 26

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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we should be passing laws to prevent additional diversions, Prop DD would actually make things worse for the environment in the Western U.S. So what else could be considered a “water project” under Prop DD? Or put another way, how would you feel if we told you that Mr. Fracking, the oil and gas trickster himself, Josh Penry was a consultant pushing for the passage of Prop DD? Makes you wonder why that is, doesn’t it? Passing the poorly worded Prop DD could help provide the millions of gallons of water it requires to frack every oil and gas well being drilled in Colorado even as global warming caused by these wells is threatening our rivers and lakes. It’s no coincidence this proposition has been written in the vaguest terms possible. And when critics tried to have their concerns added to the Blue Book description of “why people oppose this bill” they were dismissed. The state’s monied interests want Prop DD to pass and they don’t care what the environmental cost will be. And don’t be confused by big greens supporting this proposition. A quick examination of where they get their millions in funding should clear up any confusion there. Please join Boulder Weekly and the environmentally informed citizens of our state in voting no on Prop DD. We simply can’t continue to destroy our natural environment in the name of development. n Boulder County Question 1A (Coroner Term Limit Extension to Five Terms) ❑ Yes/For No/Against In a perfect world, there would be no need for term limits. This is not a perfect world. We endorsed extending the term limits for the office of Boulder County Sheriff because Joe Pelle has been an excellent sheriff and we might as well have him around as long as we can. But not everyone is Joe Pelle. We see no reason to extend the term limit for coroner, a move that would likely subject us to more years of having Emma Hall as the coroner. As we reported back in 2014, there were serious problems alleged under her watch. Employees told BW that morale was at an all-time low and much of that was because Hall refused to take actions against her then-contracted forensic pathologist, who many in Hall’s departI

ment claimed was acting inappropriately. Despite the seriousness of the allegations being pressed by Hall’s staff nothing was done, at least not in the months leading up to her next election. Hall even went so far as to tell Boulder Weekly in 2014 that all was well and she believed the allegations were politically motivated. Despite holding this position through the election, Hall and her forensic pathologist parted ways shortly after the election. Boulder Weekly was later informed that the same behaviors that had caused problems in Hall’s office reappeared at her forensic pathologist’s subsequent position causing stress and confusion for yet another coroner and their staff. All of which could have been likely avoided with proper supervision and leadership from the Boulder County Coroner. Hall’s office has also been accused of being extremely slow, which leaves the families whose loved ones have died in great distress for prolonged periods of time waiting to know what really happened. (For more details on the 2014 allegations see “Dying for the truth,” June 12, 2014, and “The politics of death,” May 15, 2014.) We think a four-term limit with no extention is by far the best thing for Boulder County residents. Vote no and bring in a new coroner and culture. n District Ballot Issue 6B: Four Mile Fire Protection Yes/For ❑ No/Against When the Gallagher Amendment passed in 1982, the intent was to balance the ratio between residential and commercial property taxes (45% for residential). While this has benefited residential property owners, it has diminished the amount of tax revenue generated to provide governmental resources. Adjusting mill levies is one way to “de-Gallagherize” primarily residential districts. Neither a yes nor a no on Ballot Issue 6B will immediately raise taxes or allow Four Mile to adjust their mill levies. But a yes will allow Four Mile Fire Protection that privilege in the future, should the residential assessment rate fall below 7.15%. A no vote will remove the possibility of increasing the mill levy in the future.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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Chasing Arctic ice by Travis Metcalfe

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n late September, Swedish activist Greta Thunberg led the largest global climate strike in history, inspiring 7.6 million people in 185 countries to urge world leaders to take action against climate change. Two days before the mobilization began, at the end of the Arctic melt season, sea ice extent (a measurement of the ocean where there is at least some ice) was at the second lowest level on record. Scientists from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder have been tracking Arctic sea ice since modern satellite observations began in 1979. The polar regions of the Earth provide an early warning system for the future of climate change on our planet. While global average temperatures have increased about 1 degree I

Celsius since the industrial revolution, the poles have warmed about three times faster. Melting ice is the reason for the accelerated change at the poles, something that scientists refer to as a reinforcing feedback mechanism. Before the planet began to warm, bright polar ice reflected much of the energy from the Sun back into space. As temperatures started to rise, melting ice exposed the darker sea below, which absorbed more of the incoming solar energy. The resulting rise in sea temperatures melted even more of the ice, decreasing the reflectivity further and absorbing a higher fraction of the incoming energy over time. The warmer the planet becomes, the faster it gets warmer near the poles. “I’ve watched the Arctic radically BOULDER WEEKLY


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It may be too late to save the Arctic, but if we start now, we might still have time to save ourselves. transform from an environment that the explorers of the 18th and 19th centuries would have been very familiar with, to something very different today,” says Mark Serreze, director of NSIDC and a distinguished professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Colorado. Serreze moved to Boulder in 1986 for doctoral studies in Arctic sea ice variability. He has traveled to the Arctic more than a dozen times for field work, starting in the early 1980s and most recently this year. Two of the small ice caps that he studied early in his career have now disappeared. The annual sea ice minimum in September has gone from covering an area of about 7 million square kilometers during his first visit, to just over 4 million square kilometers today. He recently wrote a book called Brave New Arctic: The Untold Story of the Melting North, which recounts what he has witnessed in his career as a polar scientist. “It’s kind of a wild ride through 30-some years of research,” he says. Much of the long record of Arctic sea ice measurements owes its existence to spy satellites operated by the U.S. Department of Defense. Starting in the 1960s, the Air Force Space Command managed a series of imaging satellites that passed over the north and south poles following the day-night line. With an orbital period of 100 minutes, the satellites could observe the entire surface of the Earth twice a day, a capability that was particularly useful for military reconnaissance and surveillance. But it also produced a vast quantity of data over the polar regions. The program was declassified in the early 1970s, making the data available to the scientific community. In addition to their imaging capabilities, the satellites eventually carried instruments that could measure microwave radiation. The crystal structure of ice emits a very specific signature in microwaves that is not present in liquid water, and it can be BOULDER WEEKLY

measured through clouds in daytime or at night. This allowed the satellites to make daily observations of the total area covered by sea ice, and these measurements have continued for decades. “In the early 1990s we first started to see it change, but we really weren’t clear what was happening,” recalls Serreze. “What we’re seeing is that we’re not just losing the extent of ice, it’s getting thinner as well.” Since modern satellite measurements began in 1979, the Arctic sea ice minimum in September has grown smaller by about 13% each decade. There are variations from year to year caused by random fluctuations in the weather, but the overall trend is unambiguously downward. A record low occurred in 2012, when Arctic sea ice covered just 3.39 million square kilometers. Through most of this summer, the gradual decline in sea ice closely followed the trajectory of 2012, even tracking slightly below it in late July and early August. But in mid-August the annual melt diverged from the 2012 path and eventually reached the second lowest minimum on record. By the time kids born in the next few years reach Thunberg’s age, the Arctic will likely be ice-free in September. Shipping companies will enjoy a shortcut between Asia and Europe, and the fossil fuel industry will be salivating at the prospects for new oil exploration. By then, the planet could be straining under the weight of a human population approaching 9 billion. Considering who loses the most from inaction, it’s easy to understand why younger people are leading the fight against climate change. It may be too late to save the Arctic, but if we start now, we might still have time to save ourselves. Travis Metcalfe, Ph.D., is a researcher and science communicator based in Boulder. The Lab Notes series is made possible in part by a research grant from the National Science Foundation. I

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Get Salted Breathe Easier

Conservation unites

New Extended Hours

New polling data reveals Republican and Democratic voters in Western states increasingly prioritize the health of public lands

by Emma Athena

A

mid recent turmoil in the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) — the contested relocation of its headquarters from Washington, D.C. to Grand Junction; widespread opposition to its anti-public-lands acting director William Perry Pendley; and the questionable confirmation of a new oversight official who previously worked for the oil industry — there may be cause for optimism about the future of public lands. New polling data from the Center for Western Priorities (CWP), a Denverbased policy and advocacy organization focused on land and energy issues PUBLIC DOMAIN/NPS across the American West, indicates voters in five mountain states are united across party lines in one major goal: resource conservation. This finding comes from a survey CWP deployed between August and September 2019, which asked likely voters in Arizona, Colorado, Montana, Nevada and New Mexico for their opinions on several public lands issues. In a report detailing the findings published on Oct. 3, CWP affirms the overwhelming majority of voters consider themselves outdoor enthusiasts; more than 90% agree that the mountains and the outdoors are what makes living in their state special; and they agree that belief would heavily influence the way they vote in upcoming elections. In a media conference call on Oct. 3, CWP Executive Director Jennifer Rokala explained public lands and BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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• FIRST RESPONDER FRIDAYS the outdoors have become increasingly important issues in competitive election races across the Mountain West in recent years. “Westerners care deeply about our public lands and we vote on them,” she said. Last year, CWP labeled the five states the “Outdoor Voting Bloc.” “When given the choice between a candidate with a balanced conservation-minded approach to public lands and a candidate that supports deregulating the energy industry over conservation, the balanced conservation candidate wins by a large margin,” the report states. The survey found most Western voters not only use public lands, but they care about how those lands are protected: 51% labeled themselves as “conservationists,” 61% believe the U.S. needs to “protect new deserving public lands,” and 81% support increased spending on existing public lands “to ensure that our national parks, wildlife refuges, monuments and other lands have the necessary funding for access and maintenance.” When asked about how the current administration is handling issues related to public lands, parks and wildlife in the West, 50% of voters altogether said they disapprove, though the opinion wasn’t evenly distributed along party lines: 85% of Democrats, 53% of Independents and only 10% of Republicans conveyed disapproval. Nearly 70% of all voters, however, did express opposition to the reduction of national monuments I

such as Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante; that includes 81% of Democrats, 70% of Independents and 56% of Republicans. Majorities in all three parties also consider positions on “public lands, waters, and wildlife” to be more important than positions on “environment and climate change” when examining a candidate’s fitness for public office, an interesting distinction given the climate crisis. Brian Gottlieb, founder and president of Gottlieb Strategic Research, the polling firm CWP contracted, emphasized overall support for conservation is heavily bipartisan, particularly on the issue of permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), a congressional program that uses revenue from offshore oil and gas productions to support the conservation of land and water: 87% of Democrats, 78% of Independents and 70% of Republicans agreed the LWCF should be fully funded. The western unification of values that’s reflected in CWP’s poll is also apparent in current elected officials. Recently Sen. Michael Bennett (D-CO) led other key leaders in the “Outdoor Voting Bloc” — Tom Udall (D-NM), Martin Heinrich (D-NM) and JonTester (D-MT) — plus another seven Senate Democrats, in a letter campaign on Sept. 26, calling for the termination of BLM acting director Pendley’s authority. “For decades, Mr. Pendley has advocated for the widespread sale of public lands and fought to erode America’s conservation legacy,” the letter states. “The American people deserve a leader at the BLM who will work on behalf of its mission.” As local 2019 elections for new public officers draw near and campaigns for the 2020 elections continue to gain traction, “It will be worth watching to see if more candidates highlight an agenda of protecting the West’s outdoor way of life in their strategies to win,” CWP’s Rokala said. OCTOBER 10, 2019

