Boulder Weekly 6.23.2022

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CANNABIS BUSTS AND ARRESTS INCREASED IN 2021 AS THE DEA RAMPS UP ENFORCEMENT

by Will Brendza

Women secretaries of state face harassment, p. 8

Exploring the terror of “hysteria,” p. 14

Grill cheese, not grilled cheese, p. 24

2022



news:

Amid falsehoods about the 2020 election, states’ top election officials are grappling with inaccurate information by Barbara Rodriguez, The 19th

buzz:

In debut novel, Denverite Nina Shope explores the terror of a woman diagnosed with hysteria by Bart Schaneman

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art and culture:

Chris Dunn’s glacial photography weaves art and philosophy into a crowded climate conversation by Ben Berman

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nibbles:

Skip the brats and sizzle up some halloumi, paneer and panela for summer feasts by John Lehndorff

weed between the lines:

Marijuana arrests spiked dramatically in 2021 as authorities crack down on a black market that isn’t going anywhere by Will Brendza

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departments

4 The Anderson Files: Progressives divided over county commissioner and sheriff races 7 Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 5 City Beat: Racial equity, a settlement for Seth Franco, and no rebates for e-bikes in Boulder 13 Boulderganic: A Boulder nonprofit and an innovative solar company join forces to offer solutions 19 Events: What to do when there’s nothing to do 22 Film: Kaleidoscopic plurality in ‘Neptune Frost’ 23 Astrology: By Rob Brezsny 27 Drink: Spirits from Wood’s High Mountain Distillery 29 Cuisine: Taste of the Week: Tacos built with flavor 31 Savage Love: Pride and preference BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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JUNE 23, 2022

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Publisher, Fran Zankowski Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor-in-Chief, Caitlin Rockett News Editor, Will Brendza Food Editor, John Lehndorff Interns, Ben Berman, Rebecca Rommen Contributing Writers: Dave Anderson, Emma Athena, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Shay Castle, Angela K. Evans, Mark Fearer, Jodi Hausen, Karlie Huckels, Dave Kirby, Matt Maenpaa, Sara McCrea, Rico Moore, Adam Perry, Katie Rhodes, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Tom Winter SALES AND MARKETING Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Account Executives, Matthew Fischer, Carter Ferryman Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman CIRCULATION TEAM Sue Butcher, Ken Rott, Chris Bauer BUSINESS OFFICE Bookkeeper, Regina Campanella Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Editor-at-Large, Joel Dyer June 23, 2022 Volume XXIX, number 41

As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism, and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2022 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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Progressives divided over county commissioner and sheriff races by Dave Anderson

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ou might have noticed that the Boulder County ballot for the Democratic primary has only two contested races. As I was trying to figure how I was going to vote, Boulder Weekly news editor Will Brendza suggested that I devote my column to the subject. I watched many candidate forums on Zoom and contacted quite a few activist friends. Unfortunately, almost all of my friends wanted to be anonymous. There were no stark differences on the issues between candidates in either race. Commissioner Matt Jones has chosen not to run for a second term. Louisville Mayor and chemical engineer Ashley Stolzmann earned the support of Jones and was JUNE 23, 2022

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the first to announce that she was running. Elaina Shively is supported by the other two commissioners, Marta Loachamin and Claire Levy. Shively is director for the Center for Prevention and Restorative Justice at the Boulder County District Attorney’s office. She leads the state’s first addiction and mental health diversion program for the office so that people can get treatment rather than an automatic jail sentence. Sheriff Joe Pelle is term-limited. Pelle recruited retired Boulder Police Deputy Chief Curtis Johnson to the sheriff ’s department last year, where he is currently division chief, and has endorsed Johnson as his successor. Louisville Police Chief David Hayes advocates a “culture shift” in the department. He notes that sheriff ’s office jail staff used tasers on two people who were in restraints and secured in the jail, and that two former deputies are currently serving time in the state prison for manslaughter BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


(for the death of a young CU justice and police brutality can be Boulder student who was in their ignored if you are white and well-off. custody). Johnson says he was at the It wasn’t too long ago that the Boulder Police Department when the climate crisis was ignored, student died and that there has been downplayed, denied. (Many righta “significant policy change” on wingers are still deniers.) Then tasering recently. However, Johnson suddenly it comes home with wild says that after 20 years with the same destructive floods, fire, drought. Last leader, the Dec. 30, the sheriff ’s climate crisis hit department needs Boulder County “it needs a little in the mouth. kick in the rear, In an some new interview in New energy.” York Magazine, An old friend climate scientist and progressive Daniel Swain activist who has said the Marshall in the decades of Fire was experience in the something fire. As mayor of Louiscounty gave me unique and some insight. She horrifying. It was ville, Ashley Stoltzmann wanted to be an “urban rapidly responded to anonymous. We firestorm.” The agreed that most recent save her community. progressives are urban firestorms divided. happened after She said the bombing of “environmentalists cities during are leaning toward (Stolzmann), and World War II. In centuries past, cities social and racial justice activists with wooden buildings burned down leaning toward (Shively) for county frequently. commissioner. There may be some It wasn’t a wildfire. It wasn’t as who like the idea of a small town bad as the Camp Fire in Paradise, mayor like (Stolzmann) on the California, in 2018, with 18,000 commission, and maybe others (like structures burned and 85 deaths. me) who like that (Shively) has a Swain says that fire “was in the track record of working on ‘wildland-urban’ interface— progressive efforts within the county, essentially, houses in the woods.” and who possibly she has the ability The Marshall Fire was different. to work well with a county staff that It was “subdivisions, tract homes, fire has had a lot of turnover.” just tearing through suburban With regard to the sheriff ’s race, environments we’ve been taught to she said, “I think that (Hayes) shot think of as safe in every way.” himself in the foot at the NAACP Both of the sheriff candidates forum by uttering ‘all lives matter’ lost their homes in the fire. As mayor and resisting community ideas of Louisville, Stoltzmann rapidly about policing. I see that ( Johnson) responded to save her community. publicly endorsed state legislation Of the multiple crises demanding to require police communication to our attention, climate change is “a be unencrypted, and (Hayes) civilizational wake-up call,” as Naomi opposed it. When I met (Hayes), he Klein has said. But everything and seems to be sincerely interested in every crisis is connected. community-based mental health You need to hand in your ballot by response, but ( Johnson) also has 7 p.m. on Tuesday June 28. There are clear ideas on how to improve no Republicans running for Boulder mental health response. “ County positions in this primary. I am We face multiple crises that still not sure how I will vote. demand urgent attention. The battle This opinion column does not for democracy is being waged at the necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Jan. 6 hearings, but it can seem Weekly. abstract. The fights over criminal Email: letters@boulderweekly.com

BOTH OF THE SHERIFF CANDIDATES LOST THEIR HOMES

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Racial equity, a settlement for Seth Franco, and no rebates for e-bikes in Boulder by Shay Castle

Staff recommended gathering information from more diverse cities with outdoor dining programs, and acknowledged the limitations of racial equity assessments in a city that is 79% white. “This leads us to a broader question that outdoor dining alone cannot address—how do we make the City of Boulder more inclusive?” Councilmember Nicole Speer expressed her disappointment with the outreach efforts during Tuesday’s discussion. Community Vitality Director Cris Jones said the quick turnaround did not leave enough time for robust outreach. “In the nature of trying to stand up a program in really short order, it does make it challenging to have a broad, widely inclusive public engagement process,” Jones said. City staff will continue to seek feedback, Jones said. A five-year extension of the outdoor dining program—with new standards for size and structures— was approved unanimously by

BOULDER HAS A RACIAL EQUITY TOOL—BUT IT’S TOO WHITE TO USE IT Boulder loves a grand plan, and there was perhaps none grander than its racial equity plan, adopted last year, and accompanying assessment tool. Together, they provide a path to ensuring that every city dollar, decision, policy and program worked to correct historic and systemic racism. Rollout of the tool (a 14-page set of questions) has been inconsistent. It has become somewhat of a routine for diversity-minded council members to ask if the racial equity tool has been applied to whatever issue is confronting them that night; the answer is often no. The city’s Community Vitality department—gearing up for a fiveyear expansion of outdoor dining in Boulder—recently gave it a go. “Given the demographics of Boulder, we lack adequate input from people of color,” staff wrote in pre-meeting notes to council. “Input was gained from stakeholders that primarily represent a White demographic.” JUNE 23, 2022

see CITY BEAT Page 6 l

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Reviewer Jill Murphy:

ANOTHER SETTLEMENT RELATED TO POLICE MISCONDUCT will be paid out this year after council OK’d giving $2 million to the family of Seth Franco.

