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PHILIP TRAMMEL SHUTZE

ATLANTA CLASSICIST, CONNOISSEUR, and COLLECTOR

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TWENTIETH CENTURY ATLANTA’S foremost architects, Philip Trammell Shutze designed hundreds of residential and commercial works in Atlanta and throughout the South. He also had a brilliant collection of decorative arts, ceramics, silver,furniture,rugs, and paintings that reflected his keen eye and scholarly approach. Influenced by prominent collectors such as Henry Francis du Pont, Shutze acquired an impressive array of eighteenth-century and early nineteenth-century furniture, Chinese Export, Meissen, English porcelain and pottery, art, and decorations. From his hometown ofColumbus,Georgia,to Georgia Tech and Columbia University—where he earned degrees in architecture—to the American Academy in Rome, Italy, Shutze reveled in the Classical tradition in art and architecture. His interest in Classicism, as well as his love of landscape architecture,is seen in the pieces he chose for himself. Shutze only began collecting when he was almost sixty years old, but he left a remarkable legacy of refinement.His collection is a spectacular insight into the private life of this great designer of public structures. The Story of a Collection provides an unparalleled look into the pieces Shutze purchased for himself. The images in the catalog not only present the pieces Shutze selected but also convey the way in which he displayed, used,and enjoyed them.The collection became an important part of his social life both in acquisition and in sharing its enjoyment. Shutze often shopped through catalogs,and he did not drive, so friends drove him to dealers and auctions. Letters reflect the delight dealers took in his visits. Shutze truly lived with the beauty he so loved, from the Chinese procelain in which he served tea to the “sailors’ valentines” displayed on the wall of his bedroom. NE OF

After he died in 1982, the Atlanta Historical Society received his decorative arts collection with the stipulation that it would be housed in Swan House,the 1928 residence he designed for Mr.and Mrs. Edward Inman of Atlanta on their Buckhead estate.Shutze’s will asked that the collection “be made available for study by students and scholars concerned with the decorative arts.” Fulfilling that request, his collection is on permanent exhibition at Swan House. Philip Trammell Shutze once noted,“You don’t copy the past; you adapt the beauty of the past to your present needs, and in the process, you make each design uniquely your own.” As you turn the pages of The Story of a Collection, you will see through Shutze’s eyes but make the enjoyment your own.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

REBECCA B. MOORE has been curator of decorative arts and of the Philip Trammell Shutze Collection at the Atlanta History Center since 1996. She is the curator for the new permanent exhibition of the Shutze collection at Swan House. ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

EDWIN OWEN has specialized in producing photographs of fine and decorative art, rare books, and historic artifacts from museums, cultural institutions, publishers, and private and corporate collections since 1978. Originally from Washington, D.C.,he now resides in Prague with his wife and son.


PHILIP TR AMMELL SHUTZE A TLANTA C LASSICIST , C ONNOISSEUR , and C OLLECTOR

The Story of a Collection


PHILIP TR AMMELL SHUTZE A TLANTA C LASSICIST , C ONNOISSEUR , and C OLLECTOR

The Story of a Collection R EBECCA B. M OORE

ATLANTA HISTORY CENTER


THE ATLANTA HISTORY CENTER would like to acknowledge the support and contributions of the following toward the exhibition Philip Trammell Shutze: Atlanta Classicist, Connoisseur, and Collector: P HILIP TRAMMELL S HUTZE E NDOWMENT F UND of THE C OMMUNITY F OUNDATION for G REATER ATLANTA ...

E XPOSITION F OUNDATION Inc. ...

THE FORWARD ARTS F OUNDATION ...

WILMINGTON TRUST

Published by ATLANTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC. 130 West Paces Ferry Road Atlanta, Georgia 30305 404-814-4000 Book Development The Bookhouse Group, Inc. 818 Marietta Street Atlanta, Georgia 30318 404-885-9515 www.bookhouse.net Editorial Director: Rob Levin Chief Operating Officer: Renee Peyton Managing Editor: Sarah Fedota Artistic Direction: Rebecca B. Moore Design: Kevin Smith Special Edition Packaging Design: Gary Fedota Writer: Rebecca B. Moore Copy Editing and Indexing: Bob Land Prepress: Jill Dible and Muriel Diguette Collection Photography: Edward Owen Collection photography ©Edward Owen. All rights reserved. Additional Photography: Judy Pishnery Pages 26, 54, and 70 All other photography courtesy of the Atlanta History Center. Copyright © 2005 Atlanta Historical Society, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from The Atlanta History Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Manufactured in South Korea.


Members of the original Shutze committee at Swan House, 1998: (Left to right) Mrs. Julian S. Carr, Mrs. Beverly M. DuBose Jr., Mrs. William H. Schroder Sr., Mrs. Charles B. West; not pictured Mrs. Ivan Allen Jr.

Dedication

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HERE IS A SPECIAL GROUP OF WOMEN to whom I dedicate Philip Trammell Shutze: The Story of a Collection. They knew Philip Shutze, each in her own way, and helped make this collection a gift to the Atlanta Historical Society. Through their leadership and foresight, after Shutze died, the collection was inventoried, cleaned, marked, and moved in their station wagons to Swan House in 1983. They were the members of the committee who helped exhibit his collection for the first time. One of them gave money for the study and storage room on the third floor of Swan House to make sure it was kept in a stable environment. Their interest in and love for the decorative arts helped preserve the collection of Philip Shutze so that it could be shared with the people of Atlanta and its visitors. Now, with the publication of this book, it will reach others as well.

A toast to: Louise Allen Mary Elizabeth Schroder Anne Carr Margie West Duffie DuBose Thank you for your support and care while I have been the curator of the Shutze Collection and for your dedication to the collection for all these years. REBECCA B. MOORE Curator of Decorative Arts and the Shutze Collection

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CONTENTS The Ceramic Circle . . . . 9 Foreword . . . . 11 Philip Trammell Shutze: Atlanta Classicist, by Rebecca Moore . . . . 13 Philip Trammell Shutze: Connoisseur and Collector, by Rebecca Moore . . . . 17 Chapter One: Chinese Export Porcelain . . . . 27 Chapter Two: Continental Porcelain and Pottery . . . . 55 Chapter Three: English Porcelain and Pottery . . . . 71 Chapter Four: Furniture . . . . 103 Chapter Five: Silver, Art, and Decoration . . . . 129 The Decorative Arts, by Philip Trammell Shutze . . . . 161 The Walpole Society . . . . 164 List of Dealers . . . . 165 The Shutze Book Collection . . . . 169 Acknowledgments . . . . 173 Index . . . . 174


THE CERAMIC CIRCLE OF

ATLANTA

THE CERAMIC CIRCLE was founded in 1976 by Mrs. Charles West and by the late Mrs. Bates Block. Both Margie West and Margaret Block were inspired to collect ceramics by the same mentor, Melonie Delhom, the curator at the Mint Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina. Although the two women collected in different fields, they both visited English factories with Ms. Delhom and continued a lifelong study of ceramics. With twelve members, the Ceramic Circle was formally chartered, and has enjoyed a lengthy tenure. Today, the group meets monthly and participants present research papers or guest speakers give informal lectures. The purpose is to further education and interest in the field of ceramics. Their archival material is held by the Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center. —Sally Dorsey Members who have contributed to the publication of this catalogue are listed below: Mrs. Carleton F. Allen Mrs. William B. Astrop Mrs. Robert M. Balentine Mrs. Dameron Black III Mr. James H. Bruns Mrs. W. Wheeler Bryan Mrs. Thomas C. Chubb Mrs. Emory Cocke Mrs. Beverly M. DuBose Jr. Mrs. Beverly M. DuBose III Mrs. William B. Floyd Mrs. Barrett Howell Mrs. Fred Hoyt Jr.

Mrs. John M. Law Mrs. Graydon Boyd Leake III Mrs. William Matthews Mrs. George E. Missbach Jr. Mrs. Nolan C. Moore Mrs. James Z. Pressley Mrs. Klaus Putter Mrs. W. Harrison Reeves Mrs. Thomas T. Richards Mrs. Michael Schroder Mrs. Bronson Smith Mrs. Charles B. West Mrs. Thomas Williams Mrs. H. Dillon Winship Jr.

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Foreword

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1982 the Atlanta Historical Society received a gift from Philip Trammell Shutze in his last will and testament: N

“During my lifetime I have collected furniture, furnishings, rugs, porcelains, silver, objets d’art, paintings, books, wall hangings, brackets, light fixtures, lanterns, photographs, professional papers, drawings and other papers, and other items of decorative arts which mean a great deal to me. I wish to bequeath this collection in a manner which is most likely to assure its continued preservation, maintenance, and enjoyment.” Since 1983 this gift of over a thousand objects has been displayed and stored at Swan House, designed and built by Philip Shutze in 1928. The historic Swan House has been owned by the Atlanta Historical Society since 1966, and is the core of the Atlanta History Center campus. In 2000, Shutze’s collection was put in storage during the restoration of Swan House, but now it is on view in permanent exhibition galleries on the Swan House Terrace Level. At the same time we are pleased to have a catalogue of the collection available for the first time. Although best known for his architecture, Philip Shutze amassed in a few years a decorative arts collection that would take most people a lifetime to collect. The terms of his will state that he wanted the collection “to be made available for study by students and scholars concerned with the decorative arts.” With this publication and the new exhibition, we are indeed fulfilling Shutze’s wishes and dream for his collection. REBECCA B. MOORE Curator of Decorative Arts and the Shutze Collection Atlanta History Center August 2005

Swan House, Atlanta History Center, designed by Philip Shutze, built 1928. The exhibition of the Shutze Decorative Arts Collection is located on the Terrace Level.

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PHILIP TRAMMELL SHUTZE Atlanta Classicist

Philip Trammell Shutze, earned him a full scholardesigner of Swan House, ship in 1908 to the once said of his career, “It Georgia School of Techhas always been my chonology. While attending sen mission to keep the Georgia Tech, Shutze Swan House, completed in candle of Classicism burnbecame part of the 1928 for the Edward ing.” Keep it burning he did, for Inmans, was designed by school’s first architecture class and Philip Shutze. This is the almost half a century. He was respon- private east façade, which worked with the Atlanta architectural sible for the design of over seven hun- faces away from the public firm of Hentz and Reid. In 1915, street. Shutze’s decorative dred residential and commercial arts collection, given by him after he completed a second architecto the History Center in works in Atlanta and throughout the 1982, is on exhibition in the tural degree at Columbia University South. His work was frequently fea- Terrace Level galleries of in New York, Shutze won the prestiSwan House at the Atlanta tured in national and regional publi- History Center. gious Rome Prize awarded annually cations, such as House and Garden by the American Academy in Rome, and Southern Architecture Illustrated. Shutze was Italy. That scholarship gave Shutze the oppornamed a fellow of the American Institute of tunity to study at the academy and travel Architects and honored in 1977 as “the greatest throughout Europe. The American Academy living classical architect” by Classical America, was founded in 1894 by a group of Americans, a society dedicated to promoting the classical led by architect Charles McKim, to provide final tradition in American arts. professional preparation for the most promising Born and raised in Columbus, Georgia, Philip American architectural students. Based loosely Shutze was a star student in the town’s public on the prestigious French Academy in Rome, schools and graduated as the valedictorian of the American Academy immersed these alreadyhis high school class. His accomplishments trained architects in classical art and architecture Left: Philip Shutze in Rome, circa 1917, while he was at the American Academy after winning the Rome Prize in 1915.

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for three years in the hopes that they would incorporate claswas completed in 1928 for Emily and Edward Inman, Shutze sical ideals into their future commissions. drew upon English and Italian architecture, often consulting While studying at the academy from 1915 to 1920, Shutze the photographs and drawings from the many scrapbooks he meticulously photographed, sketched, and measured buildcompiled in his travels abroad. Influenced by the Italian villas ings and gardens throughout Italy. When the United States he had studied in Rome, Shutze positioned Swan House on a entered World War I in 1917, the American Academy closed hill; visitors arrived by a long winding drive through the woods temporarily, and Shutze spent the rest of the war as a volunteer to the private courtyard entrance at the rear of the house. with the American Red Cross. Further Italian elements are After the war ended, he comapparent throughout the house, pleted his studies at the acadfrom the Ionic and Doric emy. Upon Shutze’s return to columns to the urns flanking the the United States, he worked front door to the exquisite with several New York archimolding and relief details of the tects and the Atlanta firm of interior. Hentz, Reid and Adler. After Shutze’s interest in the the death of Neel Reid in Regency style is reflected in 1926, Shutze became the the Goodrum and Englishfirm’s principal designer and, Chambers houses on West Paces one year later, a full partner. Ferry Road in Atlanta, with their Shutze was first and forelight exterior colors, symmetriAbove: Although Shutze had more than seven hundred residential and commost a classicist, which is evi- mercial commissions, he never built a house for himself. The elevation above, cal facades, and dining-room dent in many of his designs. circa 1955, is a house he designed to live in, but it was never built. During chinoiserie decorations. Later in Influenced by his travels his later years, he lived in a two-bedroom apartment on Peachtree Street. his career, paralleling the growth abroad, he initially drew upon Left: The Charles Daniel house in Greenville, South Carolina, one of his of his decorative arts collection, styles ranging from Italian last residential commissions, was completed in 1957. Shutze developed an interest in baroque to English Regency. the Colonial Revival movement He was later inspired by American vernacular architecture, in America. Throughout the country, this revival in appreciespecially the James River plantation houses of the eighteenth ation of eighteenth-century American furniture and decorative century. arts also fueled interest in American colonial architecture. From the 1920s to the 1940s, Shutze continued his work The houses that Shutze designed in the 1950s for such with Hentz, Adler and Shutze as the firm’s designer and draftsclients as Harry and Morris Dwoskin and his aunt, Mrs. man. Hal Hentz retired in 1944, and Rudolph Adler died the Thomas Erwin, as well as one he designed (but never built) following year, prompting Shutze to launch out on his own for himself, clearly show the influence of Williamsburg archiin 1950. For the next three decades, until his death in 1982, tecture and the James River plantation houses in Virginia. he maintained an office at the Candler Building in downtown One of his last commissions, the Charles Daniel house in Atlanta and further cemented his reputation and legacy as one Greenville, South Carolina, can be compared to the Governor’s of the city’s most talented and influential architects. Palace in Williamsburg, with its steep roof, chimneys, and Classical sources informed not only Shutze’s architectural cupola surrounded by a balustrade. drawings, but his landscape designs as well. As architectural Apparent in the accomplished sketches, elevations, and historian Vincent Scully has noted in Elizabeth Dowling’s drawings that Shutze created for his clients is an attention to book American Classicist, Shutze “visited and studied gardens, detail and decoration that became his trademark. He was an especially the haunted classical romantic gardens of the artist as well as an architect, but he was foremost a classicist Renaissance and baroque Italy, and he took them seriously.” true to his training at the American Academy in Rome, even Noting the similarities between the climates of Atlanta and when he looked to the eighteenth-century architecture of his Italy, Shutze sought to create garden designs that reflected native South for inspiration. Shutze said it best in a 1978 the lush landscapes and green color schemes of boxwoods and interview with Atlanta Magazine: “You don’t copy the past; grass lawns that he had come to know in Rome. you adapt the beauty of the past to your present needs, and in Swan House, Atlanta’s landmark residence, is generally the process, you make each design uniquely your own.” regarded as Shutze’s finest work. In designing this home, which —Rebecca B. Moore

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PHILIP TRAMMELL SHUTZE Connoisseur and Collector

This is the story of a Shutze did not choose collection, a very to collect in depth in personal collection of one area, but assembled a surThis large Staffordshire figfurniture, silver, ceramics, glass, paint- ural group (1815-1823) is vey of decorative arts and furniture: one of the rare pieces in ings—more than one thousand Shutze’s collection, remarkeighteenth- and nineteenth-century able for its large size and the objects all told—acquired within a rel- imprint of the maker’s name Chinese Export, eighteenth-century atively short time. Philip Shutze did “TITTENSOR” on the Meissen, English pottery and porcereverse. It was purchased not begin collecting until he was from the noted collector lain of the eighteenth and nineteenth almost sixty. He did not have a cura- Mrs. Giles Whiting of New centuries. His furniture ranges from York in 1972. tor. He did not drive a car or travel the seventeenth century to the early extensively, yet he amassed a collection of icons nineteenth. His other art objects reflect his perof eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century decsonal appreciation of these periods, and show a orative arts. In his two-bedroom apartment on curiosity and admiration beyond those of a Peachtree Street, Shutze’s collection covered the purist collector. walls and filled his custom paneling and cabinets. By the time Shutze began collecting in the late He used them every day; they were the furnish1940s, several changes were occurring in his proings for his home. There were boxes under his fessional life. The firm of Shutze and Armistead bed, in the oven, and in the bathtub. His blue dissolved in 1950. That same time his dear and white Canton ware, which he used as his friend, James Means, an architect he had worked “everyday china,” was stacked on open shelves with since his early days at Hentz, Reid and in his kitchen. Adler, moved from Atlanta to Albany, Georgia,

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to work with another friend decrease in his purchases, but and architect, Edward Vason the number jumped again in Jones. Shutze’s last major res1953. From that point on, for idential commission came in the remainder of his life, 1957, the Charles Daniel Shutze made only a few major house in Greenville, South purchases each year. Carolina. After living with his During his early collecting sister and her husband for years, Shutze took a few trips thirty-two years, he moved to the Northeast, accompainto an apartment on nied by friends, because he Peachtree Street in 1959, in did not drive. The Shutze the same complex where his archives contain numerous sister and brother-in-law had letters from dealers in New Above: Shutze in his apartment on Peachtree Street, where he moved in 1959. moved. York, Pennsylvania, and New According to his records Left: Kitchen in Shutze’s apartment with his blue and white Chinese Export England. From 1949, dealers and correspondence, Shutze displayed on the open kitchen shelves. in Boston and New York began buying furniture and wrote to say that they enjoyed Below: Throughout his apartment, Shutze created “tablescapes” such as this ceramics seriously in 1949; his one in his apartment living room with the Chinese Export “Hong” punch bowl seeing him and Mr. and Mrs. sales receipts jumped from a and large Staffordshire figure of Bacchus and Ariadne in the center of the gate- (James) Means in their shops. leg table. dozen purchases in 1948 to From 1950, Melvin Hubely more than one hundred the following year. But the real exploand the Art Exchange recollected favorably his recent visit to sion in Shutze’s buying came in 1950, when he bought furniture their shops in Boston and New York with the Joneses (Mr. and ceramics from Ginsburg and Levy, David Stockwell, Melvin and Mrs. Edward Vason Jones). There are also many references Hubely, Arthur Sussell, and Joe Kindig, and ceramics from the to advertisements in The Magazine ANTIQUES. Indeed, Art Exchange. The years 1951 and 1952 marked a 50 percent Shutze must have read his monthly issue of Antiques the way

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we read our catalogues from L.L. Bean and Neiman Marcus. That afternoon they visited Winterthur, du Pont’s home, the There are pages turned down and pencil drawings on tracing same year it opened as a major decorative arts museum. In his paper throughout the copies in his archives, as he “shopped” book Mystic Chords of Memory, Michael Kammen discusses through the attractive advertisements of David Stockwell, Joe the cultural influence in the 1930s of a group of private collectors Kindig, Shreve’s, and Katrina Kipper. Some of his letters to of Americana, including du Pont, R. T. H. Halsey, and Electra dealers are handwritten, others typed—perhaps because of the Havemeyer Webb, who moved into the public world of personal difficulty in reading his handwriting. One Connecticut dealer museums. One may assume that they influenced Shutze in the wrote back to Shutze asking him, “Please type your letter, I direction of his collecting, with du Pont as the measure. Shutze’s cannot understand a word of it.” passion for collecting was driven by his intellectual curiosity. Throughout his correspondence with dealers there are refHis library of decorative arts books at the Atlanta History erences to Henry Francis du Pont, the collector who bought Center contains the “textbooks” of twentieth-century research furniture and ceramics for his decorative arts museum, in the field (see appendix). He held on to almost every issue of Winterthur. Shutze, as it turned out, was buying from many The Magazine ANTIQUES from the 1920s, and subscriptions of the same dealers as du Pont. From time to time, Shutze is to Connoisseur, Apollo, and Country Life came to his office in reassured that du Pont does “buy objects with repairs.” Or the Candler Building and his apartment. “this pair is better than the one at Winterthur” or “there is one Auctions of collectors’ estates were another way Shutze just like it at Winterthur.” added to his collection. One of the most thrilling must have In 1951, Shutze, through his connection with the Peachtree been acquiring furniture and porcelain from Luke Vincent Garden Club in Atlanta and the Lockwood’s estate in 1954. Garden Club of America, vis- Left: Dining room in Shutze’s apartment with large Chinese Export armo- Lockwood’s book, Colonial ited the sister of Henry Francis rial tureen in the center of the table. Furniture in America (New du Pont for lunch at her home Below: Bedroom in Shutze’s apartment with tambour desk at the foot of York, 1913), was one of the outside Wilmington, Delaware. his bed. first to discuss early American

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furniture. The Jonathan Gostalowe chest from Philadelphia in Shutze died, his will specified that his collection would go to Shutze’s collection was purchased at the auction and is illusthe Atlanta Historical Society to be exhibited at Swan House, trated in Lockwood’s book. Shutze also bought one of the finest the most loved house he designed. His desire was that it would portraits of George Washington, by James Sharples, from be a “teaching collection,” so others would learn to appreciate Lockwood’s estate. the decorative arts of the eighteenth century that had brought Throughout this catalogue you will see many purchases made him so much pleasure. Perhaps the earlier museum benefactors, through W. E. Browne Decorating Company in Atlanta. A like du Pont and Havemeyer, were in his thoughts when he long-established design firm, the Browne Company must have gave his collection to the Atlanta Historical Society. acted as an agent for Shutze. Even though there are letters from As a classicist, Shutze was concerned that “good taste” was dealers, often Shutze is invoiced by Norman Pendley, president disappearing, as lava lamps, potato chip chairs, and paintings of the Browne Company and a close friend. The archives also of Campbell’s soup cans became the rage of the day in the post– contain Pendley’s letters from London about finding the “right” World War II era. A connoisseur is defined as “a person who St. George and Dragon and the Bow squirrel. Shutze typed an is especially competent to pass critical judgment in an art and undated inventory, probably around 1960, listing what he matters of taste.” When one reads his essay on decorative arts, owned, whom he bought each item from, and how much he written in 1973 (in the appendix), you will clearly hear the eighpaid for it. There were inventory lists of the collection in his teenth-century connoisseur’s interpretation of modern taste: apartment and his office as well as some items that were stored “Charlatanism is rife.” at W. E. Browne Decorating Left: Looking debonair in his plus fours and with his pipe, Shutze The Philip Trammell Shutze Company. poses in front of a villa door in Italy. He spent five years in Italy Collection is now on permanent In the 1970s, Shutze exhibited after he won the 1915 Rome Prize to study at the American exhibition at the Atlanta History Academy in Rome after completing his degree from Columbia part of his collection at Swan University. Center in Swan House, which he House. It may have been a test run designed in 1928. Below: Another view of Shutze’s dining room with Chinese export for the future gift to the Atlanta —Rebecca B. Moore “Mandarin” and “Fitzhugh” porcelain on the sideboard under the Historical Society. In 1982, when orange damask swag.

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CHAPTER I

CHINESE EXPORT PORCELAIN

For centuries the Orders made Chinese held the at Canton, the secret of making porcemain trading port lain, that fine translucent opened in 1699, often Chinese Export material, fired at such a high took two years to receive by “Hong” Bowl, Hong Kong. temperature it can hold hot the time the ships sailed Chinese export porcelain boiling liquids like tea. All bowl, circa 1785, decorated there and back. England and cultures made pottery, but with images of the hongs at European countries estabCanton harbor. The hongs its characteristics could not were the buildings where lished “hongs” on the shore Westerners lived and conequal that of porcelain. where they could place ducted their trade business. Early under-glaze blue orders and trade for six and white porcelains drove the China months of the year. Wives, forbidden Trade, along with tea and silks. Then by the Chinese to enter China, spent Westerners began sending their own their time at Macao, the Portuguese objects or drawings to be copied in colony. porcelain. For example, silver teapot America could not participate in the and milk-jug forms were reproduced China Trade until its independence in porcelain. Drawings of coats of arms from England. In 1784 the ship were sent to decorate their sets of “china.” Empress of China set sail from In the eighteenth century enamel decPhiladelphia to enter the United States orations and Western forms surpassed in the marketplace and to establish its Asian forms in blue and white. own “hong.” Facing page: Ceramic Circle of Atlanta tablesetting exhibition, February 2000. “Tobacco Leaf” table service, Philip Trammell Shutze Collection.