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‘THE RIVER’ COURTESY OF LEISURE TIME FEATURES

Documenting landscapes, poetizing reality

One of the reasons for this sudden wave of expansion: the 2008 Beijing Olympics. “All of these old neighborhoods [were] getting torn apart and paved over in the name of creating this shiny appearance for the Olympics,” Shih says. That trend continues to this day and is still a part of the cinematic discourse. Both The Farewell and Ash is Purest White from this year use China’s shifting landhe landscape of China is changing. scape as a way to emotionally displace their lead characters. “There’s a lot of environmental change in This trend in Chinese cinema certainly isn’t new, terms of building and demolition,” professor but it isn’t that old either. The roots of Shih’s selecEvelyn Shih tells Boulder Weekly. “But also in terms of environmental ‘KAILI BLUES’ COURTESY OF GRASSHOPPER FILMS tions trace back to 2006’s Still destruction that people are Life from filmmaker Jia Zhangke — director of the starting to pay attention to, and aforementioned Ash is Purest really be hurt by.” White. Filmmakers and audiences Set in Fengjie on the are starting to pay attention as Yangtze River, Still Life looks at well, which is why Shih, an the destruction of a town assistant professor of Chinese upstream from the massive at the University of Colorado Three Gorges Dam. Shih tried Boulder, put together a series of hard to get Still Life for the six movies to play at CU’s series but couldn’t. Luckily, a International Film Series (IFS) distributor Shih and IFS director Oct. 20-30: Dragon Inn, Pablo Kjølseth were working with suggested Goodbye Dragon Inn, The River, The Great Buddha+, Crosscurrent as a worthy replacement. Crosscurrent and Kaili Blues. “[It’s] about the [Yangtze], and about traveling Shih points out these changes are happening all down the river, and the various environments you hit over China: “Not just around factory towns, but also in as you go down,” Shih explains. “Not just the actual the sort of monumental architecture that’s going up.”

CU’s International Film Series to screen six movies from China and Taiwan

by Michael J. Casey

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

The changing Chinese

space of that geographical landscape is featured in six different films playentity, but also the trope of ing at CU’s International what the river means in literaFilm Festival Oct. ture and poetry and art.” 20-30. As Shih explains, Crosscurrent is “a bit of a different take,” one that would be difficult to see in Colorado if not for Shih’s series, IFS and a helpful distributor. Crosscurrent also employs a familiar theme in contemporary Chinese art-house cinema: strong, poetic documentary aesthetics. “There’s a kind of trend toward documentary realism, even among fictional films, coming out of a very strong independent digital video documentary scene,” Shih says. “[They are] trying to capture a certain angle on all of these realities.” That is most evident in Kaili Blues, the debut of young and assured director Bi Gan — whose followup, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, is easily one of 2019’s best. But Shih’s series isn’t just about physical environments; it’s about aural ones as well. Soundscapes in cinema are one of the topics of Shih’s graduate class, Environmental Media — the basis of IFS’ series. And as Shih says, her class draws heavily on Taiwanese film The River, from master Tsai Ming-liang. Lyrical in execution and existential in nature, The River employs a soundscape of rivers and rain that transports you inside the movie. As Shih says, “[It’s] like the noise you kind of walk around in.” see IFS Page 34

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The same goes for The Great Buddha+, a stark black and white punk picture of southern Taiwan that utilizes dashboard cameras, and people watching dash-cams, as a narrative device. “Because [the dash-cam is] pointed straight ahead, the sounds they’re listening to are from inside the car,” Shih explains. “You can’t see the people talking. ... You’re forced to absorb it, completely, through the medium of sound.” As the saying goes, a work of art is a mirror the artist holds up to society. And considering how ubiquitous mechanically reproduced images and sounds are in this century and the last, it only makes sense that the mirror reflects images of people watching and listening. It’s in The Great Buddha+, and it’s in Goodbye Dragon Inn, a movie set in a dilapidated movie theater during its final screening of Dragon Inn. “The film is playing in the movie theater, but we never really watch it,” Shih explains. “You just hear the soundtrack of the movie going on in the background as you’re really watching the people who are watching the film.” And with a clever stroke of programming, Goodbye Dragon Inn will be preceded by the 1967 wuxia classic Dragon Inn from director King Hu. “[Hu] came out of the Hong Kong studio scene, but he really made his

ON THE BILL: Films From Asia at IFS: ‘Dragon Inn,’ 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20; ‘Goodbye Dragon Inn,’ 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 22; ‘The River,’ 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 23; ‘The Great Buddha+,’ 7:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 28; ‘Crosscurrent,’ 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 29; ‘Kaili Blues,’ 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 30. International Film Series, University of Colorado Boulder, Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 Colorado Ave.

mark by making these martial arts epics,” Shih says. Set during the Ming Dynasty and featuring acrobatic martial arts and swordplay, Dragon Inn is a little bit like an Eastern Western. And like the Westerns of yore, space and place are integral to the film’s aesthetic. “[Hu’s] creating this landscape, this idea of ancient China,” Shih says, “that is actually all filmed in Taiwan and Hong Kong. “Because this was during the Cultural Revolution,” Shih continues, “there’s no way they’re going to go into the [country] of China to film this.” As Shih says, Dragon Inn “does have the mark of that particular historical moment. And it really has something to say with how you can construct an imagined national space with cinema.” Over a few days in October, that national space will flicker brightly, and those immersive soundscapes will paint aural murals at the International Film Series.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Mixing in a few clouds

Matt and Kim take a bit of a serious tone with latest album

M

att and Kim have made a career out of creating upbeat, catchy pop anthems that seem tailor-made to get concert crowds smiling, singing and jumping up and down. The music on the duo’s latest album, Almost Everyday, should have that same effect. But lyrically, a little darkness has crept into the songs, mixing a few clouds in with the usual sunny disposition of the music. “We’d been lucky enough to have a comfortable life and a positive life, and I think a lot of our albums, the songs reflect that,” singer/keyboardist Matt Johnson observes in a recent phone interview. “But it was interesting to get the inspiration from having a tough year and how that, kind of in a therapeutic way, [led us] to write songs to kind of just discuss this and try to get things off of our chests. And that was new for us. We didn’t do that all the time, but that was new for us.” The difficulties began when Johnson’s partner in the group, drummer Kim Schifino, suffered a torn ligament during a concert in March 2017. This meant reconstructive surgery on her leg and a long and grueling rehab that forced Matt and Kim to stop doing one of their favorite things — playing live shows — for the better part of a year. Add in a world around them that featured the tragedies and heartache of mass shootings and a divisive political/social climate, and it seems perfectly reasonable that the songs the duo created during this period aren’t all cartwheels and giggles. In particular, the specter of death pops up on multiple occasions throughout Almost Everyday, although not in the kind of serious or heavy-handed ways BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ON THE BILL: Matt and Kim. 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Tickets are $32.50-$35, axs.com.

by Alan Sculley many artists deal with this topic. More often than not, the emphasis isn’t on finality as much as it is on the importance of making the most of the limited time one has on this planet. The notion of life being temporary — filled with special people, times and experiences that can be gone at any point — resonated with Johnson as he had to stay put. It was the first time in

If anything, though, the music is bigger and bolder sounding than ever on Almost Everyday. “We’re an indie band and we don’t want to not be an indie band. That’s the space we want to be in,” Johnson says. “But we also were like, ‘What is the [current] version of indie music?’ “We’re big fans of bands that are in hip-hop and pop music, and my feeling is that when I listen to COLIN DEVON MOORE music now and it doesn’t have things in that subbeat range and stuff, it’s almost like it’s missing a spectrum of sound,” he says. “We’re like we wanted to still keep the indie mentality, but add it into a world where we’re listening to these DJs who give you huge spectrums of just sonics, from super-deep lows to pristine highs and how do we make that part of what we do?” Almost Everyday came out in May 2018, and Schifino was back to her usual self, dancing and jumping on her drums on tour — until recently. In early August, his adult life when he wasn’t able to tour she fell on stage at the Maha Festival and tore an ACL. She’s been undergoing and fully experience the life he and physical therapy and will be back in Schifino have created in Matt and Kim. action for the duo’s fall tour, which will “It made me feel like this was a time celebrate the 10th anniversary of the after the band, like we were a retired Grand album. That 2009 record features band,” he says. “I had never taken that the gold-certified single, “Daylight,” and kind of time [off], and it made me reflect on, ‘Remember when we used to be in this was the commercial breakthrough for Matt and Kim. band that would tour around the country In addition to playing Grand in its and play shows for people?’ I felt like I had entirety, Johnson says the group will this bit of this It’s a Wonderful Life perplay a selection of other songs, sure to spective on what if this was all gone? I be crowd-pleasers. “The biggest satisthink that made its way into the album.” faction I get on stage is what makes the If there’s a bit more grit, and coheaudience excited. If I see them jumping sion, to the lyrics on Almost Everyday, the music on the album shares the buoy- up and down and singing along, I’m so into it,” he says. “If the audience wants ant, even celebratory, catchy-as-can-be to hear ‘Daylight’ 15 times in a row, character of the five previous albums they’ve got it. But I think they like it a litJohnson and Schifino have released tle more diverse.” since forming Matt and Kim in 2004. I