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CITY BEAT from Page 5

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JUNE 23, 2022

COUNCIL OK’S $2M SETTLEMENT TO FAMILY OF SETH FRANCO Another settlement related to police misconduct will be paid out this year after council OK’d giving $2 million to the family of Seth Franco. Franco was arrested in 2017 after his probation officer called for a welfare check, believing Franco to be suicidal. The responding officers cuffed Franco and searched his bag, finding a psychedelic mushroom. The arrest was later ruled unconstitutional, and a jury awarded Franco $3.4 million for the ordeal— posthumously. Franco died by suicide while in a halfway house in 2020. The settlement was reduced to $2 million after negotiations between the parties. Per Boulder’s charter, council must approve any payment over $10,000. This is the third high-profile settlement stemming from BPD action in two years. Zayd Atkinson, confronted while picking up trash outside his home, was paid $125,000 in 2020, and Sammie Lawrence received $95,000 earlier this year after a forcible arrest by a police officer with a history of questionable force. NO E-BIKES FOR BOULDER Boulder will not follow Denver’s footsteps in providing residents rebates to buy e-bikes, a program that proved so popular that 3,250 people applied for 150 vouchers. The idea was first proposed by a member of the Transportation Advisory Board, and brought to council by member Matt Benjamin. l

But even he joined with his peers in voting against directing staff to stop work on existing bike- and pedfriendly projects to get a pilot program launched by September. “It does frustrate me a bit that our institution as a whole may lack the agility to take on things like this when the moment needs to be seized,” Benjamin said. There was widespread enthusiasm for the idea, though some on council questioned whether $100,000 would be better spent on bus or B-Cycle passes. Thread from the discussion: bit.ly/3HJtexs COUNCILS, QUICKLY Lafayette’s City Council passed a set of gun control measures, joining Boulder, Louisville and Superior. Longmont and Boulder County will take on the thorny issue later this year. Thread from Moms Demand Action volunteer: bit.ly/39Mhazc Boulder’s fire chief said ambulance response times should get faster within the next year or so, as more staff are trained as paramedics. Thread: bit.ly/3zWVCdS SUMMER SHIFT Council is on a two-week summer break. When they return, meetings will be moved to Thursday nights. The first post-summer, post-shift meeting is scheduled July 14, where elected officials will discuss doling out grants to nonprofits from Community, Culture, Safety and Resilience Tax revenues, and changes in council procedure. Emails: letters@boulderweekly.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


MORE DIVERSITY IN ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH Most people know that Alzheimer’s disease impacts a person’s memory, but they might not realize that it disproportionately affects older Black and Hispanic Americans versus older whites. Black Americans are about two times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s, and Hispanic Americans are about one and a half times more likely to develop the disease. Despite this, research projects have not included sufficient numbers of Blacks or Hispanics. This under-representation hinders research and limits our understanding about how an approved drug or diagnostic tool may affect the populations most likely to need them. There is an urgent need for more diversity in current and future research projects to ensure that advances in Alzheimer’s science benefit everyone. Congress is currently considering the Equity in Neuroscience and Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials (ENACT) Act. This bipartisan legislation would increase the participation of underrepresented populations in Alzheimer’s clinical trials by addressing existing shortcomings in existing research systems and processes. I want to thank Congressman Joe Neguse, Congressman Jason Crow and U.S. Senator Michael Bennet for showing their support for the ENACT Act by cosponsoring the bill. I ask the other members of our state’s congressional delegation to join them. We must do better, and we can do better. Thank you to those members of Congress who have already put those words into action for Coloradans living with Alzheimer’s. Jean Ruecker

believe only Elaina has the skill set to lead effectively. She will listen to the public and to subject matter experts at Boulder County and beyond. She will work collaboratively with the other two commissioners, staff, and the public to develop community centered solutions. Solutions for issues such as environmental protection, climate

action, community safety, and justice reform—Elaina’s priorities— need systemic change that can only come from building coalitions at all levels of government and engaging with the public in a meaningful way. That is the role of a County Commissioner, and working with Elaina, I have seen her do this effectively time and again.

Her background in meaningful systems change is rooted in identifying and addressing inequities with disproportionate impacts, so that everybody has the chance to thrive in Boulder County. She will listen, collaborate, and lead. Please join me in voting for Elaina Shively with your June primary ballot. Deb Gardner/Boulder Email: letters@boulderweekly.com

ELAINA SHIVELY FOR BOULDER COUNTY COMMISSIONER I am thrilled to support Elaina Shively for the office of Boulder County Commissioner. As a former commissioner myself, I am acutely aware of the critical issues facing our County. I have worked with both candidates in this election, and I BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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JUNE 23, 2022

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COURTESY OF JENA FOR COLORADO

Women secretaries of state face threats and harassment for battling election lies

hearings by a special congressional committee on the Jan. 6, 2021, attack, the ongoing realities of challenging those lies continue for these secretaries. These election officials back in 2020 debunked lies, myths and conspiracy theories about a presidential election that ultimately was deemed the most secure in U.S. history. Secretaries of state of both parties were subject to harassment for addressing disinformation (misleading information that is intentionally designed to cause harm to people) and misinformation (misleading information that is shared because a person truly believes it). But for the women secretaries of state serving in key battleground states—many of whom are Democrats—the work of combating inaccurate information made them targets for misogynistic harassment and threats of violence. In the lead-up to the nation’s next major election this year, some of these women secretaries say the harassment has not let up as they devote even more time to combating misinformation. Jena Griswold, the secretary of state in Colorado, said former President Donald Trump’s lies about his loss to President Joe Biden in 2020 led her office to be more focused on insider threats—concerns that some people now seeking to work in elections are doing so to overturn free and fair elections in the future. Griswold has also had to be more responsive to vitriol targeting election workers and “massive” misinformation. “I think a way to conceptualize it is that the former president of the United States tried to steal the presidency in 2020 and failed, but the actions on that failed attempt have not stopped. They’re now focused on 2022 and 2024,” she said. Griswold said her office has received numerous threats of violence since 2020, including death threats linked to misinformation. “Gender plays a major role. It plays a major role when you’re secretary of state. It plays a major role in your day-today—the threshold to be threatened for doing your job is much lower,” she said. New Mexico Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver, who just oversaw her state’s June 7 primary, launched a “Rumor vs. Reality” website aimed at fact-checking myths about her office’s election administration. “The point of having this site is it’s sort of a central clearinghouse for everything that we know about that is New Mexico specific and not New Mexico specific. Even if it’s like a macro-level conspiracy theory that potentially could influence voters in the state, we’re addressing that there too,” she said. Toulouse Oliver called the work of combating disinformation and misinformation, which has popped up at other secretary of state offices, necessary given the political

As discussion of falsehoods about the 2020 election and their deadly consequences are televised from Capitol Hill, states’ top election officials are grappling with inaccurate information—which can make them targets.

by Barbara Rodriguez, The 19th DETAILS: Colorado

Secretary of State Jena Griswold, as well as other female politicians, have been the target of misinformation, harassment and gender-based attacks from the right.

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n the spring of 2021, Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs was in public with staffers following a televised interview when the group spotted a man nearby. The man, according to Hobbs, began filming and following them. Hobbs’ staff was on high alert: Unbeknownst to the secretary at the time, that day her office had received a threat from an anonymous caller who said Hobbs “deserves to die.” The caller asked what the secretary was wearing to find her more easily. Hobbs’ staff did not know if the caller was the same man following them, but they pulled the secretary away just in case. “This guy ended up basically chasing me into the building,” Hobbs told The 19th. “We didn’t know who he was or who he was associated with. But that threat had come in and my staff knew about it. And it just all felt very attacking in a way that I don’t think would have happened to a man.” It’s been two years since secretaries of state were propelled into the public consciousness for running America’s elections—and pushing back against lies about the 2020 election’s legitimacy that ultimately led to an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. As falsehoods about that election and their deadly consequences go on display during JUNE 23, 2022

