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Contents Volume 2: January - April 2014

2…House Notes 4…CSO Musicians 8…Board of Directors 9…Administration 10…Letter from CSO President of the Board

11…Letter from CSO Executive Director

12…Letter from CSO Acting Artistic Advisor

CONCERTS 22.... Pops III

Wicked Divas

26

Boeing Family Concert Classical Fusion

30.... Chamber Orchestra IV

Bach, Mendelssohn and Schumann Masters from Leipzig, Germany

34.... Masterworks IV

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6

40.... Pops IV

Back to Romance

42.... CSO Chorus

Music with Friends

44.... Chamber Orchestra V

14…CSO Chorus

16…CSO Gospel Choir

46.... CSO Chamber Music

& Spiritual Ensemble

18…CSOL®

Time Machine: Tchaikovsky’s Dreams and Journeys

Musical Journey to Germany

48.... Masterworks V

The Firebird

20…CSO Educational

54.... Magnetic South

Programs

The Carolina Connection II

21…CSO Remix

56.... Masterworks VI

47…Corporate Supporters

61.... Chamber Orchestra VI

65…Membership Benefits

66…Donor Recognition

Saint-Saëns “Organ” Symphony

CSO Virtuosi

64…PepsiCo National

Young Artist Competition

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House Notes TICKET INFORMATION

FOR THE ENJOYMENT OF ALL

• Individual Concert Tickets

• Quiet, Please!

Purchase through www.CharlestonSymphony.org, call us at (843)723-7528, or visit us at CSO Administrative Offices, 756 St. Andrews Blvd., Charleston, SC, 29407. Tickets, if available, are also on sale at the door the night of the performance (ticket prices subject to change). Convenience fees may apply.

Please be sure to turn off all cell phones, paging devices, and watch alarms.

• Student Discount

• From the Stage

All full-time students (6-22 yrs old) with a valid ID may purchase tickets in person, either at CSO Administrative Offices or at the door, for $20 (Some concerts excluded; subject to availability. College students may be required to show I.D.)

PLEASE HELP US RECYCLE Please keep your program guide if you wish. We also encourage you to place your program guide in the recycle boxes as you leave this performance for use at future performances.

SUBSCRIBERS - DON’T LET YOUR GOOD SEATS GO TO WASTE! If you are unable to attend a concert, call the CSO at least 48 hours prior to the performance to exchange tickets for a future CSO concert (subject to availability) or donate your unused tickets to the CSO for a tax-deductible contribution. As an alternative, you may pass along your unused tickets to friends or family. All tickets are non-refundable and single ticket exchanges are not offered. Call (843) 723-7528, ext. 110 or visit CSO Administrative Offices for details.

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• Electronic Devices Cameras, camera phones, audio recorders and video recorders are not permitted, as they may interfere with the musicians’ performance. Free to all ticket holders, pre-concert talks are held from the stage from 6:30-7 pm prior to all Masterworks Series concerts at the Sottile Theatre.

• Children We love kids, but we discourage the attendance of children under the age of six to an evening performance because they tend to be too long. Parents will be asked to remove disruptive children from the concert hall.

• Late Seating In consideration of both artists and audiences, latecomers will be seated at the discretion of staff. Please make every effort to arrive on time. We provide two opportunities for late seating. For a Classical performance - one after the completion of the first work on the program and another at the end of the first movement of the work immediately following intermission. For Pops/Special Event performances - one after the completion of the second work on the program and another after the completion of the first work immediately following intermission. Doors open at 6:15 pm for Masterworks performances and 6:30 pm for Pops performances at Sottile Theatre. Doors open thirty minutes prior to performances at the Dock Street Theatre. Doors open an hour before performance for all other performances.

- C H ARLE S TON S YM PHON Y OR C HEST R A


Welcome to this performance of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra. Here are some tips and suggestions to enhance the concert experience for everyone. Enjoy!