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Unexpected and unfamiliar

Boulder Phil opens with music by Rock & Roll Hall of Famers

by Peter Alexander

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he Boulder Philharmonic “There are other things, like a really a lightness to it.” Orchestra somewhat unexpected- slow trill that creates a rumbling, undulatThe suite comprises six movements ly opens its 2019-20 season ing, unsettling feeling. At one point the that range from sweetly lyrical to fast and Saturday, Oct. 12, with music by players are holding a note, a big chord, virtuosic in the flute part, which will be two members of the Rock & Roll and Greenwood says to increase the bow played by the Boulder Phil’s principal flutHall of Fame, Jonny Greenwood of pressure and at the same time reduce ist, Elizabeth Sadilek-Labenski. “I was not Radiohead and Jon Lord of Deep Purple. the left hand (fingering) pressure so the even aware that it existed,” she says. Or maybe it’s not unexpected. “That note ‘corrodes and cracks.’ When Butterman suggested the piece sense of experimentation, of providing “He’s clearly got ideas about the kind to her, “I listened to it and just fell in love something offbeat — that is part of our of sound world he’s trying to get, (and) with it,” she says. “It really fits me as a identity,” Boulder Phil music director exploiting the full capacity of the resourcplayer. There are definitely virtuosic placMichael Butterman says. “This program es at hand.” es, but it’s written so well for the instruadheres to the approach that we’ve taken If Greenwood is gritty, Lord’s suite for ment that it’s not awkward in any way. It’s of presenting well-known works from the flute, strings and piano, To Notice Such really a pleasure (to play).” classical canon along with pieces likely to Things, is pretty. Written in memory of Sir Schubert’s Fifth Symphony was the be a surprise.” PHOTO BY GLENN ROSS very first piece he ever The work from the claswrote for pay, and one sical canon in of the few symphonies this case is out of his nine that he Schubert’s Fifth ever heard. “That’s Symphony. incredible to think of,” Written when the Butterman says. “In the composer was previous year he had only 19, it is a written something like 140 songs. When he lively and pleasant work that was 18, he was just reflects writing, writing, writing Schubert’s admi— he wrote because it’s what he had to do.” ration for Mozart. In other At the time, Schubert wrote in his words, it is worlds away journals of his love for Mozart’s music, and from the Rock & Roll Hall of Butterman finds that reflected in the Fifth Fame. ON THE BILL: ‘Gritty/Pretty’ — The proSymphony. “It is a piece that is brimming John Mortimer, a Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra, with Elizabeth Sadilek-Labenski, gram is titled with his affection for Mozart,” he says. writer and close flute. “Gritty/Pretty,” “You hear it in the third movement, a fastfriend who died in Johnny Greenwood: Suite from of which the 2009, the score driven, minor key minuet, a real echo of ‘There Will Be Blood.’ gritty part is the Jon Lord: ‘To Notice Such Things,’ takes its title from a the third movement of Mozart’s Suite for flute, piano and strings. Symphony No. 40. suite from Greenwood’s poem by Thomas Schubert: Symphony No. 5 in score for the brutal film “It’s a piece that I think no one Hardy, suggesting B-flat major. could fail to enjoy. His gift for melody is epic There Will Be Blood. that Mortimer 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant “I didn’t come up with the certainly well represented in both the noticed things that St., Boulder. [“Gritty/Pretty” title], first and the second movement. The others did not. Tickets: 303-449-1343, bit. Butterman says. “That’s piece may not be specifically familiar, Butterman first ly/320HGvG marketing, but I kind of heard To Notice but the style, the approach, the general like it. I think it’s appropriSuch Things on the feeling of the symphony will be immediate.” ately recognizable. It’s an entirely radio. “After I discovered what it was, I Greenwood’s music is written for charming piece.” thought I’d like to know more,” he says. Butterman enjoys presenting strings and the rare electronic instrument At that time it had not been published, Schubert’s tuneful, charming music ondes martinot, which will be replaced by but Butterman eventually got a copy orchestral oboe. In spite of writing for a alongside pieces by literal rock stars. “I directly from Lord through his manager. conventional string group, Butterman “It took quite a bit of doing, but I have my am excited to share the unexpected and says, Greenwood “creates sounds that own set of parts that were forwarded from unfamiliar side of these two rock icons are unexpected, and kind of other-worldLord. with our audience,” he says. ly. He asks the strings to use guitar picks, “I think it’s remarkable that their “This is a piece that I have done a which creates a percussive effect that music can share a program with the number of times. Much of it is very beaudoesn’t sound like anything else. tiful and lyrical music, and it certainly has young Schubert.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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Live eTown Radio Show Taping with Ron Pope & Special Guest. 7 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 13, eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. After completely scrapping early recording sessions for his upcoming album ‘Bone Structure,’ Nashvillebased singer-songwriter Ron Pope set out on a new path, crafting candid songs about his newborn daughter. Some songs speak to her directly, while others reflect on the moral of a personal experience, but they’re all raw, honest and emotionally intelligent, as fans have come to expect from Pope.

CUBAN CONNECTION.

STRINGS & STORIES WITH KID REVERIE.

Yateras, Cuba, located in the province of T E N Guanatánamo, is a municipality consisting of several small towns and agricultural land. Like Boulder, Yateras is a mountainous region, but unlike Boulder, Yateras’ tropical landscape features swaying palms, citrus trees and coffee plants. Put on your dancing shoes on Oct. 11 and head to the Museum of Boulder, where the Boulder-Cuba Sister City Organization will be hosting a salsa party to support the work they do in building cultural bridges. Enjoy salsa dancing lessons with famed choreographer Rasta Tom beginning at 6 p.m, then learn about Boulder’s Sister City relationship with the Municipality of Yateras. Tickets are $15 and includes one drink ticket, good for wine or beer, eventbrite.com

The Strings & Stories concert series features national and local musicians in HY AP an intimate and strippedR G down setting. Musicians play songs from their catalog, tell the stories of how the songs came to light, and answer a few audience questions. This iteration features Kid Reverie, a rock band out of Denver featuring the voice and writing of Steve Varney, guitarist for Gregory Alan Isakov and former leader of the Denver band Glowing House. Varney put together a quartet at the beginning of 2016 and began writing furiously. The sound is reminiscent of Feist, Ryan Adams, The Black Keys and Alabama Shakes. Tickets are $15 at eventbrite.com

7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, Museum of Boulder, 1121 Pine St., Boulder, 720-295-0426.

ART PARTS PRESENTS: IN CONSTANT NAVIGATION: RACE, MIGRATION, CULTURE AND COMMUNITY = ART.

7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St., Boulder, 303-442-1787.

African American artist Grace Kisa was brought up in three African countries, Canada and the U.S. Her global upbringing influenced her worldview as a “third culture kid.” Kenyan art traditions using found objects continue to influence her artistic narrative, but it’s working as a black female artist in our current political climate that inspires the powerful and feminine spiritual activism inherent in her work. Kisa will speak about her work — which will be on display at Art Parts Creative Reuse Center in Boulder from Oct. 11 to Nov. 23 — at First Congregational Church. Tickets are $5 and will be sold at the door.

see EVENTS Page 42 OCTOBER 10, 2019

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arts CITY OF LONGMONT Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver: ‘Eyes On: Erika Harrsch,’ Hamilton Building, through Nov. 17; ‘Eyes On: Jonathan Saiz,’ through Nov. 17; ‘Phantom Canyon: A Digital Circuit,’ through Oct. 16; ‘The Light Show,’ through May 2020; ‘Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection,’ through January 2020. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont: Annual Dia de Los Muertos exhibition opening reception: ‘Ancestors,’ Friday, Oct. 11, 6 p.m. Dia de Los Muertos will show through Nov. 3. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden: ‘Character and Narrative,’ East Gallery, through Oct. 20. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont: ‘Front Range Rising,’ permanent exhibit; ‘Ruckus Rodeo: Pop Art & Cowboy Culture,’ through Jan. 5.

FIREHOUSE ART CENTER’S annual Dia de Los Muertos exhibition kicks off this year on Friday, Oct. 11 with a celebration of ancestors. This exhibition combines traditional altars, which incorporate Aztec history and Mexican culture, with community produced Catrina paintings, photographs and portraits from the private collection of local residents and their families. Summit Tacos will be on hand to fill bellies. The party starts at 6 p.m.

Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons: ‘40 years/40 artifacts’ includes objects, photographs and documents detailing the museum’s 40 years of operation. MONUMENTAL — coproduced by Black Cube and the Denver Theatre District. Through Jan. 31, 2020. For times and locations, denvertheatredistrict.com/event/monumental. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Wild: Buffalo in Boulder,’ through Jan. 12; ‘Archive 75: Multilayered Stories Told Through a Boulder Lens,’ through March 29, 2020.

Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada: ‘Colorado Abstract +10: A History and a Survey,’ through Nov. 17.

Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver: ‘Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation,’ through April 5; ‘Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler: Flora,’ through April 5; ‘Stacey Steers: Edge of Alchemy,’ through April 5.

Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder: Adriana Corral: ‘Unearthed/Desenterrado;’ Gretchen Marie Schaefer: ‘Folding and Thrusting,’ through Jan. 19.

NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder: ‘Photography by Mark Shegda’ and ‘Pastel Paintings by Teri Hoyer,’ through Oct. 26.

BMoCA at Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., University of Colorado Boulder: ‘Helen Zughaib: Stories My Father Told Me,’ through Nov. 24;

Open Studios Self-Guided Tours. Noon-6 p.m. Oct 12-13. Find map online for various locations, openstudios.org.

Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Street Wise,’ Canyon Gallery, opens Oct. 11 through Dec. 1.

University of Colorado Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder: ‘Body Language: Picturing People,’ through June 2020; ‘Object: Color,’ through September; ‘Its Honor is Hereby Pledged: Gina Adams,’ through Nov. 2.

Bricolage Gallery, Art Parts Creative Reuse Center, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder: ‘Found In Translation: Assemblages by Grace Kisa,’ opens Oct. 11, through Nov. 23.

University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado Henderson Building,1035 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Feathers and Flora,’ Henderson Building, through Jan. 31; ‘Fossils: Clues to the Past,’ Paleontology Hall, ongoing exhibit; ‘Ground Level Ozone,’ McKenna Gallery, ongoing exhibit; ‘Life in Colorado’s Freshwater,’ ongoing traveling exhibit; and more.

Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder: ‘Modern Habitat: Building Energetic Spaces,’ MacMillan Gallery: Will Day; Polly Addison Gallery: Margie Criner; McMahon Gallery: Arch 11, HMH, HouseFish, Pyatt Studio, SopherSparn, Renée del Gaudio Architecture and Workshop 8; Hand/Rudy Gallery: Davis Arney, through Oct. 15.

EVENTS from Page 41

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10 Music Cigarettes After Sex. 8 p.m. Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Hip Pop for Adults. 6 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 720-749-2531. Homevibe & eTown present Carbon Leaf. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Kitchen Dwellers — with Ghost Town Drifters. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Last American Trio. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. The New Mastersounds. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

Nightwaves: The Faint (DJ Set). 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

and Lauren Stovall. 7:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-2064.

Open Mic — with Tony Crank. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

The Talbott Brothers. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214.

Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Ten Keys to Writing Memorable Song Lyrics. 6:30 p.m. Arapahoe High School, 6600 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 720-561-5968.

Robert Johnson. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. The Rocket Summer. 7:30 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Scotty Sire. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. The Seers. 5:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. The Songwriter Hour featuring Taylor Sims

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Tiffany Christopher. 7:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Todd Snider — with Very Special Guest Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Vic N’ the Narwhals. 8 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. see EVENTS Page 44

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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OCTOBER 10, 2019

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LIVE MUSIC!

Events Adultology: Molecular Gastronomy. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Dance For Parkinson’s Program. 11:30 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-506-3568. Tuesdays (Gordon Gamm Theater) and Thursdays (Boulder Ballet Studio 3).

The Tune Up at Full Cycle Every Friday 7:30-9:30 PM

1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tunupboulder.com

Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452. Genealogy: More Record Groups and How to Use Ancestry.com @ Meadows. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Humanity, Survival, & Philosophy - Pop Culture & Philosophy. 6 p.m. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8411. Janeane Garofalo. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Oct. 12. Open Studios Tour Preview Exhibit. 10 a.m. Naropa University, 2130 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-748-9132. Russian Ballet Theatre presents ‘Swan Lake.’ 7:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 347-901-3042.

THURSDAY OCTOBER 10 7:00 PM

CLIMATE CHANGE IN OUR BACKYARD: THE WATER TOWERS OF THE WEST 8:30 PM

LASER PRINCE FRIDAY OCTOBER 11 7:00 PM

INCOMING! HARD-HITTING STORIES OF OUR COSMIC ORIGINS

Tabletop Gaming Club: Werewolf & Unspeakable Words. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Winner of Penn & Teller Fool Us, Ivan Amodei Presents Secrets & Illusions. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 805-529-9219.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11 Music

10:00 PM

A. J. Fullerton. 7 p.m. La Vita Bella, 471 Main St., Longmont, 720-204-4525.

FISKEDM: BASSNECTAR 11:30 PM

LIQUID SKY THE WALL SATURDAY OCTOBER 12 1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES & LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 2:30 PM

DREAM TO FLY 10:00 PM

LIQUID SKY TOOL INOCULATED 11:30 PM

LASERMAU5 SUNDAY OCTOBER 13 12:00 PM

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STARS AND PLANETS 3:00 PM

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CAPCOM GO! THE APOLLO STORY

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 44

Shark’s Ink. — with Ana Maria Hernando. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

8:30 PM

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY

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FILMS

EVENTS from Page 42

Abear. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914.