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


climate. The effort is bipartisan and includes some Republican secretaries of state. “We are in an almost completely different universe of just literally having to combat complete lies and falsehood that have no basis in reality,” she said. “We are still dealing with, almost two years later, the big lie and all of its various components.” In Colorado, Griswold pushed this year for a package of election bills, including one that would expand security requirements around voting equipment. “When election deniers threaten my life for safeguarding Colorado’s elections, it strengthens my resolve because I know I’m on the right side of history,” she said. It’s not just secretaries of state— the majority of election workers are women. It’s important to highlight ongoing threats toward that workforce, said Joanna Lydgate, cofounder and CEO of States United Democracy Center, a nonpartisan organization that advocates for advancing free, fair and secure elections. She said it’s important to highlight ongoing threats of harassment toward election workers to better protect them. Several states are considering legislation aimed at doing that and more. “The reason our democracy held in 2020 was because really good election officials on both sides of the aisle did the right thing. And now those very people are dealing with really unprecedented levels of harassment and threats just for doing their job,” she said. “The people who are making those threats don’t discriminate by political party, but we definitely do see them tap into all kinds of prejudice. So that puts people who’ve historically been targeted— whether it’s women, people of color, religious minorities—at greater risk.” Hobbs called the onslaught of misinformation about elections administration a challenge in her state. After the 2020 election, Arizona Republicans called for an audit; no credible evidence of widespread fraud was found. Since then, many GOP lawmakers have continued to point to discredited claims of voter fraud

in introducing new restrictions on voting laws. “We figured out early on in the 2020 cycle that misinformation was going to be a problem. And we had to get out in front of it, and we did everything we could to do that. But we’re still having to stay out in front of it,” said Hobbs, who is now running for governor. “It’s been a constant battle, and it’s one of the biggest challenges that we’re facing.” In Michigan, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson said in an interview last month with NBC News that she learned around the 2020 elections that Trump suggested she be arrested for treason and executed. A Trump spokesperson claimed Benson lied in the interview. Kristina Karamo, a Republican who is challenging Benson in the secretary of state race and has falsely claimed the 2020 election was rigged, said on social media that Benson is lying about threats against her life. Lucina Di Meco, who studies gendered disinformation around the world, is cofounder of #ShePersisted. She said women political leaders are often the target of harassment linked to accusations of being liars or untrustworthy. “We see this happening in a number of countries around the world, where misogyny is weaponized,” she said. Benson, who confirmed recently that she was interviewed by the U.S. House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection that has been linked to Trump’s lies about a stolen election, has talked publicly about taking on more security measures around her state’s elections, including asking state officials to investigate attempts to illegally gain access to voting equipment. There is no comprehensive data available to quantify the intersection of gender and misinformation. Much of it—and the gender-based attacks and harassment—spread

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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online. In April, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said it was creating a disinformation board and named Nina Jankowicz, an expert on disinformation and extremism and author of the book How to Be a Woman Online, to head it. But just a few weeks later, after Jankowicz was targeted for harassment and her work mischaracterized by attacks from the right online, the board was shut down, The Washington Post reported. As misinformation becomes a more serious threat to the

a lot of this misinformation more attractive for people to believe in. And so there is this entire gendered element that has gone pretty understudied in the past,” she said. Gowri Ramachandran, senior counsel for the Brennan Center for Justice, said legislators have the power to provide more funding to help election administrators protect themselves. The Brennan Center estimated recently that about $300 million could help election workers for the next five years, including to bulletCOURTESY OF JENA FOR COLORADO proof offices and shield their personal information. Among policy ideas that have floated around is enrolling election workers in programs that protect the identities of domestic violence survivors. “It’s sort of a coincidence that programs that are designed for domestic violence survivors who are primarily women, historically, that those are now seeming like attractive programs and useful programs for election officials, including secretaries of state and their staff,” she said. Di Meco said democracies around the world, including in the United States, risk losing a administration of elections, some generation of women political leaders researchers are trying to study the if there are not more concerted efforts effects of gender in the sharing of to challenge disinformation about misinformation. their work and the gendered attacks At the Center for an Informed aimed at discrediting them. Public at the University of She said while individual people Washington, researchers say they’re are advocating for state-level policy studying the gender dynamics of aimed at protecting election workers instances of “information attacks.” and launching debunking websites, The research, which is not complete more digital platform standards are yet, is expected to include the needed to protect gender rights and examination of social media accounts democracy. that include those of election officials. “We need to think beyond the Rachel Moran, a postdoctoral small solution of digital literacy and fellow at the center, said she wants to putting the burden on the individual examine whether more misinformation to try and fix the world,” she said. exists in places where there are women “We need to think instead about what holding positions of power within digital platforms can and should do. elections. Moran said other areas of Because this isn’t a problem that’s misinformation—around abortion, happening by chance. It’s happening gender-affirming care and COVID— by design. Those platforms are treat the study of gender as a variable designed to maximize hatred and instead of a key area. outrage, because those generate the “There’s this idea—this underlying most engagement.” misogynistic framework that makes Email: editorial@boulderweekly.com JUNE 23, 2022

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Udall says. “We need to offer [POW] members a way to take action … to be part of the solution.” That’s where Palmetto comes in. It offers a tangible way to take action right at home, to reduce your fossil fuel energy reliance and to invest in the future. The goal is to connect POW’s audience and members with Palmetto’s solar energy services, to educate and incentivize as many members of the outdoor state as possible to make the switch. “This partnership, for us, really sits at that intersection of all those things, and we’re so excited about it,” Udall says. Palmetto was founded in 2010 with the intention driving a wider adoption of renewable energy and to make it as affordable and accessible as possible. Palmetto sees a green “utility revolution” on the horizon, where our main energy sources are decentralized and renewable— sourced from the sun and wind. It’s a prophecy the company is determined to manifest. “Based on what Palmetto has deployed so far in terms of clean energy systems, it’s equivalent to [saving] 804 million miles driven on the road,” Jason Conrad, Palmetto’s vice president of product marketing, says, adding that’s equivalent to preventing 359 million pounds of coal from being burned. That’s considerable. And it directly equates to savings for homeowners as well. On average in the U.S., homeowners who install solar panels save about $1,500 a year on electricity—roughly $37,000 over the 25-year life of a solar panel. In Colorado, the average starting cost for a six kilowatt solar panel system is $17,000, for which owners receive a $4,446 federal tax rebate. They also increase the property value of a home by a national median of $9,274, according to Greenlancer. However, despite those savings, a lot of homeowners are deterred by solar’s perceived complexity, Conrad says. “The process of converting to clean energy is not as straightforward as it could be in the U.S.,” he admits, but “one of the biggest barriers to clean energy

Mobilizing the ‘outdoor state’

A Boulder nonprofit and an innovative solar company join forces to offer clean energy solutions to outdoor enthusiasts

by Will Brendza

J

eremy Jones was alarmed. The professional snowboarder was watching more and more ski areas closing early, or never even opening at all, because of a lack of snow. With each passing ski season Jones worried more about how climate change was going to affect his passion, his sport, his livelihood. So he decided to do something about it. In 2007 Jones founded Protect Our Winters (POW), a Boulder-based nonprofit dedicated to mobilizing the outdoor community on climate. Other pro athletes, dirtbags and die-hards quickly joined the cause to fight climate change and, as the organization’s name suggests, to protect our winters. POW’s done a lot to accomplish those goals in the years since Jones started it. In 2020 they reached over 33 million people through a non-partisan voting campaign and met with 32 Republican and Democratic congress members on the topic of climate change, advocating for grid transmission upgrades, promoting incentives for electric vehicles, phasing out fossil fuel subsidies and more. Now they’ve teamed up with Palmetto, a company leading the charge toward more efficient sources of renewable energy, to drive sustainability further, faster. It’s an effort that goes well beyond snow sports, says Torrey Udall, POW’s vice president of operations and finance. It’s an effort aimed at shifting American households off of fossil fuel energy by tapping into the ever-growing outdoor community—what POW refers to as the “outdoor state.” “We believe that outdoor state can really tip the balance on climate,” Udall says. By POW’s estimate, there are some 57 million people participating in climbing, biking, hiking, river sports and, of course, skiing and snowboarding—all of whom have good reasons to care about the environment. “78% of that community, of our audience, is conditioned to think, ‘What can I do in my own life [about climate change]?’”

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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adoption in the U.S. is really just a lack of understanding.” Conrad says there are generally three misperceptions that prevent people from pursuing solar energy on their own. A misperception of upfront costs, misperceptions surrounding financing options, and what he calls a general “mystification” of how complicated the whole process of designing, installing and maintaining a solar system is. Palmetto’s business model breaks those barriers down in three simple steps: First, they offer a solar savings estimate that calculates exactly how much solar potential your home’s roof has. Conrad explains Palmetto has rooftop data on 84% of the buildings in the U.S., and chances are, your home is one of them. Palmetto then does all of the specific design, engineering and permitting, and works with local solar providers to have the system installed for you. And finally, it provides ongoing support, monitoring and maintenance. Palmetto’s new partnership with POW connects it with a gigantic pool of environmentally minded outdoor enthusiasts, who may have never heard of Palmetto, but who want to know more about solar power. All POW members will receive a 10% discount on Palmetto’s solar services. And Palmetto will be conducting educational presentations at all of POW’s 2022 events, on solutions to address emissions. “It’s core to [POW’s] mission to work with brands to help accelerate the work and solutions on climate,” Udall says. “We get to work with someone whose business model is built on the idea that we need to get this technology to scale and then we get to offer our members a way to take action.” It’s all about incentivizing and mobilizing POW members to be part of the solution, Udall says. It’s directly in line with the mission Jones started POW with over 15 years ago: to make the outdoor state the nation’s most influential climate advocates. “We need all outdoor enthusiasts to join this effort,” Udall says. “The whole mission here is to help people understand that clean energy is not just people that have a lot of money. It’s not just for people that want to make a statement.” It’s for anyone who cares about the outdoors and the environment, he says. It’s something that everyone in the outdoor state should be prioritizing. Email the author at wbrendza@ boulderweekly.com.