FOR YOUR COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE

IMPORTANT INFO

• Parking

CSO Patron Services (843) 723-7528, ext. 110

Sottile Theatre: Three paid parking garages are located near the theatre. These garages are: George Street Garage on St. Philip Street between George and Liberty Streets, Wentworth Garage at the intersection of Wentworth and St. Philip Streets, and St. Philip Garage on St. Philip Street between Calhoun and Vanderhorst Streets. Dock St. Theatre: Paid parking is available at the nearest garage on the corner of Church and Cumberland Streets. Additional street parking is available. Additional venue parking is available on our website at www.CharlestonSymphony.org.

• Accessibility To purchase handicap accessible tickets, please call CSO Patron Services at (843) 723-7528, ext 110.

Our Address: 756 St. Andrews Blvd. Charleston, SC 29407 Office Hours: Monday-Thursday: 9 am - 5 pm Friday: 9 am - 12 noon Concert Nights: 9 am - 4 pm Our website: www.CharlestonSymphony.org Charleston Symphony E-News

Sottile Theatre: House back of orchestra level is available but limited to those with wheelchairs and one companion. to those with wheelchairs (and 1 companion) is available. This section is not for those with canes. People who have trouble walking (i.e., they use a cane, walker, etc) should access the theatre via the front door and take the elevator to the first floor. ADA restrooms are located on the first floor behind the concessions area.

Receive the latest news, information and special pricing opportunities by signing up for the CSO’s e-news at www.CharlestonSymphony.org. Also stay connected on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ CharlestonSymphony, follow us on Twitter: @ChsSymphonyOrch, or pin with us on Pinterest: www.pinterest. com/chassymphony.

Dock Street Theatre: Wheelchair seating is available on the Main Floor Row P, along with companion seating. ADA restrooms are located on the first floor.

FOR YOUR SAFETY

• Restrooms Restrooms are conveniently located on each level.

• Food and Beverage Sottile Theatre: Concessions are available for purchase at Sottile Theatre. Food and beverages are not permitted in the hall. Dock Street Theatre: Concessions are available at the Dock Street Theatre during concerts with intermission only. Food and beverages are not permitted in the hall. Concerts, performers, dates, times, and locations are subject to change with or without notification. Your attendance constitutes consent for use of your likeness and/or voice on all video and/or audio recordings and in photographs made during CSO events.

In the event of an emergency, please use the exit nearest your seat. This is your shortest route out of the hall. A staff member is in the lobby at all performances. PROGRAM BOOK ADVERTISING Our program book is published several times per year and is viewed by over 20,000 people per year. Show your support for the CSO while raising the visibility of your business or organization. For program book advertising rates and information, call the Charleston Symphony Orchestra at (843) 723-7528.