Started in 1955, CU-Boulder’s First Person CinInternational Film Series, University of Colorado ema is the longest-running program in the world Boulder, Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 Colorado screening avant-garde film and video work. MonAve., 303-492-8662. day, Oct. 14’s show honors the work of Cooper ‘The Biggest Little Farm,’ 3:45 p.m., Sunday, Battersby and Emily Vey Duke, known collectively Oct. 13. as Duke and Battersby. Three of their shorts: Bad ‘The Death of Dick Long,’ 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Idea for Paradise, You Were An Amazement on Oct. 12. Free show. the Day Your Were Born and Song of Praise for First Person Cinema, 7:00 p.m., Monday, Oct. the Heart Beyond the Cure, screen at 7 p.m. inside 14, inside VAC 1B20. CU’s Visual Arts Complex, room 1B20. Admission ‘Honeyland,’ 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 10. is free. —MJC ‘I Vitelloni’ on 35mm, A STILL FROM ‘SONG OF PRAISE’ 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15. BOULDER: ‘Memory: The Origins Boedecker Theatre, Dairy of Alien,’ 7:30 p.m., Arts Center, 2590 Walnut Friday, Oct. 10. St., 303-444-7328: ‘Piranhas,’ 7:30 p.m., ‘Brittany Runs a Wednesday, Oct. 16. Marathon,’ Oct. 16-19. ‘The Pollinators,’ 1 ‘Fiddlin’,’ Oct. 9-12. p.m., Sunday, Oct. 13. ‘Harpoon,’ 8:45 p.m., Friday, Oct. 11. Nomad Playhouse, ‘The Miracle of the 1410 Quince Ave., Little Prince,’ Oct. Boulder, 303-443-7510: 16-19. Wandering Reel ‘The Sweet Requiem,’ Traveling Film Festival. Oct. 11 and 12. Tickets Oct. 9-12. at wanderingreel.org Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., 303-786-7030: ‘Teton Gravity Research: Roadless,’ 6:45 DENVER: p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 9. Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, 303-744-9686: Century Theatre, 1700 29th St., 303-444-0583: Indigenous Film & Arts Festival. 6:30 p.m. ‘Abominable’ Thursday, Oct. 10, ‘Ad Astra’ ‘The Addams Family’ LONGMONT: ‘Alien’ 40th anniversary 1 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 13. Regal Village at the Peaks 12, 1230 S. Hover Road, ‘Downton Abbey’ 844-462-7342: ‘Gemini Man’ ‘Abominable’ ‘Hustlers’ ‘Ad Astra’ ‘Jay & Silent Bob Reboot,’ 7 p.m., Tuesday, ‘The Addams Family’ Oct. 15. ‘Downton Abbey’ ‘Jexi’ ‘Gemini Man’ ‘Joker’ ‘IT Chapter Two’ ‘Judy’ ‘Jexi’ ‘Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice’ ‘Joker’ ‘The Lion King’ ‘Lucy in the Sky’ LOUISVILLE: ‘Metallica & San Francisco Orchestra: S&M Regal Cinebarre Boulder, 1164 W. Dillon Road, 2,’ 7:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 14. 844-462-7342: ‘Once Upon a Time… In Hollywood’ ‘Abominable’ ‘The Peanut Butter Falcon’ ‘Ad Astra’

Bailen. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, 303-442-3282: ‘National Geographic: Pittsburgh to Paris,’ 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 12.

Black Pumas — with Neal Francis. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Through Oct. 12

Flatirons Food Film Festival, Oct. 10-13 Full schedule at flatironsfoodfilmfest.org and read more on pages 51 and 55.

Cavetown. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Coco Montoya. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Edges: By Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. 7:30 p.m. Old Main Chapel, 1600 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. FACE Vocal Band. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Homevibe & eTown present Delta Rae — with Frances Cone. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. The Inspector Cluzo — with ’68 and The Messenger Birds. 7 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Jeremy James Meyer, Stray Local. 8 p.m.

OCTOBER 10, 2019

‘Brittany Runs a Marathon’ ‘Downton Abbey’ ‘The Goldfinch’ ‘Hustlers’ ‘IT Chapter Two’ ‘Joker’ ‘The Lion King’ ‘Once Upon a Time… In Hollywood’

The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Sad Songs. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-2064.

Kitchen Dwellers. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

The New Mastersounds — with Very Special Guests Ghost-Note. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Second show on Oct. 12.

Landon Cube: The Orange Tour. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Lindsey Saunders. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Little Brother. 9 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Live Music Fridays. 7 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Maudlyn Monroe: The Joyous Return of

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No-No Boy in Concert. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Random Rab. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Rhythm & Roots. 8 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 303-931-5856. Robert Johnson Band. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Shakedown Street. 8:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Steve Glotzer and Friends. 5 p.m. Millenium Harvest House, 1345 28th St., Boulder. The Tom Weiser Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Unauthorized Absence. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Events Aesthetic Perfection: Into The Black World Tour 2019. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Auditions for Scrooge in Love. 1 p.m. Lafayette Recreation Center, 111 Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-444-4479.

Comedy Open Mic Saturday Night. 6:30 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002.

Starcrawler. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Community Karaoke. 7:30 p.m. Cannon Mine Coffee, 210 South Public Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0625.

Tank & The Bangas. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Events Blessing of the Animals. 10:30 a.m. St. Ambrose Episcopal Church, 7520 S. Boulder Road, Boulder, 720-333-3354. Burlesque for Benefit. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Fall Harvest Festival. 9 a.m. American Legion Building, 315 S. Bowen, Longmont, 303-588-1459. Farm Days with the Museum. Noon. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4850. People. 12:30 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce

St., Boulder, 303-449-5928. Free Pumpkin Giveaway in Old Town Lafayette. Noon. DeBakker Group - RE/MAX Alliance Office, 109 N. Public Road, Lafayette, 303-915-6815. Halloween House. 11 a.m. Kappa Kappa Gamma House, 1134 University Ave., Boulder, 303-808-4363. Joey Diaz. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Junior & Senior Fishing Derby. 9 a.m. Wally Toevs Pond, Walden Ponds Wildlife Habitat, Boulder. see EVENTS Page 46

Family Evening at the Museum: CariBOO: Mythical Creatures and Stories. 7 p.m. Nederland Mining Museum, 200 N Bridge St., Nederland, 303-258-7332. Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Meatloaf & the Milkman Comedy Show. 7:30 p.m. Denver’s Dangerous Theatre, 2620 W. Second Ave., Denver, 720-989-1764.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 Music Amythyst Kiah. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Brian David Collins, Jeremy Dion. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Chris Dismuke Band. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Digable Planets. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Dillinja with Fury, Goreteks, They Invade and Relyt. 9 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Edges: By Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. 7:30 p.m. Old Main Chapel, 1600 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Erik Boa Duo. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Flamenco at Caffè Sole. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339. Jidenna. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Joe Hertler & The Rainbow Seekers — with Proxima Parada and Special Guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Justin Willman. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. K.Flay. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482. Wendy Woo Band. 8 p.m. The Wild Game Entertainment Experience, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 720-600-4875. Masked Intruder. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

CALL NOW TO BOOK THE BAND FOR YOUR ROCKIN’ HOLIDAY PARTY 303-819-8182 www.hindsightclassicrock.com

The Music of Selena — with the Colorado Symphony. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Peanut Butter Players Family Theatre

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

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words IN ‘REVOLUTION of the Soul,’ yoga teacher and activist Seane Corn shares accounts of her life with raw honesty — enriched with in-depth spiritual teachings — to help us heal, evolve and change the world. Corn will speak about and sign her new book on Monday, Oct.14 at 7:30 p.m. at First Congregational Church in Boulder.

SUNDAY, OCT. 13

Fred Grover — Spiritual Genomics. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

BAFS ‘Second Sundays’ Poetry Workshop. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder.

Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

SATURDAY, OCT. 12 Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Seane Corn — Revolution of the Soul. 7:30 p.m. First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St., Boulder So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, OCT. 15 Young Pine. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Erik Estrada — Understanding Nonprofit Law and Finance. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

THURSDAY, OCT. 10

FRIDAY, OCT. 11

MONDAY, OCT. 14

Creative Writing Lab for Grades 3-5. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16 From Our Shelves Fiction Bookclub — Before We Were Yours. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Peter Heller —The River. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

EVENTS from Page 45

National Geographic: Paris to Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Jonny Woods, Liz Berube, Lonely Whale. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Annie Frazier, Eye-yoob. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

New Heights: Dancing on the Walls that Divide Us. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 510-225-8844. Through Oct. 13.

LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Peter Tosh Birthday Celebration. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Pumpkin Patch. 11 a.m. Kilt Farm, 6001 Jay Road, Boulder, 970-846-6233.

Phil Collins — Still Not Dead Yet, Live! 8 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

Events

Pumpkin Pie Days Vintage and Antique Market. 9:30 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Through Oct. 13. Spooky Printmaking. 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120; 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Stand Up Comedy Showcase at Endo Brewing. 8 p.m. Endo Brewing, 2755 Dagny Way, Suite 101, Lafayette, 720-442-8052. Teen Takeover Saturday — Halloween Edition. 6 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont.

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Steel Pulse. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Events Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Goats Galore. 10:30 a.m. Agricultural Heritage Center, 8348 Ute Highway, Longmont, 303-776-8688.

Music

My Boo Spooky Photoshoot. 1 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

4 Winds Unity Benefit Concert. 3:30 p.m. Unity of Boulder Spiritual Center, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411.

New Heights: Dancing on the Walls that Divide Us. 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 510-225-8844.

The Delta Sonics Duo. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Pop-up Clam Shell. 10:30 a.m. Two Hands Paperie, 803 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-444-0124.

Edges: By Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. 2 p.m. Old Main Chapel, 1600 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

Second Sunday Concert Series Presents: Hannigan-Silver Trio. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

GWAR: Use Your Collusion Tour. 6:30 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 14

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13

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Second Sunday Concert Series Presents: Hannigan-Silver Trio. 2 p.m. Canyon Theater, Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapaho Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

OCTOBER 10, 2019

Music

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‘Mis Pininos’/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Babies and Board Books. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Chess Club. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Monday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. School Day-Off Camp: Fierce, Funky, Fashion Show. 9 a.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. see EVENTS Page 48

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

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EVENTS from Page 46

Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

theater

Toddler Time. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Your Life, Your Legacy. 5:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15 Music Dave Mason — Feelin’ Alright Tour 2019. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Experience Hendrix Club Seating. 7:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Pl, Denver, 303-623-0106. Face. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Faculty Tuesdays: Songs We Love to Play. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Jeff White, Milo Matthews. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

The Addams Family. Jesters Dinner Theater, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Dec. 1 and Jan. 3-26

Lizzo: Cuz I Love You Too Tour. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482.

Another Night Of Grand Guignol. Theater 29, 5138 W. 29th Ave., Denver. Opens Oct. 11. Through Oct. 19.

Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Open Mic — with Andy Eppler at Grossen Bart. 6 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060. Ron Ivory & Friends: Motown & Classic Soul. Noon. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Snatam Kaur Live. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, Boulder, 303-492-8423. Songhoy Blues. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Tool. 7:30 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Events 3rd Tuesday Lunchtime Concert Series Presents: An Afternoon with Ron Ivory & friend — Motown & Classic Soul. Noon. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Adaptive: Film Screening — Climbing Lotus Flower Tower. 7:15 p.m., 633 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-8866. All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500. Conversations in English Tuesdays. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 48

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LE THÉÂTRE du Grand-Guignol was a Victorian theater in Paris that specialized in showcasing the most stylized, gory and shocking horror theater in the world. Founded in melodrama, the Grand Guignol’s plays were meant to stun and terrorize audiences; the theater even boasted an on-staff doctor to resuscitate traumatized patrons. Denver’s Pandemic Collective presents two timeless horror plays originally performed at the Parisian theater in the 1900s, revived for a second life and underscored with live music by Sleep Wake. Showing at Theater 29 in Denver Oct. 11-19.

OCTOBER 10, 2019

Burning the Old Man. CU Department of Theatre, Loft Theatre, CU Campus. Through Oct. 13. A Doll’s House/A Doll’s House Part 2. Denver Center Theatre Company, Ricketson Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Nov. 24. Everybody — presented by The Catamounts. Dairy Arts Center, Carsen Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 12. Ghosted: A Paranormal Mystery. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Through Oct. 27. The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace

Music BIG K.R.I.T.: From The South With Love 2019 Tour. 8 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Center for Musical Arts Jazz Ensemble. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Jazzetry Night! featuring Von Disco. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Monster Rally. 8:30 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060.

Drive, Johnstown. Through Nov. 17. I do! I do! Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Oct. 27. Mamma Mia! BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Feb. 22. Mrs. Warren’s Profession — presented by Germinal Stage. The John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through Nov. 9. The Necromancer’s Stone. The BITSY Stage. 1137 S. Huron St., Denver. Through Nov. 23. Once. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through Oct. 13. Pass Over. Curious Theatre, 1018 Acoma St., Denver. Through Oct. 12. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street — presented by Equinox Theatre Company. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through. Oct. 19. Tiny Beautiful Things — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company. Dairy Arts Center, Grace Gamm Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 12. Universe 92. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Through Oct. 19.

Special Guests. 8:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Too Many Zooz. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Events Birding through the Seasons. 7 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8470. BTAB @ Main. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Flatirons Mineral Club Junior Geologists Group. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Teen Open Study. 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

RE: Search featuring Plantrae andMOUR — with Volo (Late Set), Jordan Polovina,

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


900 BASELINE ROAD BOULDER CO • 303.440.7666 coloradochautauqua @colo_chautauqua

OCT 12 FILM

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OCT 16

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OCT 17 CRAIG DEMARTINO: REBUILT

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NOV 11 THE BREATHING OF THE EARTH

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TICKETS & full events calendar: chautauqua.com

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

www.twinpeaksdispensary.com I

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CHRISTIAN ROHLFS, ‘THE SOLDIER’ 1914, PUBLIC DOMAIN

HIGH ALTITUDE CRAFT PIES BUILT IN BOULDER

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Please join us to honor our indigenous relatives of Boulder Valley and raise awareness of the current epidemic of Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women, girls, and Two-Spirits.

POW WOW

PARADE

O c t o b e r 12 t h - 14 t h 12 P M - 6 P M

O c t o b e r 14 t h 9 A M - 12 P M

Boulder Int er national Peace Garden Canyon be tween Broadwa y & 9t h

Begins at Pear l S tree t Mall Ends at Boulder Int er national Peace Garden (Pow Wow Grounds)

Stories from the Marsh Land by Kayla Archibald-Hall

Woven stories from the marsh land. A baptism of fire erupts in your eyes. A first day built of sweat and smoke and bomb craters. Where did your innocence go? Oh soldier, that was lost long ago. Today we are built on trust and brotherhood. HOOAH! You’ve lost light to bodies drenched in sorrow. Let the earth swallow you whole. Reopened your eyes to gunfire and blood, until the grasslands felt like home. Spent nights carrying flat hearts. With brothers held in strong arms. This is how a soldier marches when the weight of a country is cradled from harm. We are the brothers spun of chaos and redemption. With memories tethered to weapons. Racing heart, strong pulse. Revered strength welcomed back into the American spirit.

Kayla Archibald-Hall. Appalachian. Paid Advertisement by Boulder Valley Indigenous Peoples Day

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

Boulder Weekly accepts poetry and flash fiction submissions of 450 words/35 lines or fewer and accompanied by a one-sentence bio of the author. Send to poetry@boulderweekly.com

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


NEON

OCTObER-NOvEMbER-DECEMbER General Admission $9 Student $7 MEMORY: THE ORIGINS OF ALIEN

HONEYLAND A doc About A MAcedoniAn beekeeper’s conflict with neighbors

From Greek myth to modern day sci-Fi, the roots oF “alien” burrow deep

DIrEctOrS LjubOMIr StEfANOv AND tAMArA KOtEvSKA SPEND tHrEE YEArS wItH A bEEKEEPEr

TOM SKERRITT STARRED IN RIDLEY SCOTT’S ORIGINAL “ALIEN” AND ALSO IN THE SHORT FILM PRECEDING TONIGHT’S FEATURE

wED 10/9 & tHur 10/10

FRIDAY 10/11 7:30 PM

7:30 PM

$9 GA / $7 StuDENt

$9 GA / $7 STUDENT

MuENZINGEr

MUENZINGER

INTROS BY “mEmORY” CINEmATOgRAPhER ROBERT muRATORE & “ThE PhANTOm 52” DIRECTOR gEOff mARSlETT

FLATIRONS FOOD FILM FESTIvAL

W

ords, for better or worse, shape our perception of the ON THE BILL: ‘The Biggest world. Some, like death and decay, carry negative Little Farm.’ 3 connotations. Hearing them conjures images of morp.m., Sunday, Oct. tality, finality, even obsolescence. Others, like birth 13, International Film Series, and growth, invoke positivity: Tiny baby hands graspCU-Boulder, ing adult fingers and small green plants pushing through pitchMuenzinger black soil. Auditorium. Other words, like harmony, carry both. For most, it’s a pleasing word denoting agreeability and complementation. It’s positive through and through. But harmony is the result of progression, an achievement acquired through deliberate structure — and getting there isn’t always a positive experience. That search, that quest for harmony, forms the underlying journey of The Biggest Little Farm, a documentary from nature photographer John Chester. Chester’s story starts in 2010, in a small apartment in Santa Monica, California. John is a cinematographer working for a variety of nature programs; wife Molly is a private chef and food blogger. When the two adopt Todd, a midnight black rescue mutt with soulful eyes, their lives change — mainly because Todd barks all the time. Residential relocation is in order. Molly, who dreams of a children’s book version of a farm — one complete with pigs and sheep and chickens and every fruit and vegetable imaginable — convinces John to purchase 200 acres of barren land 40 miles northwest in Moorpark. Going from barren land to a working farm takes money and a whole lot of planning. Enter Alan, a hippy guru clad in linen and sandals. Alan educates John and Molly on how to plan and plant their personal Eden while offering up analogies of farming as surfing on waves. But first, what was once dead must be brought back to life. To do so, Alan encourages the Chesters to build a massive composting facility. Moorpark spelled backward is kraproom, and soon enough, the Chesters’ farm is flourishing. But after a year of success, death creeps back in. John and Molly are faced with a series of problems, one right after the other, with increasing severity. They want to handle each problem in the most natural way possible, but that isn’t always the easiest. Technology can mitigate some problems, but not all. At some point, you have to cede control and let nature take its course. Here, The Biggest Little Farm finds harmony, and the Chesters find what they are looking for. It’s a sweet movie, though a bit saccharine and preachy at times. Then again, it’s hard not to be when you crack some sort of cosmic code. It’s not every day you succeed at doing something that seems impossible, even less so when you understand how. Few movies have struck a chord with audiences this year quite like The Biggest Little Farm. It’s not hard to see why. The seventh annual Flatirons Food Film Festival (Oct. 10-13) closes with the popular documentary followed by a dinner at Bramble and Hare with Eric and Jill Skokan, who have a biggest little farm of their own. For more information on the four-day festival, flip over to Nibbles on page 55. The full lineup of movies and events is on page 57, and tickets are at flatironsfoodfilmfest.org.

In search of a harmonious web of life ‘Biggest Little Farm’ to close Flatirons Food Film Festival

by Michael J. Casey

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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F I L M S

BIGGEST LITTLE FARM

THE POLLINATORS NOON TO 1:00 PM: POLLINATORS FAIR A compelling tAle of honey bees And the environment

A riveting story of trAnsformAtion And leArning from nAture

BEES ARE INDISPENSABLE TO THE FEEDING OF AMERIcA BUT OUR AGRIcULTURAL PRAcTIcES SERIOUSLY ENDANGER THEM AND OUR OwN FOOD SEcURITY

Two DREAMERS wITh ThEIR BELovED DoG UNLock AND UNcovER A BIoDIvERSE DESIGN FoR LIvING whILE BRINGING ThEIR BARREN FARM To LIFE

SUNDAY 10/13 1:00 PM

SUNDAY 10/13 3:45 PM

MUENZINGER

MUENZINGER

$13 GA / $12 STUDENT

PLuS THREE ADDED bONuS FILMS NOT ON PRINTED SCHEDuLE

b O N u STHE DEATH OF DICK LONG fREE ADvANCED SCREENINg Of NEw fIlm BY ONE Of ThE DIRECTORS Of “SwISS ARmY mAN” TwO bAND-MATES STRuGGLE TO COvER uP THE uNLIKELy EvENTS THAT LED TO THEIR FRIEND’S DEATH

SATuRDAy 10/12 7:30 PM

FREE SHOw MuENZINGER F R O M

I T A L y

MAMMA ROMA

PASOLINI

Based on RoBeRto saviano’s novel “GomoRRah”

Banned upon its release in italy for oBscenity, today pasolini’s MaMMa roMa reMains a classic

Willem Dafoe is the spitting image of the murDereD Director

FIVE MEN IN LIMbO bETwEEN ADOLEscENcE AND ADuLThOOD DREAM OF EscAPE FROM ThEIR sMALL TOwN

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BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF Breakfast Sandwich

Shamane’s Bake Shoppe 2825 Wilderness Place, Unit 800, Boulder, shamanesbakeshoppe.com

PHOTOS BY STAFF

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hamane’s is one of those places everyone needs to know about but you selfishly want to keep to yourself so there’s not a line out the door every morning. This small bakery/cafe/deli puts out beautiful pastries, fresh and flavorful soups, salads and sandwiches, and stunning desserts. Stop by at breakfast and choose from a menu of breakfast burritos, pasties, filled croissants, muffins and sandwiches. It’s that last one we chose recently — thick-cut Applewood-smoked bacon topped with a farm-fresh fried egg, tomato, avocado, Muenster cheese and homemade Dijon mayo. It’s all served on house-baked, hearty multigrain bread. Look, we could say it’s as good as a breakfast sandwich gets, but you should just go and try it, and all the other great baked goods and meals at Shamane’s. $9.75.