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aperceived madness better losttotime In her debut novel, Denverite Nina Shope explores the terror of a woman diagnosed with hysteria

by Bart Schaneman

N

ot that long ago, women were diagnosed with hysteria, kept in asylums and subjected to all manner of strange medical procedures to “cure” them. It would be nice to say that society has advanced well beyond the days of tormenting women, says Denver-based author Nina Shope, “but we’re obviously still struggling to allow women to claim full autonomy over their bodies and their reproductive system, which is very depressing.” Set in a 19th-century Parisian hospital, Shope’s debut novel, Asylum, imagines the relationship between reallife patient Louise Augustine Gleizes and well-known French neurologist J.M. Charcot. Charcot made Augustine famous by publicly exhibiting her symptoms as hysteria while she was a patient at Salpêtrière Hospital in the 13th arrondissement. (According to contemporary diagnoses, Augustine’s symptoms were likely a result of posttraumatic stress disorder, brought about by sexual abuse as a young person.) Shope is quick to point out that this

layers of meaning and reference given

looking glasses that line the walls,

is not a book to read too quickly.

Shope says her layered style of writing is intentional. “What’s interesting are the books in which you can break down to the word level or the sentence level a paragraph, and there might be like three things going on at once,” she says. “You read the surface meaning and understand it, or you can kind of go back and delve into the resonances and the symbolism and associations.” She aims to

is thinking of Charcot: “You say, Augustine, your name is forth shining glass balls like those used by sailors to trap witching spirits, revolving mirrors borrowed from the bird catcher, magnets curved delicately in the middle of your palm. You ignite glittering beams spinning and scattering, catching in the antique

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COURTESY DZANC BOOKS

In lyrical, propulsive prose, Shope takes the reader deep into the shadows of both the institution where Augustine was held, and the characters she spent so much time contemplating. Here is a writer who pays careful attention to the quality of her language at the sentence level: “At times,” Shope writes in the novel, “it seems that (Augustine’s) dreams have dissolved matter itself and that (Charcot’s) tongue is stitching it back together, words spilling from his mouth like a thick skein of cloth. He picks at the edges of her slumber, trying desperately to make it unravel.” Shope’s writing operates with l

BOULDER COUNTY’S


put the reader in a situation where they must locate themselves, and “they’re almost overwhelmed by what’s going on and by the language.” “For example, the asylum becomes a character,” Shope says. “There’s a physicality of the body that gets overlapped with the buildings or the rooms or the apparatus.” Shope began thinking about this book as far back as 1998. She was in a women’s history class and read Elaine Showalter’s The Female Malady: Women, Madness and English Culture, 1830-1980. Augustine and read her story and became interested in it,” Shope says. At the time, Shope was having panic attacks and thought some of the symptoms overlapped with those of hysteria. “If I lived in a different era, who knows what I would have faced?” Shope says. “So then I started thinking about these women who were put in a situation and how they had to come to terms with that existence or make sense of it.” Through her panic attacks she related to Augustine’s hysteria diagnosis and what Shope calls a “fear of embodiment.” “When you have a panic attack your body frightens you,” she explains. “And it becomes a torment to be alone in your own body with those sensations.” Hysterics were thought to face a fear of abandonment and being alone with their symptoms, Shope says.

“So that dilemma was something I sympathized with, about how overwhelming it must have been,” she adds. Shope graduated with a master’s

ON THE BILL: Nina Shope will read from her debut novel, Asylum, on Thursday, June 23 at 6:30 p.m. at Boulder Bookstore, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Tickets are $5.

creative writing from Syracuse University in 2003. Since then she has published a novella and now this novel, which was published after winning the 2020 Dzanc Prize for Fiction. For inspiration and source material, Shope consulted Georges DidiHuberman’s Invention de l’hystérie: Charcot et l’iconographie photographique de la Salpêtrière. At the time there was no English translation available, so she translated the entire text on her own. “And I only took French in high school,” Shope says, “so it was a really long process in and of itself. But it also fully immersed me in the language and the ideas of the book.” She considered trying to publish the translation, but by the time she was done with her own someone else

Five to read

ive books for people who like strange, experimental writing by women writers, as suggested by Nina Shope. The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman by Angela Carter. “This novel might be a bit harder for some readers to ‘get

F

A city is under siege by the maniacal Doctor Hoffman, who is waging a Reality War and inundating the world with mirages. It features stereoscopic viewing machines, doppelgangers, peep shows, and the most grotesque brothel imaginable. “ The Fan Maker’s Inquisition by Rikki Ducornet. “A gorgeously imagined novel that weaves together the Marquis de Sade, the colonization and destruction of the Maya Indians, and a young fanmaker who creates sensual works of art in the midst of the French Revolution.” My Mother’s House and Sido by Colette. “These two short books (joined in one volume) by Colette contain some of the most beautiful, lush prose written, and the description of her garden,

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

had published one. In the afterword to Asylum Shope writes, “Like the ‘protean’ disease of hysteria, in which patients were known to usurp and appropriate the gestures, words, and identities of others, my novel absorbs and contains ideas, quotations, section titles, and metaphors from the source material I used.” Shope says at one point she had 1,200 fragments for the book with no order whatsoever. She worked with her sister, Nikki, who is her primary editor, to arrange the pieces into a cohesive text. “It took an ungodly number of drafts to find the primary arc of the book,” she says. “(Nikki’s) a great reader. And I owe her much thanks for my first book, my second book, and the next ones to come.” Email: editorial@boulderweekly.com

her connection to nature, pets, and her mother and daughter are completely immersive and engrossing. If you are a poetic sort, this is a must read.” Cruddy by Lynda Barry. “A brilliant, extremely funny, heartbreaking novel, a sort of modern Grimm’s fairytale (a deeply violent and grotesque one) narrated by the incredible teenager Roberta, whose parents are living nightmares, whose ‘friends’ are a strange contingent of doomed oddballs, and whose tale of a murderous road trip with her father will haunt you long after you The Ten Thousand Things by Maria Dermoût. “Written in 1958 and reissued by The New York Review of Books, this novel is another exquisitely written book, and if you have ever been fascinated and entranced by a relative’s cabinet of curiosities or by some strange item seen as a child in your grandmother’s house, this book captures that sense of magic, obsession, and mystery.” l

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S U N D AY J U N E 2 6 T W O S H O W S O N LY BUFFALO ROSE presents

A N I N T I M AT E E V E N I N G W I T H

Contemporary Jazz . Triple Grammy Nominated first us tour since 2019 Show 1: 4.00pm - 5:30pm

Show 2: 7.30pm - 9:00pm

Tickets starting at $45 for G.A. Preferred Seating and Reserved Tables Available.

Tickets available at: www.buffalorosegolden.com 1119 Washington Ave. Golden, CO 80401 720-638-5597 www.buffalorosegolden.com 16

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June 23-26

Featuring comics from Late Night and Comedy Central along side local headliners. The festival highlights women and diversity in comedy. Shows are at Tilt, License No. 1, Finkle and Garf, Front Range Brewing, Dairy Arts and Tiki on Main. Tickets at BoulderComedyFestival.com l

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


An icy expedition

DETAILS: Sensing Ice: Explorations of Knowing Nature. The Jerry Crail Johnson Earth Sciences & Map Library, 2200 Colorado Ave., Boulder. Through Dec. 29.