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Blanc de chine figural group Kangxi, 1700–10 Mark: none Height: 5.75 inches (14.6 cm) 1982.325.309 Description: Formerly thought to represent Governor Duf and his family, the figures are modeled as a Dutchman and his wife holding beakers and seated at a table on which is placed a bowl of fruit. To the gentleman’s right stands a small boy holding a fan, a hound seated at their feet, and to the lady’s left stands a little girl holding a dish, a monkey seated at their feet. Between the two animals is a jardinière, all on an oval mound base. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1956 Notes: PTS inventory, page 20; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 4 Literature: This group is illustrated in an Art Exchange advertisement in The Magazine ANTIQUES, February 1956, page 122, “Gov. Duf was Diderik Durven, Governor General of the Dutch East India Company from 1729-32. Shows his wife, 2 servants and his animals, c.1740-60.”

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Armorial charger and pair of plates Yongzheng, circa 1730 Mark: none Diameters: 16.5 inches and 8.75 inches (42 cm and 22.2 cm) 1982.325.506 Description: Each piece is painted in the center in white, dark red, gold, and black with the arms of Carteret beneath a squirrel crest. The cavetto has a wide border of ironred and gilt scrolls reserved with four Oriental landscape panels and edged in tassels, and the rim has four iron-red, gold, and blue floral sprays alternating with four flowerhead motifs within an iron-red and gilt scroll-band border. Provenance: Walter Willson, Ltd., Chicago, date unknown Notes: PTS inventory, page 12: “armorial with squirrel. Cartwright crest”

Plate depicting “The Baptism of Christ” Qianlong, circa 1735 Mark: none Diameter: 8.625 inches (22 cm) 1982.325.504.C Description: The scene is painted in shades of iron-red and gilding with Christ standing in the stream and being blessed by St. John beneath the Dove of the Holy Ghost. The rim is decorated with cherubs amidst swags of flowers and fruit issuing from the mouth of an eagle, and terminating in a banner inscribed “Mat.3.16.” Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 4; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 5 Comments: The New Testament verse referred to is Matthew 3:16: “And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: and lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him.”

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Plate, “In the Arbor� Qianlong, circa 1738 Mark: none Diameter: 10.25 inches (26 cm) 1982.325.516 Description: After the design by Cornelius Pronk, and painted in a broad palette of famille-rose enamels heightened in gilding, the center depicts a Europeanized Chinese couple beneath a flower-entwined green arbor surrounded by four children and flanked by tall flowering shrubs, and in the foreground three ducks in a small pond. The black-hatched turquoiseground rim reserved with twelve roundels alternately painted with insects or with sprigs of flowers or fruit and flanked by iron-red edged reserved shells or feather motifs. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1971 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 18 Comments: A letter from the Art Exchange, dated January 25, 1971, refers to a similar example illustrated by Michel Beurdeley, Chinese Trade Porcelain, page 177, catalogue number 124. (This book was reissued as Porcelain of the East India Companies [London, 1962], but the page and catalogue numbers for this reference remain the same.)

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Plate, “La Dame au Parasol” Qianlong, circa 1740 Mark: none Diameter: 9.25 inches (23.5 cm) 1982.325.515 Description: After the design by Cornelius Pronk and painted in an Imari palette of underglaze-blue, iron-red, and gilding, the center depicts a Chinese lady feeding four ducks amidst rushes while her maid holds a parasol above her head. The cavetto has a floral border, and the iron-red rim is patterned with gilt rectangles and reserved with small panels of ladies alternating with foliate-edged cartouches of ducks. The underside of the rim has seven underglaze-blue insects. Provenance: unknown Comments: Cornelius Pronk (1691–1759) was commissioned by the Dutch India Company in August 1734 to create designs for translation onto Chinese porcelain. This is the best known of the three designs he is documented to have created, all of which Shutze acquired for his collection.

Plate, “Doctor’s Visit to the Emperor” Qianlong, circa 1740 Mark: none Diameter: 9.625 inches (24.4 cm) 1982.325.517 Description: After the design by Cornelius Pronk, and painted in rose, blue, brown, iron-red, shades of green, and gilding, the center depicts three men seated and a fourth standing beneath a tree by a low table, a peacock on a fence to the left, all within a gilt herringbone-bordered roundel. The rim has six green-scale-bordered lozenges, each painted with a different fish and flanked by a bird on a plateau beneath a triangle of gilt cell diaperwork. The exterior rim has a similar gilt trellis diaper band border. Provenance: unknown

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Figure of a cockerel Qianlong, circa 1740 Mark: none Height: 12.25 inches (31.1 cm) 1982.325.374 Description: His eyes are enameled in dark brown, his biscuit comb and wattles show traces of iron-red cold paint, and his beak and legs show traces of “cafeau-lait” glaze. He is modeled standing above a brown-glazed tree stump. Provenance: David Stockwell, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 6; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 4 Comments: A letter from Stockwell to Shutze, dated September 1, 1950, asserts, “This is the finest one I have ever owned.”

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One of a pair of helmet-shaped ewers Qianlong, circa 1740 Mark: none Height: 9.75 inches (24.8 cm) 1982.325.147.A Description: Modeled after a Rouen faience shape taken from a silver original, each is painted in rose, blue, turquoise, green, salmon, and yellow with a wide foliate scroll border around the rim and spout within gilt bands. The gadrooned base and circular foot have similarly colored panels within foliate bands, and the midsection and foot edge with Greek key borders. The foliate-scroll handles are colored in iron-red, rose, and gold, and also one in blue. Provenance: J. A. Lloyd Hyde, New York City, 1953 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1 Comments: A letter from Hyde dated February 9, 1953, refers to a “pair of Lowestoft ewers of large size c. 1700 from silver models.” Another letter from Hyde, dated March 3, 1953, states that “The ewers were bought in Paris from a baroness.”

Portrait plate Qianlong, circa 1740 Mark: none Diameter: 9.125 inches (23.2 cm) 1982.325.514 Description: The center is painted en grisaille after a print by Petrus Schenck with a full-length portrait of Peter Wolff holding a rifle and standing by his dog in a glade with a house behind him in the distance. Beneath him on the cavetto is the inscription “PETRUS DE WOLFF PETRE,” and the cavetto and rim are painted in blue, iron-red, and gold with borders of scrolling Oriental floral sprays within a grisaille and gilt foliate-scroll border at the rim edge. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 18; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6 Comments: The portrait on this plate was taken from a print by Petrus Schenck (1660–1718), after a 1686 engraving by John Smith of the portrait painted by William Wissing (1658–87) of young John Cecil, The Lord Burghley. The identity of the inscribed subject, Peter Wolff, has not been determined.

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Reticulated inkstand Qianlong, circa 1745 Mark: none Width: 6.25 inches (15.9 cm) 1982.325.368 Description: The honeycomb-pierced stand is formed by three conjoined hexagonal wells painted with rose, blue, and turquoise blossoms on the brown cell-diaper borders, their upper rims with brown and gilt trellis-diaper borders. The wells are fitted with a pair of hexagonal ink pots and a pounce pot painted with pink and green floral sprigs. Provenance: J. A. Lloyd Hyde, New York City, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 22; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1

Sconce in the shape of an arm Qianlong, circa 1745 Mark: none Length: 6.625 inches (16.8 cm) 1982.325.159 Description: The candle-arm is modeled as a right forearm wearing a yellow bracelet and holding a yellowhandled candle nozzle molded with iron-red lotus petals at the base and painted with an iron-red ruyihead border at the rim. The arm issues from a teardrop-shaped bracket molded with scrollwork colored in rose, yellow, turquoise, blue, and white. Provenance: Frederick Victoria, New York, no date Notes: PTS inventory, page 5

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Pair of candlesticks Qianlong, circa 1745 Mark: none Height: 7.625 inches (19.4 cm) 1982.325.419 Description: Modeled after a silver original, each has an octagonal baluster stem, painted with lotus sprays and various floral borders and supporting a similarly decorated urn-form candle nozzle. The chamfered square foot is painted with vases of flowers, precious objects, and lotus sprays above a trellis-diaper border. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1966 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 3

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Plate depicting “The Nativity� Qianlong, circa 1745 Mark: none Diameter: 9 inches (22.9 cm) 1982.325.504.A Description: The subject is painted en grisaille heightened in gilding with Mary, Joseph, and the shepherds adoring the Infant in the manger with a recumbent donkey in the foreground. The rim has a border of floralentwined strapwork within grisaille and gilt bands. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 4; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 5

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Plate depicting “The Crucifixion� Qianlong, circa 1745 Mark: none Diameter: 8.875 inches (22.5 cm) 1982.325.504.B Description: The subject is painted en grisaille with Christ on the cross flanked by the two crucified thieves. Beneath their feet stand the Virgin, Mary Magdalene, and St. John before a crowd of onlookers, and in the foreground the Roman centurions are casting dice. The rim has a border of strapwork, scalework vignettes, cornucopias, and foliate scrolls within grisaille and gilt bands. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 4; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 5

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Group of Dutch or Tyrolean dancers Qianlong, 1750–1760 Mark: none Height: 5.875 inches (14.9 cm) 1982.325.426 Description: After the Meissen model by Johann Friedrich Eberlin, the young man is wearing a yellow hat, a patterned blue doublet over a rose-cuffed yellow jacket, a white ruff, iron-red breeches with turquoise florets at the knees, and black shoes. His pigtailed partner is wearing a patterned iron-red bodice with a turquoise stomacher and gilt edging over a white blouse with yellow bows on the sleeves, a white apron, a rose-starred white skirt, and iron-red shoes. The couple is whirling on a mound base molded with iron-red, yellow, and rose florets and turquoise leaves. Provenance: Earle D. Vandeker of Knightsbridge, London, 1980 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 27 Comments: This is one of the last objects Shutze acquired for his collection.

“Wilkes & Liberty” bowl Qianlong, circa 1770 Mark: none Diameter: 10.25 inches (26 cm) 1982.325.136 Description: The exterior is painted on the front and reverse in iron-red, rose, green, blue, turquoise, black, and gold with two portrait cartouches: one depicting John Wilkes beneath a lion passant crest, flanked by two supporters, probably Serjeant Glynn (his legal advisor) and Lord Temple (his patron), above the motto “ALWAYS READY IN A GOOD CAUSE,” and surmounted by the inscription “Wilkes & Liberty”; and the other depicting Lord Chief Justice Mansfield beneath a serpent crest and flanked by Lord Bute and devil as supporters above the motto “JUSTICE SANS PITIE.” The sides and the center of the interior have floral sprays; the interior rim is decorated with an iron-red and black cell-diaper border. Provenance: Joseph Carbone, Boston, Massachusetts, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 12; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6 Comments: A letter from Carbone dated August 26, 1952, indicated that the bowl came from Ipswich, Massachusetts, and he also states: “You have my personal guarantee that the Wilkes bowl is absolutely Continues next page

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Continued from previous page genuine old and of the period. It is illustrated in Lloyd Hyde’s book on Lowestoft. I believe this one is in better condition than the one in Mr. du Pont’s collection (his has more cracks).” The book by J. A. Lloyd Hyde to which he refers is Oriental Lowestoft (New York: 1936), page 100, plate 20.

Bourdaloue Qianlong, circa 1770 Mark: none Length: 10.25 inches (26 cm) 1982.325.495 Description: The oval vessel painted in underglaze-blue on either side with two Chinamen conversing near a large pagoda and two others crossing a bridge beyond, in a river landscape beneath a cell-diaper border around the rim. The loop handle has a heart-shaped thumbpiece and is painted with a long foliate spray. Provenance: unknown Comments: By tradition, this form, generally found with a cover, was named for a French clergyman named Bourdaloue, whose sermons were so lengthy that ladies found it necessary to bring to church a vessel that could be hidden under their dresses to avoid emergencies.

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Group of a Dutch couple Qianlong, circa 1770–80 Mark: none Height: 9 inches (22.8 cm) 1982.325.416 Description: The lady is wearing an iron-red-lined blue veil, a purple bodice edged in black and gold over a green blouse, and a green and yellow striped skirt sprigged in black, her white cuffs shaded in blue, and she is holding a rose handkerchief. Her gentleman companion is wearing a gilt-edged black tricorn on his brown hair, a blue cravat and cuffs, an iron-red coat edged in black and gold, black breeches, blue stockings, and black shoes, his right arm around her shoulders. Both are standing on an oval base mottled in green and brown and applied with green and rose leaves. Provenance: unknown

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Partial dinner service in the “Tobacco Leaf� pattern Circular saucer dish, diameter: 10.875 inches (27.6 cm) (shown); Pair of circular salt cellars, diameter: 4 inches (10.2 cm) (shown); Pair of sauce tureens and covers, length: 7.5 inches (18.4 cm); Pair of small soup tureens, covers, and stands, tureen length: 11.5 inches (29.2 cm), stand length: 12.375 inches (31.4 cm); Soup tureen and cover, with oval stand, tureen length: 14.25 inches (36.2 cm), stand length: 18.25 inches (46.3 cm) (shown); Oval platter, length: 15 inches (38.1 cm) (shown); Set of six two-handled small cups and saucers, cup height: 2.125 inches (5.4 cm), diameter: 4.875 inches (12.4 cm) Provenance: The Art Exchange and D. M. & P. Manheim, New York City, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, pages 19, 21, 24

Qianlong, circa 1775 Mark: none 1982.325.280 Description: Each piece is painted in underglaze-blue, yellow, turquoise, green, and rose with large overlapping leaves superimposed with large rose and ironred blossoms and surrounded by smaller colorful blossoms, all heightened in gilding. The rims have a scalloped edge. The assembled and incomplete service comprises forty-two pieces: Pair of berry dishes, diameter: 6.5 inches (16.5 cm); Six plates, diameter: 8.875 inches (22.5 cm); Six soup plates, diameter: 8.875 inches (22.5 cm); Pair of sauceboats and leaf-shaped stands, length: 8 inches (20.3 cm) (shown);

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Fruit basket on stand Qianlong, circa 1775 Mark: none Height: 14.75 inches (37.5 cm) 1982.325.458 Description: After the Meissen original, it is formed as a pierced oval basket, painted on the interior with a gold and iron-red floral spray within a gilt spearhead border, and on the exterior with iron-red florets at the intersections of the basketwork. The basket is supported by a stand, modeled as a tall tree trunk stand flanked by two iron-red-draped putti and painted all around with colorful floral sprays and sprigs above applied rose and green floral sprigs. The foot rim is painted with turquoise and white stylized foamy waves. Provenance: unknown

Pair of seated hounds Qianlong, 1750–80 Mark: none Height: 6.25 inches (15.9 cm) 1982.325.158 Description: Modeled affrontÊ, each has a coat spotted in brown, gray, iron-red, and touches of rose, an open mouth heightened in iron-red, eyes picked out in black, a tail curling over the haunches, and wearing a collar affixed with a bell. Provenance: D. M. & P. Manheim, New York City, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 19

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Pair of boar’s head tureens Qianlong, circa 1763 Mark: none Length: 14.125 inches (36.6 cm) 1982.325.163 Description: Each is naturalistically modeled, with bristles picked out in gray; an iron-red snout; an open mouth with white teeth and a rose-colored tongue; black, gray, and iron-red eyes; iron-red ear interiors; and around the neck a rose collar forming the foot rim. Provenance: unknown

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Pair of chamber candlesticks Qianlong, circa 1785 Mark: none Diameter: 5.5 inches (14 cm) 1982.325.418 Description: Each is modeled as a stalk of green bamboo heightened in iron-red and gilding and forming the candle nozzle, issuing a smaller stem to form the loop handle, and affixed to an octafoil dish painted in a Mandarin palette with floral clusters within an ironred and gilt hatchwork border edged in rose leafage and scrolls. Provenance: Lester E. Dunbar, Chicago, 1953 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1

“Hong� bowl Qianlong, circa 1785 Mark: none Diameter: 14.125 inches (35.9 cm) 1982.325.62 Description: The punch bowl is painted in the so-called Mandarin palette around the exterior with a view of figures and boats before the hongs on the Pearl River at Canton, each flying its flag for Denmark, Holland, England, Sweden, the imperial flag, and the white flag of France, above a gilt husk border on the foot. The interior has a central floral medallion and a gilt trelliswork border edged in green beadwork around the rim. Provenance: Mrs. Frank M. Wray, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 12; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 7 Comments: In a letter to Shutze, March 13, 1952, Mrs. Wray writes she has spoken with Mr. J. A. Lloyd Hyde about this bowl, which is similar to the one illustrated in his book, Oriental Lowestoft: with Special Reference to the Trade with China and the Porcelain Decorated for the American Market, page 29, plate 3. Hyde also makes a reference to this in a letter written to Shutze in 1953.

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Pair of soup tureens and covers Qianlong, circa 1790 Mark: none Length: 16 inches (40.6 cm) 1982.325.128 Description: From the mid-eighteenth-century Hochst faience model by Ignaz Hess, each is of lozenge shape, molded with leafage, raised on four cylindrical legs with iron-red and gilt-heightened scroll toes, and with purple fingerscrolled handles at the ends. The fluted covers have an iron-red and green lotus leaf knop, and each piece is colorfully painted on either side with a floral bouquet within a leaf-shaped panel beneath borders of floral clusters interrupting a blue line, rose beaded swags, tassels, and giltstarred blue bands. Provenance: J. A. Lloyd Hyde, New York City, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 12; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6 Comments: A letter dated March 20, 1952, from Lloyd Hyde states, “I consider them the most fascinating pieces of Lowestoft I have ever seen. . . . I bought the big tureens in Paris from an old countess. . . .� Lowestoft or Oriental Lowestoft was a term used by dealers and collectors up to the 1960s to refer to Chinese Export porcelain, which was confusing because of the Lowestoft factory in Suffolk, England. Recent research has shown that the Lowestoft factory did not produce any hard paste porcelain as once thought.

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“Toby Philpot” jug Which Now Foams With Mild Ale Out Of.” The reverse painted with an iron-red circular table laid with a blue beaker and two plates and cutlery on a white cloth. There is a small shrub by the entwined-strap handle, and behind the handle are the initials “RB” in worn gold and iron-red. The rim has a gilt-starred blue band border. Provenance: unknown Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498: Handwritten page with description and quotation from Laurence Sterne’s novel Tristram Shandy, first published in 1768, with the following quotation at the bottom of the page: “taken from [D.M. & P.] Manheim’s ad – Antiques 1955, similar jug.”

Qianlong, 1790–95 Mark: none Height: 8.875 inches 1982.325.355 Description: The barrel-shaped body is painted on the front with the well-known toper wearing a black tricorn, a blue coat, a white shirt, yellow breeches, pink-shaded white stockings, and black shoes, seated on an iron-red chair with his clay pipe by his right leg, holding a brown jug of foaming ale in his left hand and a document in his right inscribed with a passage from Laurence Sterne’s novel Tristram Shandy: “Dear Tom This Brown Jug

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Jardinière and stand Qianlong/Jiaqing, 1790–1800 Mark: none Height: 6.75 inches (17.1 cm) 1982.325.181

blue border edged with dots and a wavy line repeated around the rim of the stand. The stand is painted on the exterior with three blue and gold floral sprays and is raised on five similar bracket feet. Provenance: Schuykill House, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, date unknown Notes: PTS inventory, page 3: “See Lloyd Hyde, Similar form in Mr. du Pont’s collection.”

Description: The flaring cylindrical flower pot is painted on the exterior with a tall row of yellow-centered blue leaves veined in gilding above Greek key and ruyi-head bands and five small bracket feet. The rim has a gilt-starred

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Pair of bough pots Jiaqing, circa 1800 Mark: none Height: 7.625 inches (19.4 cm) 1982.325.141 Description: Each is of flaring square shape, molded on every side with basketwork reserved with a panel painted in brown monochrome on the front and back with a sailboat on a river before a distant country house. Beneath the loop handles on the sides, the panels are painted with floral sprays; the rim and foot rim have a gilt-heightened brown floral and fruit sprig border. Provenance: unknown Comments: The original covers, now missing, would have been flat or slightly domed and pierced with five holes for flower stems or boughs to be arranged.

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Neoclassical urn Jiaqing, circa 1800 Mark: none Height: 16.375 inches (41.6 cm) 1982.325.23 Description: Modeled after a Marieberg original, and made probably for the Swedish market, the slender shieldshaped body is molded on the front and back with a gilt beadwork oval painted in brown monochrome with a river view, and surrounded by shaded tan and gilt drapery swags issuing from the tall gilt rectangular fret handles. The lower part of the body is molded on a dimpled tan ground with gilt-edged chartreuse leaves, and the neck, handle, and cover with gilt-edged chartreuse fluting. The circular foot is molded with a border of molded salmon and gilt petals, and the integral square base is marbleized in gray and tan. The tall domed cover is surmounted by a gilt artichoke knop. Provenance: J. Dorf, sold at Christie’s in London on October 17, 1966, lot 133; The Art Exchange, New York City, 1966 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 13 Comments: A letter from the Art Exchange, dated November 23, 1966, describes this piece as a “Chinese Export vase and cover, c.1785, chartreuse with sepia landscape medallion.”

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One of a pair of pistol-handled urns Jiaqing, circa 1810 Mark: none Height: 14.875 inches (37.8 cm) 1982.325.1 Description: Each shield-shaped body is molded on the front and reverse with a gold-ground oval medallion painted in famille-rose enamels with birds amidst flowering branches and surrounded by purple and gold grapevine borders, all within a green and gilt husk swag pendant from the gold, salmon, and blue curved handles. The shoulder has a green and purple grapevine border, and the neck, blue, iron-red, gold, and green borders repeated on the cover around the gilt bud knop. The circular foot has a molded green and blue leaf border, and the square base, a wavy blue border. Provenance: Arthur Sussel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, invoice dated March 27, 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 3 Comments: A letter from Sussel, dated March 27, 1950, notes that there is an “almost identical pair [of urns] in [the] Music Room at Powell House, Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia.” (The Samuel Powell house was installed in the Philadelphia Museum of Art early in the twentieth century.) Sussel also writes, in answer to a question from Shutze, “Yes, Mr. du Pont has bought many things with repairs. . . .” (Here Sussel is referring to Henry Francis du Pont, whose vast collection of decorative arts is at his former home, Winterthur, now a decorative arts museum.)

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Pair of reticulated baskets Jiaqing, circa 1810 Mark: none Lengths: 7.25 inches (18.4 cm) and 7.5 inches (19 cm) 1982.325.839 Description: Each is colorfully enameled in the center and on the everted rim with blue, turquoise, chartreuse, yellow, and brown leaves, veined and edged in gilding, and superimposed in the center with iron-red, rose, and blue blossoms surrounding an ermine-mantled shield enclosing an anchor surrounded by the motto “SPERO MELIORA SECORQUE.” The armorial device is repeated on either side of the exterior within a circular medallion interrupting the pierced sides, and the rim is affixed at each end with a gilt angularloop handle. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, no date Notes: PTS inventory, page 13

“Brown Fitzhugh” reticulated oval basket Jiaqing, circa 1820 Mark: none Length: 10.5 inches (26.7 cm) 1982.325.155 Description: Characteristically decorated in the center with a diaper and beast medallion, edged in spearheads and dumbbells, initialed “RF,” and surrounded by four clusters of flowers and precious objects. The pierced sides are reserved on the front and back with similar initialed medallions, and the everted rim with a border of butterflies, diaper and scalework panels, floral sprays, and Greek key. Provenance: The Antique Show, Atlanta Biltmore Hotel, Atlanta, Georgia, no date Notes: PTS inventory, page 20 Comments: The pattern name “Fitzhugh” is associated with Thomas Fitzhugh, who ordered the first service in this design around 1780.

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Two Carp-form tureens Jiaqing, circa 1820 Mark: Chinese character mark on the interior of one tureen and both covers Length: 12.875 inches (32.4 cm) 1982.325.154

Jiaqing, circa 1820 Mark: none Length: 19.125 inches (48.6 cm) 1982.325.156.B

Description: Each is modeled lying on one side, with scales picked out in iron-red and gilding with iron-red fins and tail, and with a dark brown eye. The upper side of the body is removable to form the cover. Provenance: Katrina Kipper, Queen Anne Cottage, Boston, Massachusetts, no date Notes: PTS inventory, page 5

Description: The center is molded with grooves angled toward the trough at one end, and is painted in brown monochrome with a central diaper and beast medallion edged in spearheads and dumbbells, initialed “JRT,” and surrounded by four clusters of flowers and precious objects. The cavetto has a cell diaper band, and the rim has a border of butterflies, diaper and scalework panels, floral sprays, and Greek key motifs within a worn gilt edge. Provenance: J. A. Lloyd Hyde, New York City, 1953 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1 Comments: The invoice from Hyde, March 3, 1953, lists this as a “roast platter with well.”