Involtini

Via Perla 901 Pearl St., Boulder, viaperla.com

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ack in the day, before Airbnb and Travelocity, we spent a weekend at a farm stay in the countryside in northwest Italy’s Lombardy region, where we were first introduced to bresaola, air-dried and salted beef. We were pleasantly surprised by its muskiness and rich flavor. If you can’t make it to Italy anytime soon, if ever, check out the happy hour at Via Perla. There’s a plethora of traditional Italian dishes to choose from, with options for wine pairings and more. Based on our previous experience, we chose the involtini — four pieces of succulent bresaola wrapped around pecorino cheese and fresh arugula. Delightful. $4 for four.

Power Greens Bōl

Whole Sol Blend Bar 1420 Pearl St., Boulder, wholesol.com

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hole Sol Blend Bar sells healthy bowls, toasts, juices and smoothies. The ingredients in each bowl are dairy- and gluten-free, and everything is organic. The integrity of those ingredients comes across in the food, as in the power greens hot “bōl.” Shredded kale is mixed with sauerkraut, two poached eggs, hemp seeds, Dijon dressing and avocado. The kale is slightly bitter, the sauerkraut is punchy and crunchy, the eggs and avocado are delightfully rich and the Dijon dressing ties it all together. $10.

Oktoberfest Ale

Crystal Springs Brewing Co. 604 Main St. and 657 S. Taylor Ave., Louisville, crystalsprignsbrewing.com

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is the season for Oktoberfest-style beer in Boulder County, and we appreciate Crystal Springs’ Oktoberfest ale. It’s got all the malt and richness you want from the autumnal brew, but a delightful and subtle zip that perks up the taste buds. It’s also pretty light on the tongue, so you’ll likely get through a can in no time. Prices vary.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


ALEJANDRO IBARRA

Beyond Taco Tuesday Film fest celebrates women who champion real Mexican cuisine

by John Lehndorff DIANA KENNEDY has devoted her culinary career to promoting real Mexican cuisine. Watch her story in ‘Nothing Fancy’ at the Flatirons Food Film Festival.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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f you enjoyed a chicken mole taco on National Taco Day, raise a glass of mezcal to an unlikely hero. If you’ve “discovered” or have learned to appreciate tortas ahogadas, chile en nogada or cochinita pibil, send a thank-you card to Diana Kennedy, the 96-year-old Brit expatriate who has done more than any single individual to bring real Mexican cuisine to the world. Among cookbook legends, Kennedy has far from a grandmotherly reputation. She is famously combative and unafraid to lambaste anyone she thinks is being less than genuine when it comes to her adopted home’s fare. Meet chef Claudette Zepeda, the rare Latina star in a culinary stratosphere that is male-dominated and slow to accept Mexican fare as one of the world’s great cuisines. The San Diego-based Top Chef competitor and James Beard Award semifinalist was born in the U.S. and raised between Tijuana and Guadalajara. During her career as a pastry chef and executive chef she has become known for her outspoken defense of Mexican cooking techniques and ingredients. “The bias against Mexican food in this country is wrong and slightly racist,” Zepeda says. “Mexican food gets put in this cheap food category, smothered in cheese and sauces, and that’s a poor representation of our culture.” While Diana Kennedy won’t be on hand in Boulder, I

she and Claudette Zepeda will join forces Oct. 12 at Boulder’s seventh annual Flatirons Food Film Festival, a weekend of food-related cinema, tasting and education. Kennedy, who lives in Michoacán, is the subject of Nothing Fancy: Diana Kennedy, a scars-and-all documentary chronicling her culinary career. She has inspired several generations of chefs through her iconic cookbooks, The Art of Mexican Cooking and The Essential Cuisines of Mexico. Claudette Zepeda will launch the day devoted to immigrant cuisines with a free lecture at the Boulder Public Library about Mexican food and the common elements linking ancient cuisines. “No food culture is one-hundred-percent indigenous,” Zepeda says. “There are lots of migrant influences in Mexican cooking and other cuisines globally that were determined by the spice trade and the slave trade.” She notes that most Americans don’t realize how regional food is in Mexico, changing dramatically from state to state, and they also don’t realize just how long Tex-Mex food has been served in “America.” “Research shows that the first signs of Tex-Mex cuisee NIBBLES Page 56

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coffee – breakfast – lunch – tapas – dinner

5530 spine rd, boulder 303.719.1431 aperitivoboulder.com Executive Chef: Miguel Vazquez

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sine appeared in the 16th century, and it has evolved ever since,” she says. “There are just a lot of misconceptions about the food. Cheddar cheese was never part of it, and neither was shredded lettuce.” Before the documentary is shown, there will be a reception catered by a collective of the best and brightest local Mexican eateries. The menu features masa cake with red mole carnitas with serrano (Centro), cactus salad with lime and queso fresco (Comal Incubator), ceviche tostada (Comida), charred beef short ribs with guajillo (Teocalli Cocina) and halibut yuzu ceviche (Work and Class and Super Mega Bien). For the finale, a cajeta tart with horchata Anglaise from “Biker Jim” Pittenger. For many years, Kennedy was much better known outside of Mexico and it took a ridiculous number of years before her work was translated into Spanish. She hates the moniker “the Julia Child ALEJANDRO IBARRA of Mexican cooking,” preferring to be thought of as a naturalist like Charles Darwin. “She is received very well now in Mexico because she walks the walk,” Zepeda says. “She’s a living legend. Diana does her due diligence, and she’s very respectful to the women who cook the food.” The Flatirons Food Film Festival (continuing through Oct. 13) includes a free discussion 11 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 12 on the #MeToo movement in the restaurant industry led by Beth Gruitch and Sara Brito. Information: flatironsfoodfilmfest.org ‘BEET’ POETRY I pulled 1973’s John Keats’s Porridge: Favorite Recipes of American Poets out of my archives. The odd volume features such gems as Edward Abbey’s Hardcase Survival Pinto Bean Sludge, Joyce Carol Oates’ Easter Anise Bread and this borscht recipe from former Boulder resident Allen Ginsberg: “Boil 2 big bunches of chopped beets and beet greens for one hour in two quarts of water with a little salt and a bay leaf, and one cup of sugar. When cooked, add enough lemon to balance the sugar, as for lemonade (4 or 5 lemons or more). Icy chill; serve with hot boiled potatoes on side and a dollop of sour cream in the middle of red cold beet soup. On side also: spring salad (tomatoes, onions, lettuce, radishes, cucumbers).”

Front Range Food for Front Range Families Voted East County’s BEST Gluten Free Menu

LOCAL FOOD NEWS Two legendary chefs — Dave Query and Janos Wilder — will team up for a dinner Oct. 22 at the Gold Hill Inn to benefit the Gold Hill Elementary School. ... The Lazy Dog Bar & Grill has closed after 22 years at 1346 Pearl St. ... The Mac & Cheezary has opened at 3895 Wadsworth Blvd. in Wheat Ridge just in time for the annual Mac and Cheese Festival Oct. 12. denvermacandcheese.com ... Plan ahead: National Boston Cream Pie Day (10/23), Mincemeat Pie Day (10/26), National Bavarian Cream Pie Day (11/27), National Pumpkin Pie Day (12/25), National Pie Day (1/23). TASTE OF THE WEEK Piece, Love & Chocolate in Boulder is an artisan chocolatier that sells all manner of gorgeous truffles, candies and chocolate pastries, but the shop’s most iconic item may be its simplest. The Amoreo is Peace, Love & Chocolate’s heart-shaped reinvention of the Oreo cookie. Crisp, gluten-free chocolate wafers sandwich an upgrade on the classic sweet, creamy filling. It’s perfect with a glass of milk or mug of drinking chocolate, though pricey if you want to plow through a half dozen.

Open at 7:30 Every Day for Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Brinner!

BOTTOMLESS WINE WEDNESDAYS 4-8pm

WORDS TO CHEW ON “Most plants taste better when they’ve had to suffer a little.” — Diana Kennedy John Lehndorff hosts a special hour-long, 20th anniversary Radio Nibbles special at 8:30 a.m. Oct. 10 on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org).

MORNINGGLORYCAFE | 1377 FOREST PARK CIRCLE, LAFAYETTE | 303.604.6351

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BOULDER WEEKLY


Book the cooks

Head to culinary-themed Fort Collins Book Festival for workshops, chats and readings with award-winning food writers

by Matt Cortina

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ational conversation is fostered through books, reading and writing,” says Anne Macdonald, a librarian and co-director of the Fort Collins Book Festival, which runs Oct. 18-19 at venues throughout Fort Collins. Now, why should you head up north for the festival, and why is a story about a book festival in the food section? Because this year’s theme is “Food for Thought” and includes panels on everything from regenerative agriculture to regional cooking to food history and culture. There are food-focused writing

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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workshops, cooking demonstrations and opportunities to sample food and beverages. Best of all: everything is free. The festival, now its in fourth year, has rotated themes. Macdonald says focusing the events on food makes sense because of Northern Colorado’s culinary scene. “We chose food this year because it is one of those uniquely Fort Collins/ Colorado State economic clusters: food systems, food science, culinary practices, CSAs, regenerative agriculture, food movements, food culture and history, food justice, food and climate, the culOCTOBER 10, 2019

ture of gathering around food, the sociology of food, human nutrition...” Macdonald says. “We’ve invited regional and national authors, visionaries and culinary experts to challenge the way we think about food and our food systems.” Macdonald says the Festival searched for food writers and professionals who have published in recent years, but who are also engaging speakers that “are able to take complicated concepts and present them to an ordinary audience in a conversational style.” Rick Bass has won plenty of writing awards, including an O. Henry Award and a Pushcart Prize. He’ll be reading from and speaking about his book The Traveling Feast based on his journey around the country making memorable meals for his mentors to express gratitude. Jeff Gordinier is the food and drinks editor at Esquire and will share stories see BOOKS Page 60

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“Never underestimate how much assistance, how much satisfaction, how much comfort, how much soul and transcendence there might be in a well-made taco and a cold bottle of beer.” ~ Tom Robbins

BOOKS from Page 59

HOW TO FIND US:

] [ [ ] ] [ Restaurants: Meadows on the Parkway Shopping Center / Foothills and Baseline, The Lounge at Boulder Theater 2032 14th St, Boulder (Serving an hour before and during all shows) Food Carts: Pearl Street Mall (Mon. – Fri., 11am – 3pm) Sanitas Brewery 3550 Frontier Ave. Unit A Boulder (Daily)