CU Boulder doctoral graduate Chris Dunn’s glacial photography reflects his way of weaving art and philosophy into a crowded climate conversation

by Ben Berman

C

hris Dunn stood on the edge of a melting glacier on the icy shores of Greenland, the wind whipping his face while frostbite-inducing currents raced in the gaping fjords beneath him. The philosopher and environmental researcher felt a wide range of emotions about the journey that led him to this remote spot. “I would call [Greenland] the loneliest, wildest place I’ve ever been,” Dunn says. “It felt so isolating, and there was a background fear the whole time. Like, ‘Gosh, I can’t wait till this ends,’ but also, ‘What’s just around the corner?’ It’s this complex mixture of wonder and fear and accomplishment.” When Dunn returned to Boulder, he sought a way to translate these intangible emotions into a work that would convey his feelings toward this landscape in a very real way for others—a tall order, given the challenge of trying to fully immerse someone in a place that’s not only unfamiliar to them, but entirely otherworldly. For Dunn, the presentation, produced by CU Boulder’s Nature, Environment, Science & Technology Studio for the Arts, was about creating a “direct, embodied sensation” for others—in other words, crafting a space that would allow them to see the vast peaks and valleys surrounding these glaciers, hear the cracking and straining of melting ice sheets, and parse through enhance understanding of these glaciers’ size, scope and current conditions in an ever-warming climate. This is the meat and bones of Dunn’s Sensing Ice, Explorations Of Knowing Nature, a multimedia exhibit currently displayed at CU Boulder’s Earth and Map Science Library. collected by Dunn, the exhibit features on-site music and recordings from Alaskan composer Matthew Burtner. These elements, according to Dunn, combine to create a primarily artistic and philosophical experience, rather than one geared toward educating about climate science. Establishing a strong sense of place was a key component of this project, an inspirational model Dunn drew from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, which weaves environmentalism and BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

CHRIS DUNN

going in with a sense of how they’re going to approach the world. Essentially, they’re going to measure certain things, or observe certain things systematically, or they have certain hypotheses in mind already. But there’s something that happens once you leave the

philosophy. “What I’m trying to do is create a place for humanities research and perspectives within these places that are completely dominated by the sciences almost entirely,” Dunn says. For Dunn, this was the crux of his academic foundation, as he completed a master’s in philosophy from the University of Montana before moving to CHRIS DUNN Boulder to pursue a doctorate in environmental studies, a program he completed in late 2021. Throughout his years researching and working as everything from a backcountry ranger to a freelance photographer, Dunn made a striking realization. “The world needs more humanities research alongside especially “in places that are often exclusively visited and researched by scientists.” Dunn’s journey in Greenland and the resulting product of Sensing Ice seeks to get at the heart of this issue, where, in this day and age of polarizing climate rhetoric, pressing ideas are often misinformation, rather than artistic works that appeal to people’s emotions in a positive way. to places, and they are attentive to those places, but in a very different way,” Dunn says. “They’re already l

JUNE 23, 2022

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strips away all the experience of a sensation. And that place is kind of lost altogether.” Thus, Dunn’s work seeks to create a new world, one in which “humanities aren’t just in service of the sciences.” Throughout Sensing Ice sounds and emotions evoked by witnessing these primordial sheets of ice, rather than bogging down an audience in facts they may already know. “I’m not trying to preach to the choir,” Dunn admits, alluding to Boulder’s progressive population that Dunn trusts with preexisting familiarity and involvement with climate activism. So, Sensing Ice wasn’t crafted as a product of pure science communication, much less science activism. However, Dunn recognizes that exhibiting a work of art related to melting glaciers in 2022 is sure to garner the easy assumption that it is. “Any art can move beyond the intent of the creator, creating a project as immersive as this one has purpose beyond evoking raw, philosophical emotion. For Dunn, putting these massive, immovable natural landscapes on display may offer a fresh perspective for those looking to fully grasp the impact the anthropocene era may have on these remote locations, no matter how much we assure ourselves these icy monuments can stand the test of time. “To solve really complex problems, especially environmental issues, you need to be looking at it in a variety of ways,” Dunn says. “I really do think that this approach is a big, important piece that needs to be part of the (climate) conversation because I do think it actually can and should affect real world decisions.” “It is pretty cool, though, when on an isolated ridge in what feels like the middle of nowhere, to wonder if anyone has set foot there, but never knowing for the landscape itself is left in such a condition that it isn’t evident. I think that we need to continue to keep some places that way.” Email: editorial@boulderweekly.com 17


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UPCOMING CONCERTS and EVENTS at DOG HOUSE MUSIC PRESENTS

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“THE PRINCE TRIBUTE” ALT ROCK NIGHT “ALICE IN CHAINS TRIBUTE”

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live entertainment, special events, great food and drinks

Nissi’s Entertainment Venue & Event Center 1455 Coal Creek Drive Unit T • Lafayette Get your tickets @ www.nissis.com 18

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


E VENTS

EVENTS

Author Talk: Stacy Gold—‘Wild at Heart’

5 p.m. Friday, June 24, The Read Queen, 129 N. Harrison Ave., Louisville, thereadqueen.com Meet outdoor adventure athlete and romance author Stacy Gold at The Read Queen for a book talk and signing of her new book, Wild at Heart, which features a man with no backpacking experience, and a woman with plenty, hitting the trail separately. When Mother Nature keeps shoving them in each other’s paths, with one of them usually

If your organization is planning an event, please email the editor at crockett@boulderweekly.com

Boulder Comedy Festival

June 23-26, venues around Boulder County, bouldercomedyfestival. com

Decadent Decades Silent Disco

9 p.m.-2 a.m. Friday, June 24, DV8 Distillery, 2480 49th St., Suite E, Boulder. Tickets: $15-$20, dv8.fun

PHOTO

Teton Gravity Research presents ‘Esperanto’

Festival brings together incredible comedians and all the beauty and adventure that the Boulder area has to offer, creating an experience not to be missed. The Festival brings focus to and highlights women and diversity in comedy. Nationally touring comics featured on winners and local comedians to create a sea of hilarity at venues

6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 23, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, Tickets: $20, z2ent.com/bouldertheater-venue Esperanto, Teton Gravity Research’s latest mountain biking

8-9:15 p.m. Friday, June 24, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Tickets: $17, thedairy.org

ride through the West, following some of the biggest rock stars in professional mountain biking, and exploring how we share our dreams

game shows are now live, and, best of all, you can even play—with the best host in town, Rion Evans, guiding the way, and sets that look real. Bring your family and friends to play against or to

Game Show Night with Rion Evans

see EVENTS Page 20

For more event listings, go online at boulderweekly.com/events

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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E VEN T S

EVENTS

EVENTS from Page 19 JUST ANNOUNCED

JUST ANNOUNCED

JUL 23 .............................................................................. CYCLES + SQUEAKY FEET JUL 30 ............................................................................................ DEEZY LE PHUNK AUG 26 ............................................................................................. SULLIVAN KING SEP 17 ................................................... GOV’T MULE (FOX 30TH ANNIVERSARY) OCT 19 .................................................................................... MAKAYA MCCRAVEN

OCT 1 .................................................................................................... JULIAN LAGE OCT 15 .............................................................................................................. MUNA OCT 26 ................................................................................................ TEDDY SWIMS

THU. JUN 23 TUE. JUN 28 MEET & LIVE TOUR IN USA

GOLDEN CHILD FRI. JUL 1

TETON GRAVITY RESEARCH: ESPERANTO SUN. JUL 17 OUTBACK PRESENTS

88.5 KGNU, WESTWORD & MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY PRESENT

MOUNTAIN ROSE

SOLSATELLITE, THE GREEN HOUSE BAND SAT. JUL 2 ROOSTER & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

SAL VULCANO LIVE SAT. JUL 23 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

JAMES MCMURTRY JONNY BURKE

THE EXPENDABLES

WED. AUG 3

FRI. JUL 15

LOCAL NATIVES

A-MAC & THE HEIGHT, P-NUCKLE

JORDANA

DAB RECORDS PRESENTS

COLORADO’S FINEST UNDERGROUND HIP HOP

FEAT. LANDON WORDSWELL & THE DON AVELAR/MCAD OF FREEDOM MOVEMENT, VOZ-11, INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, OSCIFY, SAV, ROBIN SAMPLES, TMC! & TONE ET SAT. JUL 16 ROOSTER PRESENTS

STEELY DEAD COOL SHADE

THU. AUG 4

SON VOLT

JACK BROADBENT FRI. AUG 5 88.5 KGNU PRESENTS

LES CLAYPOOL’S BASTARD JAZZ

FEAT. STANTON MOORE, MIKE DILLON, SKERIK 50 YEARS OF MUSIC

88.5 KGNU PRESENTS: KING OF THE BEACH TOUR

WAVVES

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL GREG SCHOCHET & LITTLE AMERICA