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Musicians Violin

Yuriy Bekker * Concertmaster & Acting Artistic Director

Viola

Alexander Boissonnault *

Jan-Marie Christy Joyce *

Principal Second

Principal

Asako Kremer *

Alexander Agrest *

Herzman-Fishman Foundation/Leo and Carol H Fishman Chair

Micah Gangwer * Assistant Concertmaster

Assistant Principal Second

Frances Hsieh Nonoko Okada Lauren Cless Brent Price

* Designates core musicians

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Assistant Principal


Cello

Bass

Flute

Norbert Lewandowski *

Thomas Bresnick *

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh *

Principal

Principal

Principal

Marlies Tindall Chair

Dr. Jim and Claire Allen Chair

Caroline and Albert Thibault Chair

Damian Kremer *

Regina Helcher Yost *

Assistant Principal

Second Flute & Piccolo

Barbara Chapman Chair

Paul and Becky Hilstad Chair

Timothy O’Malley

Tacy Edwards

continued >>

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Musicians Oboe

Clarinet

Horn

Mark Gainer *

Charles Messersmith *

Brandon Nichols *

Principal

Principal

Principal

Mrs. Phyllis Miller Chair

Ilse Calcagno Chair

Bob and Marcia Hider Chair

Kari Kistler *

Gretchen Roper *

Anne Holmi *

Second Oboe & English Horn

Debra Sherrill

John Frampton Maybank Chair, in loving memory

continued from

* Designates core musicians

previous pages

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Trumpet

Trombone

Timpani

Vacant Principal Trumpet*

William Zehfuss *

Beth Albert *

Principal

Principal

Cal and Joyce East Chair

Dr. S. Dwane Thomas Chair

JoAnn Lamolino * Second Trumpet

Bassoon

Percussion

Thomas Joyce * Bass Trombone Robert and Benita Schlau Chair

Katherine St.John *

Ryan Leveille *

Principal

Principal

Suzanne Gemmell Chair, in memory of Sue Metzger

Harp Kathleen Wilson

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2013-14 Board of Directors Executive Committee: • President | Robert Schlau | Wealth Management Advisor, Merrill Lynch

• VP Nominating and Governance | Dr. James M. Ravenel | Physician, Former Chairman of the Board, Roper St. Francis

• First VP | Cynthia Hartley | Former Senior Vice President of Human Resources, Sonoco Products Company

• VP Marketing | Charlie Cumbaa | Senior Vice President, New Business Ventures, Blackbaud Inc.

• VP Finance | Michael Moody | Former Chairman and CEO, Force Protection, Inc. • VP Education | Dr. James Braunreuther | Fine Arts Coordinator, Charleston County School District

• Secretary | Ellen Claussen Davis | President, E.C. Davis & Associates, LLC • CSOL® President | Sue Ingram • Past President | John H. Warren III | Partner, Warren & Sinkler Attorneys at Law

Directors: • Quentin Baxter | Musician/Adjunct Professor of Jazz Percussion, College of Charleston

• J. Hugh McDaniel | Project Manager, Project Services Group, Benefitfocus, Inc.

• Jessica Buchanan | Owner, Tease Dry Bar, LLC

• Phyllis Miller | Retired Antique Dealer, Volunteer

• John Cahill | Executive Chairman, Kraft Foods Group, Inc

• Ellen Dressler Moryl | Director of Office of Cultural Affairs, City of Charleston, Retired

• Judy Chitwood

• Robert Pearce | Attorney, Smith Moore Leatherwood

• Dr. William Cook | Physician, Lowcountry Internal Medicine

• Mayo Read | Former Owner, Palmetto Travel Service

• Julie Fenimore | Educator, CSO Advocate

• W. Bratton Riley | Director of Program Development, Maybank Industries, LLC

• Andrea Gilliard | Research Assistant, Plant Virology and Collateral Duty Safety Manager, USVL, US Department of Agriculture

• Byron Stahl | Financial Advisor, Atlantic Coast Advisory Group

• Clyde Hiers | Certified Public Accountant • Paul Hilstad | Retired Partner and General Counsel, Lord, Abbett & Co, LLC

• Roger Steel | Former CEO, SNS Properties, Inc. • Bright Williamson | Principal, Associated Spine Technologies

• David H. Maybank, Jr. Esq. | Lawyer, Hennessy and Walker Group, P.C.

Ex-Officio Members: • Marty Besancon | Cultural Arts Director, City of North Charleston

Life Members: • Laura Hewitt

• Susan Cheves | President, Charleston Symphony Orchestra Chorus

• Max L. Hill, Jr.

• Dr. Joseph M. Jenrette, III | Physician, MUSC Radiology

• Marianne Mead

• Valerie Morris | Dean, School of the Arts, College of Charleston

• Eloise Pingry

• Lee Pringle | Founder, Charleston Symphony Orchestra Gospel Choir and Spritual Ensemble