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One of a pair of “Green Fitzhugh” crested hot water dishes, covers, and stands Jiaqing, circa 1820–25 Mark: none Length: 17.125 inches (43.5 cm) 1982.325.145

Provenance: D. M. & P. Manheim, New York City, invoice dated December 22, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 18; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 7 Comments: The crest is that of a member of the Rawson family. According to David Sanctuary Howard, Chinese Armorial Porcelain (London, 1974), page 976, or Volume 2 (2003), page 544, “In the 1820s the English firm of Rawson and Company was one of seven trading at Canton,” and this service, one of the very few British armorial services known in the “Green Fitzhugh” pattern, presumably was made for a family member during that decade.

Description: Each dish is painted in the center with the brown demi eagle head crest of Rawson encircled by a garter inscribed with the motto “LAUS VIRTUTIS ACTIO” within an apple-green-enameled medallion edged in spearheads and dumbbells, and surrounded by the four characteristic clusters of flowers and precious objects. The rim has a green border of butterflies, diaper and scalework panels, floral sprigs, and fret motifs, and the ends have a spout at either end, heightened in gilding. The covers are similarly decorated, but with the crested medallion on either side flanking the gilt pine cone knop.

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CHAPTER II

CONTINENTAL PORCELAIN

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POTTERY

China held on to the secret and began to produce large of making porcelain for figures of animals and centuries until the early characters from the theater eighteenth century, when and mythology. Augustus Rex, elector of For almost half a cenSaxony and king of tury Meissen was the Continental Porcelain Poland, imprisoned an primary producer of hardVase, Europe. alchemist to find out how paste porcelain, but Vase, 1755–65, Hochst Factory, Germany, flowerto make gold. Although France, Italy, and England encrusted vase with gilt-edge scalloped rim; body decorated Bottger did not find gold, were experimenting as well with birds amidst small trees. he found the formula for and producing soft-paste something as good as porcelain. Sévres in France gold— porcelain. began to make hard-paste By 1710 the Meissen factory was porcelain in 1768. producing hard-paste porcelain. Early Tin-glazed earthenware, pottery wares were decorated with gilding; coated with an opaque tin glaze, was then with the arrival of artist Johann introduced from Asia to Europe. It Gregor Horoldt, painting and enamel was produced in Italy as “maiolica.” chinoiserie decoration began in the In France it was called “faience” and 1720s. In 1731, the sculptor Johann “Delft” in Holland, both named for Joachim Kaendler came to the factory the towns where it was produced. Facing page: Ceramic Circle of Atlanta tablesetting exhibition, February 2000. Dessert service, circa 1804–09, France, made for Joseph Murat, Philip Trammell Shutze Collection.

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Pair of teabowls and saucers Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, circa 1725 Mark: one saucer with letter S in iron-red on the base Diameter: 2.875 inches and 5 inches (7.3 and 12.7 cm) 1982.325.42 Description: Each piece is molded on the lower portion of the exterior with gadrooning and decorated in gilding at Augsburg, probably in the Seuter workshops. The gadroons are picked out alternately in gilt stripes and scrolls, and the interior of the saucers are decorated with tooled gilt chinoiserie figures at various pursuits within a wide band edged with small scrolls repeated on the exterior rim. The gadroons are picked out alternately in gilt stripes and scrolls. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 14; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6

Wine pot Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, circa 1740 Mark: crossed swords mark in underglaze-blue on the base Height: 6.375 inches (16.2 cm) 1982.325.123 Description: The pear-shaped body with double-C-scroll handle and bearded satyr’s mask molded serpent spout heightened in gilding is painted in the manner of Johann Gregor Horoldt with a continuous scene of colorful chinoiserie figures at various pursuits in a garden on a green plateau edged in a double red line. The decoration is repeated with variations around the domed cover beneath the gilt artichoke knop. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated 1952 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6

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Figure of a “Map Seller� Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, circa 1745 Mark: none Height: 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) 1982.325.22 Description: Modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, the young man is wearing a green hat, an iron-red-lined lavender coat, a yellow shirt, and blue breeches, and on his back is a black satchel strapped to a brown wood case. He is holding a map of England in his right hand and a rolled-up map in his left, and walking on a mound base applied with a yellowcentered blue floret and green leaves. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated March 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 14; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6

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Set of figures of “The Four Continents” Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, 1746–50 Mark: none

“Europe” Height: 10.125 inches (48.6 cm) 1982.325.18 Description: Modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, the maiden is wearing a pink and gold crown, a turquoise-lined mantle patterned with indianische Blumen, edged in gilding and fastened with jewels over a puce bodice. She is holding a blue and gilt orb in her left hand and a gilt scepter in her right and seated before a tandappled white horse amidst books, a globe, a shield, and instruments of the arts. The figure is on a rounded rectangular base applied with colorful florets and green leaves. Comments: Indianische Blumen, the German name, refers to stylized flower motifs derived from Oriental porcelain.

“America” Height: 10.5 inches (26.9 cm) 1982.325.19 Description: Modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, the Indian maiden is wearing a colorful feathered headdress and skirt, a gold belt, and a white feather cape, a green parrot perched on her right hand, and a white cornucopia spilling over with fruit and flowers supported in her left arm. The figure is seated on a brown crocodile above a rectangular base applied with colorful florets and green leaves.

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“Asia” Height: 12.25 inches (31.11 cm) 1982.325.20 Description: Modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, Asia is depicted as a maiden wearing a tall white headdress swagged with “pearls,” a gilt-edged white cloak over a gilt-belted white robe, and a white skirt patterned with indianische Blumen, holding in her right hand a gilt scepter and over her left wrist a censer. The figure is seated on the back of a kneeling camel with a pink and gold blanket before a turquoise-leafed palm tree on a rectangular base.

“Africa” Height: 11.5 inches (29.5 cm) 1982.325.21 Description: Modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, the maiden is depicted as a Blackamoor wearing a tan elephant headdress, a gilt-edged and “jeweled” white cloak, a colorfully feathered skirt and stockings, and a white drapery over her lap. A sheaf of yellow wheat is in her raised left hand, and she is seated on the back of a recumbent lion with a tan mane, tail and paws, a black muzzle, and iron-red tongue in his open mouth, on a rectangular base applied with colorful florets and green leaves. Provenance: Baron von Seidlitz, Paris; The Art Exchange, New York City, invoice dated 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 17; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1 Comments: A letter of February 18, 1953, from Adolf Beckhard of the Art Exchange notes that a similar set of “The Four Continents” from the collection of the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut, is illustrated by David Rosenfeld in Porcelain Figures of the Eighteenth Century in Europe (New York, 1949), pages 36–37.

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Figure of a “Camel on Parade” Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, circa 1750 Mark: none Height: 9.375 inches (23.8 cm) 1982.325.27

is a blue blanket edged and tasseled in gold and molded on either side with a gilt-heightened rococo cartouche. The animal is walking above a white cairn and rockwork base encrusted with green and yellow “moss” and leaves. Later mounted on a Louis XV–style gilt-metal rococo scroll oval base. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 17; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6

Description: Modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, the brown dromedary with a pale pink muzzle and ears and black eyes is wearing gilt-tasseled nets around his neck, with colorful plumed ornaments on his head and hump. There

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Set of figures of Apollo in his chariot with four horses Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, circa 1750 Mark: crossed swords mark in underglaze-blue on the base of the chariot Height: Apollo 9 inches (22.8 cm), horses 7 to 7.6 inches (17.8 to 19.3 cm) 1982.325.312.A–E

extended, and the youthful god is seated in his gilt-heightened rococo scrollwork chariot with flame-spoked revolving wheels amidst pastel clouds and gilt lightning bolts. Two pairs of Meissen figures of galloping horses. Modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, en suite, each animal with a pale salmon muzzle, open mouth with iron-red tongue, tan-spotted back, and billowing white mane and tail, wearing a gilt-edged rose harness, galloping above pale blue and pink-heightened clouds. The harness is now fitted with metal eyes for reins, and each figure is mounted on a metal base. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, 1955 Notes: PTS inventory, page 28; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2

Description: Modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler as the mythological deity wearing a green wreath on his fair hair. His yellow-lined white drapery is patterned with colorful indianische Blumen and edged in gilding, and a brown quiver of arrows slung on his back. His right arm is raised high, his left arm is

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Figure of a potentate Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, circa 1755 Mark: faint crossed sword mark in under-glaze blue and letter B in puce Height: 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) 1982.325.413.A Description: The potentate, probably modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, is shown as a young man wearing a crowned white turban above his pointed ears with a blue-lined yellow cloak patterned with indianische Blumen, a gilt scalework breastplate with green tassels, and a gilt-edged puce skirt. A gilt eagleheaded sword is thrust into the belt at his left hip, and a blue posy held in his extended right hand, and he is standing on a gilt-heightened scroll-molded base applied with a puce-edged white floret and green leaves. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated March 31, 1970 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 17

A group of “The Judgment of Solomon” Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, circa 1755 Mark: crossed sword mark in under-glaze blue and letter B in black Height: 6.625 inches (16.8 cm) 1982.325.413.B Description: “The Judgment of Solomon,” modeled by Johann Joachim Kaendler, depicts the king wearing a gilt crown and iron-red and white turban, a fur-lined pale lavender cape sprigged in puce and gold, with a giltdotted white tunic, yellow breeches, and pink boots. He is wielding a dagger held aloft in his right hand, supporting a flailing baby with his left arm, and standing on a gilt-heightened scroll-molded base applied with an iron-red-edged white florets and green leaves. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, March 31, 1970 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 17

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Rose box and cover and a pair of coffee cups and saucers Hard-paste porcelain Meissen Factory Germany, circa 1765 Mark: the box with a crossed swords mark and the cups and saucers with a crossed swords and dot mark, all in under-glaze blue, the saucers also with impressed numeral 43 Box diameter: 4.75 inches (12.1 cm); Cup height: 2.5 inches (6.4 cm); Saucer diameter: 5.5 inches (14 cm) 1982.325.28 Description: The rose-form covered sugar box is naturalistically modeled with rows of overlapping petals shaded in puce. The knop is formed as a green rose branch terminating in a bud. The cups and saucers are molded on the exterior with overlapping rose petals shaded in puce and edged on the rim in gilding. The cups have a green twig-form handle, and the saucers are painted on the interior in shades of iron-red, puce, green, yellow, blue, and gray with sprigs of deutsche Blumen. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, invoice dated December 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 18; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6 Comments: The German name, deutsche Blumen, refers to natural-looking flower motifs.

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Two salt cellars Tin-glazed earthenware Savona, Italy, circa 1750 Mark: the first with a shield mark flanked by the initials B C in blue on the base; the other painted in the well with the letter S. Height: 3 inches (7.6 cm) 1982.325.341 Description: Each with a square top centering a concave well and raised above a square pedestal on four paw feet. One is painted around the top with a bird, an insect, and flower sprays, on two sides are sailboats, and on the other two sides with flowering plants. The second one has the same dragonfly design on all four sides. Provenance: unknown

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Plaque Tin-glazed earthenware Delft, Holland, circa 1750 Mark: none Height: 13.375 inches (34 cm), width: 16.375 inches (41.6 cm) 1982.325.591

cartouche beneath an iron-red flame device, flanked by iron-red, yellow, and blue flowers and green leafage on a manganese ground. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated August 13, 1970 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 17 Comments: This plaque was hanging on the wall in Shutze’s kitchen next to the openshelved cabinet filled with his “everyday” Canton porcelain dishes.

Description: The center of the plaque is painted with a black, green, and yellow bird in a yellow and manganese cage, recessed within a framework molded as iron-red and yellow-fringed blue drapery surmounted by a baldachin painted with a blue landscape roundel. At the bottom is a blue landscape

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Garniture set Tin-glazed earthenware De Porceleyne Claeuw Factory Circa 1780, Delft, Holland Mark: claw marks and numerals 150 in manganese on the base of each vase Height: vase and cover 12.5 inches (31.8 cm), beaker 8.75 inches (22.2 cm) 1982.325.372 Description: Composed of three baluster vases and covers with parrot knops, and a pair of beakers, each piece of hexagonal section, and painted on the front in blue, manganese, iron-red, yellow, and green with flowers arranged in a tan and orange urn within a blue scrollmolded cartouche, the reverse painted with a foliate sprig. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated November 29, 1957 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 5

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Portrait roundel Terra cotta Jean-Baptiste Nini (1717–86) France, circa 1779 Diameter: 6.375 inches (16.2 cm) 1982.325.83 Description: The roundel is molded in relief with a profile portrait of the head of Benjamin Franklin surrounded by the inscription: “ERIPUIT. COELO. FULMEN.SCEPTRUMQUE.TIRANNIS.1779” and “NINI F.,” the truncation of the shoulder incised “I.B.NINI.F 1778,” and molded with a rococo coat of arms, all within a molded self-frame. Provenance: The Ceramic Book Company, Newport, England, invoice dated June 17, 1955 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 3 Comments: Jean-Baptiste Nini, an Italian artist, worked in Paris during the time Franklin was there. For nine years Franklin lived abroad and was immensely popular with the French.

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Dessert service Twelve soup plates, diameter: 9.375 inches (23.8 cm) Pair of sauceboats with swan-neck handles and four clustered paw feet, height: 8.375 inches (21.3 cm) Tear-shaped sauceboat stand, length: 10.25 inches (26 cm) Twelve dinner plates, diameter: 9.375 inches (23.8 cm) Oval dish, length: 10 inches (25.4 cm) Pair of square dishes, length: 7.5 inches (19.1 cm) Pair of oval sauce tureens on attached stands with six paw feet, and covers with gilt pomegranate knops, height: 6.675 inches (16.8 cm), length: 8.25 inches (21 cm) (one shown) Pair of oval sauce tureens raised on two demi-caryatid supports on attached stands with six paw feet, and covers with gilt griffin knops, height: 8.25 inches (21 cm), length: 8.5 inches (21.6 cm) (one shown)

Hard-paste porcelain Darte Frères Factory, 1804–09 Paris, France Mark: DARTE FRÈRES A PARIS stenciled in iron-red on the bases of sauceboat stand, square dishes, on small oval sauces, medium oval sauces and coolers 1982.325.496 Description: Each piece is decorated in orange and gold with a central roundel initialed “JM” and with a wide border of circular paterae, palmettes, and other neoclassical foliate devices within gilt bands. The set comprises fifty pieces.

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Pair of lozenge-shaped dishes, length: 9.675 inches (24.4 cm) Set of six pots de crème with gilt loop handles and covers with gilt ball knops, height: 3.375 inches (8.6 cm) (two shown) Mustard pot on an attached circular stand, and cover with a gilt conical knob, height: 4.75 inches (12.1 cm), stand diameter: 5.75 inches (14.6 cm) (shown) Pair of circular fruit coolers and covers (liners missing), the bowl rims affixed with lion heads, and the bowls raised on the shoulders of three burnished gold figures of demi-cherubs surrounding a central fluted support, all above an incurvate triangular gilt base raised on three paw feet, the covers with deep central wells obscuring the columnar handles, height: 11 inches (27.9 cm) (shown)

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Provenance: Joachim Murat, Paris; Rich’s, Atlanta, Georgia, with an invoice from W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, dated December 28, 1955 Notes: PTS inventory, page 6; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 3 Comments: Joachim Murat (1767–1815) was a French cavalry commander and one of Emperor Napoleon I’s thirteen marshals. In 1800 he married Napoleon’s sister Maria Annunciata Bonaparte and in 1808 became king of Naples under the title Joachim I Napoleon, the “Dandy King.” Upon his defeat by the Austrian army at Tolentino, May 2–3, 1815, he was captured and executed on October 13, 1815.

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CHAPTER III

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The Chinese tury bone-porcelain method of making hardbecame the standard paste porcelain was indebody for the manufacture pendently discovered in of porcelain in England. English Porcelain England before 1768 and The potteries in StaffordTureen, England. patented that year by Tureen and cover, circa 1765, shire are well known for William Cookworthy of West Pans Factory; each piece their figures and tableware. molded as overlapping leaves Plymouth. In 1770 it was alternately decorated under Their pottery was decotransferred to the Bristol the glaze in “Littler’s blue,” a rated with pearlware glazes deep blue glaze developed by Factory and purchased three William Littler. and transfer printing. years later by Richard Combining different colChampion. Many successful and artisored clays produced agateware and tic imitations of true porcelain were tortoiseshell earthenware. Josiah made in Europe and England using Wedgwood and Thomas Whieldon glass and other materials like flint and are well known for their semi-translubone to create a soft-paste porcelain. cent glazes. Perhaps the best known Some of the factories producing is creamware, a cream-colored earthporcelain in England in the eighteenth enware made with ball clays and flint. century were Bow, Chelsea, Derby, Wedgwood, who was a great entreBristol, Worcester, Caughley, Longton preneur, gave a set to Queen Charlotte, Hall, Lowestoft, Liverpool, Plymouth, and it became known as and Spode. During the nineteenth cen“Queensware.” Facing page: Ceramic Circle of Atlanta tablesetting exhibition, February 2000. Tea service, circa 1810, factory unknown, Philip Trammell Shutze Collection.

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ENGLISH PORCELAIN “Goat and Bee” jug Soft-paste porcelain Chelsea Factory, Triangle Period, 1745–48 London, England Mark: incised triangle under the base Height: 4.25 inches (10.8 cm) 1982.325.35 Description: Modeled as two goats lying in opposite directions at the base of a pear-shaped jug with a sinuous leafy branch handle. The front of the jug is molded beneath the spout with a flowering branch applied with a small bee. Provenance: D. M. & P. Manheim, New York City, invoice and letter dated December 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 19; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 7

“Hound and Vase” double scent bottle and stoppers Soft-paste porcelain Chelsea Factory, Red Anchor Period, circa 1756 London, England Mark: none Height: 2.8125 inches (7.1 cm) 1982.325.478 Description: Modeled as a tan-spotted greyhound, seated beside a gilt-gadrooned urn, the dog’s head forming one stopper, and a bird perched on the gadrooned cover of the urn forming the other stopper. The urn and the domed base are painted with colorful floral sprigs, and the concave underside is painted with a floral spray. The bottle necks, foot rim, and dog’shead stopper are mounted in gold. Provenance: The collection of Jessie Woolworth Donahue, New York, sold at the Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., in New York City on April 28, 1972, sale number 3358, lot 96, page 30 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 19

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One of four “Strawberry Leaf” soup plates Soft-paste porcelain Chelsea Factory, Gold Anchor Period, 1760–65 London, England Mark: brown anchor marks Diameter: 9 inches (22.9 cm) to 9.5 inches (24.1 cm) 1982.325.481 Description: Each is painted in the center with shades of puce, yellow, green, blue, and brown with scattered sprigs of fruit, berries, flowers, and insects. The rim is molded and painted in iron-red, yellow, and green with three strawberry plants and three large leaves. Provenance: unknown

Candlestick Soft-paste porcelain Bow Factory, circa 1750 Stratford, West Ham, London, England Mark: none Height: 4.75 inches (12 cm) 1982.325.34 Description: After a Chinese blanc de chine model, the leaf-molded, scalloped bobèche is supported on a cylindrical standard entwined with a snarling dragon, raised on three lion’s-mask-and-paw feet. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated April 21, 1954 Notes: PTS inventory, page 26; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2

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One each of four knife and fork handles Soft-paste porcelain Bow Factory, circa 1755 Stratford, West Ham, London, England Mark: none Lengths: Knife handles 3.125 inches (7.9 cm); fork handles 2.75 inches (7 cm) 1982.325.397 Description: Each is of pistol shape and painted in iron-red, blue, green, and gold with scattered small sprigs and blossoms. All are now mounted with silver collars, four affixed with a steel knife blade, and four with a steel two-tined fork. Provenance: The Art Exchange, New York City, invoice dated December 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 18; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6

Figure of a squirrel Soft-paste porcelain Bow Factory, circa 1760 Stratford, West Ham, London, England Mark: none Height: 8.375 inches (21.3 cm) 1982.325.29 Description: After the Meissen model by Johann Joachim Kaendler, the animal, with fur delineated in brown and his eyes and claws in black, is depicted nibbling a small green, rose, and yellow fruit held in both forepaws, and seated amidst rose and blue florets and green leaves on a scroll-footed base heightened in rose and green. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated 1954 Notes: PTS inventory, page 26; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2

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Figure of a cockerel Soft-paste porcelain Bow Factory, circa 1760 Stratford, West Ham, London, England Mark: none Height: 4 inches (10.2 cm) 1982.325.120 Description: His plumage is colored in yellow, purple, iron-red, and turquoise, with iron-red comb and wattles, and a black and tan beak and legs. He is modeled perched above a rose floret and green leaves on a mound base molded with rose-heightened rocaillerie. Provenance: Walter Willson, Chicago, Illinois, invoice dated May 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 6; Shutze archives MSS 498, Folder 13, Folder 5

Pair of figures of seated pigeons Soft-paste porcelain Bow Factory Stratford, West Ham, London, England, circa 1760 Mark: none Length: 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) and 6.75 inches (17.1 cm) 1982.325.60 Description: Both have plumage colored in purple, puce, mauve, brown, and touches of blue, and a salmon beak and feet. Provenance: Boswell and Ward, London Marshall Field Company, Chicago, invoice dated May 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 6; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 5

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“Quail pattern” baskets Soft-paste porcelain Bow Factory, 1760–65 Stratford, West Ham, London, England Mark: none Diameter: 6.125 inches (15.6 cm) and 6.25 inches (15.9 cm) 1982.325.279 Description: Each is painted in the center in a Kakiemon palette of iron-red, blue, and turquoise, and gilding with a brace of quail beneath a flowering tree under an iron-red scroll border around the interior rim. The exterior is molded with pierced basketwork applied at the intersections with yellowcentered blue florets above a border of iron-red spearheads around the rope-molded foot rim, and affixed at the sides with yellow and green ropework handles issuing branches of forget-me-nots. Provenance: The collection of Luke Vincent Lockwood, Greenwich, Connecticut, sold at the Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., in New York City on May 15, 1954, sale number 1521, lot 387, page 90, illustrated on page 91 Notes: PTS inventory, page 25; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2 Comments: The term “Kakiemon” refers to the asymmetrical design and color palette associated with the Japanese artist Sakaida Kakiemon (1596–1666). His “quail” pattern is well known and was imitated at Meissen, Chantilly, and a number of mid-eighteenth-century English porcelain factories. The Kakiemon family of potters still works in Japan.

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Figure of James Quin as “Falstaff” Soft-paste porcelain Derby Factory, circa 1780 England Mark: incised number 291 Height: 11.625 inches (29.5 cm) 1982.325.49 Description: The portly actor is wearing a plumed brown hat, a gilt-edged iron-red doublet, and white ruff over a patterned gilt, iron-red, green, and black waistcoat belted in brown with a list issuing from his right pocket, a yellow shirt, patterned blue breeches, and tan-cuffed brown boots. He is holding a sword in his right hand and a gilt oval shield in his left, standing before a mottled brown and green tree trunk amidst maroon primroses on a gilt-heightened scroll-molded base. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated June 24, 1959 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 7 Comments: James Quin, born in 1693, was an actor at Drury Lane who became famous for his role as Sir John Falstaff in the comedy The Merry Wives of Windsor, written by William Shakespeare.

Figure of “Africa” Soft-paste porcelain Derby Factory, circa 1820 Derby, England Mark: none Height: 9.875 inches (25 cm) 1982.325.92 Description: The allegorical figure is from a set of “The Four Continents” after the Meissen model by Friedrick Elias Meyer. The child Blackamoor, wearing a brown elephant’s-head hat and pink-lined yellow drapery sprigged in puce, is holding a pale blue cornucopia brimming with colorful fruit and standing above a tan lion with his left knee resting on the lion’s back on a mottled green and brown mound applied with florets and leaves edged with pink and gilt scrollwork. The title “AFRICA” is inscribed in gilding on the front of the base. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 13; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 5

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Tureen with cover West Pans Factory, circa 1765 Musselburgh, Scotland Mark: crossed L’s in underglaze-blue Diameter: 8.125 inches (20.6 cm) 1982.325.111 Description: Each piece is molded as overlapping leaves alternately decorated under the glaze in “Littler’s blue” heightened in white enamel with floral cartouches, or painted in rose, purple, iron-red, yellow, and green with floral sprigs and sprays. The handles and knop are formed as green-edged leaves veined in iron-red. Provenance: D. M. & P. Manheim, New York City, letter dated December 29, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 19; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 7 Comments: This class of wares, formerly thought to be early products of the Longton Hall factory in Staffordshire, has been reascribed to West Pans, where William Littler established a porcelain factory (near Edinburgh) around 1764 after the closing of his factory at Longton Hall. The term “Littler’s blue” refers to rich underglaze-blue color developed by Littler.