BOYO, SMUT

SUN. AUG 14

SUN. JUL 31

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

ROOSTER PRESENTS

INNER WAVE MON. AUG 1

JERRY GARCIA’S 80TH BIRTHDAY PARTY

FEAT. A VERY JERRY BAND, DAVE & MATT ABEAR, CHRIS SHELDON, BILL MCKAY, WSG EVAN JONES (BOBBY) TUE. AUG 2

BOMBINO

SELASEE & THE FAFA FAMILY WED. AUG 31 88.5 KGNU PRESENTS

HIATUS KAIYOTE SAT. SEP 24 FALL TOUR 2022

TWO FEET TUE. OCT 4

GARCIA PEOPLES

RY X

WED. AUG 3

WED. OCT 5

JACK BARTON ENTERTAINMENT & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT: JBE TRIPLE A SUMMITFEST

INVIOLATE TOUR

CHARLEY CROCKETT, SAM FENDER, NIKKI LANE

STEVE VAI

THU. AUG 4

HERE COME THE MUMMIES

SAT. OCT 8 THE PYRAMID SCREAM TOUR

JACK BARTON ENTERTAINMENT & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT: JBE TRIPLE A SUMMITFEST

PAOLO NUTINI, DELTA SPIRIT, MYRON ELKINS FRI. AUG 5

An Afternoon with Dorothy Wickenden

3-4:30 p.m. Sunday, June 26, Stewart Auditorium, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Free registration is available at longmontmuseum.org or by calling 303-651-8374. A special program with Dorothy Wickenden, executive editor of The New Yorker, as she discusses her latest book, The Agitators. Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders, assistant professor of African American history at CU Boulder, will join Wickenden in the conversation to discuss the themes of her new book, including abolition, women’s rights, and Harriet Tubman’s friendship with Martha Wright and Frances Seward. The program will be followed by a book signing with books for sale at the museum gift shop.

SPECIAL GUEST SAXSQUATCH FRI. OCT 14

Author Talk: Zoe Hana Mikuta—‘Godslayers’

6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 28, Boulder Bookstore, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Tickets: $5, boulderbookstore.net Zoe Hana Mikuta will speak about and sign her new book, Godslayers, the high-octane sequel to last year’s Gearbreakers. With the rebellion with an insidious plan to begin inducting Badlands children into a new Windup Pilot program, the odds have never been more stacked against victory will depend on whether Eris back to each other from opposite sides of a war. Godslayers is perfect for fans of , Pierce Brown’s , and Marie Lu’s Legend series.

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

GASOLINE LOLLIPOPS THE RIVER ARKANSAS

EIVØR

EMILY JANE WHITE

TUE. OCT 25

THU. AUG 11

GRAHAM NASH - AN INTIMATE EVENING OF SONGS AND STORIES

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

88.5 KGNU PRESENTS

LOVING SYLVIE

NOV 8 ...................................................... CHARLES LLOYD OCEAN TRIO

FRI. AUG 12

RED FANG

BELL WITCH & AERIAL RUIN: STYGIAN BOUGH, HELP AUG 13 ................................ THE PAMLICO SOUND + THE BURROUGHS AUG 20 .............................................................................. THE DISTRICTS SEP 1 ...................................................................................... VISTA KICKS SEP 2 .................................................................... JAMESTOWN REVIVAL SEP 3 ................................................................................. 22 & GOOD 4 U

20

3-9 p.m. Saturday, June 25, Cottonwood Square, 7960 Niwot Road, Niwot. Free

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

SAT. AUG 13

FRI. JUL 29

Niwot Jazz Festival

INSIDE AN HOURGLASS TOUR

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2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

JUNE 23, 2022

‘Emma! A Pop Musical

June 25-July 3, The Spark, 4847 Pearl St., Unit B4, Boulder. Tickets: $18$28, thesparkcreates.org Emma, a senior at Highbury Prep, is certain she knows what’s best for her sophomore Harriet by the end of the school year. But will Emma’s relentless Austen’s classic novel, this new musical features the hit songs of legendary girl groups and iconic female singers from The Supremes to Katy Perry.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


EVENTS

LIVE MUSIC FRIDAYS!

CONCERTS

Show starts at 7pm NO COVER Happy Hour drink specials 4-6pm

MOORS & MCCUMBER, PHOTO BY RICH RYAN

Trivia Night Every Wednesday at 7pm Win a $50 bar tab

2355 30th Street • Boulder, CO tuneupboulder.com

RED EARTH CYCLES

FRIDAY, JUNE 24

Ms Amy—The Jet Set. 5 p.m. Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Boulder. Tickets: $10 cover Mad Dog Blues. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette. Tickets: $10-20

SATURDAY, JUNE 25

Many Mountains. 6 p.m. Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Boulder. Tickets: Free Annie Booth Sextet CD Release concert party. 6 p.m. Caffe Sole, 637R S. Boulder Road, Boulder. Tickets: $18 suggested cover Veronica May. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette. Tickets: $5-20 Chris Stapleton. 7 p.m. Ball Arena, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Tickets: $91+. Second show on June 26. Kamasi Washington. 8 p.m. Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Tickets: $49.95

SUNDAY, JUNE 26

Jake Leg. 5 p.m. Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Boulder. Tickets: Free

MONDAY, JUNE 27

Keb’ Mo’ with Anthony D’Amato. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua

Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Tickets: $47.00 - $65.00

TUESDAY, JUNE 28

FACE. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s Entertainment Venue & Event Center, 1455 Coal Creek Drive, Unit T, Lafayette. Tickets: $25-30

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Fleet Foxes. 7:30 p.m. Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop St., Denver. Tickets: $55-$99.50 Golden Child. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Tickets: $49-$69

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29

Moors & McCumber. 6 p.m. Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Boulder. Tickets: $25 cover Santana + Earth, Wind & Fire. 7 p.m. Ball Arena, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Tickets: $39.50+

THURSDAY, JUNE 30

Peter Stoltzman Quartet. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette. Tickets: $10-20 Takács Quartet Plays John Adams’ ‘Absolute Jest.’ 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Tickets: $25-$75

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Beyond binary

Kaleidoscopic plurality in ‘Neptune Frost’

by Michael J. Casey

I Boulder’s Local Music Shop Since 1971

through the sky. Any relationship to reality is purely intentional. Writer/director/composer/rapper Saul Williams conceived Neptune Frost graphic novel and musical in 2013, then as the studio album MartyrLoserKing in 2016,

Shop online at hbwoodsongs.com for no contact pickup or free local delivery (on purchases over $20). Open to customers or for pick-up with these hours of operations: Mon.-Fri. 10am - 6pm, Sat. 10am - 5pm, Sun. 12pm-4pm

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303.449.0516

t opens in an African coltan mine. Black bodies dig through the rocks for precious metals. “Metal precious currency,” the narrator intones. “Third and First world currency. Black market currency… That old black-bodied currency.” Men with guns demand the workers dig. Later, a character will draw a parallel between these workers and all workers—past and present, nameless, faceless, personless—with robots. Servants in the purest sense. “All you pay not to see.” But in Neptune Frost, you pay to see it all, though this is no documentary. Neptune Frost is a kaleidoscopic futuristic musical about a group of hacktivist rebels led by an intersex

hbwoodsongs.com

The Dairy Arts Center presents

M u s i c a l Va n g u a r d s

and cinematographer Anisia Uzeyman. If that sounds like a twisty way to the big screen, it makes perfect sense in Neptune Frost. It’s a movie of many layers: Not all of them stack neatly, but none of them are boring. Back to those mines: Tekno (Robert Ninteretse) has discovered coltan among the rocks—it’s the base mineral powering your smartphone, computer, tablet, what-have-you. Tekno holds the mineral high in the sky in worship, and one of the guards strikes him dead. Tekno’s brother, and enter the world. That’s where he crosses paths with ON THE BILL: Neptune (Elvis Ngabo and Cheryl Isheja) and navigates Neptune Frost is now a world that has pushed past ancient and futuristic, playing in limited technological and organic, male and female. Binary may release. be the language of computers, but those reductive ones and zeros have no place here. Neptune Frost: Kinyarwanda, Kirundi, Swahili, French and English, each one furthering the plurality Williams and Uzeyman are clearly celebrating. The dialog has the subtlety of a manifesto. The images are as muted as a Day-glo hunter’s jacket.