720.573.4194 • mcdevittacosupply.com

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

from his book Hungry about his four ry workshop using chocolate for inspirayears following famed Noma chef Rene tion. Macdonald says the workshops are Redzepi around the world. open to anyone from beginning writers to Toni Tipton-Martin won a James those who have been published — “Our Beard Award for her book The Jemima goal is to foster a networking opportunity Code: Two Centuries of African American as much as a writing workshop,” she Cookbooks, which was also hailed as adds. one of the best cookbooks of the century Inclusivity is indeed paramount for by The New Yorker. Tipton-Martin will talk the festival planners, which is especially about how she amassed one of the exciting given this year’s focus on food. world’s largest collections of cookbooks Food and dining can be exclusive — for created by African American authors, and a variety of reasons — and some food how those books and the recipes within professionals actively seek out exclusivhave impacted food, families and comity in promoting their restaurants or food munities. She’ll COURTESY FORT COLLINS BOOK FEST establishments. And also talk about “influencers” eager to her upcoming, impress the masses obviously highly by hitting the best anticipated food spots around the cookbook: world don’t really care Jubilee: Recipes about making it feel from Two like their experiences Centuries of are attainable for us African commoners. And yet American we all have to eat, Cooking. and there are rich Joshua and important stories Sbicca is a CSU between the cracks assistant pro— some of which the fessor of sociology who will talk about his writers in this festival will be able to book Food Justice Now, which calls for share. everyday foodies to think deeper about That’s the point of highlighting food in existing systems and work toward elimia book festival, Macdonald says. nating inequalities within and beyond the “We still believe that new ideas, food system. thoughts, visions, even our paradigm Sean Sherman founded The Sioux shifts, are communicated through books, Chef, a group of indigenous chefs, reading and writing. We also believe that researchers, food lovers and more that you don’t convey those ideas or create seeks to revitalize indigenous cooking useful conversations if the book festival is and promote it within the modern food exclusive or full of barriers,” she says. scene. His The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous As such, the festival will be held at Kitchen won a James Beard Award, and “popular, but easy-going venues” like he’ll speak at the festival about the effort New Belgium Brewery, Wolverine Farm to revolutionize North American cooking Publick House, Old Firehouse Books, by looking back on and utilizing indigeScrumpy’s Hard Cider Bar and Pub and nous food knowledge. Ginger and Baker. Two sessions will be There will also be 10 workshops for offered in Spanish this year, as well. writers at the festival, including a poetry Feel free to stop in at any of the class entitled “Where does your food events. View a full schedule and learn come from?”; a short-story workshop on more about the visiting authors and food writing about the food scene; and a poet- professionals at focobookfest.org. I

BOULDER WEEKLY


BREWERS ASSOCIATION

Boulder County brings home the hardware and the cachet Dispatches from the 2019 Great American Beer Festival

by Michael J. Casey

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n behalf of the Brewers Association staff, I’d like to thank you all for being here,” Great American Beer Festival (GABF) Director Nancy Johnson told a packed Bellco Theater inside Denver’s Colorado Convention Center on Saturday, Oct. 5. It was the 38th time the festival brought together American brewers for an annual celebration. And it was the 33rd time the commercial competition took center stage. “How many folks in here are here for the first time?” Johnson asked. And with nearly half the room raising their hands, GABF proved once again to be a ritual of passage for brewers. Out of the 9,497 beers submitted in the competition, 401 came from first-timers. And as Johnson surmised, every one of them probably had the same mix of “exhaustion and adrenaline” that she had for them. “If you don’t have butterflies in your stomach, it’s because you don’t have a beer entered,” competition director Chris Swersey said, taking the stage. For the next two hours, the names Swersey read would either calm or curdle those stomachs. Some long-standing breweries would continue their streak of excellence, while 37 of those 401 first-timers would receive some medal to validate their hard work. And there are few as deserving as Longmont’s Primitive Beer, which won a silver medal for Shibbleshabble in the Experimental Beer category. Owned and operated by husband and wife, Brandon and Lisa Boldt, Primitive Beer is devoted to spontaneously fermented, slightly sour, un-carbonated wild ales with a sense of place. Both work at larg-

er breweries (Lisa at Odd13 Brewing and Brandon at 4 Noses Brewing Company), and Primitive is their passion project. The silver medal awarded is validation: the Boldts make Primitive Beer their way and the hard way. The way brewing pioneers currently celebrating legacy anniversaries did decades ago. Walking down GABF’s main concourse felt like a problem of homogeneity: Certain styles reigned supreme, and it seemed like every brewery wanted a crack at it. But Boulder County bucked the trend with gold medals from four widely diverse styles and heritages: Echo Brewing Company’s Junebug for Belgian- and French-style Ale; Bootstrap Brewing’s 1956 Golden Ale for Golden or Blonde Ale; Twisted Pine Brewing Company’s Northstar Imperial Porter for Other Strong Beer; and in the honey beer category, A&M Honey Bock from BJ’s Restaurant & Brewery. Boulder is the research and development brewery for BJ’s — the Californiabased brewpub chain — and gold for A&M Honey Bock isn’t their first. Aaron Stueck and company have been producing some of the best beer you’ll find at any brewpub, let alone beer found in shopping centers. Last year they won gold for their Belgian Quad; back in 2012, it was gold for Got Beer — their take on the Swedish gottlandsdrikke. Of Colorado’s 40 medals, Boulder County brewers took home eight, each one vastly different than the other. At times, it feels like the brewing world is contracting. But in Boulder County, it’s as good as it’s ever been.

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS DIVISION OF ST. THOMAS AND ST. JOHN Case No. ST – 19 – CV – 271 ACTION FOR DEBT FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND BREACH OF CONTRACT CAPTAIN’S COMMAND AT BLUEBEARD’S BEACH CLUB OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC. Plaintiff, vs. ELIZABETH SISLER, Defendant. FIRST AMENDED SUMMONS To: Elizabeth Sisler 2856 Kalmia Ave., Apt. 305 Boulder, CO 80301-5910 Within the time limited by law (see note below) you are hereby required to appear before this Court and answer to a complaint filed against you in this action and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment by default will be taken against you as demanded in the First Amended Complaint, for DEBT, FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND BREACH OF CONTRACT. PURSUANT TO COURT ORDER FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION ENTERED BY HON. JUDGE KATHLEEN MACKAY ON SEPTEMBER 18, 2019. Witness my hand and the Seal of this Court this 18th day of SEPTEMBER, 2019. ESTRELLA H. GEORGE Clerk of the Court By: Jeanette M. Smith Deputy Clerk Richard H. Dollison, Esq. Michall J. LaRochelle, Esq. Attorney for Plaintiff Law Offices of Richard H. Dollison, P.C. 5143 Palm Passage, Ste. B28/29 P.O. Box 6135 St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. 00804 NOTE: This defendant, if served personally, is required to file his/ her answer or other defenses with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty one (21) days after service of this summons, excluding the date of service. The defendant, if served by publication or by personal service outside of the jurisdiction, is required to file his/her answer or other defense with the Clerk of this Court within thirty (30) days after the completion of the period of publication or personal service outside of the jurisdiction, and to serve a copy thereof upon the attorney for the plaintiff, and in the case of any form of mailing requiring a signed receipt, within 30 days from the date of receipt as indicated by the signed receipt.

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BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: “Love is when you meet someone who

tells you something new about yourself,” wrote poet André Breton. I think that’s an excellent principle to put at the top of your priority list in the coming weeks, Aries. To be in maximum alignment with cosmic rhythms, you should seek input from allies who’ll offer insights about you that are outside your current conceptions of yourself. You might even be daring enough to place yourself in the paths of strangers, acquaintances, animals, and teachers who can provide novel reflections. There’s just one caveat: Stay away from people who might be inclined to fling negative feedback.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Constantine P. Cavafy’s poem “Waiting

for the Barbarians” imagines the imminent arrival of an unpredictable agent of chaos. “The barbarians are coming today,” declares the narrator. Everyone in town is uneasy. People’s routines are in disarray. Faces look worried. What’s going to happen? But the poem has a surprise ending. “It is night, and the barbarians haven’t come,” reports the narrator. “Some people have arrived from the frontier and say that there aren’t any more barbarians.” I propose that we use this scene as a metaphor for your life right now, Taurus. It’s quite possible that the perceived threat isn’t really a threat. So here’s my question, taken from near the end of the poem: “What are we going to do now without the barbarians?”

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Some folklorists prefer the term “wonder

tales” rather than “fairy tales.” Indeed, many such stories are filled with marvelous events that feature magical transformations, talking animals, and mythical creatures like elves and dragons and unicorns. I bring

this up, Gemini, because I want to encourage you to read some wonder tales. Hopefully, as you do, you’ll be inspired to reimagine your life as a wonder tale; you’ll reframe the events of the “real world” around you as being elements in a richly entertaining wonder tale. Why do I recommend this? Because wonder tales are like waking dreams that reveal the wishes and curiosities and fascinations of your deep psyche. And I think you will benefit profoundly in the coming weeks from consciously tuning in to those wishes and curiosities and fascinations.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: “All the effort in the world won’t matter if

you’re not inspired,” writes novelist Chuck Palahniuk. I agree! And that’s a key meditation for you right now. Your assignment is to enhance and upgrade the inspiration you feel about the activities that are most important to you — the work and the play that give you the sense you’re living a meaningful life. So how do you boost your excitement and motivation for those essential actions you do on a regular basis? Here’s a good place to begin: visualize in exuberant detail all the reasons you started doing them in the first place.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: I hope you are embarking on a vigorous

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: I suspect that in the coming days you’ll be able to see into everyone’s souls more vividly than usual. You’ll have a special talent for piercing through the outer trappings of their personalities so as to gaze at the essence beneath. It’s as if your eyes will be blessed by an enhancement that enables you to discern what’s often hidden. This upgrade in your perception may at times be unsettling. For some of the people you behold, the difference between how they present themselves and who they actually are will be dramatic. But for the most part, penetrating to the depths should be fun, enriching, even healing.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: “This heart is rusty,” writes poet Gabriel Gadfly. “It creaks, it clanks, it crashes and rattles and bangs.” Why is his heart in such a state? Because he has been separated from a person he loves. And so he’s out of practice in doing the little things, the caring gestures and tender words, that a lover does to keep the heart well-oiled. It’s my observation that most of us go through rusty-heart phases like this even when we are living in close proximity to an intimate ally. We neglect to practice the art of bestowing affectionate attention and low-key adoration. We forget how important it is for our own welfare that we continually refresh and reinvigorate our heart intelligence. These are good meditations for you right now, Leo.

new phase of self-redefinition. I trust you are excited about shedding old ways of thinking about yourself and eager to revise and re-imagine the plot of your life story. As you do, keep in mind this helpful counsel from physicist Richard Feynman: “You have no responsibility to live up to what other people think you ought to accomplish. I have no responsibility to be like they expect me to be. It’s their mistake, not my failing.”