“King of Prussia” mug Soft-paste porcelain Worcester Factory, 1757 Worcester, England Mark: none Height: 3.438 inches (8.7 cm) 1982.325.121 Description: The cylindrical body is transfer-printed in black with an engraving by Robert Hancock, depicting a bustlength portrait of Frederick the Great above the date 1757 and “KING of PRUSSIA.” Beneath a Cupid flying with a wreath, the monarch is pointing toward a cluster of war trophies beneath battle pennants to the left. To the right is the anchor rebus of Richard Holdship above the inscription “RH Worcester.” On the reverse is the trumpeting Angel of Fame to the right of the ridged loop handle. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated November 29, 1960 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 8

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“Cabbage Leaf ” jug Soft-paste porcelain Worcester Factory, First Period, 1775–80 Worcester, England Mark: none Height: 10.125 inches (25.7 cm) 1982.325.90 Description: Molded around the body with overlapping leaves and around the neck with fluting interrupted by the mask-form spout. Beneath the spout is painted the coat of arms of Annesley, Viscount of Glerawly of County Fermanagh surmounted by the Moor’s head crest and Viscount’s coronet flanked by a wide border of green oak leaves and gilt acorns on a black band above a gilt berried vine. Both borders are repeated around the neck, and the base has a further gilt vine border. Provenance: Sainsbury Collection, Bournemouth, England (according to a small note card); Charles Willson, Chicago, Illinois, invoice dated 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 6; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 5 Comments: Letter from Willson Galleries to Shutze, dated November 29, 1951: “same mold shown on Plate #56, page 90, R.L. Hobson’s WORCESTER PORCELAIN.”

Teapot and cover Hard-paste porcelain Champion’s Bristol Factory, circa 1775 Bristol, England Mark: none Height: 6 inches (15.2 cm) 1982.325.405 Description: The spherical body is painted on either side and on the cover in iron-red, yellow, blue, purple, and green with sprays and sprigs of flowers. The cover rim and the foliate-molded spout are edged in brown, and the handle is molded with foliage. Provenance: unknown Notes: PTS inventory, page 13 Shutze notes in his inventory “Bristol teapot”— “Brown,” which might suggest that he purchased this through W.E. Browne Decorating Company in Atlanta, no date.

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Pair of figures of “Anthony and Cleopatra” Porcelaneous body Enoch Wood, circa 1800 Burslem, Staffordshire, England Mark: none Length: 12.25 inches (31.1 cm) and 12.5 inches (31.7 cm) 1982.325.332 Description: Anthony is wearing an iron-red-belted pink mantle and gilt scalework breastplate with lion’s mask sleeves over a pale blue skirt with a gilt foliate border, and puce, iron-red, and gilt sandals. He is modeled gazing upward, holding the gilt handle of his sword, and reclining on mottled green and brown rockwork. Cleopatra is wearing a pink mantle over her brown hair, a pink-lined turquoise décolleté robe edged with gilt pebblework borders and patterned with pink rose sprigs within gilt circlets, and iron-red and gilt sandals, and an asp entwined around her left arm. She is modeled asleep with her left arm over her head, and reclining on mottled green and brown rockwork. Each figure is on a rectangular base marbleized in orange, iron-red, rose, turquoise, and black. Provenance: Plummer LTD, New York City, invoice dated 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 6; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 4 Comments: These figures are featured in a Plummer advertisement in The Magazine ANTIQUES, April 1946, page 221.

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Partial tea service Soft-paste porcelain John Rose Factory, circa 1810 Coalport, Shropshire, England Mark: pattern No. 159 in gold 1982.325.577 Description: Each piece is painted in under-glaze blue, iron-red, green, yellow, and gold with a somewhat abstract “Japan� pattern of flowering trees and shrubbery within gilt-edged rim. The teapot, sugar bowl, and milk jug have gilt palmette borders around the shoulder. The partial set, lacking cups and saucers, comprises: Oval teapot and cover, height: 6.75 inches (17.1 cm) Oval sugar bowl and cover, height: 5.375 inches (13.7 cm) Cake plate, diameter: 7.25 inches (18.4 cm) (not shown) Waste bowl, diameter: 6.375 inches (16.2 cm) Oval teapot stand, length: 7.25 inches (18.4 cm) Oval milk jug, height: 4.75 inches (12 cm) Provenance: unknown

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ENGLISH POTTERY Teapot and cover Salt-glazed stoneware Staffordshire, England, 1745–55 Mark: none Height: 5.375 inches (13.7 cm) 1982.325.404 Description: The globular body is mold-applied all around in crisp relief with roses, scroll motifs, and a border of scrolls, palmettes, and leafage. It has a crabstock handle and spout and is raised on three paw feet. The cover has a bird-form knop. Provenance: unknown

One of a pair of plates Tin-glazed earthenware Bristol or Wincanton, England, circa 1750 Mark: none Diameter: 8.75 inches (22.2 cm) 1982.325.80 Description: Each has a powdered manganese ground reserved in the center with a quatrefoil panel painted in blue with a windswept tree and two small cottages in a river landscape. The rim is reserved with four blue fish. Provenance: David Stockwell, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 14; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 7 Comments: Correspondence from David Stockwell, April 17, 1952, states: “This set we believe to be identical to a part of the collection in the Queen Anne dining room, [in the] Winterthur [Museum].” Literature: The plates are illustrated in David Stockwell’s advertisement in The Magazine ANTIQUES, April 1952, page 319.

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“Pecten Shell” teapot and cover Solid agateware Staffordshire, England, 1750–60 Mark: none Height: 5 inches (12.7 cm) 1982.325.185 Description: The cream-colored body is marbleized in brown and blue, press-molded on either side as a scallop shell, and affixed with a plain loop handle and curved spout. The similarly molded cover has a mushroom knop. Provenance: unknown

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Oval basket Salt-glazed stoneware Staffordshire, England, circa 1760 Mark: none Length: 9.3125 inches (23.7 cm) 1982.325.448 Description: The exterior is press-molded with diamond-pierced basketwork, impressed at the intersections with small florets, the ends with twisted loop handles. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated November 28, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 15; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6

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Teapot and cover Salt-glazed stoneware Staffordshire, England, circa 1761 Mark: none Height: 4.25 inches (10.8 cm) 1982.325.403 Description: This rare enameled teapot and cover commemorates the marriage of George III in 1761. The globular body is molded with fluting reserved on either side with a scroll-edged cartouche molded with King George III wearing rose and purple robes and a yellow crown, and Queen Charlotte wearing a rose dress and yellow crown. They are seated on either side of an arch surmounted by two purple-winged cherub heads and a rose-cloaked figure in flight with a green wreath, all between green borders repeated on the cover between two further molded cherub heads and a fruit-form knop. The handle is molded with ridges and the spout with leafage. Provenance: unknown

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Teapot and cover “Tortoiseshell”-glazed cream-colored earthenware Staffordshire, England, circa 1765 Mark: none Height: 4.75 inches (12.1 cm) 1982.325.100 Description: The hexagonal body is molded on each side with a panel of a chinoiserie figural scene: two depicting a Chinaman and a bird, the third a Chinese lady and child by a table. The rim and cover rim have a fretwork border of “cash medallions,” and the whole is in stripes of brown and yellow underglaze-oxides. The foliate-molded handle and spout are covered in a green glaze. Provenance: unknown Comments: According to David Barker and Pat Halfpenny, Unearthing Staffordshire (Stoke-on-Trent, 1990), page 56, traditionally, this chinoiserie teapot form was attributed to the Staffordshire potter William Greatbach on the basis of a misinterpretation of an ambiguous invoice. While shards of this model were excavated from the Greatbach factory waste tip, they also have been found on other sites in Stoke-on-Trent, including Thomas Whieldon’s factory site at Fenton Vivian.

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Teapot and cover Cream-colored earthenware (creamware) Staffordshire, England, circa 1770 Mark: none Height: 4 inches (10.2 cm) 1982.325.402 Description: The spherical body and cover have a russet-enameled ground reserved with black-edged vinelike stripes patterned in black with florets and oeils de perdix, and the beaded rim is edged in gilding. It has a basket-molded spout and an S-scroll handle, and the cover has a mushroom-shaped knop. Provenance: unknown

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Sauceboat and stand, “Fox and Swan” Pearlware Staffordshire, England, circa 1780 Mark: none Length: sauceboat 7.5 inches (19 cm) and stand 7.5 inches (19 cm) 1982.325.55 Description: The sauceboat has a spout modeled as a brown fox’s head rising from green-glazed grasses. The handle is formed as the arched neck of a yellow-beaked swan with blue heightened plumage. The stand is molded as a spread-winged swan also with blue-heightened plumage. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated February 27, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 23; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1

Flask Pearlware Possibly Ralph Wood Jr. Burslem, Staffordshire, England, circa 1780 Mark: none Length: 6.125 inches (15.5 cm) 1982.325.119 Description: The oval vessel is molded on either side with Cupid standing beside the scantily draped Venus, seated and holding a billowing drapery, and the edge is molded with husks. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated November 29, 1960 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 8

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Coffee pot and cover Cream-colored earthenware (creamware) Leeds, Yorkshire, England, circa 1780 Mark: none Height: 10.625 inches (27.3 cm) 1982.325.173

tree in a landscape with a distant church and windmill, all within an ironred scroll-edged cartouche issuing berried branches. The domed cover has a reduced version of the scene beneath the floral knop. The foliatemolded spout is heightened in iron-red, and the entwined fluted-strap handle has iron-red and green floral terminals. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated December 19, 1961 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 9

Description: Decorated in Holland, the pear-shaped body is painted on either side in iron-red, green, black, yellow, and puce with a shepherd and his seated companion holding a bowl of fruit beside two recumbent sheep beneath a

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Pair of ewers Cream-colored earthenware (creamware) Leeds, Yorkshire, England, circa 1785 Mark: none Height: 9.875 (25 cm) inches and 10 inches (25.4 cm) 1982.325.183 Description: Each has a fluted pear-shaped body with a waisted neck and foliate-scroll-molded valanced rim above a flaring ogee foot molded also with fluting. The entwined reeded-strap handles have floral terminals. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated May 31, 1963 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 11

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Pair of “George Washington” plates Pearlware Joshua Heath Hanley, Staffordshire, England, circa 1789 Mark: impressed numeral 3 and I H Diameter: 9.625 inches (24.4 cm) 1982.325.63 Description: Each plate is transfer-printed in underglaze-blue with two roundels, one depicting a bust portrait inscribed “WASHINGTON PRESIDENT” and the other enclosing the Great American Eagle. Above and below are shells and trailing sea plants. The rim has a diaper, spearhead, and dumbbell border. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated January 31, 1955 Notes: PTS inventory, page 26; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 3 Literature: Hayden Goldberg in “The Earliest Known Example of Historical Blue Staffordshire,” The Magazine ANTIQUES, July 1981, page 178, plate 1, illustrates an identical plate and suggests that it was the only one known at the time of publication.


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Three obelisks Pearlware The Wood Family Burslem, Staffordshire, England, circa 1790 Mark: none Height: 16.375 inches (41.6 cm) 1982.325.94

Height: 10.375 (27 cm) inches and 10.25 inches (26 cm) 1982.325.95 Description: The pair of smaller obelisks is marbleized in shades of cream, blue, ochre, black, and two shades of brown above a blue square base applied on the front and back with a cream-colored oval medallion heightened in worn gilding and depicting “Hercules and the Nemean Lion,� between creamcolored acanthus-molded borders above a black foot rim. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated November 28, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 27; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6

Description: The taller obelisk is covered in a porphyry-marbleized slip colored in cream, blue, and two shades of brown, above a blue square pedestal applied on each side with a cream-colored patera between leaf-molded borders. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated January 30, 1954 Notes: PTS inventory, page 15; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2

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Figure of Demosthenes Pearl-glazed earthenware Wood & Caldwell Burslem, Staffordshire, England, 1790–1810 Mark: none Height: 18.25 inches (46.3 cm) 1982.325.99 Description: The particularly large figure of the orator, also referred to as “St. Paul Preaching at Athens” and “Eloquence,” was modeled by Enoch Wood after the sculpture by Sir Henry Cheere as a brown-bearded orator wearing an ermine-lined brown cloak over a rose robe, leaning forward with his right arm extended. He is standing barefooted beside a graymarbleized column molded with a mythological figure of Hermes and surmounted by a scroll and a quill, on a black-marbleized base. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, receipt dated November 3, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 27; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1 Comments: Enoch Wood and James Caldwell were partners from 1790 to 1818, producing a variety of earthenware figures and wares. The factory continued from 1818 to 1846 as Enoch Wood & Sons, and during this period exported large quantities of pottery to North America.

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Pair of Liverpool jugs Cream-colored earthenware (creamware) Liverpool, England, circa 1800 Mark: none Height: 9.875 inches (24.8 cm) 1982.325.164

the first fifteen states. Under the spout is a roundel formed of wheat, husks, kegs, and flowers enclosing the inscription “C & S DEVENS.” The rim and handle are edged in black enamel. Provenance: Katrina Kipper, Queen Anne Cottage, Boston and Accord, Massachusetts, letter dated 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 6; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 4 Literature: The jugs are illustrated in a Queen Anne Cottage advertisement in The Magazine ANTIQUES, January 1950, page 2.

Description: Each jug is transfer-printed in black and enameled on one side with a ship with a black and yellow hull flying the American flag over a green sea above the name “AMAZON.” On the reverse side is an oval medallion containing a portrait of George Washington flanked by the allegorical figures of Justice and Liberty within a border of stars and the names of

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Allegorical figure of “Peace” Pearl-glazed earthenware Wood & Caldwell Burslem, Staffordshire, England, 1800–10 Mark: none Height: 30 inches (76.2 cm) 1982.325.450 Description: The massive figure is modeled probably by Enoch Wood as a classical maiden with yellow-bound brown hair, with skin heightened in flesh tones, and wearing a décolleté blue-lined yellow robe with one sleeve and patterned with brown and turquoise “cailloute”-type motifs. She is gazing down at the purple-winged white dove held in her left hand, her left arm resting on a square pedestal, marbleized in black, and standing barefooted on a black rectangular base. Provenance: Ginsburg & Levy Inc., New York City, invoice dated November 3, 1972

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Jug and cover Pearlware Leeds, Yorkshire, England, circa 1805 Mark: none Height: 5.75 inches (14.6 cm) 1982.325.37 Description: The jug has a foliate-molded spout and an entwined fluted strap handle with floral terminals, and the cover has a floral knop. Each piece is decorated with a sponged manganese ground bisected by a checkered band of white and brown slip. Provenance: unknown

Figural group of putto and lioness Pearl-glazed earthenware Staffordshire, England, 1810–15 Mark: none Height: 5.75 inches (14.6 cm) 1982.325.412 Description: The naked child is blowing a green horn and is seated astride a yellow lioness with a black muzzle and paws walking on a green and brown oval mound base applied with pink florets and moss cluster. Provenance: unknown

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Pair of figures of lions Pearlware Wood & Caldwell Fountain Place, Burslem, Staffordshire, England, 1810–15 Mark: none Length: 5 inches (12.7 cm) 1982.325.78 Description: The beasts are modeled affronté̃, recumbent on an iron-red-edged rectangular base, each with a shaded tan and brown coat and mane, and iron-red and black-heightened eyes and mouth. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated 1951 Notes: PTS inventory, page 13; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 5

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Allegorical figure of “Fire” Pearl-glazed earthenware John Dale Burslem, Staffordshire, England, circa 1815 Mark: impressed on the reverse “I. Dale Burslem” Height: 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) 1982.325.45 Description: The youth is wearing a black hat, an iron-red cloak over a white jacket trimmed in iron-red and green, and yellow breeches. He is holding two flaming torches and standing against a green tree trunk on a green mound base edged with blue rocaillerie and inscribed on the front “FIRE.” Provenance: Uncertain, but probably from a group of figures without description on an invoice from W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, March 31, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 23 Literature: Illustrated by Pat Halfpenny, English Earthenware Figures, 1740–1840, Antique Collectors’ Club (Woodbridge, Suffolk, England, 1991), page 243

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Large farmyard group Pearl-glazed earthenware Charles Tittensor Shelton, Staffordshire, England, 1815–1823 Mark: impressed TITTENSOR on the reverse Length: 14.375 inches (36.5 cm) 1982.325.359 Description: This unusually large figural group is composed of a shepherd wearing a black hat, a blue jacket, an ochre-striped waistcoat, and ochre breeches, and his companion wearing an ochre skirt and patting a lamb, both standing at the crotch of an ochre and blue-flowering large green leafy tree. Beneath them are a recumbent lamb and brown-spotted goat flanked by a large ochre-spotted cow and a brown-spotted horse surrounded by a kneeling shepherdess similarly dressed to the shepherd’s companion, a pair of black-spotted ochre deer, and an ochre-spotted

sheep and ram all on a large green mound base applied with rows of blue and yellow florets. Provenance: Mrs. Giles Whiting, New York, sold at Sotheby Parke Bernet, Inc., in New York City on April 14, 1972, sale number 3346, lot 87, page 14 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 19 Literature: Illustrated by Pat Halfpenny in English Earthenware Figures, 1740–1840, Antique Collectors’ Club (Woodbridge, Suffolk, England, 1991), page 108

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Figure of “The Roran Lion” Pearl-glazed earthenware Staffordshire, England, 1825–35 Mark: none Length: 12.125 inches (30.8 cm) 1982.325.371 Description: With a greenish-tan coat, and brown mane, tail, and nose, his iron-red tongue lapping from his open mouth, he is modeled standing with his foot on a globe patterned with black wrigglework and bisected by numbers, on a green rectangular base raised on six black feet. The base is inscribed on the front “THE RORAN LION.” Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated May 31, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 23; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1 Comments: So-called table base figures and groups of this type traditionally have been attributed to the Staffordshire potter Obadiah Sherrat, but apparently without any supporting documentation or marked examples. During the vogue for these colorful ornaments in the second quarter of the nineteenth century, they must have been made by a number of capable Staffordshire potters.

Bust of George Washington Black basaltes Wedgwood Etruria, Staffordshire, England, circa 1876 Mark: impressed WEDGWOOD on both socle and bust Height: 18.25 inches (46.4 cm) 1982.325.165 Description: His head is turned slightly to the left, and modeled with his hair en queue, his shoulders bare, and raised on a waisted circular socle. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated March 31, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 28; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1 Comments: Shutze, the classicist and patriot, had several images of George Washington in his collection, including a reproduction of the 1795 “Vaughn” portrait of Washington by Gilbert Stuart, now in the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. Shutze’s painting, a reproduction by the artist C. Gregory Stapko, hung over the mantel in his living room.

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CHAPTER IV

FURNITURE

In the first quarter of the opened a group of twelve twentieth century there was period rooms under the Walnut armchair, a growth of interest in leadership of Luke Vincent Philadelphia, PA. Philadelphia armchair, circa American decorative arts, Lockwood. Lockwood 1760, with shell carved at driven partly by nostalgia, wrote Colonial Furniture in crestrail above a solid vasiform splat with beaded arms and and also by the recognition America in 1901, one of the cabriole legs ending in trifid feet. Shutze purchased furniof the beauty and merits of first scholarly books on ture from prominent dealers American furniture and American furniture. Shutze in Pennsylvania, New York, and New England. This armarchitecture. In 1909 the bought several items from chair was bought from David Metropolitan Museum of the auction sale of Stockwell’s store, Latimer House, in Philadelphia. Art did not own a single Lockwood’s estate, includpiece of American furniing an important Philadelture, but by 1924 the museum opened phia chest by Jonathan Gostelowe. a new American Wing, exhibiting Shutze’s collection includes AmerAmerican furniture and decorative ican and English furniture, as well as arts in original rooms from colonial Chinese Export lacquered furniture, houses. from the eighteenth century to the In 1929 the Brooklyn Museum early nineteenth century.

Facing page: Living room in Philip Shutze’s apartment, 1982.

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Barometer Walnut, inlaid marquetry John Shaw, Holburn (1710–1715) England, eighteenth century Height: 49 inches (124.5 cm), width: 8 inches (20.3 cm) 1982.325.261 Description: The molded, arcaded architectural cresting is supported by twisted columns above an engraved silver calibrated plate, with a shaped pendant base. Provenance: Garner & Marney, London, England; W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, 1968 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folders 15, 17

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Corner chair Walnut England, early eighteenth century Height: 32 inches (81.3 cm) 1982.325.260 Description: The toprail carved at the center with a shell, the terminals carved with a large flowerhead and leafage, having two solid vasiform splats, the shaped seat continuing to a frontal shell-carved cabriole leg ending in a paw foot and three turned tapering legs ending in pad feet. Provenance: Jessie Woolworth Donahue, New York, sold at Parke Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York City on April 29, 1972, Sale number 3358, lot 450, page 138; W. E. Browne Decorating Company, 1972

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Pair of side chairs with rush seats Maple, pine New England, circa 1740 Height: 40.75 inches (103.5 cm) 1982.325.222 Description: Each has a carved yoke-form crestrail above a solid vasiform splat flanked by molded stiles, the rush seat continuing to block-and-vase turned legs joined by a bead and reel frontal stretcher, continuing to Spanish feet. Provenance: Luke Vincent Lockwood, Greenwich, Connecticut, sold at Parke Bernet Galleries, New York City, sale number 1521, May 15, 1954, lot 495, page 149 Notes: PTS inventory, page 25

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Wall mirror Walnut, gilt, gesso, eglomise Continental, circa 1750 Height: 48 inches (121.9 cm), width: 24 inches (60.9 cm) 1982.325.825 Description: The cresting is carved and gilded and centering a flowerhead and scrolls enclosing a painted glass panel decorated with a young lady wearing a hat and holding a bird, the rectangular mirror plate within a molded and gilded framework, a carved and gilded pendant below. Provenance: Mrs. Giles Whiting, New York; W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated January 1974 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 21 Literature: This mirror is illustrated in an article about Mrs. Giles Whiting in The Magazine ANTIQUES, May 1956, page 434.


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Daybed Maple New England, mid-eighteenth century Length: 67 inches (170.2 cm) 1982.325.250 Description: The long seat is supported on six cabriole legs and two square tapering legs, all joined by block-andvase-turned stretchers, the back ratcheted. Partially painted brown. Provenance: Antique Galleries, Boston, Massachusetts, invoice dated August 31, 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 16; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 4

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Tea table Mahogany Newport, Rhode Island, mid-eighteenth century Height: 28.25 inches (71.7 cm), width: 31 inches (78.7 cm) 1982.325.216 Description: The oblong contoured top has a molded piecrust lip projecting over a scalloped apron edged with a scrolled fillet and enhanced with c-shaped brackets. The cabriole supports end in hoof feet. Provenance: Maurice Rubin, Brookline, Massachusetts, Parke Bernet sale, lot 151, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 10; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6 Comments: Letter from W. E. Browne, dated May 27, 1952: “I enclose herewith the records on the pieces you purchased from the Rubin sale. . . .” Shutze also bought a Frothingham oxbow chest, a pole screen, and a pink luster pitcher at this sale.

Arm chair Walnut Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1760 Height: 39.5 inches (100.3 cm) 1982.325.209 Description: The crestrail is carved at the center with a shell, flanked by prominent ears, above a solid vasiform splat flanked by dishes and beaded arms ending in knuckle terminals. The arm supports continue to a drop-in seat on cabriole legs ending in trifid feet. Provenance: David Stockwell, Latimer House, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, invoice dated April 22, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 10; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 7 Literature: Illustrated in David Stockwell’s Latimer House advertisement in The Magazine ANTIQUES, April 1952, page 319

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One of a pair of side chairs Walnut Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1760 Height: 40 inches (101.6 cm) 1982.325.202 Description: The shaped crestrail has notched ears above a solid vasiform splat, the drop-in seat continuing to cabriole legs ending in paneled trifid feet. Provenance: Mary Ball Washington, Virginia Custis Family, Virginia Strong family, Erie, Pennsylvania David Stockwell, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, letter dated August 1, 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 1; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 4

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Chest of drawers Mahogany Jonathan Gostelowe (1744–95) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1770 Height: 34 inches (86.3 cm), length: 45.5 inches (115.6 cm) 1982.325.249 Description: The molded top is above a case with four cockbeaded and graduated long drawers flanked by carved canted stiles, on ogee bracket feet. Provenance: Luke Vincent Lockwood, Greenwich, Connecticut, sold at Parke-Bernet Galleries in New York City, on May 15, 1954, sale number 1521, lot 533, page 186 Notes: PTS inventory, page 25; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2 Literature: Illustrated by Luke Vincent Lockwood in Colonial Furniture in America, 3rd ed. (New York, 1926), figure 128, page 128

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High chest Maple with mahogany finish Dunlap school New Hampshire, late eighteenth century Height: 72.75 inches (184.8 cm), width: 39.5 inches (100.3 cm) 1982.325.252 Description: In two parts: the upper with a molded cornice above three thumb-molded short drawers, four thumbmolded and graduated long drawers below; the lower section with a long drawer above another long drawer with panels to simulate three small drawers, the central one fan-carved, the skirt carved with fans and scrolls continuing to cabriole legs ending in claw-andball feet. Provenance: unknown

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Secretary bookcase Walnut Pennsylvania, late eighteenth century Height: 99 inches (251 cm), width: 39.25 inches (99.7 cm) 1982.325.207 Description: In two parts: the upper with a molded and dentiled cornice above a blind fret-carved frieze, a pair of cupboard doors with scalloped panels below flanked by stop-fluted quarter columns, the cupboard doors opening to an interior with adjustable shelves and pigeonholes; the lower section with a thumb-molded hinged lid opening to an interior with small drawers, pigeonholes, and a central fan-carved prospect door, the case with four thumb-molded and graduated long drawers flanked by stop-fluted quarter columns continuing to ogee bracket feet. Provenance: Melvin Hubley, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, correspondence dated May 10, 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 9; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 25

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Tambour desk Mahogany Massachusetts, 1790–1800 Height: 44 inches (111.7 cm), width: 36.5 inches (92.7 cm) 1982.325.259 Description: In two parts: the upper with a pair of tambour slides fitted with ivory knobs and opening to an interior with pigeonholes above three small drawers; the lower section with a hinged baize-lined writing flap above a pair of cupboard doors, continuing to bracketed square tapering and molded legs.