John Pizzarelli must do a bang-up job garbling facial recognition programs. It’s unclear how far in the future Neptune Frost is set, but the designs feel like technology has advanced to the point where it’s become organic. Neptune and Matalusa’s rebels incorporate e-waste into every aspect of their clothing, makeup and hair. Matalusa wears a vest of keyboard keys, Neptune has computer chip piercings, and copper wires are woven through just about everyone’s locs. When one revolutionary is injured, another says, simply, “The motherboard’s been damaged.” When an arm is severed, a new one is fashioned from discarded computer parts. All of it is colorful, all of it vibrant. And all of it is fascinating. Neptune Frost is direct—characters address the camera Ariel Posen

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be playing on eternally just off-camera. What a full world, Williams and Uzeyman seem to be saying. A pity to reduce it. For more movie reviews, tune into After Image Fridays at 3 p.m., on KGNU: 88.5 FM and online at kgnu.org. Email questions or comments to editorial@boulderweekly.com l

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


by Rob Brezsny ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: In her poem “Two Skins,” Bahamanian writer Lynn Sweeting writes, “There is a moment in every snake’s life when she wears two skins: one you can see, about to be shed, one you cannot see, the skin under the skin, waiting.” I suspect you now have metaphorical resemblances to a snake on the verge of molting, Aries. Here’s a tip: The snake’s old skin doesn’t always just fall away; she may need to take aggressive action to tear it open and strip it off, like by rubbing her head against a rock. Be ready to perform a comparable task.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: “Imagine a world 300 years from now,”

writes Japanese novelist Minae Mizumura, “a world in which not only the best-educated people but also the brightest minds and the deepest souls express themselves only in English. Imagine the world subjected to the tyranny of a singular ‘Logos.’ What a narrow, pitiful, and horrid world that would be!” Even though I am primarily an English speaker, I agree with her. I don’t want a world purged of diversity. Don’t want a monolithic culture. Don’t want everyone to think and speak the same. I hope you share my passion for multiplicity, Taurus—especially these days. In my astrological opinion, you’ll thrive if you immerse yourself in a celebratory not usually exposed to.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Imagine you’re not a person, but a medley of four magical ingredients. What would they be? A Gemini baker named Jasmine says, “ripe persimmons, green hills after a rain, a sparkling new Viking Black Glass Oven, and a prize-winning show horse.” A Gemini social worker named Amarantha says she would be made of “Florence and the Machine’s song ‘Sky Full of Song,’ a grove of birch trees, a blue cashmere knee-length sweater, and three black cats sleeping in the sun.” A Gemini delivery driver named Altoona says, “freshly harvested cannabis buds, a bird-loving wetlands at twilight, Rebecca Solnit’s book Hope in the Darkness Maui.” And now, Gemini, what about you? Identify your medley of four magical ingredients. The time is right to re-imagine the poetry of YOU.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: Filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard believes

wherever it takes you. When you do that, Godard says, you have no need or urge to ask questions like “Why am I here?” or “What is my purpose?” The richness of your story is the ultimate response to every enigma. That’s an intensely vibrant way to live. Personally, I’m not able to sustain it all the time. But I think most of us now and then.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: I asked Leo readers to provide their

insights about the topic “How to Be a Leo.” Here are responses that line up with your current astrological omens. 1. People should try to understand you’re only 2. Be alert for the intense shadows you may cast with your intense brightness. Consider the possibility that even if they seem iffy or dicey, they have value and even blessings to offer. —Cannarius Kansen. 3. Never break your own heart. Never apologize for showering yourself with kindness and adoration. —Amy Clear. 4. At the moment of orgasm, scream out your own name. —Bethany Grace

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: It’s your birthright as a Virgo to become potential to detect opportunities coalescing in the midst of trouble. You can develop a knack for spotting the order that’s hiding in the chaos. Now is a time when

you should wield these skills with artistry, my dear— everyone whose lives you touch.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: One of my heroes died in 2021: the

italize her name). She was the most imaginative and independent-minded activist I knew. Till her last day, she articulated one-of-a-kind truths about social justice; she maintained her uncompromising originality. But it wasn’t easy. She wrote, “No insurgent intellectual, no dissenting critical voice in this society escapes the pressure to conform. We are all vulnerable. We can all be had, co-opted, bought. There is no special grace that rescues any of us. There is only a constant struggle.” I bring this to your attention, Libra, because I suspect the coming weeks will require your strenuous efforts to remain true to your high standards and unique vision of reality.

Call 720.253.4710 All credit cards accepted No text messages

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: You now have the power to make your-

self even more beautiful than you already are. You are your way. I trust you understand I’m not referring to the kinds of beauty that are worshiped by conventional wisdom. Rather, I mean the elegance, allure, charm, and grace that you behold in old trees and gorgeous architecture and enchanting music and people with soulful idiosyncrasies. PS: The coming weeks will also for yourself.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: It’s the Season for Expressing Your Love—and for expanding and deepening the ways you express your love. I invite you to speak the following quotes to the right person: 1. “Your head is a living forest full of songbirds.” —E. E. Cummings. 2. “Lovers continuously reach each other’s boundaries.” —Rainer Maria Rilke, 3. “You’re my favorite unfolding story.” — Ann Patchett. 4. “My lifetime listens to yours.” — Muriel Rukeyser.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: In the coming weeks, make sure you do Haruki Murakami: “You’re seeking something, but at the same time, you are running away for all you’re worth.” that, dear Capricorn, now is a good time to clear away your confusion. If you are in some sense undercutting yourself, perhaps unconsciously, now is the time to expose your inner saboteur and seek the necessary

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: A Tweeter named Luxuryblkwomen articulates one of her ongoing goals: “bridging the gap between me and my ideal self, one day at a time.” I’d love it if you would adopt a similar aspiration in the coming months. You’re going to be exceptionally skilled at all types of bridge-building, including the kind that connects you to the hero you’ll be in the future. I mean, you are already a hero in my eyes, but I know you will version of your best self. Now is a favorable time to do the holy work of forging stronger links to that star-to-be.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: A blogger named Lissar suggests that

the cherry blossom is an apt symbol for you Pisceans. She describes you as “transient, lissome, blooming, lovely, fragile yet memorable and recurring, in tune with nature.” Lissar says you “mystify yet charm,” and that your “presence is a balm, yet awe-inspiring and moving.” Of course, like all of us, you also have your share of less graceful qualities. And that’s not a bad thing! We’re all here to learn the art of growing into our ripe selves. It’s part of the fun of being alive. But I suspect that in the coming weeks, you will be an extra close match for Lissar’s description.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Grill cheese NOT grilled cheese Skip the brats and sizzle up some halloumi, paneer and panela for summer feasts

by John Lehndorff

P

ay attention. A light bulb (preferably a low-energy LED bulb) will go on over your head when you

All hail Halloumi: Halloumi

SIZZLIN’ SKEWERS: Try

Cheese in Fames: kefalotyri well in the form of saganaki

on a griddle, not on a grill. Tandoor-roasted or Saagsimmered:

Other Sizzling Cheeses: Feta First: raclette. Baja-style Cheese Taco: The queso panela,

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JUNE 23, 2022

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


frico Finding Cheeses:

JOHN LEHNDORFF

Where the Giant Cupcake Lives

Local Food News

Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue

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Hope to see you soon!

John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles every Thursday morning on Boulder’s community radio station, KGNU (88.5 FM, streaming at kgnu.org). Email him at nibbbles@boulderweekly.com BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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AMERICAN PIE: Local bakers will throw down for Jamestown’s cake and pie contest this Fourth of July.

by John Lehndorff

JOHN LEHNDORFF

Taste of the Week: Tacos built with flavor

T

aco Tuesday has become highly competitive. There are so many Boulder County restaurants serving what are labeled “authentic” Mexican street tacos, I checked in with Pepe and Veronica Diaz at Tierra Y Fuego Taqueria in North Boulder to refresh my tastebuds with the real, scratch-made deal. The couple’s nearby Diaz Farm supplies some of the fresh produce featured in the fare. My mouth was very happy about the pancita taco I started with. Soft corn tortillas brightened with mango habanero salsa. On the side: Mexican rice and black beans topped with cheese. Equally

with grilled chicken thighs marinated in lime juice, onions and spices. Sprinkled on top is a smooth avocado jalapeno salsa. Tierra y Fuego’s cheese enchiladas caught the attention of my guest, who enjoyed two cheese enchiladas with chicken smothered in house-made red and mole sauces. We were happy to add warm tortilla chips and freshly made guacamole. Other menu items at the restaurant include grilled camarones a la parrilla with lengua— quesadillas, tortas, gorditas and burritos. The meatless menu star is Diaz’s zesty potatoes and carrots in green chile sauce. Wash the heat away with an iced glass of horchata or hibiscus aguas frescas.

Boulder Recipe Flashback: A simple salad

1/4 cup pine nuts, lightly toasted 1/3 cup diced red onion 2 tablespoons herbes de Provence mixture (or other green herbs) Gorgonzola Dressing: 1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/2 cup crumbled Gorgonzola cheese 1/4 cup diced fresh shallots Salt and black pepper, to taste

B

efore it became known as Cheese Importer’s Warehouse, with Colorado’s largest selection of cheeses in one place, the Longmont food company was known as Willow River Cheese. The company wholesaled diverse cheeses to Boulder County eateries and stores. In the late 1990s, Willow River shared a simple salad recipe requested by a fan. Willow River Gorgonzola Salad 1 16-ounce jar plain artichoke hearts, drained 1/2 cup oil-cured black olives, drained 1/2 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes

Mix salad ingredients in a bowl. Combine dressing ingredients, toss with salad, refrigerate and serve.