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: You’ve probably heard the saying, “Genius is 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration.” It’s often attributed to inventor Thomas Edison. Sixteenthcentury artist Michelangelo expressed a similar idea. “If you knew how much labor went into it, you would not call it genius,” he said about one of his masterpieces. I’m guessing that you Scorpios have been in a phase when these descriptions are highly apropos. The work you’ve been doing may look productive and interesting and heroic to the casual observer, and maybe only you know how arduous and exacting it has been. So now what do you do? I say it’s time to enjoy the fruits of your efforts. Celebrate! Give yourself a thrilling gift.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: “The universe is under no obligation to make sense to you,” declared astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. If that’s even a little bit true, I bet you won’t believe it in the coming weeks. According to my

analysis, the universe will make a great deal of sense to you — at times even exquisite, beautiful, breathtaking sense. Life will be in a revelatory and articulate mood. The evocative clues coming your way about the nature of reality could tempt you to believe that there is indeed a coherent plan and meaning to your personal destiny.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: In 2005, Facebook was a start-up com-

pany barely on the map of the internet. Its president asked graffiti artist David Choe to paint murals on the walls of its headquarters. Choe asked for $60,000, but the president convinced him to be paid with Facebook stock instead. Years later, when Facebook went public, Choe became a multi-millionaire. I suspect that in the coming months you will be faced with choices that are less spectacular than that, Capricorn, but similar and important. My conclusion: Be willing to consider smart gambles when projects are germinating.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: “Experiment is the sole source of truth,” wrote philosopher and polymath Henri Poincaré. “It alone can teach us something new; it alone can give us certainty.” He wasn’t merely referring to the kinds of experiments that scientists conduct in laboratories. He was talking about the probes and explorations we can and should carry out in the course of our daily lives. I mention this, Aquarius, because the coming days will be prime time for you to do just that: ask provocative questions, initiate novel adventures, and incite fun learning experiences.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: In my opinion, Piscean singer, poet and actor Saul Williams produces high-quality art. So he has earned a right to critique mediocre art. In speaking about movies and TV shows that are hard to enjoy unless we dumb ourselves down, he says that “we have more guilty pleasure than actual f— pleasure.” Your assignment in the coming weeks, Pisces, is to cut back on your “guilty pleasures” — the entertainment, art, and socializing that brings meager returns — as you increase and upgrade your actual f— pleasure.

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OCTOBER 10, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


A: I’m fine about relationships with seemingly set end points, as relationships don’t have to be open to or become long-term in order to be a success. (Did We brought Savage Love Live to the you meet a nice person? Did you have Music Box Theatre in Chicago, the some good sex? Did you part on good Barrymore Theatre in Madison, and the terms? Success!) And the world is filled Pantages Theatre in Minneapolis over three nights. As is always the case at live with couples that met at a time in their lives when school or work commitments shows, the crowd had more questions meant they couldn’t be than I could possibly ROMAN ROBINSON together — and yet, years answer in a single night. or even decades later, So in this week’s column, they’re still together. You I’m going to tear through never know. some of the questions I wasn’t able to get to. Q: Is it OK that I always seem to hate my partners’ Q: If you use food for mothers? Is this normal? vaginal play, is there any A: It isn’t and it’s not. type you should definitely When you’re the common avoid? denominator in a lot of highA: Lasagna makes for stress, high-conflict relationa lousy insertion toy. (Food ships, you’re most likely the doesn’t belong in vaginas; problem. there could be bacteria on the food, even after washing, that results in a nasty Q: Why do straight guys like anal so infection. #FuckFirst #EatAfter) much? A: Superhero movies, bottled beer, Q: How do you feel about relationwatching sports — there are lots of things ships that have a time frame or defined straight guys like that I just don’t get. But end point? For example, one person is I get why they like anal: Done right, anal going away for school or a new job?

BY DAN SAVAGE

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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feels amazing. And not just for the person doing the penetrating. When it’s done right, it is also great for the person being penetrated. And sometimes the person being penetrated is a straight guy. Q: My husband and I are swingers. For him, it’s who he is. For me, it’s something I do (and like!). We argue over how often we go out or have sex with other couples. Any suggestions for finding a happy medium? A: More often than you’d like, and less often than he’d like — call it the bittersweet spot. Q: What tips do you have for lesbians in long-term relationships who want to keep sex fun and interesting? A: My advice for lesbians who want to keep their LTRs hot is the same as my advice for gays, straights, bis, etc. who want to keep theirs hot. At the start of the relationship, you were the adventure they were on, and they were the adventure you were on. That’s why it was so effortlessly hot at the start. But once you’re not each other’s sexy new adventure anymore — once you’re an established couple — you have to go find sexy adventures together to keep it hot. And that requires making a conscious effort. Explore your kinks, buy some sex toys, have sex someplace other than your bed-

OCTOBER 10, 2019

room, invite very special guest stars, etc. Q: How do I create a sexier bedroom for even better sex? A: Bedrooms are overrated, if you ask me (which you did), whereas basements, office stairwells, clean single-seat restrooms in upscale restaurants, dark corners of public parks, the space underneath banquet tables in hotel ballrooms, etc. are all underutilized. Q: I’m 99.975% sure I don’t want kids. My boyfriend of almost four years has a vasectomy scheduled for the end of the year. Should we go through with it? My boyfriend is really fucking sexy, hence the .025% doubt. A: Vasectomies, like pregnancies, are reversible. Your boyfriend could also go to a sperm bank and put a load or three on ice. Thanks to everyone who came to our live shows! Savage Love Live comes to Toronto and Somerville on Oct. 11 and 12. For info and tickets go to savagelovecast.com/events. On the Lovecast, love your curvy body, with Elle Chase: savagelovecast. com; mail@savagelove.net; Follow Dan on Twitter @fakedansavage; ITMFA.org.

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Better living through automation by Seymour

A

s the marijuana industry scales up across the globe, technology is rising to meet the occasion. That’s right, friends: Robots are going to be harvesting your weed… the pot bots are coming. There are lots of estimates floating around about just how big the cannabis industry will get over the next few years, but an article by The Motley Fool simplifies the numbers, suggesting that “the weed industry could practically double up the soda industry in about a decade, and may give the alcohol industry a run for its money, depending on whether consumers trade off alcohol consumption in favor of cannabis use.” This is where automation comes into play in the cannabis industry, as it has in other sectors of the agricultural industry. While traditional farmers can pretty easily use big equipment like selfdriving tractors and robotic harvesters, the delicate, often greenhouse-confined nature of marijuana crops present a unique challenge for tech companies to overcome — which, of course, they will. Take, for example, Boston-based company Bloom Automation, which uses image-based technology to trim those delicate, trichomeencrusted buds. “It’s been done by hand because the product you want is very specific,” Jon Gowa, CEO of Bloom, told business tech website ZDNet last September. “A traditional machine would chop it up. At the end of the day cultivators are selling this for quite a lot of money, so human harvesting has made sense.” But maybe not for much longer.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Bloom’s harvester trims clusters of flowers using machine vision and path planning algorithms. Different cameras measure depth and identify parts of the plant, differentiating between flowers, branches and leaves. Bloom taught the system how to do this by incorporating thousands of images of marijuana plants. Here’s how Bloom CEO Gowa explained it to Weedmaps in February of this year: “Essentially, you’re loading conveyor belts with the branches which enter a cell where the robot, or robot arm, is contained, along with cameras that image the branches. The computer then analyzes the data and guides the robot to a specific location; on the next plant it gives a whole different set of actions because it’s looking at a different plant and the sensors are making new decisions.” As of earlier this year, Bloom’s weed-harvesting robot was running at about 95 percent accuracy. Of course trimming isn’t the only job machines can help with. Imagine-based machines can be taught to find impurities like mold in plants, or weed out (pun intended) a

OCTOBER 10, 2019

male plant in a crop. With a federally legalized marijuana industry, Canada is a big player in AI innovation for cannabis grows, like William Bond Ai in Ontario. According to some recent reporting from NJ.com, William Bond Ai uses traditional agricultural robots from FarmBot (an open source platform) but programs the devices to understand the specifics of cannabis. What all this means for traditional labor is up for interpretation. Trimming weed has long been a fairly lucrative, if not tedious, job that provided good money for those willing to put in the hours. Longtime trimmers told Weedmaps earlier this year that they felt like AI in the cannabis industry runs against the counterculture that created the industry in the first place. “This industry started with people who were against capitalism, people who wanted to come out to the rugged, rough wilderness and make money their own way without being told what to do,” one trimmer and grower said. “The idea of robot trimmers is totally destructive; the whole nature of the industry was people coming together to celebrate the abundance of harvest. It was rich and beautiful. It was an industry of sharing.” Still, others believe technology is what will ultimately liberate us all to live happier, more self-directed lives. The World Economic Forum estimates that AI will create as many jobs as it displaces, simply changing the type of work humans do. Whether we are headed for a new age of high-quality jobs or an era of greater inequality, one thing is for certain: AI is changing the game, and we can expect to see more of it in the pot industry as the years go by.

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Pot drives Tucker Carlson around the bend By Paul Danish

W

ow. Marijuana really can drive people around the bend. Not smoking it or vaping it or eating it – just thinking about Congress legalizing it will do the trick. Consider the sad case of Fox News host Tucker Carlson. The mere thought of legalized marijuana causes him to become unhinged. His most recent episode of reefer madness was brought on by the passage of the marijuana banking bill by the U.S. House of Representatives with an overwhelming 321 to 103 vote. The bill, sponsored by Colorado Democratic Representative Ed Perlmutter and dozens of other house members, would protect banks that serve marijuana businesses in states where pot is legal from being prosecuted by the feds. Because marijuana is still illegal at the federal level, marijuana producers and dispensaries are largely denied access to banking services, which means they have to run cash-only businesses. This makes them obvious robbery targets. It also means they can’t get bank loans. The potential for fraud and tax evasion is also higher in cash-only enterprises than in ones who keep their money in banks and pay their bills with checks. Perlmutter’s bill is obviously intended to address those issues. Ah, but Carlson thinks Perlmutter and the bill’s other 320 supporters had a hidden agenda when they voted for it. They voted for it because the bill is a step toward pot legalization — and the bill’s supporters want to see pot legalized because they want the American people to be so strung out that they won’t notice what a lousy job Congress is doing.

MAKE THE GOOD TIMES BETTER

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

“They want you to be dumb,” Carlson said. “... When you mismanage the country this badly, you want the people to be so out of it they don’t respond. That is really true.” “Choose sobriety so you can be awake enough to

critique them and the crappy job they’re doing,” he added. “Even though marijuana is still illegal federally, the bill would allow banks and credit unions to provide banking services to people who deal marijuana,” he said. “So in the middle of the deadliest drug epidemic in our history, the only thing Congress can agree on is that it ought to be easier to sell drugs to Americans.” Uh, “the deadliest drug epidemic in our history” involves opioids like fentanyl. It does not involve marijuana, which is the single safest drug by almost any metric you choose to measure drugs by.

Apparently, it has never occurred to Carlson that trying to fight the opioid epidemic by cracking down on pot is like the drunk who was looking for his car keys under the streetlight because it was too dark to look for them at the other end of the block where he lost them. According to Marijuana Moment, the banking bill was endorsed by 50 state banking associations, the National Association of State Treasurers, the top financial regulators in 25 states, a majority of state attorneys general and bi-partisan governors of 20 states. Apparently, congressmen aren’t the only people in the country that want you to be dumb. The kindest thing that can be said about Carlson’s outburst is that he’s being a sore loser. The more accurate thing that can be said about him is that he’s the kind of guy who gives a drug-free lifestyle a bad name. • • • • For the past year, national polls have found that about two-thirds of the American people are fed up with pot prohibition and want to see recreational marijuana legalized. Now a new poll sponsored by the libertarian Cato Institute suggests Americans have had their fill of the broader war on drugs as well. The poll found that 55% of those surveyed favored “re-categorizing drug offenses from felonies to civil offenses, meaning they would be treated like minor traffic violations rather than crimes.” Forty-four percent of those surveyed were opposed. The question was asked as part of the institute’s Welfare, Work, and Wealth National Survey. The survey was conducted last March and relied on phone interviews with 1,700 adults.

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