Provenance: Mr. R. J. Adams, Plymouth, Massachusetts Mrs. Giles Whiting, New York, sold at Sotheby Parke Bernet, sale number 3345, lot 341, page 50 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 19 Comments: A note inside of the interior right drawer states it “belonged to Mr. R. J. Adams of Plymouth, Mass., the oldest Harvard graduate, age 104.”

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Bow-front chest of drawers Cherry, curly maple, and holly New England, 1790–1810 Height: 37.5 inches (95.2 cm), width: 41 inches (104.1 cm) 1982.325.831 Description: The rectangular top has a bowed front and inlaid edge above a case with four cock-beaded long drawers, veneered with satinwood and rope inlays, serpentine-shaped apron and flaring bracket feet. Provenance: Mrs. Giles Whiting, New York, sold at Sotheby Parke Bernet in New York City, on April 22, 1972, sale number 3346, lot 685, page 108 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 19

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Two-chair-back settee Mahogany Slover and Taylor New York, 1795–1800 Length: 42 inches (106.7 cm) 1982.325.219.A Description: The crestrail has two carved center panels above reeded uprights, the arms decorated with leaf carving on molded downward curving supports, the upholstered seat with a bow-front on reeded tapering legs. Together with a matching side chair. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated October 22, 1958 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 6

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Japanned dressing table Pine, gesso, paint, varnish England, late eighteenth/early nineteenth century Height: 28.5 inches (72.4 cm), width: 29.5 inches (74.9 cm) 1982.325.210 Description: The rectangular top has a molded edge above a skirt with a drawer, on turned tapering legs ending in pad feet; with chinoiserie decorations in the form of figures, pavilions, flowers, and leaves in colors on dark green ground. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated January 31, 1955 Notes: PTS inventory, page 16; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 3

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Tall clock Mahogany David Wood Newburyport, Massachusetts, circa 1800 Height: 88.5 inches (217 cm), width: 18.5 inches (47 cm) 1982.325.205 Description: The hood has a pierced fret centered by three fluted plinths with brass finials above a florally decorated white painted dial fitted with second hand and date register, the maker’s name within a chapter ring painted with Roman numerals and the spandrels painted in colors with stylized flowers. The case has a cupboard door flanked by brass-capped fluted quarter columns continuing to a plain base and ogee bracket feet. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated January 29, 1960 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 8

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Pair of tables, George III Mahogany England, circa 1800 Height: 31 inches (78.7 cm), width: 36.25 inches (92 cm) 1982.325.201 Description: Each with a rectangular top with rounded corners and reeded edge above a case with a single cockbeaded frieze drawer, on square tapering legs. Provenance: Neel Reid, Atlanta, Georgia Notes: PTS inventory, page 10 Shutze notes in the inventory that they are from the Neel Reid collection. Comments: Neel Reid (1885–1926) was the principal designer for Hentz, Reid and Adler in Atlanta. Shutze worked for the firm during his academic years and became the main designer for the firm after Reid’s tragic early death in 1926.

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Card table Mahogany, satinwood Maryland, circa 1800 Height: 29.5 inches (74.9 cm), width: 36 inches (91.4 cm) 1982.325.227 Description: The serpentine-fronted top has an inlaid edge above a skirt inlaid with a satinwood panel and apron, on square tapering legs ending in cross-banded cuffs. Provenance: Miss Ella Parsons, sold at Parke Bernet, sale number 673, lot 158, May 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 10; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 4 Comments: A letter from W. E. Browne, dated May 1950, states the table was “exhibited in Independence Hall in Philadelphia, also [at the] Philadelphia Museum of Art for 80 years.�

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Three-part dining table Mahogany American, circa 1800 Height: 28.75 inches (73 cm), width: 102.25 inches (259.7 cm) 1982.325.824 Description: Comprising two D-shaped ends, each with a beaded apron centering a drop-leaf center section; the whole on square tapering legs. Provenance: Sarah C. Lambden, Atlanta, Georgia, letter dated May 6, 1953 Notes: PTS inventory, page 24; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 13

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Small sideboard Mahogany, curly maple, satinwood Massachusetts, circa 1800 Height: 40 inches (101.6 cm), width: 33.5 inches (85 cm) 1982.325.264 Description: The rectangular top with inlaid edge above a case with three long drawers inlaid with rectangular and oval panels, the dies inlaid with curly maple and continuing to an arched apron with inlaid edge, on ring-turned and

reeded tapering legs ending in brass casters. Inscribed on the back is the name J. Budd or J. Buck. Provenance: Mrs. Giles Whiting, New York, sold at Sotheby Parke Bernet sale number 3345, April 21, 1972, lot 543, page 82 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 19 Literature: Illustrated in The Magazine ANTIQUES, May 1956, page 434

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Cylinder front lady’s writing desk and bookcase Mahogany and maple Massachusetts, circa 1810 Height: 88.5 inches (224.8 cm), width: 41.5 inches (105.4 cm) 1978.635.1 Description: In two parts: the upper with a shaped cornice above an inlaid frieze, a pair of cupboard doors, each with eglomise panels painted with swags which open to an interior with pigeonholes and small drawers, above a pull-out writing surface with two gold-tooled brown leather ratcheted writing flaps, the case with two inland drawers continuing to paneled and inlaid square tapering legs. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated October 22, 1979 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 26 Literature: Illustrated in Sotheby Parke Bernet, Fine Americana catalogue number 4211, lot 1172, January 31, February 1–3, 1979

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One of four side chairs Duncan Phyfe New York, circa 1810 Height: 34 inches (86.3 cm) 1982.325.255 Description: Each chair has a paneled crestrail, the stayrail carved in the form of paired eagles holding a banner in their beaks and centering a bow-knot, the drop-in seat flanked by molded rails continuing to molded sabre legs. Provenance: Sophia Miles Belden Mrs. Giles Whiting, New York, sold at Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York City, on April 22, 1972, sale number 3346, lot 713, page 115, illustration page 114 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 19 Literature: Illustrated in The Magazine ANTIQUES, May 1956, page 435 Illustrated in The Magazine ANTIQUES, January 1960, page 91 Illustrated in J. T. Butler, American Antiques, 1800–1900 (1965), plate 4 Illustrated in McClelland, Duncan Phyfe and the English Regency, 1800–1900, plate 249, page 263 [This book in Shutze’s collection is copy number 83 and is signed by McClelland.]

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Chinese Export lacquer sewing table China, circa 1850 Height: 29 inches (73.6 cm), width: 24 inches (60.9 cm) 1982.325.50.B Description: The rectangular top has rounded corners opening to an interior fitted with lidded compartments and numerous carved ivory implements including spools, needle cases, and frames, the case on lyreform uprights continuing to trestle dragon-form feet. The whole decorated in gilt with Chinese figures, pavilions, and pleasure boats on black ground. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, correspondence dated October 1979 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 26 Comments: Shutze had two lacquer sewing tables. One was bought earlier and is noted in his inventory.

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Pair of bamboo arm chairs Wood, reed, cane China, mid-nineteenth century Height: 35.5 inches (90.1 cm) 1982.325.225 Description: Each chair has a rectangular back composed of smaller segments above a closed-in cane seat, a pierced skirt below, on clustered “bamboo” legs joined by stretchers. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated May 30, 1952 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6 Comments: The W. E. Browne invoice describes the chairs as “1 pair of Reed chairs from Pavilion at Brighton, England.”

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Wall mirror Walnut, gilt Phidelphia, eighteenth century Height: 49.5 inches (129.7 cm), width: 21.75 inches (55.2 cm) 1982.325.214 Description: The upright molded frame is edged with a gilded gesso fillet, having a scalloped and pierced cresting centering a carved and gilded shell above a two-part mirror plate with a shaped pendant below. Provenance: Luke Vincent Lockwood, Greenwich, Connecticut, sold at Parke-Bernet Galleries in New York City, on May 15, 1954, sale number 1521, lot 503, page 155 Notes: PTS inventory, page 25; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2

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SILVER, ART, and DECORATION Most of the English silver Luke Vincent Lockwood. in Shutze’s collection Shutze was a great came from early acquiadmirer of our first pressitions as a collector, purident, and had several Open Silver Salt, chased from British dealers images of him in ceramics, England, 1770s. and estate auctions as well as Above is one of four English textiles, and paintings. salts in Shutze’s collecfrom Atlanta merchants. silver An eclectic mix of decotion. Trencher salts such as Many will recognize the these were used as individual rations, from sailors’ valensalts. Before the eighteenth names of prominent eigh- century, a master salt was tines to charming enamel teenth-century silversmiths, placed at the head of the table boxes to quill work and where the nobility sat. Those such as Hester Bateman, who sat “below the salt” had needlepoint, rounds out his less political and social rank. among his silver collection. collection. In the exhibition His art collection ranges there is a re-creation of a from Chinese Export paintings and table in Shutze’s living room (see the watercolors to English prints. He had photograph by the title page) where he a copy made of the Vaughan Gilbert has placed objects of many different Stuart portrait of George Washington, origins in a decorative display on his which he had hanging over his living eighteenth-century card table. It is an room mantel. In addition he had an example of his wide-ranging interests important portrait by James Sharples and his ability to bring different eleof George Washington, which he ments together in a thoughtful and bought from the estate of the collector unexpected way. Facing page: This is a close-up detail of Hong Kong harbor from the painting by an unknown Chinese artist, first half of the nineteenth century, on page 139. Shutze purchased the painting from Shreve, Crump & Low, Boston, in 1952.

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Three silver casters Erasmus Cope Dublin, Ireland, circa 1732 Height: 7.25 inches (18.4 cm) and 5 inches (12.7 cm) 1982.325.544 Description: One large caster with a pair of smaller size casters; baluster-shaped bodies with fine domed reticulated shaker tops. Provenance: John Bell, Aberdeen, Scotland, receipt dated April 10, 1971 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 18 Comments: In the eighteenth century, spice casters were made in sets of three, one larger than the other two. The smaller pair was used for pepper.

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Silver tankard John Langlands (d. 1793) Newcastle, England, circa 1759 Height: 8 inches (20.3 cm) 1982.325.326 Description: Straight tapering sides and molded girdle; flat bottom with stepped molding; raised circular stepped lid with handle terminating in a heartshaped tailpiece. Provenance: John Bell, Aberdeen, Scotland, receipt dated June 1949 Notes: PTS inventory, page 2; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 3

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Silver kettle and stand Augustin Lesage London, England, circa 1764 Mark: same mark on kettle and stand Height: Kettle and stand 13.75 inches (34.9 cm), Kettle 10 inches (25.4 cm) 1982.325.322 Description: Plain pear-shaped body, the side with molded oval medallion engraved

with the Royal arms in cartouche; ebony wood hinged bail handle; trilateral stand on scroll supports fitted with a central spirit burner. Engraved with crowne ciphers and monograms. The flat cover is surmounted by an ivory knob. Provenance: Marian Davies, Parke-Bernet Galleries, lot 215 Notes: PTS inventory, page 11; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14

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Silver teapot Daniel Smith and Robert Sharp London, England, circa 1769 Height: 6 inches (15.2 cm) 1982.325.324 Description: Globular pedestal base teapot, decorated with bright cutting on shoulder with ebony wood handle; hinged dome cover with fluted knob, gadrooned edges on mouth and handle. Provenance: Ginsburg & Levy, New York City, invoice dated August 1, 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 2; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 4

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Silver footed creamer William Sutton London, England, circa 1787 Height: 6 inches (15.2 cm), base: 2 inches (5.1 cm) 1982.325.892 Description: This George III helmet-shaped cream jug is decorated with bright-cut engraving, and beaded lip with a high-loop molded strap. Provenance: unknown

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Two of four silver open salts Makers undetermined, marks worn England, circa 1776 and 1796 Length: each 2.875 inches (7.3 cm) 1982.325.321.A,C Description: Rectangular trencher salts with clipped corners containing an oval well. Concave sides extend outward to the foot; rim and base with molding. Provenance: John Bell, Aberdeen, Scotland, correspondence dated June 1949 Notes: PTS inventory, page 2; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 3

Silver ladle Hester Bateman (1709–94) London, England, circa 1780 Length: 13 inches (33 cm) 1982.325.320 Description: Plain but graceful punch-ladle; on the end of the handle is an engraved crown above an arm holding an arrow. Provenance: Charles Willis Jewelry, Atlanta, Georgia, no date Notes: PTS inventory, page 2 Comments: Hester Bateman, from a family of silversmiths, recorded her mark in 1761, after her husband died in 1760. Other prominent Bateman silversmiths were Anne, Jonathan, Peter, and William Bateman.


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Silver tea service Robert and David Hennell Thomas Wallis II London, England, circa 1800 1982.325.318 Description: Silver tea service decorated with bright rope cutting around verge and base with oval urn finials, monogram in cartouche. The tea caddy, made by Thomas Wallis II, has a divided center with a lock, and is of a later date (1801). Tea set comprises: Pedestal-base coffee pot, height: 11.25 inches (28.6 cm) Teapot, height: 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) Open sugar bowl, length: 6.25 inches (15.9 cm) Cream jug, length: 5.5 inches (14 cm) Tea caddy, length: 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) Waste bowl, length: 7.5 inches (20 cm) Provenance: John Bell, Aberdeen, Scotland, correspondence dated March 2, 1949 Notes: PTS inventory, page 2; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 3 Literature: Illustrated in an advertisement by John Bell in The Magazine ANTIQUES, March 1949, page 232: “a very rare George III silver tea and coffee service made by R. and D. Hennell, London 1800.” Comments: David Hennell (1712–85) registered his first mark in London in 1736. His son Robert (1741–1811) joined him in 1763.

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Pair of silver sauceboats Joseph Lownes (1754–1820) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1785 Mark: “J. Lownes” Length: 7.5 inches (19 cm) 1982.325.323 Description: Pair of sauceboats with four hoof feet with shell mounts and flying scroll handles. Provenance: David Stockwell, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, letter dated September 1, 1950 Notes: PTS inventory, page 2; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 49

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Portrait of George Washington Pastel James Sharples (1752–1811) America Framed height: 8.5 inches (21.6 cm), width: 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) 1982.325.52 Description: Bust-length figure of Washington in profile to the left with his hair powdered and tied in a queue with a large black bow; black coat, with frilled shirt front. Framed in a giltwood frame with a gold oval mat. Provenance: Acquired from the artist Collection of Colonel James McHenry (1753–1813), to whom it is said to have been presented by Washington Collection of Peter Hoffman, Baltimore, Maryland

Collection of William Manzies Collection of William Manzies Jr., 1897 From J. Percy Sabin, New York Collection of Edwin B. Holden, New York Collection of George S. Palmer Collection of Luke Vincent Lockwood, Greenwich, Connecticut, sold at Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, May 15, 1954, sale number 1521, lot 451, page 120–21 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2 Literature: Recorded and illustrated in Katherine McCook-Knox, The Sharples (1930), number 28. Recorded in J. H. Morgan and Mantle Fielding, The Life Portraits of George Washington (1931), page 404, number 12.

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Painting “Hong Kong” Oil on canvas Artist unknown China, 1835–50 Framed height: 23 inches (58.4 cm), framed width: 35.75 inches (90.8 cm) 1982.325.127 Description: Hong Kong harbor as seen from Kowloon on the mainland with various types of boats in the harbor and buildings on the hillside of the mountainous landscape. “HONG KONG” is written at center bottom. It is in the original Chinese Export frame. Provenance: Shreve, Crump and Low Co., Boston, Massachusetts, September 17, 1952 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 7 Literature: Illustrated in an advertisement by Shreve, Crump and Low in The Magazine ANTIQUES, September 1952, back cover.

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Painting, view of Canton Oil on canvas Youqua China, circa 1850 Framed height: 16.75 inches (42.5 cm), width: 29.75 inches (75.6 cm) 1982.325.74.A Description: Oil painting of the view of Canton Harbor with the hongs along the waterfront, bearing American, British, and French flags, among others, and with the steamship Willamette in the right foreground; behind the steamship is the church which was built circa 1848. The back bears the label of Youqua, Old Street No. 34, Queens Road. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated August 31, 1953 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1 Comments: Youqua was one of the prominent Chinese painters in the midnineteenth century. He is well known for his scenes of the harbors in China. The attached label gives his addresses as 34 Old Street (Canton) and Queens Road (Hong Kong), which indicates he was working in both cities at this time. The hongs in Canton were established for Westerners to trade with the Chinese. They were limited to only thirteen countries, which flew their national flags to indicate their residences. America entered into the China Trade in 1784 after independence from England. The height of trade in Canton was from 1720 to 1860. The hongs were destroyed by fire in 1822, were rebuilt only to be destroyed by fire again in 1841 and 1856, and then not rebuilt.

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Painting, Flemish landscape Oil on canvas Artist unknown China, late eighteenth, nineteenth century Framed height: 26 inches (66 cm), framed width: 37.5 inches (95.2 cm) 1982.325.166 Description: Western-style painting of a pastoral river scene depicting a boat in front of a farmhouse and barn with domestic “barnyard animals,” in original wood frame. Provenance: Arthur Sussell, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, correspondence dated November 1961 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 9 Comments: Letter dated April 10, 1978, from Crosby Forbes, founder/curator of the Museum of the American China Trade, written after his visit to Shutze’s home: “The next thing I admired greatly was the Chinese painting in the bedroom which I took to be of a Dutch scene, c. 1770–90. Its original Chinese Hogarth-style frame is also very rare. I have never seen another like this and consider it very special.”

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Framed colored map, “Carolina, Florida, and the Bahamas Islands” Hand-colored engraving I. Michael Seligmann (1720–62) Germany Framed height: 28.75 inches (73 cm), width: 34.5 inches (87.6 cm) 1982.325.614 Description: Colored map showing Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, and Florida, with the Bahamas, the islands of Cuba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico and Hispaniola, and the Yucatan Peninsula. Provenance: The Old Print Shop, New York City, receipt dated July 2, 1953 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 1 Literature: William P. Cumming, The Southeast in Early Maps (Chapel Hill, 1998), map #292, page 273. Comments: Johann Michael Seligmann was an engraver and publisher working in Nuremberg, Germany. He published artworks by prominent naturalists, including George Edwards and Mark Catesby, during the third quarter of the eighteenth century.

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Four framed bookplates of birds Hand-colored engravings Mark Catesby (1682–1749) England Framed height: 24.5 inches (62.2 cm), width: 20 inches (50.8 cm) 1982.325.75 Description: Set of four botanical and ornithological bookplates: A. Volume I, plate 59, “Arbor Jasmin and the Bahama Titmouse.” B. Volume I, plate 60, “Water Tupelo and the Hooded Titmouse.” C. Volume I, plate 20, “Water Oak and Red Headed Woodpecker.” D. Volume I, plate 31, “Dahoon Holly and the Little Thrush.”

Provenance: unknown Comments: Mark Catesby made his first trip to America in 1712 and visited his sister in Virginia. He was fascinated by the fauna and flora of this New World and came back for another visit, collecting specimens and sketching animals in their natural habitat. He also visited Bermuda in 1725. His publication Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, published in 1731, was the first natural history of plants and animals in America. The second edition was colored by his good friend George Edwards. He was interested in using scientific names, and his work was used by Linnaeus in his Systema Naturae.

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Four framed prints of monkeys Colored engravings George Edwards (1693–1773) England, circa 1748 Framed height: 10 inches (25.4 cm), width: 8 inches (20.3 cm) 1982.325.335 Description: Depicting monkeys in naturalistic settings, some with inscriptions, numbered as bookplates. Published according to an act of Parliament in 1744 through 1748. Dated 1748. Animal seated on rock in a natural setting holding two cherries, with text, “A little black Monkey brought from the W. Indies by the Honourable Commodore Fitzroy Lee in the year 1747 Drawn from life natural size . . . Geo. Edwards,” “196,” dated 1748 on rock Lemur in naturalistic setting, with text, “The Black Maucauco from Madagascar,” “217,” “Geo Edwards Delin et Sculp” Animal in naturalistic setting, with text, “The Little Lion monkey from la Vera Cruz in New Spain natural lignes,” “195,” “G. Edwards 1750” Seated ring-tailed lemur, holding fruit, head of another peeking out behind, with text, “Mavcavco Dict,” “197” Provenance: unknown Comments: George Edwards, English naturalist and ornithologist, worked as Librarian to the Royal College of Physicians, and later was a Fellow of the Royal Society. He studied art in Holland and became interested in natural history and birds, making colored drawings of birds and animals. In 1743 he published his first volume about birds, a fourth volume came out in 1751, and three supplementary volumes in 1758, 1760, and 1764. He was a contemporary of Mark Catesby.

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Pair of framed figure studies Charcoal on paper Allyn Cox (1896–1982) America Framed height: 12 inches (30.5 cm), width: 8 inches (20.3 cm) 1982.325.553 Description: A pair of drawings of male nudes, perhaps studies for a mural or painting. One is signed by the artist. Provenance: Believed to be a gift from the artist Comments: Allyn Cox, the son of American artist Kenyon Cox, studied at the American Academy in Rome at the same time Shutze was there (1915–20). They became great friends and corresponded throughout their lives. They both died in 1982. Cox is best known as a muralist, particularly his work at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. He also painted murals for some of the houses Shutze designed.

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Mirror, stumpwork, Charles II Glass beads, silk, wool England, 1663 Height: 23 inches (58.4 cm) 1982.325.334 Description: Mid-seventeenth-century stumpwork with a central rectangular mirror plate; the surround in beadwork with the initials “SR” and the date “1663,” depicting Charles II and his queen; decorative motifs include unicorn, tree of life, butterflies, hearts. Frame modern. Provenance: Joseph Levy, Parke-Bernet sale number 2002, 1961 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 9

Two enamel candlesticks Enamel, copper-gilt England, circa 1765 Height: 9.375 inches (23.8 cm) 1982.325.97 Description: Each candlestick with a shaped and scalloped dome base, a knopped stem, and a detachable scalloped bobéche, and colorfully painted with floral sprays alternating on the nozzles, stems, and foot with turquoise or green-ground cartouches edged in gilt scrollwork and centering a gilt sprig. Provenance: David Stockwell, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, invoice dated April 17, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 14; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 7 Notes: In the invoice, April 17, 1952, Stockwell notes, “These are similar to ones in the candlestick room at Winterthur.” Literature: Illustrated in an advertisement by David Stockwell in The Magazine ANTIQUES, December 1952, page 475

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Etui Enamel, copper-gilt Staffordshire England, circa 1768 Length: 4 inches (10.2 cm) 1982.325.477 Description: The tapering oval body and cover with a green ground patterned with white dots, and reserved on either side with a gilt-scroll-edged cartouche painted in shades of green, brown, blue, yellow, and rose with figures near cottages or ruins in a rural landscape; mounted in copper-gilt and fitted on the interior with an ivory writing slide inscribed “Lady Katherine Chartins August 1768,” a pair of scissors, a combined pair of tweezers and nail file, a ruler, a pencil holder, a tortoiseshell-handled penknife, a bodkin, and a compass; the rims mounted in copper-gilt. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated March 31, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 14; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6 Comments: In the eighteenth century an etui was used as a small case for personal articles, such as sewing implements. It could be carried in a pocket or hung on a chain.