• Burton R. Schools

• Caroline Thibault | Immediate Past President, CSOL®

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• Edward H. Sparkman


Administration Executive Director Michael Smith

Patron Services and Marketing Coordinator LesLee Ames

Concertmaster and Acting Artistic Director Yuriy Bekker

Music Librarian Rachel Gangwer

Director of Patron Services Cynthia Branch

Stage Manager Judge Kelly

Director of Development Monica Jenks

Finance Manager Lisa McDonald, CPA

Director of Operations and Personnel Thomas Joyce

Development Associate Alex Pagano

Director of Marketing Tara Scott

Education Coordinator Stephanie Silvestri

Gift Officer Megan Alder

Development Assistant Susan Walker

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Notes from the CSO’s Leadership Dear Friends, I would like to welcome and thank you for attending this performance of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra (CSO). We have had an exciting season so far, and look forward to an equally exciting second half. The CSO’s Masterworks performances again feature internationally renowned guest artists and we will host three more Music Director candidates serving as guest conductors. Each week of our Masterworks performances, we host events to provide you the opportunity to learn more about these candidates, and we encourage you to offer your feedback through either our online or print formats. In addition to our Masterworks series, we have appealing Pops, Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Music concerts held throughout our season that we hope will transport you to new musical heights. Our education programs continue to expand with plans to reach 18,000 young people this year. We are fortunate to have our highly talented group of core musicians work on stage, in schools and at special events to introduce music into the lives of young people across our region. I want to note that the artistic vision of Yuriy Bekker, our Concertmaster and Acting Artistic Director, has been a driving force behind the CSO’s expansion into family-friendly programming, the attraction of world-class guest talent, and our hugely successful Masterworks, Chamber Orchestra and Pops series. We are thankful to continue to have his tireless efforts in bringing both familiar and exciting, new works of music to our audiences. We are also pleased to announce that Michael Smith, former principal trumpet player with the orchestra, has been appointed as Executive Director. Michael will bring new energy, ideas and vision to our organization and we look forward to his leadership in the years to come. Our Board of Directors, staff and musicians have all worked tirelessly to establish a firm financial footing for our organization. We’ve enjoyed three consecutive years with an operational surplus and hope to continue that trend this year as well. The Charleston Symphony Orchestra and its partners and affiliates continue to provide strong artistic leadership for Charleston and the future of our organization is brighter than ever. Of course, any success we have is as a result of the steadfast investment of our CSO donors and subscribers. Currently, 65% of the organization’s operating revenue comes from philanthropic support. Every contribution counts. We are so grateful for your generous giving in the past and look forward to reaching new milestones with your support in the future. My fellow CSO board members, our staff and our musicians join me in thanking you for all you do for the CSO. Enjoy this concert and I look forward to seeing you often this season.

Sincerely,

Robert M. Schlau President, Board of Directors, Charleston Symphony Orchestra

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- C H ARLE S TON S YM PHON Y OR C HEST R A


Dear CSO family, Welcome to the second half of the 2013-2014 season. I have had the pleasure of meeting many of you in the CSO family already from my years playing trumpet, and I look forward to getting to know many more of you in my new role as executive director of the CSO. I am very excited about the opportunities that are ahead. While the orchestral music industry in our nation is enduring difficult times, we should all take pride in the fact that our orchestra is building a healthy and sustainable model. This accomplishment is a direct result of responsible leadership from our Board of Directors, dedicated musicians and staff members, active affiliate organizations, and most of all, your spirited support and generous financial contributions. Many of us have heard recently that classical music is a dying art. I challenge this assertion. It is our civic responsibility to expand our audience through outreach efforts in our schools as well as with groups of people who don’t yet know the power of classical music. We will continue challenging our musicians to raise the bar of artistic excellence each year and expand our programming in order to respond to the needs and appetites of our current patrons. Our future success will be determined by the example we set in how a modern symphony orchestra can and should best serve its community. Your support and inspiration will guide these efforts, as we strive to be among the best in our industry. For the remainder of this season, we look forward to sharing more amazing programming and superb guest artists and conductors with you. As we expand the reach and impact of our current educational programs, we are also launching two new education programs with the generous support of The Boeing Company and PepsiCo. The Boeing Company is sponsoring a family concert called Classical Fusion as well as our Young People’s Concerts where Title 1 students are bused in by us to expose them to classical music. The January 25th Family Concert will feature three local young geniuses performing with the CSO, including hip hop violin sensation, Seth Gilliard. PepsiCo has sponsored a new National Young Artist Competition (NYAC), where young students will be selected from a national audition process to perform solos with the CSO during an April performance. We are thrilled to have these two civic-minded companies as our partners in education. We look forward to seeing you at these events to support our nation’s best young talent. The future has never been brighter for the CSO. We are ready to take our orchestra to new heights, but this is only possible with your continued patronage and financial support. I sincerely hope that you enjoy our performances, get to know our outstanding musicians, and learn more about how we help educate students across our tri-county area. And of course, I look forward to meeting you in the weeks ahead, and hearing your ideas as to how we can best serve you and this great city.