Where are Boulder County’s farm stands?

W

e are assembling a comprehensive guide to local roadside farm and food stands. Please E-mail information about farm stands including hours, offerings and a detailed location to: nibbles@boulderweekly.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Culinary Calendar: Pie on the Fourth

T

he Denver Botanic Garden has reopened its authentic Japanese Tea House for tea ceremonies weekends through September. Reservations: botanicgardens.org … Keystone’s Bacon and Bourbon Festival, June 25-26, features a wide range of bacon dishes paired with various bourbons. Details: keystonefestivals.com. ... Jamestown hosts its annual cake and pie contests during the mountain town’s Fourth of July celebration. Pies may be fruit, berry or nut. No cream-based or meringue pies. They don’t hold up in the heat. Entry forms are due June 30 and pies and cakes must be delivered by 10 a.m. on July 4. Registration: bit.ly/3OBZmWm or call Lynnie Middledorf at 303-444-0419.

The Big Spent Grain Bakeoff

I

n order for Colorado’s Front Range to become the epicenter of the American craft brew renaissance, dozens of breweries had to tap endless kegs for many years. To make all those tasty ales, brewers cook tons of barley, rice and wheat, which results in a veritable mountain of spent grain. Much of it goes to feed livestock and some is simply composted. Spent grain—basically hot whole grain cereal—is still quite tasty and nutritious. Through the month of June, Arvada’s LUKI Brewery has hosted a Spent Grain Bake-off—and there’s still time to get in on the game. To compete, bring a 1-gallon zippered bag to get spent grain on a brewing day. Freeze it if you won’t be baking with it immediately. Entries—along with recipes—are due to the brewery Thursday, June 30 at 9 p.m. Entries will be judged July 1 by brewery staff and staff dogs for three categories: Bread, Not Bread, Dog Treats. Details: lukibrew.com

Send information about Boulder County and Colorado food and drink events, classes, festivals, farm dinners, farm stands and tastings to: nibbles@boulderweekly.com. JUNE 23, 2022

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The cannabis war rages on

California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s recent promise to crack down on illegal cannabis grows in his state. Even though cannabis is legal there, California is still the largest source of black market cannabis, producing roughly 80% of all marijuana illegally sold in the US (see, Weed Between the Lines, “Fighting the dark side of cannabis,” Dec. 23, 2021). “The illicit market growers in (California) aren’t just producing cannabis for the state of California,” he says. “Most of them are producing cannabis that’s destined for well beyond the borders of California.” That black market cannabis is heading to Idaho, Wyoming, South Dakota, Tennessee, South Carolina and other states still enforcing prohibition. Which likely wouldn’t change for decades even if the federal government decriminalized cannabis tonight. “At the end of the day, what’s being discussed at the federal level are plans to remove cannabis from its federal schedule

how they wanted to legalize alcohol consumption. Some states chose to remain dry for decades afterwards— Mississippi, the last state to repeal its prohibition laws, didn’t do so until 1966. It will be the same, should the federal government ever end the prohibition of cannabis, Armentano says. It could be even worse, he adds, since the prohibition of alcohol only lasted 13 years, and the history of cannabis prohibition is over 100 years old in this country. We have entire bureaucratic institutions built around the prohibition of cannabis (looking at you, DEA). The U.S. has a lot of baggage surrounding the prohibition of this plant; from social stigma to workplace discrimination and Reaganera propaganda that’s all been ingrained over generations. Simply spending large sums of taxpayers dollars to increase cannabis arrests by 32% and stings by 22% isn’t going to solve that problem. Like a hydra, more black market producers will show up to replace the ones that go to jail. As long as there’s a demand that isn’t

thereby leave the decisions with regard to the legal status of cannabis up to each individual state,” Armentano points out. If (or hopefully when) the feds do that, those holdout states will probably come around to legalizing cannabis in some form eventually. “But it’s not going to all happen at once,” he says. “There are still going to be jurisdictions in this country where there remains a high public demand for cannabis, but where cannabis still remains an illicit commodity to produce and to sell within the borders of that state.” Armantano likens it to the prohibition of alcohol.

market, there’s always going to be illicit producers clamoring to meet it with their own supply. However, short of the U.S. government going into every state and demanding that their legislatures legalize cannabis, that’s not a problem that’s ever going to be treated at its source. “The black market can certainly be disrupted, but the black market is not going to go away entirely, certainly not in an environment where we have a patchwork system, where in some states this is a legal commodity, and in other states it still is not,” Armantano says.

Marijuana arrests spiked dramatically in 2021 as authorities crack down on a black market that isn’t going nowhere

by Will Brendza

I

t’s a nice thought to imagine the end of the cannabis prohibition being a single event. It would

across the U.S. People would be released from prison for nonviolent cannabis convictions, records would be expunged and cannabis businesses could operate without being subject to 280E (see Weed Between the Lines, “For internal use only,” April 22, 2021). We’d all spark up fatties and dance through the streets celebrating sweet, sweet victory at last. That’s a pipe dream, though, according to Paul Armentano, the deputy director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). The black market for cannabis isn’t going anywhere any time soon, Armentano says; largely because of states where cannabis is illegal. Which means that cannabis drug busts and arrests will continue to feed our prison system for the foreseeable future. We’re seeing this happen presently. Even though 19 states, Washington D.C. and Guam have all recreationally legalized cannabis, cannabis busts and arrests skyrocketed in 2021. Federal law enforcement and their partners seized over 5.5 million pounds of cannabis in 2021, a 22% increase over the 2020 numbers. They also made 6,606 cannabis arrests, 32% higher than in 2020. “The drug war isn’t over,” Armentano says. “Despite the reality that most Americans want to see cannabis legal, in many jurisdictions in this country, and under federal law, it remains illegal, and that law is enforced in many parts of the country.” Armentano speculates that 2021’s dramatic increase in seized plants and cannabis arrests has to do with

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in 1933, it was still up to states to decide whether and

JUNE 23, 2022

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Email the author at wbrendza@boulderweekly.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


ROMAN ROBINSON

I’m taking a week off, so this week’s “Savage Love” is a reprint of a column that was originally published on January 13, 2016. I hope everyone has a happy and safe Pride. Please be careful out there. —Dan Dear Dan: I recently moved to the South, and on Grindr I’m noticing a lot more racist messaging as overt as “no Blacks” and “no Asians.” I’m wondering what I can (or should) do as a chat

course, but they’re thicker on the ground in more conservative areas. And while in their 30s and 40s (and older) doing this kind of crap, it sometimes seems to be more prevalent among younger gay white men. These young guys—often recently out and from overwhelmingly white areas—get online and start saying dumb, racist shit. So long as they stay in Kansas or Utah, GEAR, they don’t get a lot of pushback. But once a JMPG moves to Chicago or Los Angeles, they gay men… reformed JMPGs or neverever-were JMPGs… start to get in their faces about how unacceptable and harmful this shit is. Decent gay men of all ages and

to block these people?

BY DAN SAVAGE

message them and ask them to change their —Grinding Endlessly Against Racism Dear GEAR: preference” gays. JMPGs pop up everywhere, of

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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preference” crap because it never seems to stop. But that’s not true; it does stop. After gay people who know better (and are better) get in the face of a JMPG, his latent moral imagination can kick into gear. The JMPG starts to think about how it would feel to be on the receiving end of this shit, maybe he recalls the Golden Rule back from Sunday School, perhaps he makes a few

JUNE 23, 2022

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non-white friends and listens to them. Maybe he even starts to question his own precious preferences. (Are he mindlessly adopt preferences assigned to him by Hollywood and porn?) And then maybe—hopefully, ideally—he stops being a JMPG. Even if he figures out that, yes, he’s primarily attracted to other white guys, he realizes he can act on his preferences—he can fuck the guys he wants to fuck—without needlessly disparaging anyone along the way. Another young and/or dumb JMPG moves to town and the whole someoneneeds-to-get-in-his-face process starts up all over again. So, when you see a JMPG with “no Blacks” or “no Asians” or GEAR, push back. Tell him he’s being an asshole. Getting through to JMPGs is slow, one-dude-at-at-time work, but you can be part of the solution. Email questions@savagelove.net Follow Dan on Twitter @FakeDanSavage. Find columns, podcasts, books, merch and more at savage.love.

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