Bonbonniere, “Pug’s Head” Enamel, copper-gilt Staffordshire England, circa 1770 Length: 2.5 inches (6.3 cm) 1982.325.113 Description: With a pink tongue, tan and black eyes, black muzzle, and tan fur delineated in black, the slightly domed circular cover painted with a black-spotted white hound on the iron-red, brown and green-shaded bank of a blue stream before distant gray-green trees under a cloudy sky; the rims mounted in copper-gilt. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated January 30, 1954 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2 Comments: Bonbonniere refers to small decorated boxes, especially for sweets, in the eighteenth century.

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Snuffboxes, three birds Enamel, copper-gilt Staffordshire England, circa 1770 Length: 3.125 inches (7.9 cm) and 2.5 inches (6.3 cm) 1982.325.115 Description: 115.A: Enamel snuffbox in the form of a bullfinch, with an iron-red breast, brown back, and yellow and black tail and wing feathers, modeled perched amidst green grasses, the conforming almost flat cover repainted with a goldfinch perched on a branch; the rims mounted in copper (shown on its side). 115.B: Enamel snuffbox in the form of a sparrow, with a gray and blue beak, black eyes, brown back, and yellow breast with black and gray delineated plumage, modeled perched amidst green grasses, the conforming almost flat cover painted with an insect and a thistle, finch amidst yellow thistles; the rims mounted in copper-gilt. 116.C: Enamel snuffbox in the form of a thistle finch with a tan beak, black eyes and head, iron-red mask, white breast, brown back, black tail, and gray, yellow, and black wings, modeled perched amidst green grasses, the conforming almost flat cover painted in shades of brown, yellow, and green with three putte and a birdcage before a large building. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated January 30, 1954 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 2

Needlecase Enamel, copper-gilt England, circa 1777 Length: 5.125 inches (13 cm) 1982.325.818 Description: The spirally fluted cylindrical body painted with a pair of red hearts inside a blue, green, brown, and maroon rococo cartouche within a purple banner inscribed in iron-red “SAIGNENT POUR VOUS,� the cover formed as a bust of a lady wearing a rosecolored scarf and a white dotted purple shawl over a green bodice, the reverse of each with a pink rosebud or spray; mounted in copper-gilt. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated March 31, 1952 Notes: PTS inventory, page 14; Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 13, Folder 6

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Mirror knobs, four pairs Enamel, copper-gilt, brass Staffordshire England, late eighteenth century and early nineteenth century 1982.325.442 Description: A: South Staffordshire, circa 1790, each with a dark blue ground painted with a white urn heightened in gilding and swagged with gilt foliate garland; with brass surrounds and shaft. Diameter: 1.875 inches (4.8 cm) B: Each transfer-printed in black and painted in shades of green, brown, yellow, rose, and blue with a tree near houses in a river landscape or a townscape; with gadrooned brass surrounds and shafts. Length: 2 inches (5 cm) C: Each transfer-printed in black and painted in rose, green, blue, iron-red, and yellow with a classical maiden leaning against a monument inscribed “Sacred to Friendship,” with brass surrounds and shaft. Diameter: 1.625 inches (4.1 cm) D: Each transfer-printed in black and painted in yellow, purple, brown, and rose with a classical maiden holding a goblet and looking at an eagle; with brass surrounds and shafts. Diameter: 1.875 inches (4.8 cm) Provenance: Katrina Kipper, Queen Anne Cottage, Boston and Accord, Massachusetts, no date Notes: PTS inventory, page 15 Comments: Luke Vincent Lockwood, Colonial Furniture in America (New York, 1926), page 327: “It was the custom throughout the eighteenth century to support the looking-glasses on small rosettes, thus making them tilt forward.”

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Pair of featherwork and watercolor pictures Feathers, gouache, ink Artist unknown England, perhaps, circa 1820 Framed height: 8.625 inches (21.9 cm), width: 10.5 inches (26.7 cm) 1982.325.293 Description: Pair of early-nineteenth-century George III featherwork bird pictures. One titled “Gold Fasan,” the other one titled “Papager,” with featherwork bodies and watercolor tree branches. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, invoice dated January 1974 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 21 Comments: “Fasan” is the German word for pheasant.

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Pair of japanned fans Wood, gesso Origin unknown, nineteenth century Length: 15.5 inches (39.4 cm) 1982.325.194 Description: Pair of early-nineteenth-century black japanned and turned wooden fans. Each rectangular fan with chamfered corners, turned wood handles, decorated with cream japanning on a black ground. Provenance: unknown

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Pair of sailor’s valentines Wood, shells Caribbean, nineteenth century Width: 13.75 inches (35 cm) 1982.325.198 Description: Pair of sailor’s valentines. Each in an octagonal case, one with a starburst center, one with a heart, with borders of cream and brown scallops and diamonds in pink. All constructed of shells. Provenance: Davison-Paxon Department Store, Atlanta, Georgia, no date Notes: PTS inventory, page 15 Comments: Although called sailor’s valentines, these shell mosaic souvenirs were made in the British West Indies, particularly Barbados. The shells in these “valentines” are only native to that area. Also, the materials required to make them would not have been readily available on board ship. Most were made between 1833 and 1869.

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Snuff bottles Lapis lazuli, amber, jade, rose quartz, hornbill China, late nineteenth/early twentieth century 1982.325.491 1982.325.820 1982.325.819 Description: 491: Amber circular snuff bottle and a jade stopper, the body carved on the front with a sage riding a mule, on the reverse with a boy carrying a prunus branch, and on the sides with prunus or a bird perched on rockwork. Height: 2.1 inches (7 cm) 820: The lapis ovoid body carved on the front with stylized rockwork and a tree, and on the reverse with a kylin’s head; with a rose quartz domed stopper. Height: 2.5 inches (6.03 cm) 819: The rounded square body carved on the front with a scene of three figures and a wagon outside a pavilion, and on the reverse with a man on horseback approaching a wagon; the russet skin carved on the sides with scaly dragons, and the cover of russet. Height: 2.3 inches (5.7 cm) Provenance: Fu-Ming-Fair, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, correspondence dated March 9, 1968 Notes: Shutze archives MSS 498, Box 14, Folder 15 Literature: Illustrated in an advertisement by Fu-Ming-Fair in The Magazine ANTIQUES, March 1968.

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Necklaces and pendant Amber, agate Unknown origin/date 1982.325.717 1982.325.719 1982.325.720 Description: 1982.325.717: String of graduated oval dark amber beads. Length: 32 inches (81.3 cm) 1982.325.719: String of oval and round faceted amber beads. Length: 25 inches (61.25 cm) 1982.325.720: Agate pendant carved in the form of a goldfish. Provenance: unknown

Tea caddy, quill work Wood, paper, paint, glass England, late eighteenth century/nineteenth century Height: 5 inches (12.7 cm) 1982.325.71 Description: Rectangular box with chamfered corners, with a velvet-lined interior, the body with panels of rolled paperwork under glass. Provenance: W. E. Browne Decorating Company, Atlanta, Georgia, no date Notes: PTS inventory, page 13

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PHILIP SHUTZE ESSAY & APPENDIX 161


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E SSAY & A PPENDIX

THE DECORATIVE ARTS BY

PHILIP

TRAMMELL

SHUTZE

The following is an unedited essay, originally handwritten by Philip Shutze, expressing his views on the decorative arts. It is part of the Shutze manuscript collection at the Kenan Research Center.

IN P R I N C E L Y D A Y S there was always the patron of the arts who furnished the key. He sought out and discovered the worthy, the able and the gifted and allowed him to live in some kind of freedom from want so as to indulge his talents. The church has always been one of the greatest bodies to foster the fine arts, architecture—painting and sculpture. The Medici were insatiable sponsors and collectors. The dukes of England built great houses of splendor and filled them with artifacts. In these later days we have our men of fabulous wealth who are trying to channel some of their vast resources to worthy fields to avoid giving it all for the tax which is dangerously threatening their existence. In our own time we have seen the Rockefellers unselfishly give their millions for all kinds of medical research—the restoration of Williamsburg—Mr. Mellon’s superlative National Gallery—the Fords—and in the foreground, the magnanimous Mr. du Pont and his extraordinary gift to the nation of a museum of decorative arts, without a peer, at Winterthur.

Here, I think, under one roof he has assembled the most wonderful showing of American arts and crafts—architecture (domestic) furniture of all schools— paintings—rugs—lighting fixtures from the simplest, most modest to the most elegant and rare—eliciting a stature never before attained by American creations. The search and all that it entailed was extensive, long, and tedious. Mr. du Pont must have envisioned what he wanted and sought it out with the aid, no doubt, of learned helpers—experts— fine dealers etc. Fortunately he was able to lavish millions to gratify his every wish for perfection. We are all the richer for his unselfishness. (A friend of mine once said, soliciting for a children’s hospital, I should give without stint to this cause but it is beyond me—I know beggars are despised but I would beg anyone for a donation for this worthy cause and feel not in the least blameful—) It was my good luck once with friends to visit Winterthur at the invitation of Mrs. Crowninshield (Mr. du Pont’s sister) for lunch at her own beautiful house near Winterthur.

Left: Bedroom in Shutze’s apartment with an American serpentine chest and Chinese Export lacquer dressing mirror.

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This was prior to its becoming a museum (a Garden Club of America connection). With burgeoning Atlanta, growing by leaps and bounds in many ways, little thought seems to be occupying the minds of most of her citizens and only a very few are seeing how badly we are in need of a museum of decorative arts—our large Memorial Arts Center with emphasis on the performing arts has ample facilities for ballet, concert halls, lecture rooms, collections of paintings, sculpture generously donated by one of our most liberal citizens—anonymously—does in no way fill the needs of the above mentioned branch affiliate. I sincerely believe that this expression should be an involvement of things of American origin. There are many cities, large and small, particularly in New England, scattered over the nation with somewhat the same view in mind and the whole country has been ransacked for specimens so that, at this late date to start acquiring prime antiques it would be necessary to seek out private collectors, overcrowded museums, first-rate dealers, and certainly a great deal of money would be required if indeed an example is found worthy of purchase. Of course gifts and loans from larger museums will help. One needs only to follow and study the catalogues SothebyParke-Bernet to determine what an American bonnet top highboy, a Goddard or Townsend chest, a Copley portrait brings in today’s market. Of course if the Metropolitan or even Winterthur had a superfluity of grand style Philadelphia highboys they might spare one of their rich collection to such an impoverished city as Atlanta—many collectors, if they knew where things were going and if they would be properly cared for might sell or even loan or donate a fine piece that our efforts were unable to afford. Our problem would be difficult—the acquisition of fine pieces of museum quality—in the possession of a dealer of unquestioned credibility a trade might certainly ensue—of an individual, a collector whose exaggerated idea of value might have to be appeased—the purchase from an overcrowded museum or in the case of duplicate specimens perhaps one might effect a sale, a donation or loan. All of the larger museums have floors of magnificent artifacts which never enjoy the exposure of exhibition for want of space or perhaps of duplication. For the exceptional individual it is very frustrating, of course, to have the urge, the ability to choose, the taste, the knowledge and in no way be able to even conceive of ever creating this assembling of prime antiques with the backing of an appreciative patron’s indulgence. Only rarely in a generation in a city is one such combination effected and yet one is requisite to the other.

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For instance, if he had the backing of money, a search for the fine old pieces which have undergone several changes of hands and have necessarily increased in price with every change of ownership are fine enough to still be cared for and retained by the owner whether he be collector, dealer or museum. The collector would be the most difficult to handle and yet with an overabundance of treasure he might be induced to part with one item if it went to a fine collection and received proper remuneration. There are people who buy antiques for investment and would certainly expect a profit. As a starter let’s try some of the exquisite pieces formerly owned by Miss Helen Temple Cooke. In Miss Cooke’s day it was not too difficult to find things of this highest quality. She had impeccable taste; on Aug. 19 & 20, 1959 Robert C. Eldred, East Dennis, Mass. held a sale of what remained of her effects at auction and issued a catalogue with some extraordinary pieces. The prime objects and most desirable of the lot were a block front secretary—shown in Nutting #705 Eldred 2264—18th century portrait of Elizabeth Sister in law of John Singleton Copley by Christian Gullager 1789—258—tall case clock Simon Willard 1800—2456—Sheraton pagoda mirror American 18th century 250—carved chair New England 18th century 242—King Hooper collection, sold by I. Sack the Anderson Galleries, 489 Park Avenue, Dec. 10 Friday and Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, 1926. Sideboard mahog & satinwood 1790-1800 ($2200) H. T. Cooke Wellesley Mass. Dining table 159 (2900) 1800 H. T. Cooke. There is no easy way to know who bought these various prizes and where they are today and actually may be entirely unobtainable but possibly research could uncover their present whereabouts and enough money if offered might be had. What an amazing starter for a museum as a nucleus! After examining all available sale catalogues as far back as we can find such records noting which items are suitable for quality, style, authenticity so far as it is possible to ascertain, a visit should be made to all of the important dealers reputable and cooperative and to as many important museums as can be visited. As many photographs as possible should be collected for careful study and comparison. It would be extremely important to create a sympathetic setting for the chosen treasures possible a very fine house modeled after one of our many famous American 18th century houses, one of sufficient size to afford large furniture spaces. If old rooms of the right period were available they would be entirely in order and would prove a proper background for

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the pieces chosen. The most spectacular and monumental various kinds will be the permanent homes for these treasures. that immediately comes to mind would be “Rosewell” an early It is the duty of the present generation to preserve what we 18th century mansion planned by Mann Page but never quite have of value for the level of taste has sunk to an came to fruition. There are photographs and drawings extant unprecedented state and our production is blue denim and that provide a splendid outline to following in reproducing it. ersatz. There would be more material available than the restorers Architecture, the mistress of the fine arts has given away ever know about Williamsburg. The property that would to engineering—painting is comparatively non-existent and contain the project should be ample. A grassy wooded hillock sculpture contrived amorphous masses—an unruly blob of would be ideal. Planting should be simple but big in scale— harsh colour is just as satisfying to the painter of today as a no base planting. really good painting and certainly much less trouble. Gardens would enhance the domestic image, but reliance Charlatanism is rife! on trees, shrubs, evergreens would be desirable—rather than A very important [part] of creating a first-rate museum is herbaceous borders. the organization of its staff. The finding of a curator, preferably If water in any quantity were available it would prove to a well-trained man or woman from the Metropolitan or be as always the life’s blood of the garden. Winterthur schools—but business side of its future certainly It may well be that another generation will see collecting, of funds—an endowment preferably, since constant financial as we have known it, by the individual come to a grinding crises are detrimental to smooth functioning. halt. Wealth is continuously being drained from the rich. Taxes It must be kept alive by social activity emanating from have made it almost impossible for the average man to gifts—loans, acquisitions, in a sense, advertising—one of the accumulate an amount of money sufficient to survive, greatest tragedies that afflicts a museum is the acceptance of exclusive, of course, of anything that pertains to luxury. second-rate items by an unqualified acceptance group—the Foundations will sterner the judge the better Below: In this photograph of Shutze’s apartment living room, circa 1982, one supplant the individual as the quality. I hesitate to use donor of things of prime can see the mix of styles and how objects fill the walls and tops of furniture. the word committee—I am value, and museums of sure that when the Creator

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THE WALPOLE SOCIETY T HE S OCIETY was founded in 1910 by a group of mainly northeastern gentlemen who shared an interest in collecting Americana. They were the vanguard of collectors and historians who first recognized the merits of American furniture and decorative arts. Members included Henry Francis du Pont, founder of the Winterthur Museum, and R. T. H. Halsey, who was instrumental in the establishment of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. As “students” of the early years of colonial history, they visited very select collectors and historic houses. The following description written by Philip Shutze indicates how pleased he was by their visit in On April 7th and 8th, 1973, a group of distinguished men styling themselves “The Walpole Society,” limited to thirty members and ardent devotees of Americana, paid a visit to Atlanta. The name was derived from the celebrated Horace Walpole, the prince of epistolary writers, who devoted his pursuits to developing “Strawberry Hill,” was a chronicler of the reigns of George I, George II, and a part of the reign of George III, an avid collector. His house was a veritable museum as is shown by an inventory at the sale of his effects after his death. Mrs. Ray Efird, a charming woman with strong interests concerning Americana and allied artifacts, served as hostess and helped in selecting the sites to visit. They arrived on Saturday, April 7th, an uncommonly beastly day, pouring rain, and were taken bus-wise to Swan House, the Atlanta Historical Society and lunch at the Coach House, the reconditioned Inman carriage and servant quarters. Afterwards motored to Newnan to see the Bank’s house, a newly moved from its original site and restored old house with modern additions. They returned to Atlanta for dinner in the Alexandria Room at the Piedmont Driving Club. On Sunday, a much nicer day but slightly cloudy, they visited me in my modest apartment. After an hour of inspection they journeyed to Roswell to see the old 1830–40 Hansell house, returned to the charming house of Mrs. Efird for a superlative feast. It was a very memorable occasion and I must say that I have never met a more delightful group of gentlemen. A list of my visitors follows.

The Walpole Society in part, visiting my apartment Pres. Lammot du Pont Copeland, Greenville, Del. Sec. Wendell Garrett, New York Augustus P. Loring, Boston, Mass. John Nicholas Brown, Providence, R.I. Bertram K. Little, Brookline, Mass. (late) Ralph Hanes, Winston-Salem, N.C. Nicholas B. Wainwright, The Philadelphia Club Frederick D. Nichols, FAIA, Charlottesville, Va. John Wilmerding, Dartmouth College, Dept. of Art, Hanover, N.H. Peter Manigault, Charleston, S.C. Frank Street, N.Y. Ralph E. Carpenter Jr., N.Y. William Bradford Osgood, Boston, Mass. Andrew Oliver, Boston, Mass. Mills B. Lane IV, Savannah, Ga.

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LIST OF DEALERS BY

PHILIP

TRAMMELL

SHUTZE

I N SPITE OF not traveling extensively, Shutze was able to acquire his collection from some of the outstanding dealers in New York, Pennsylvania, and New England. Many contacts must have come from his work with Norman Pendley, president of W. E. Browne Decorating Company in Atlanta. Indeed, there is a letter in his files from Norman Pendley introducing him to Mrs. Mottahedeh in New York. Advertisements and articles in The Magazine ANTIQUES were another source of knowledge about a dealer’s reputation. It is possible to identify objects in his collection which were featured in ANTIQUES advertisements, especially in his magazine copies where he turned the page corners down. It is also clear from correspondence in the archives that these dealers were very familiar with other prominent collectors of the late forties and early fifties, when Shutze was making most of his purchases. The list that follows was in Shutze’s archival collection at the Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center. CONNECTICUT Williams Antique Shop Boston Post Road Old Greenwich John S. Walton U.S. 1 – P.O. Box 164 Riverside Silvermine Tavern Antique Shop Norwalk (John Kenneth Byard)

John Weisss West Port (Saugatuck) Milford Antique Shop Milford Evelyn Bottome Glenhook Road (rear) Stamford

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Florence Maine State Route 7 Ridgefield Queen Anne Shop 1130 New Britain Avenue West Hartford Primitive Antique Shop 195 High Street Willimantic


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MASSACHUSETTS Joseph Carbone 140 Charles Street Boston

Queen Ann Cottage 3 River Street Boston

Boston Antique Shop 63-A Charles Street Boston

George C. Gebelein 79 Chestnut Street Boston

Frank Sylva 85 Charles Street Boston

Antique Galleries 79 Chestnut Street Boston

Shreve, Crump & Low Co. Boylston at Arlington Street Boston

Yatsuhashi 420 Boylston Street Boston

NEW YORK Mottahedeh & Sons 225 Fifth Avenue

Sarah Potter Conover 820 Madison Avenue

House of Jade 17 East 42nd Street

Peter Guillle 630 Fifth Avenue

Charles Hall, Inc. 1021 Madison Avenue

Otto Wasserman 10 East 46th Street

Steuben Glass (Mr. Carson) 718 Fifth Avenue

Flea Market 1003 Second Avenue

K. T. Liang, Inc. 16 East 54th Street

Plummer 734 Fifth Avenue

Helen Penrose 931 Third Avenue

Edwin Jackson 154 East 54th Street

Tiffany (Mr. Woodin)

The Art Exchange (Lowestoft) 908 Third Avenue at 55th Street

C. W. Lyon, Inc. 2 West 56th Street

Toby House 867 Third Avenue

Lyman Huszagh 57 East 56th Street

Attman-Weiss 863 Third Avenue

Alice Marks 9 West 57th Street

Herbert Lanning 785 Third Avenue

S. J. Shrubsole 19–21 West 57th Street

Capozzi & Agrippa 591 & 643 Lexington Avenue

Israel Sack 5 East 57th Street

John Weiss 625 Lexington Avenue

Park-Bernet Galleries 30 East 57th Street

Chinese Treasure Center 441 Madison Avenue James Graham & Sons, Inc. 514 Madison Avenue Florian Papp 516 Madison Avenue Teind Baumstone 807 Madison Avenue Ginsberg & Levy 815 Madison Avenue

Right: The letters to the right are two examples of the vast correspondence between Shutze and his dealers. Receipts and invoices increased in number in the years from 1949 to the early 1950s when the majority of his collection was purchased. The Shreve, Crump & Low letter is in regard to Shutze’s purchase of the Chinese painting of Hong Kong, seen on page 139.

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NEW YORK, CONTINUED C. T. Loo & Co. 41 East 57th Street (Fuller Bldg.)

A. R. Nesle & Co. 110 East 57th Street

Ralph M. Chait 24 East 58th Street

D. M. & P. Manheim 46 East 57th Street

Oriental Fine Arts 125 East 57th Street

Hyde & Knudsen 22 East 60th Street

Philip Soval 49 East 57th Street

Needhams Antiques, Inc. 143 East 57th Street

William H. Lautz 206 East 61st Street

Museum Antique Shop 104 East 57th Street

French & Co. 210 East 57th Street

PENNSYLVANIA Joe Kindig Jr. 325 West Market Street York Melvin Hubley 534 M. Duke Street Lancaster L. P. Aardrup 341 North Queen Street Lancaster Candle Shop Antiques Mountain Springs Hotel Ephrata Schuykill House R.F.D. #1, Black Road Phoenixville

The Loft 418 M. High Street Route 100 West Chester Spring Mill Antique Shop Conshohoeken Ball and Ball 14 East Market Street West Chester Latimer House 256 South 16th Street Alfred Bullard 1609 Pine Street

Saybolt 326 North 17th Street Alfred Arnold Swartz (3.5 miles west on Rt. 202) New Hope Lester Slatoff 238 East State Street Trenton, New Jersey Arthur Sussel S.E. Corner 18th and Spruce Sts. Eugene Sussel 1929 Chestnut Street Blums Antique Shop 1837 Chestnut Street


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THE SHUTZE BOOK

SELECTION OF DECORATIVE ARTS PHILIP SHUTZE gave over seventeen hundred books to the Atlanta Historical Society, which became the nucleus for the decorative arts library at the Kenan Research Center, located in McElreath Hall at the History Center. Many of his decorative arts books are listed here. His collection also includes rare architectural, garden, and horticultural books. Albany Institute of History and Art, New York Furniture Before 1840 in the Collection of the Albany Institute of History and Art, 1962. Albiker, Karl, Meissner Porzellantiere Im 18, Jahrhundert, 1935. American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, 1969. Andreae, Bernard, Art of Rome, translated from the German by Robert Erich Wolf, 1977. Antique and Decorative Arts League, New York, First Annual Fine Arts Exposition, Sponsored by the Antique and Decorative Arts League, Inc., The Forum, Rockefeller Center, New York, 1934. Antiques Book: Outstanding, Authoritative Articles on Ceramics, Furniture, Glass, Silver, Pewter, Architecture, Prints and Other Collecting, 1950. Antiques Treasury of Furniture and Other Decorative Arts at Winterthur, Williamsburg, Sturbridge, Ford Museum, Cooperstown, Deerfield, 1959. Antrobus, Mrs. Mary Symonds, Needlework Through the Ages: A Short Survey of Its Development in Decorative Art, with Particular Regard to Its Inspirational Relationship, 1928. Atlanta (Ga.) Art Association and High Museum of Art, Seats of Fashion: 300 Years of American Chair Design; A Loan Exhibition, McBurney Decorative Arts Gallery, the High Museum of Art, 1973. Austin, John C., and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Chelsea Porcelain at Williamsburg, 1977. Bainbridge, Henry Charles, Peter Carl Faberge, Goldsmith and Jeweller to the Russian Imperial Court and the Principal Crowned Heads of Europe; An Illustrated Record, 1949. Baker, Wilma Sinclair Le Van, Silk Pictures of Thomas Stevens: A Biography of the Coventry Weaver and His Contribution to the Art of Weaving, 1957. Barber, Edwin Atlee, Pottery and Porcelain of the United States; An Historical Review of American Ceramic Art; With a New Introduction and Bibliography, 1971. Barrett, Franklin Allen, Caughley and Coalport Porcelain, foreword by W.B. Honey, 1951. Bayard, Emile, Le Style Empire. Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Europhaische Porzellan Des Bayer, Von Friedrich H. Hofmann, 1908. Bayley, Frank William, Five Colonial Artists of New England: Joseph Badger, Joseph Blackburn, John Singleton Copley, Robert Feke, John Smibert, 1929. Beer, Alice Baldwin, Trade Goods; A Study of Indian Chintz in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum of Decorative Arts and Design, Smithsonian Institution, 1970. Behrman, S. N. (Samuel Nathaniel), Duveen, 1952.

Beigbeder, Olivier, Ivory, 1965. Bemrose, William, Bow, Chelsea, and Derby Porcelain; Being Further Information Relating to These Factories, Obtained from Original Documents, Not Hitherto Published, 1898. Bemrose, William, Longton Hall Porcelain: Being Further Information Relating to This Interesting Fabrique, With Numerous Illustrations, 1906. Berendsen, Anne, Tiles; A General History, translated by Janet Seligman, 1967. Berenson, Bernard, Aesthetics and History in the Visual Arts, 1948. Berenson, Bernard, Sketch for a Self-Portrait, 1949. Berges, Ruth, Collector’s Choice of Porcelain and Fahience, 1967. Beurdeley, Michel, Porcelain of the East India Companies, 1962. Bigelow, Francis Hill, Historic Silver of the Colonies and Its Makers, 1948. Bjerkoe, Ethel Hall, Cabinetmakers of America, foreword by Russell Kettell, 1957. Blunt, Reginald, Cheyne Book of Chelsea China and Pottery, 1924. Bolton, Theodore, Early American Portrait Draughtsmen in Crayons, 1923. Brackett, Oliver, Encyclopaedia of English Furniture: A Pictorial Review of English Furniture from Gothic Times to the Mid-Nineteenth Century, 1927. Brazer, Esther Stevens, Early American Decoration; A Comprehensive Treatise Revealing the Technique Involved in the Art of Early American Decoration of Furniture, 1950. British Antique Dealers’ Association, Antique Dealers Fair and Exhibition: The Great Room, Grosvenor House, June 10–25, 1970 [Catalogue], 1970. British Museum, Dept. of Oriental Antiquities and of Ethnography, Catalogue of the Frank Lloyd Collection of Worcester Porcelain of the Wall Period, Presented by Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lloyd in 1921, 1923. Brown, Frank Chouteau, Letters & Lettering; A Treatise With 200 Examples, 1909. Bryant, Gilbert Ernest, Chelsea Porcelain Toys, Scent-Bottles, Bonbonnieres, Etuis, Seals and Statuettes, Made at the Chelsea Factory, 1745–1769, & Derby, Chelsea, 1925. Bullock, Albert Edward, Grinling Gibbons and His Compeers, Illustrated by Sixty Phototypes of the Principal Carvings in the Churches of St James’s, Piccadilly and Saint Paul’s Cathedral, 1914. Bunt, Cyril George Edward, and Ernest A. Rose, Two Centuries of English Chintz, 1750–1950, As Exemplified by the Productions of Stead, McAlpin & Co., 1957.

Left: Shutze’s apartment hallway with built-in bookshelves to accommodate his large collection of books.

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Burton, William, Porcelain: Its Nature, Art and Manufacture, 1906. Byne, Arthur, Spanish Interiors and Furniture, 1921. Campana, P. Michele, European Carpets, translated from the Italian by Margaret Crosland, 1969. Campbell Museum, Selections from the Campbell Museum Collection, 1978. Cescinsky, Herbert, English and American Furniture; A Pictorial Handbook of Fine Furniture Made in Great Britain and in the American Colonies, 1929. Cescinsky, Herbert, English Furniture from Gothic to Sheraton; A Concise Account of the Development of English Furniture and Woodwork, 1929. Cescinsky, Herbert, Old-World House: Its Furniture & Decoration, 1924. Chaffers, William, Marks & Monograms on European and Oriental Pottery and Porcelain, ed. by Frederick Lichfield, R. L. Hobson, and Justus Brinkman, 1946. Chamberlain, Samuel, Beauport at Gloucester, the Most Fascinating House in America, 1951. Chamberlain, Samuel, Southern Interiors of Charleston, South Carolina, ed. by Narcisse Chamberlain, 1956. Charleston, R. J. (Robert Jesse), World Ceramics: An Illustrated History, 1971. China (Republic), Chinese Art Treasures; A Selected Group of Objects from the Chinese National Palace Museum and the Chinese National Central Museum, Taichung, 1961. Chippendale, Thomas, Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director: Being a Large Collection of the Most Elegant and Useful Designs of Household Furniture, 1762. Chippendale, Thomas, Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director: Being a Large Collection of the Most Elegant and Useful Designs of Household Furniture, reprint, 1938. Chippendale, Thomas, Guide Du Tapissier, De L’bebbeniste, Et De Tous Ceux Qui Travaillent En Meubles: Comme Aussi Celui Des Honncetes-Gens Qui En Font Faire, 1762. Christensen, Erwin Ottomar, Index of American Design, introduction by Holger Cahill, 1950. Colonial Williamsburg, Inc., Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection: A Descriptive Catalogue by Nina Fletcher Little, 1957. Comstock, Helen, American Furniture: Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Century Styles, 1962. Cook, Cyril, Life and Work of Robert Hancock; An Account of the Life of the 18th Century Engraver and of His Designs on Battersea and Staffordshire Enamel, 1948. Cooper, Wendy A., In Praise of America: American Decorative Arts, 1650–1830; Fifty Years of Discovery Since the 1929 Girl Scouts Loan Exhibition, 1980.


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Cornelius, Charles Over, Furniture Masterpieces of Duncan Phyfe, measured detail drawings by Stanley J. Rowland, 1970. Cowie, Donald, Antiques: How to Identify and Collect Them, 1970. Cox, Kenyon, Artist and Public, and Other Essays on Art Subjects, 1914. Cox, Warren E. (Warren Earle), Book of Pottery and Porcelain, 1944. Crisp, Frederick Arthur, Armorial China; A Catalogue of Chinese Porcelain with Coats of Arms in the Possession of Frederick Arthur Crisp, 1907. Crisp, Frederick Arthur, Catalogue of Lowestoft China in the Possession of Frederick Arthur Crisp, 1907. Crisp, Frederick Arthur, Porcelain and Pottery Bearing Arms of the Livery Companies of the City of London in the Possession of Frederick Arthur Crisp, 1911. Crossman, Carl L., China Trade; Export Paintings, Furniture, Silver & Other Objects, foreword by Ernest S. Dodge, 1972. Cummer Gallery of Art, Constance I. and Ralph H. Wark Collection of Meissen Porcelains, 1965. Cushion, John Patrick, Animals in Pottery and Porcelain, 1974. Davis, Mildred J., Early American Embroidery Designs, 1969. De Bles, Arthur, Genuine Antique Furniture, 1929. De Wolfe, Elsie, House in Good Taste, Illustrated with Photographs in Color and Black and White, 1913.

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Ferrari, Giulio, Legno Nell’arte Italiana; Riproduzioni in Parte Inedite Di Saggi Dal Periodo Romanico Al Neo-Classico; Duecentosettantasette Tavole Con 451 Illustrazioni Raccolte e Ordinate con Testo Esplicatiro da Giulio Ferrari, 1910.

Heal, Sir Ambrose, London Furniture Makers, from the Restoration to the Victorian Era, 1660–1840; A Record of 2500 Cabinet-Makers, Upholsterers, Carvers and Gilders, 1953.

Feulner, Adolf, Historic Interiors in Colour: 80 Coloured Views from Castles and Private Houses, 1929.

Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, American Furniture, Queen Anne and Chippendale Periods, in the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, by Joseph Downs, foreword by Henry Francis du Pont, 1952.

Fischer, C. H., collector, Katalog Der Ausgewhahlten Und Erstklassigen Sammlung Alt-Meissner Porzellan Aller Stilrichtungen Des XVIII, Jahrhunderts ... Des Herrn Rentn, 1906. Fisher, Stanley W., English Blue and White Porcelain of the 18th Century; An Illustrated Descriptive Account of the Early Soft Paste Production of Bow, Chelsea, 1947. Fisher, Stanley W., Fine Porcelain & Pottery; The Best of the World’s Beautiful China, 1975. Fowler, John, and John Cornforth, English Decoration in the 18th Century, 1974. French, Leigh, Colonial Interiors; Photographs and Measured Drawings of the Colonial and Early Federal Periods, 1923. Gardner, John Starkie, English Ironwork of the XVIIth & XVIIIth Centuries; An Historical & Analytical Account of the Development of Exterior Smithcraft, 1911. Garvan, Francis P., Furniture and Silver by American Master Craftsmen of Colonial and Early Federal Times; Rare Early Glass and Pewter, Oriental Lowestoft and English Faience Together with Rare Lithographs by Currier & Ives, Sold by Order of Francis P. Garvan, 1931. Gay, Walter, Paintings of French Interiors, ed. and introduction by Albert Eugene Gallatin, 1920.

De Wolfe, Elsie, House in Good Taste, Illustrated with Photographs in Color and Black and White, 1920.

Ghoteborgs Historiska Museum, Chinese Porcelain Imported by the Swedish East India Company, translated from the Swedish by Mary G. Clarke, 1965.

Delieb, Eric, Matthew Boulton: Master Silversmith, 1760– 1790, 1971.

Gilhespy, F. Brayshaw, Crown Derby Porcelain, 1951.

Detweiler, Susan G, American Presidential China: Exhibition Catalog, 1975.

Ginsburg & Levy, Inc., New York, Century of American Chairs, 1720–1820: Thirty Illustrations from an Exhibition Held at the 36 East 57 Street Gallery, 1942.

Dunlap, William, History of the Rise and Progress of the Arts of Design in the United States, reprint of the original 1834 ed., 1969. Earle, Cyril, Earle Collection of Early Staffordshire Pottery Illustrating Over Seven Hundred Different Pieces, 1915. Eberlein, Harold Donaldson, Abbot McClure, and Mabel Fost, Practical Book of Early American Arts and Crafts, 1916. Eberlein, Harold Donaldson, and Cortlandt Van Dyke Hubbard, Colonial Interiors, Federal and Greek Revival, Third Series, 1938. Eberlein, Harold Donaldson, and Roger Wearne Ramsdell, Practical Book of Chinaware, 1948. Eberlein, Harold Donaldson, Interiors, Fireplaces, & Furniture of the Italian Renaissance, 1916.

Girl Scouts of the United States of America, Loan Exhibition of Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Century Furniture & Glass: Examples of Lustre Ware, Lowestoft and Toile De Jouy, 1929. Godden, Geoffrey A., Chamberlain-Worcester Porcelain, 17881852, 1982. Godden, Geoffrey A., Encyclopaedia of British Pottery and Porcelain Marks, 1964. Godden, Geoffrey A., Illustrated Encyclopedia of British Pottery and Porcelain, 1966. Gordon, Elinor, Collecting Chinese Export Porcelain, 1977. Gordon, Elinor, ed., Chinese Export Porcelain: An Historical Survey, 1977. Gusman, Pierre, Mural Decorations of Pompeii, 1924.

Ellis Memorial Antiques Show [Catalogs], 1972, 1980.

Hall, Peg, Early American Decorating Patterns, 1951.

Ellwood, George Montague, English Furniture and Decoration, 1680 to 1800, 1911.

Hallett, Charles, Furniture Decoration Made Easy; A Practical Work Manual for Decorating Furniture by Stenciling, GoldLeaf Application and Freehand Painting, 1952.

English Ceramic Circle, English Pottery and Porcelain; Commemorative Catalogue of an Exhibition Held at the Victoria and Albert Museum, May 5th–June 20th, 1948, 1949.

Halsey, Richard Townley Haines, Homes of Our Ancestors as Shown in the American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art of New York, 1946.

English Ceramic Circle, Transactions—English Ceramic Circle, 1928.

Hambidge, Jay, Dynamic Symmetry in Composition as Used by the Artists, 1948.

Fales, Dean A., American Painted Furniture, 1660–1880, 1972.

Hambidge, Jay, Practical Applications of Dynamic Symmetry, ed. by Mary C. Hambidge, 1932.

Falkner, Frank, Wood Family of Burslem, A Brief Biography of Those of Its Members Who Were Sculptors, Modellers and Potters, 1912.

Hannover, Emil, Pottery & Porcelain; A Handbook for Collectors, 1925.

Ferrari, Giulio, Ferro Nell’arte Italiana; Centocinquanta Tavole Riproduzioni in Parte Inedite Di 338 Soggetti Del Medio Evo, Del Rinascimento, Del Periodo Barocco e Neo-classico Raccolte e Ordinate con Testo Esplicatiro da Giulio Ferrari, 1910. Ferrari, Giulio, Ferro Nell’arte Italiana; Cento Tavole Riproduzioni in Gran Parte Inedite Di 169 Soggetti Del Medio Evo, Del Rinascimento, Del Periodo Barocco e Neoclassico Raccolte e Ordinate con Testo Esplicatiro da Giulio Ferrari, 1910. Ferrari, Giulio, Ferro Nell’arte Italiana; Centocinquanta Tavole Reproduzioni in Parte Inedite Di 368 Soggetti Del Medio Evo, Del Rinascimento, Del Periodo Barocco e Neo-classico Raccolte e Ordinate con Testo Esplicatiro da Giulio Ferrari, 1920.

Harbeson, Georgiana Brown, American Needlework; The History of Decorative Stitchery and Embroidery from the Late 16th to the 20th Century, 1938. Haslem, John, Old Derby China Factory: The Workmen and Their Productions, Containing Biographical Sketches of the Chief Artist Workmen, 1876. Hawley, W. A. (Walter Augustus), Oriental Rugs, Antique and Modern, 1970.

Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, American Furniture, the Federal Period, in the Henry Francis Du Pont Winterthur Museum, by Charles F. Montgomery, foreword by Henry Francis du Pont, 1966. Hepplewhite, A., and Co., Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer’s Guide; Or Repository of Designs for Every Article of Household Furniture, in the Newest and Most Approved Taste, 1789. High Museum of Art, High Museum Antiques Show [Catalog], 1969. Hill, Henry D., and Sidney Berry-Hill, Chinnery and China Coast Paintings, 1970. Hill, Henry D., and Sidney Berry-Hill, George Chinnery, 1774–1852, Artist of the China Coast, foreword by Alice Winchester, 1963. Hinckley, F. Lewis, Directory of Queen Anne, Early Georgian, and Chippendale Furniture; Establishing the Preeminence of the Dublin Craftsmen, 1971. Hispanic Society of America, Tapestries and Carpets from the Palace of the Pardo, Woven at the Royal Manufactory of Madrid, Loaned by His Majesty the King of Spain, 1917. History of Furniture, introduction by Sir Francis Watson, 1982. Hobson, R. L. (Robert Lockhart), Chinese Pottery and Porcelain: An Account of the Potter’s Art in China from Primitive Times to the Present Day, 1976. Holme, Charles, Modern Design in Jewellery and Fans, 1902. Holzhausen, Walter, Lackkunst in Europa; Ein Handbuch Fhur Sammler Und Liebhaber, 1959. Honey, W. B. (William Bowyer), Old English Porcelain; A Handbook for Collectors, 1946. Honey, W. B. (William Bowyer), Old English Porcelain; A Handbook for Collectors, 1948. Honour, Hugh, Chinoiserie; The Vision of Cathay, 1961. Honour, Hugh, Goldsmiths & Silversmiths, 1971. Honour, Hugh, New Golden Land: European Images of America from the Discoveries to the Present Time, 1975. Hood, Graham, American Silver; A History of Style, 1650– 1900, 1971. Hope, Thomas, Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, Executed from the Designs by Thomas Hope, 1937. Hornor, W. M. (William Macpherson), Blue Book, Philadelphia Furniture, William Penn to George Washington, With Special Reference to the PhiladelphiaChippendale School, 1935. Howard, David Sanctuary, China for the West: Chinese Porcelain & Other Decorative Arts for Export, Illustrated from the Mottahedeh Collection, 1978. Howard, David Sanctuary, Chinese Armorial Porcelain, foreword by Sir Anthony Wagner, 1974. Hughes, Therle, English Painted Enamels, 1967. Humphreys, John Sanford, Bermuda Houses, 1923. Hunter, George Leland, Decorative Textiles; An Illustrated Book on Coverings for Furniture, Walls and Floors, Including Damasks, Brocades and Velvets, Tapestries, 1918. Hurlbutt, Frank, Bow Porcelain, 1926. Hyde, John Alden Lloyd, and Ricardo R. Espirito Santo Silva, Chinese Porcelain for the European Market, 1956. Hyde, John Alden Lloyd, Oriental Lowestoft; With Special Reference to the Trade with China and the Porcelain Decorated For the American Market, 1936.

Hayden, Arthur, Old English Porcelain; The Lady Ludlow Collection, introduction by W. Leslie Perkins, 1932.

Hyde, John Alden Lloyd, Oriental Lowestoft, Chinese Export Porcelain (Porcelaine De La Cie Des Indes); With Special Reference to the Trade with China and the Porcelain Decorated For the American Market, 1954.

Hayward, J. F. (John Forrest), Viennese Porcelain of the Du Paquier Period, 1952.

Iannoni, Giovanni, Saggi Di Architettura e Decorazione Italiana, 1870. Impey, O. R. (Oliver R.), Chinoiserie: The Impact of Oriental Styles on Western Art and Decoration, 1977.

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A PPENDIX

Ince, W., Universal System of Household Furniture; Consisting of Above 300 Designs on the Most Elegant Taste, Both Useful & Ornamental, 1760. Irish Delftware, 1971.

Lenygon, Francis Henry, Furniture in England from 1660 to 1760, 1914.

Molesworth, H. D. (Hender Delves), and John KenworthBrowne, Three Centuries of Furniture in Color, 1972.

Lewis, Griselda, Collector’s History of English Pottery, 1969.

Montgomery, Charles F. and Patricia E. Kane, eds., American Art, 1750-1800: Towards Independence, Essays on American Art, 1976.

Lichten, Frances, Folk Art of Rural Pennsylvania, 1946.

Jackson, Sir Charles James, English Goldsmiths and Their Marks; A History of the Goldsmiths and Plate Workers of England, Scotland, and Ireland, 1921.

Litchfield, Frederick, Pottery and Porcelain; A Guide to Collectors, 1925.

Jacobsen, Charles W., Oriental Rugs, A Complete Guide, 1971.

Litchfield, Frederick, Pottery and Porcelain; A Guide to Collectors, Containing the Marks and Monograms of the Important Factories, 1951.

Jewitt, Llewellynn Frederick William, Ceramic Art of Great Britain from Pre-Historic Times Down to the Present Day: Being a History of the Ancient and Modern Pottery and Porcelain, 1878. John, W. D. (William David), and Jacqueline Simcox, English Decorated Trays (1550–1850), 1964. John, W. D. (William David), Paktong: The Non-Tarnishable Chinese ‘Silver’ Alloy Used for ‘Adam’ Firegrates and Early Georgian Candlesticks, 1970.

Lockwood, Luke Vincent, Colonial Furniture in America, 1913. Lunsingh Scheurleer, D. F., Chinese Export Porcelain = Chine De Commande, 1974. Lynn, Catherine, Wallpaper in America: From the Seventeenth Century to World War I, foreword by Charles Van Ravenswaay, 1980.

Montgomery, Florence M., Printed Textiles; English and American Cottons and Linens 1700-1850, 1970. Moore, N. Hudson, Old Glass, European and American, 1935. Morazzoni, Giuseppe, Mobile Veneziano Del ‘700, Raccolto A Cvra Di G. Morazzoni, 1927. Morazzoni, Giuseppe, Porcellane Italiane. Testo Di Saul Levy, 1960. Morgan, John Hill, What Was Gilbert Stuart’s Name? 1941. Mottheau, Jacques, Meubles Usuels: Directoire, Empire, 1953.

Mackenna, F. Severne, Champion’s Bristol Porcelain, 1947.

Mudge, Jean McClure, Chinese Export Porcelain for American Trade, 1785-1835, 1962.

John, W. D. (William David), Pontypool and Usk Japanned Wares, with the Early History of the Iron and Tinplate Industries at Pontypool, 1966.

Mackenna, F. Severne, Chelsea Porcelain; The Gold Anchor Wares (With a Short Account of the Duesbury Period), 1952.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, American Furniture in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, by Richard H. Randall Jr., 1965.

Jones, Owen, Grammar of Ornament, Illustrated by Examples from Various Styles of Ornament, 1856.

Mackenna, F. Severne, Chelsea Porcelain; The Red Anchor Wares, 1951.

Jourdain, Margaret, Chinese Export Art in the Eighteenth Century, 1967.

Mackenna, F. Severne, Chelsea Porcelain; The Triangle and Raised Anchor Wares, 1948.

Jourdain, Margaret, English Decoration and Furniture of the Later XVIIIth Century (1760–1820); An Account of Its Development and Characteristic Forms, 1922.

Mackenna, F. Severne, Worcester Porcelain; The Wall Period and Its Antecedents, 1950.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Eighteenth-Century American Arts; The M. and M. Karolik Collection of Paintings, Drawings, Engravings, Furniture, Silver, Needlework & Incidental Objects Gathered to Illustrate the Achievements of American Artists and Craftsmen of the Period from 1720 to 1820, 1941.

Jourdain, Margaret, Regency Furniture, 1795–1820, 1934. Jourdain, Margaret, Work of William Kent, Artist, Painter, Designer and Landscape Gardener, introduction by Christopher Hussey, 1948. Kelemen, Pbal, Baroque and Rococo in Latin America, 1967. Kent, William Winthrop, Hooked Rug, A Record of Its Ancient Origin, Modern Development, Methods of Making, Sources of Design, Value As a Handicraft, 1930. Kettell, Russell Hawes, ed., Early American Rooms: A Consideration of the Changes in Style Between the Arrival of the Mayflower and the Civil War in the Regions Originally Settled by the English and the Dutch, 1967. King, William, English Porcelain Figures of the Eighteenth Century, Selected and Described, 1925. Kirk, John T., Early American Furniture; How to Recognize, Evaluate, Buy, & Care for the Most Beautiful Pieces—HighStyle, Country, Primitive, & Rustic, 1970. Knoedler, M., & Co., Portraits of George Washington and Other Eighteenth Century Americans; Loan Exhibition, Sponsored by the Sons of the American Revolution, 1939. Knox, Katharine McCook, Sharples, Their Portraits of George Washington and His Contemporaries: A Diary and An Account of the Life and Work of James Sharples and His Family in England and America, 1930. Kovel, Ralph M. and Terry H., Directory of American Silver, Pewter, and Silver Plate, 1961. Krauss, Helen K., Shell Art: A Handbook For Making Shell Flowers, Mosaics, Jewelry, and Other Ornaments, 1976. Kunz, George Frederick, Book of the Pearl; The History, Art, Science, and Industry of the Queen of Gems, 1908. Kybalovba, Ludmila, Carpets of the Orient, translated by Till Gottheiner, 1970. Ladies Amusement; Or, Whole Art of Japanning Made Easy; Illustrated in Upwards of 1500 Different Designs on 200 Copper Plates Drawn by Pillement and Other Masters, [1762] 1959. Lane, Arthur, Italian Porcelain: With a Note on Buen Retiro, 1955. Le Corbeiller, Clare, China Trade Porcelain: Patterns of Exchange; Additions to the Helena Woolworth McCann Collection in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1974. Lee, Ruth Webb, Early American Pressed Glass: A Classification of Patterns Collectible in Sets Together With Individual Pieces For Table Decorations, 1960. Lenygon, Francis Henry, Decoration in England from 1660– 1770, 1914. Lenygon, Francis Henry, Decoration in England from 1660– 1770, 1920.

Macquoid, Percy, and Ralph Edwards, Dictionary of English Furniture, from the Middle Ages to the Late Georgian Period, 1924. Macquoid, Percy, History of English Furniture, 1972. Mankowitz, Wolf, Wedgwood, 1953. Margon, Lester, Construction of American Furniture Treasures; Measured Drawings of Selected Museum Pieces with Complete Information on Their Construction and Reproduction, 1949. Margon, Lester, Masterpieces of American Furniture, 1620– 1840; A Compendium, With Photos, Measured Drawings and Descriptive Commentary, 1965. Marot, Daniel, Ornamentwerk Des Daniel Marot in 264 Lichtdrucken Nachgebildet, 1892. McClelland, Nancy Vincent, Duncan Phyfe and the English Regency, 1795–1830, foreword by Edward Knoblock, 1939. McClelland, Nancy Vincent, Historic Wall-Papers; From Their Inception to the Introduction of Machinery, introduction by Henri Clouzot Wit, 1924. Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), 19th-Century America: Furniture and Other Decorative Arts; An Exhibition in Celebration of the Hundredth Anniversary of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1970. Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), American Chippendale Furniture, A Picture Book, 1949. Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), American Wing, Handbook of the American Wing Opening Exhibition, by R.T.H. Halsey and Charles O. Cornelius, 1924. Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), American Wing, Handbook of the American Wing, by R. T. H. Halsey and Charles O. Cornelius, 1924. Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), Great Bronze Age of China: An Exhibition from the People’s Republic of China, ed. by Wen Fong, introductory essays by Ma Chengyuan, 1980. Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), Greek Revival in the United States; A Special Loan Exhibition, November 9– March 1, 1943, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1943. Mew, Egan, Battersea Enamels Selected and Described, 1926. Mew, Egan, Old Bow China, 1909. Midana, Arturo, Arte Del Legno in Piemonte Nel Sei E Nel Settecento: Mobili Decorazioni Arredi Barocchi E Rococao, 521 Illustrazioni. Millar, Donald, Colonial Furniture, 1925. Miller, Edgar George, American Antique Furniture, A Book For Amateurs, 1937. Miller, Philip, Teapots & Coffee Pots, 1979. Missing Pieces: Georgia Folk Art, 1770–1976, the Catalogue of an Exhibition Organized by Anna Wadsworth, 1976.

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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815 to 1865, 1949. Musgrave, Clifford, Regency Furniture, 1800–1830, 1962. Nutting, Wallace, Furniture Treasury (Mostly of American Origin) All Periods of American Furniture with Some Foreign Examples in America, Also American Hardware, 1928. Nutting, Wallace, Furniture Treasury (Mostly of American Origin) All Periods of American Furniture with Some Foreign Examples in America, Also American Hardware, 1948. Odom, William Macdougal, History of Italian Furniture from the Fourteenth to the Early Nineteenth Centuries, 1918. Okie, Howard Pitcher, Old Silver and Old Sheffield Plate; A History of the Silversmith’s Art in Great Britain and Ireland, 1947. Oliver, Anthony, Staffordshire Pottery: the Tribal Art of England, 1981. Oliver, Anthony, Victorian Staffordshire Figure: A Guide for Collectors, 1982. Park, Lawrence, and John Hill Morgan, Gilbert Stuart; An Illustrated Descriptive List of His Works, 1926. Peabody Museum of Salem, Design Catalog of Chinese Export Porcelain for the American Market, 1785 to 1840, by Carl L. Crossman, 1964. Penzer, N. M. (Norman Mosley), Book of the Wine-Label, foreword by Andrbe L. Simon, 1947. Perry, Lilla S., Chinese Snuff Bottles; The Adventures & Studies of a Collector, 1961. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Three Centuries of American Art: Selections from the Bicentennial Exhibition Held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1976. Phillips, John Goldsmith, China-Trade Porcelain; An Account of Its Historical Background, Manufacture, and Decoration, and A Study of the Helena Woolworth McCann Collection, 1956. Phillips, John Marshall, Hundred Masterpieces of American Silver in Public Collections, 1948. Preservation Society of Newport County, Arts and Crafts of Newport, Rhode Island, 1640–1820, by Ralph E. Carpenter, Jr., 1954. Ramsey, L. G. G., Concise Encyclopedia of Antiques, 1955. Reifsnyder, Howard, Colonial Furniture; The Superb Collection of the Late Howard Reifsnyder, Including Signed Pieces by Philadelphia Cabinetmakers, Formerly Contained in the Reifsnyder Residence, the Pennsylvania Museum and Mount Pleasant Mansion, Philadelphia, 1929. Rhontgen, Robert E., Marks on German, Bohemian, and Austrian Porcelain: 1710 to the Present, 1981. Rhuckert, Rainer, Franz Anton Bustelli, Aufnahmen Von Max Hirmer, 1963.


T HE S TORY

Rosenfeld, David, Porcelain Figures of the Eighteenth Century in Europe, 1949. Rutt, Mrs. Anna Hong, Home Furnishing, 1935. Sack, Albert, Fine Points of Furniture: Early American, foreword by Israel Sack, introduction by John Meredith Graham II, 1950. Sale, Edith Dabney Tunis, Colonial Interiors, Second Series, introduction by J. Frederick Kelley, 1930. Salomonsky, Edgar, Exemplar of Antique Furniture Design; A Collection of Measured Drawings of Furniture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art Accompanied with Photographs and Text, 1923. Salwey, Charlotte Maria Birch, Fans of Japan, introduction by William Anderson, 1894. Sandon, Henry, Flight and Barr Worcester Porcelain, 1783– 1840, 1978. Savage, George, 18th-Century English Porcelain, 1952. Savage, George, 18th-Century German Porcelain, 1967. Savage, George, English Pottery and Porcelain, 1961. Schhonberger, Arno, and Halldor Soehner, Rococo Age; Art and Civilization of the 18th Century, 1963. Schlosser, Ignaz, Book of Rugs, Oriental and European, 1963. Schmitz, Hermann, Vor Hundert Jahren, Festrhaume Und Wohnzimmer Des Deutschen Klassizismus Und Biedermeier, 1920. Schreiber, Lady Charlotte, Fans and Fan Leaves, 1888. Schreiber, Lady Charlotte, Lady Charlotte Schreiber’s Journals; Confidences of A Collector of Ceramics & Antiques Throughout Britain, France, Holland, Belgium, Spain, 1911. Semon, Kurt, ed., Treasury of Old Silver, 1947. Sheraton, Thomas, Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer’s Drawing-Book in Three Parts, 1793. Shipway, Verna Cook, Masterpieces of Furniture, in Photos and Measured Drawings, new bibliography by Adolph K. Placzek, 1953. Small, Tunstall, and Christopher Woodbrid, English Wrought Ironwork of the Late 17th & Early 18th Centuries; A Portfolio of Full-Size Details, 1930. Smith, George, Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer’s Guide: Being A Complete Drawing Book, in Which Will Be Comprised Treatises on Geometry and Perspective, 1826. Smith, George, Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, in the Most Approved and Elegant Taste, 1808. Snowman, A. Kenneth (Abraham Kenneth), Art of Carl Fabergé, 1952. Soderholtz, Eric Ellis, Colonial Architecture and Furniture, 1895. Solon, L. M. (Louis Marc), Brief History of Old English Porcelain and Its Manufactories; With an Artistic, Industrial, and Critical Appreciation of Their Productions, 1903. Splendor of Dresden, Five Centuries of Art Collecting: An Exhibition from the State Art Collections of Dresden, German Democratic Republic, 1978.

OF A

C OLLECTION

Staatliche Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen, Festschrift Zur 200 jhahrigen Jubelfeier Der Haltesten Europhaischen Porzellanmanufaktur, Meissen, 1910, 1911.

Victoria and Albert Museum, Dept. of Textiles, Catalogue of English Domestic Embroidery of the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Centuries, by John L. Nevinson, 1950.

Staehelin, Walter August, Book of Porcelain: The Manufacture, Transport, and Sale of Export Porcelain in China During the Eighteenth Century, 1966.

Victoria and Albert Museum, Georgian Furniture, introduction by Ralph Edwards, 1951.

Stearns, Martha (Genung), Homespun and Blue; A Study of American Crewel Embroidery, 1963. Stillinger, Elizabeth, Antiquers: The Lives and Careers, the Deals, the Finds, the Collections of the Men and Women Who Were Responsible for the Changing Taste in American Antiques, 1980. Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), History of the Burr Portraits, Their Origin, Their Dispersal and Their Reassemblage, 1928. Stoneman, Vernon C., John and Thomas Seymour, Cabinetmakers in Boston, 1794–1816, 1959. Stoneman, Vernon C., Supplement to John and Thomas Seymour, Cabinetmakers in Boston, 1794–1816, 1965. Strange, Thomas Arthur, English Furniture, Decoration, Woodwork & Allied Arts: During the Last Half of the Seventeenth Century, the Whole of the Eighteenth Century and the Early Part of the Nineteenth Century, 1918. Strange, Thomas Arthur, Historical Guide to French Interiors, Furniture, Decoration, Woodwork & Allied Arts, During the Last Half of the Seventeenth Century, the Whole of the Eighteenth Century and the Early Part of the Nineteenth Century, 1900. Stratton, Arthur James, English Interior, A Review of the Decoration of English Houses from Tudor Times to the XIXth Century, 1920.

Victoria and Albert Museum, Schreiber Collection, Catalogue of English Porcelain, Earthenware, Enamels and Glass Collected by Charles Schreiber ... and the Lady Charlotte Elizabeth Schreiber, 1924. Viollet-le-Duc, Eugaene-Emmanuel, Mediaeval Stained Glass; A Translation of the Article, Vitrail, in the Dictionnaire Raisonne De L’architecture Francais Du Xie Au XVie Siecl, 1946. Walcha, Otto, Meissner Porzellan, 1975. Wallace, Philip B., Colonial Ironwork in Old Philadelphia; The Craftsmanship of the Early Days of the Republic, 1930. Waring, Janet, Early American Stencils on Walls and Furniture, 1968. Watney, Bernard, Longton Hall Porcelain, 1957. Watson, William, ed., Great Japan Exhibition: Art of the Edo Period, 1600–1868: Royal Academy of Arts, London 19812, 1981. Weeks, Jeanne G., and Donald Treganowan, Rugs and Carpets of Europe and the Western World, 1969. Wenham, Edward, Practical Book of American Silver, 1949. Wharton, Edith, and Ogden Codman Jr., Decoration of Houses, introduction by John Barrington Bayley and William A. Coles, 1978.

Sweeney, John A. H., Treasure House of Early American Rooms, introduction by Henry Francis du Pont, 1963.

William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art and Mary Atkins Museum of Fine Art, Frank P. and Harriet C. Burnap Collection of English Pottery in the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art, 1953.

Tilley, Frank, Teapots and Tea, 1957.

Williamson, George Charles, Book of Famille Rose, 1927.

Tokugawa Yoshinobu and Eokochi Sadao, Tokugawa Collection: Neo Robes and Masks, translated and adapted by Louise Allison Cort and Monica Bet, 1976.

Wilson, Jane, Canton China, 1961.

Tracy, Berry B., Federal Furniture and Decorative Arts at Boscobel, with painting documentation by Mary Black, 1981. Trapnell, Alfred, Catalogue of Bristol and Plymouth Porcelain, with Examples of Bristol Glass and Pottery, Forming the Collection Made by Mr. Alfred Trapnell, 1912. Tudor-Craig, Sir Algernon, Armorial Porcelain of the Eighteenth Century, forward by Sir Henry Farnham Burke, 1925. Turner, William, Ceramics of Swansea and Nantgarw: A History of the Factories, with Biographical Notices of the Artists and Others, Notes on the Merits of Thereon Etc., Also an Appendix on the Mannerisms of the Artists, 1897. United States Department of State, Guidebook to Diplomatic Reception Rooms, 1969. United States Department of State, Guidebook to Diplomatic Reception Rooms, 1973. Untermyer, Irwin, Meissen and Other Continental Porcelain, Faience and Enamel in the Irwin Untermyer Collection, 1956. Vernay, Arthur S., Decorations and English Interiors, 1927.

174

Winchester, Alice, and the Staff of Antiques Magazine, Collectors & Collection: The Antiques Anniversary Book, 1961. Winchester, Alice, and the Staff of Antiques Magazine, Living with Antiques: A Treasury of Private Homes in America, 1963. Wright, Richardson Little, House & Garden’s Second Book of Interiors, Which Contains Seven Hundred Illustrations of Halls, Living Rooms, Libraries, Dining Rooms, Bed Chambers and Other Rooms of the House, 1926. Wright, Richardson Little, House and Garden’s Book of Color Schemes, Containing Over Two Hundred Color Schemes and Three Hundred Illustrations of Halls, Living Rooms, Dining Rooms, Bed Chambers, Sun Rooms, Roofs, Garden Rooms, Kitchens and Baths, 1929. Wyler, Seymour B., Book of Old Silver: English, American, Foreign; With All Available Hallmarks, Including Sheffield Plate Marks, 1937. Zerwick, Chloe, Short History of Glass, 1980. Zweig, Marianne, Zweites Rokoko; Innenrhaume Und Hausrat in Wien Um 1830–1860, Herausgegeben Von Marianne Zweig; Mit 167 Abbildungen Im Text Und Auf 80 Tafel, 1924.


A PPENDIX

Acknowledgments

A

there is finally a catalogue illustrating more than 170 objects from the Philip Trammell Shutze Collection of Decorative Arts. It was very difficult as curator to decide on which pieces to include. In fact, as the photographer was finishing the last week of his six-week shoot here, I found myself running to ask, on more than one occasion, “Can you shoot one more object?” The work that is involved in producing a book like this requires the talents, creativity, and dedication of many people. Among those who deserve my profound thanks are: Letitia Roberts of New York City, who did the original appraisal for Sotheby’s in 1983, and reviewed all the ceramics manuscripts for me. Edward Owen, the photographer, for his wonderful images of the collection. I knew I wanted him to do the book when I saw his work for Hillwood three years ago. My colleagues at the Atlanta History Center, especially Gordon Jones, Andy Ambrose, Deborah Thomas, Heather Howell, Daniel Hoover, Stacy Braukman, David Warren, Suzanne Corbett, Frances Westbrook, and Helen Matthews. The first curator of the Shutze collection, Nancy Lester, who shared her extensive knowledge with me. I will always be grateful to her. The Ceramic Circle of Atlanta, whose members were so instrumental in moving and cataloguing the collection in 1983, and who now have helped fund this publication. The Shutze docents, who have continued to meet and learn with me, despite not having had an opportunity to give a Shutze tour for the last five years while the Swan House was being restored. Last, but not least, my husband, Nolan Moore, who has always believed in me. FTER TWENTY - THREE YEARS ,

REBECCA B. MOORE

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INDEX Adler, Rudolph, 15 American Academy (Rome), 13–15 American Classicist (Dowling), 15 American decorative arts, growing interest in, 103 American furniture, Jonathan Gostalowe chest, 23 art figure studies, framed (pair), 146–47 framed bookplates, birds (four), 143 map, framed and colored, “Carolina, Florida, and the Bahamas Islands,” 142 painting Flemish landscape, 141 “Hong Kong,” 128, 139 view of Canton, 140 portrait, George Washington, 138 prints, framed, monkeys (four), 144–45 arts, funding for, 161 Augustus Rex, 55 Barker, David, 86 Bateman, Hester, 129, 135 Bateman family of silversmiths, 135 Beckhard, Adolf, 59 Beurdeley, Michel, 30 Block, Mrs. Bates (Margaret), 9 Brooklyn Museum, 103 Browne, W. E., 109, 120 Browne (W. E.) Decorating Company, 23 Caldwell, James, 93 Carbone, Joseph, 38–39 Carr, Mrs. Julian S. (Anne), 5 Catesby, Mark, 142, 143 Ceramic Circle of Atlanta, 9 tablesetting exhibition, 26, 54, 70 Champion, Richard, 71 Charles Daniel house (Greenville, SC), 14, 15, 19 Cheere, Henry, 93 China Trade, 27, 140 Chinese Export porcelain, 18, 19, 27 basket reticulated oval, “Brown Fitzhugh,” 51 reticulated (pair), 51 bough pots (pair), 48 bourdaloue, 39 bowl “Hong,” 44 “Wilkes and Liberty,” 38

candlesticks (pairs), 35 chamber, 44 charger, armorial, and pair of plates, 29 dinner service, “Tobacco Leaf” pattern, 26, 41 ewers, helmet-shaped (one of a pair), 33 figural group, blanc de chine, 28 figure, cockerel, 32 fruit basket on stand, 42 group Dutch couple, 40 Dutch or Tyrolean dancers, 38 hot water dishes, covers, and stands, “Green Fitzhugh” (one of pair), 53 inkstand, reticulated, 34 jardinière and stand, 47 jug, “Toby Philpot,” 46 plates “In the Arbor,” 30 “The Baptism of Christ, 29 “The Crucifixion,” 37 “La Dame au Parasol,” 31 “Doctor’s Visit to the Emperor,” 31 “The Nativity,” 36 portrait, 33 platter, oval well-and-tree, “Brown Fitzhugh,” 52 sconce, in shape of arm, 34 seated hounds (pair), 42 table service, “Tobacco leaf,” 26 tureens armorial, 20 carp-form (two), 52–53 boar’s head (pair), 43 soup, and covers (pair), 45 urn neoclassical, 49 pistol-handled (one of pair), 50 Chinese Armorial Porcelain (Howard), 53 Colonial Furniture in America (Lockwood), 21–23, 103, 111, 151 Continental porcelain and pottery, 55 coffee cups and saucers (pair), 63 dessert service, 54, 68–69 figures Apollo in his chariot with four horses, 61 “Camel on a Parade,” 60 “The Four Continents,” 58–59 “Map Seller,” 57 potentate, 62

Numbers in italics indicate photographs and collection pieces.

176

garniture set, 66 group, “The Judgment of Solomon,” 62 plaque, 65 portrait roundel, 67 rose box and cover, 63 salt cellars (two), 64 teabowls and saucers, 56 wine pot, 56 Cooke, Helen Temple, 162 Cookworthy, William, 71 Cox, Allyn, 146 dealers, Shutze’s list of, 165–67 decoration bonbonniere, “Pug’s Head,” 149 candlesticks, enamel (two), 148 etui, 149 fans, japanned, 153 mirror, stumpwork, Charles II, 148 mirror knobs (four pairs), 151 necklaces, 157 needlecase, 150 pendant, 157 pictures, featherwork and watercolor (pair), 152 sailor’s valentines, 154–55 snuff bottles, 156 snuffboxes, birds (three), 150 tea caddy, quill work, 157 Delft, 55 Delhorn, Melonie, 9 deutsche Blumen, 63 Dubose, Mrs. Beverly M., Jr. (Duffie), 5 Duncan Phyfe and the English Regency, 1800– 1900 (McClelland), 124 du Pont, Henry Francis, 21, 47, 50, 161, 164 Eberlin, Johann Friedrich, 38 Edwards, George, 142, 143, 144 Efird, Mrs. Ray, 164 Eldred, Robert C., 162 Empress of China, 27 English Earthenware Figures, 1740–1840 (Halfpenny), 99, 100 English porcelain, 71 baskets, “Quail Pattern,” 76 candlestick, 73 figural group, 17 figures “Africa,” 77 “Anthony and Cleopatra” (pair), 80


I NDEX

Bacchus and Ariadne, 19 cockerel, 75 James Quin as “Falstaff,” 77 pigeons, seated (pair), 75 squirrel, 74 handles, knife and fork (one each of four), 74 jug, “Cabbage Leaf,” 79 mug, “King of Prussia,” 78 scent bottle and stoppers, “Hound and Vase” (double), 72 soup plates, “Strawberry Leaf” (one of four), 73 tea service, 70, 81 (partial) teapot and cover, 79 tureen with cover, 78 English pottery, 71 basket, oval, 84 bust, George Washington, 101 coffee pot and cover, 89 ewers (pair), 90 figural group, putto and lioness, 97 figures Demosthenes, 93 lions (pair), 98 “The Roran Lion,” 101 figures, allegorical “Fire,” 99 “Peace,” 96 flask, 88 jugs and cover, 97 Liverpool, 94–95 large group, farmyard, 100 obelisks (three), 92 plates, 82 (one of a pair) “George Washington” (pair), 91 sauceboat and stand, “Fox and Swan,” 88 teapot and cover, 82, 85, 86, 87 “Pecten Shell,” 83 Enoch Wood & Sons, 93 etui, 149 faience, 55 Fitzhugh, Thomas, 51 Forbes, Crosby, 141 Franklin, Benjamin, 67 furniture, 102, 103 arm chair, 109 bamboo (pair), 126 walnut, 103 barometer, 104 card table, 120 chest of drawers, 111, 115 (bow-front) corner chair, 105 daybed, 108 dining table (three-part), 121 dressing table, japanned, 117 high chest, 112 secretary bookcase, 113 settee, two-chair-back, 116 sewing table, lacquer, Chinese Export, 125

side chairs one of four, 124 one of a pair, 110 with rush seats, 106 sideboard, small, 122 tables, George III (pair), 119 tall clock, 118 tambour desk, 21, 114 tea table, 109 wall mirror, 107, 127 writing desk and bookcase, lady’s, cylinder front, 123 Garden Club of America, 21 Goldberg, Hayden, 91 Gostelowe, Jonathan, 103 Greatbach, William, 86 Halfpenny, Pat, 86, 99, 100 Halsey, R. T. H., 21, 164 Hancock, Robert, 78 Hentz, Adler and Shutze, 15 Hentz, Hal, 15 Hentz, Reid and Adler, 15, 119 Hentz and Reid, 13 Hess, Ignaz, 45 hongs, 27, 44 Horoldt, Johann Gregor, 55, 56 Howard, David Sanctuary, 53 Hubely, Melvin, 19 Independence Hall (Philadelphia), 120 indianische Blumen, 58 Jones, Edward Vason, 19 Kaendler, Johann Joachim, 55, 57–62, 74 Kakiemon, Sakaida, 76 Kammen, Michael, 21 Littler, William, 78 Lloyd Hyde, J. A., 33, 39, 44, 45 Lockwood, Luke Vincent, 21–23, 103, 111, 129, 151 Lowestoft, 45 The Magazine ANTIQUES, 19–21, 165 maiolica, 55 McKim, Charles, 13 Means, James, 17–19 Meissen factory, 55 Memorial Arts Center (Atlanta), 162 Metropolitan Museum of Art, 103 Meyer, Friedrick Elias, 77 Murat, Joachim, 69 Mystic Chords of Memory (Kammen), 21 Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands (Catesby), 143 Nini, Jean-Baptiste, 67 Oriental Lowestoft, 45

Numbers in italics indicate photographs and collection pieces.

177

Oriental Lowestoft: with Special Reference to the Trade with China and the Porcelain Decorated for the American Market (Lloyd Hyde), 39, 44 Page, Mann, 163 Peachtree Garden Club, 21 Pendley, Norman, 23, 165 Philadelphia Museum of Art, 120 porcelain. See Chinese Export porcelain, Continental porcelain and pottery, English porcelain Porcelain Figures of the Eighteenth Century in Europe, 59 Powell House (Philadelphia Museum of Art), 50 Pronk, Cornelius, 30–31 Queensware, 71 Quin, James, 77 Reid, Neel, 15, 119 Rome Prize (American Academy in Rome), 13 Rosenfeld, David, 59 sailor’s valentines, 154, 154–55 Schenck, Petrus, 33 Schroeder, Mrs. William H., Sr. (Mary Elizabeth), 5 Scully, Vincent, 15 Seligmann, Johann Michael, 142 Seuter workshops, 56 Sévres, 55 Sharples, James, 23, 129 Sherrat, Obadiah, 101 Shutze, Philip Trammell, 12, 16, 19, 21, 22 apartment, 2, 17, 18–21, 23, 102, 129, 163, 168 book collection, 21, 169–72 collection of, 17–23 essay on the decorative arts, 23, 161–63 house designed for himself, 15 interests and influences, 15 last will and testament, 11, 23 life of, 13–15 visit to, of the Walpole Society, 164 Shutze and Armistead, 17 silver casters (three), 130 creamer, footed, 134 kettle and stand, 132 ladle, 135 salts, open, 129, 135 sauceboats (pair), 137 tankard, 131 teapot, 133 tea service, 136 Smith, John, 33 Stapko, C. Gregory, 101 Sterne, Laurence, 46 Stockwell, David, 32, 82, 148 Stuart, Gilbert, 101, 129


T HE S TORY

OF A

C OLLECTION

Sussel, Arthur, 50 Swan House, 5, 10, 11, 13, 15, 23 Tristram Shandy (Sterne), 46 Unearthing Staffordshire (Barker and Halfpenny), 86 Wallis, Thomas, II, 136 Walpole, Horace, 164 Walpole Society, 164 Washington, George, 23, 91, 94, 101, 129, 138 Webb, Electra Havemeyer, 21 Wedgwood, Josiah, 71 West, Mrs. Charles B. (Margie), 5, 9 Whieldon, Thomas, 71, 86 Winterthur, 21, 50, 82, 161–62 Wissing, William, 33 Wood, Enoch, 93 Wray, Mrs. Frank M., 44 Youqua, 140

Numbers in italics indicate photographs and collection pieces.

178


Philip Trammell Shutze: Atlanta Classicist, Connoisseur, and Collector  

Philip Trammell Shutze, one Atlanta’s foremost twentieth-century architects, followed the Classical tradition in art and architecture from h...

Philip Trammell Shutze: Atlanta Classicist, Connoisseur, and Collector  

Philip Trammell Shutze, one Atlanta’s foremost twentieth-century architects, followed the Classical tradition in art and architecture from h...