Sincerely,

Michael A. Smith Executive Director, Charleston Symphony Orchestra

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Dear Music Lovers, This season has been a blast! Our fall featured a variety of accomplished guest artists performing dazzling music and we have so much more in store for you. In addition, we are also thrilled about the appointment of Michael Smith as our new executive director. Michael is already known to our community as a great trumpeter and he will continue to be a tremendous asset to us as he assumes this new role and leads us into our future. We now look forward to continuing our exciting programming in the second half of the season. Our January Pops will showcase an awesome act called Wicked Divas. Nicole Parker and Emily Rozek are sensational Broadway singers and will perform selections from the Tony Award-winning musical Wicked and other favorites from Phantom of the Opera, Chicago, Gypsy, My Fair Lady and more. At the end of the month, I will be featured as both violinist and conductor alongside two fantastic Charleston musicians, Volodymyr Vynntsky and Jessica Hull-Dambaugh, in our Chamber Orchestra program entitled Bach, Mendelssohn, and Shumann: Masters From Leipzig. You will be swept away in February by the ultimate of romantic music. Former CSO concertmaster and renowned violinist, Alexander Kerr, will return to Charleston to perform Samuel Barber’s exquisitely beautiful violin concerto in our Masterworks series. Music Director candidate, Lawrence Loh, will then lead Tchaikovsky’s final and most powerful work, Symphony No. 6, “Pathetique.” This masterpiece is full of deep emotions that strike the heart. Some even interpret it as Tchaikovsky’s last will and testament as he died just days after its completion. Our Valentine’s Pops will welcome multi-talented conductor and entertainer, Matt Catingub, to Charleston. He will sweep you off your feet with popular songs such as Unforgettable and When I Fall in Love. Finally, I have been looking most forward to this year’s edition of “Time Machine: Tchaikovsky’s Dreams and Journeys.” Our Chamber Orchestra will transport you back in time to explore the life and works of Tchaikovsky and what inspired him to write these incredible pieces. Great musical talent will flourish in the months of March and April. Music Director candidate, Ken Lam, will conduct our March Masterworks series. This program will include the symphonic poem Death and Transfiguration by Richard Strauss, commemorating the 150th anniversary of his birth, and a collaboration with College of Charleston cello faculty, Natalia Khoma, for a shining performance of Edward Elgar’s lush Cello Concerto. The final Masterworks program in April will feature Saint-Saëns’ brilliant “Organ” Symphony conducted by Music Director candidate, Michael Butterman, and Edvard Grieg’s beloved Piano Concerto performed by University of South Carolina piano professor, Marina Lomazov. Our Chamber Orchestra finale, entitled CSO Virtuosi, will showcase the talents of different sections of the orchestra, most notably our all-star clarinet section. We are also excited to premier a new work we commissioned for string orchestra by Charleston’s own composer, Edward Hart. As our musical journey continues this season, I am reminded of how lucky we are to have such tremendous support from our community and to perform for friends who so passionately share our love for great music. I encourage each of you to continue exploring the variety of performances, community events, and educational programs that the CSO has to offer this season and look forward to seeing you there!

Sincerely,

Yuriy Bekker Concertmaster and Acting Artistic Director Charleston Symphony Orchestra

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Yuriy Bekker CSO Concertmaster & Acting Artistic Director

Y

uriy Bekker has led the Charleston Symphony Orchestra as concertmaster since 2007 and has been the orchestra’s acting artistic director for the past three seasons. Bekker has also held the position of concertmaster for the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra and AIMS Festival in Graz, Austria, and has held additional positions with the Houston Symphony, Houston Grand Opera and Ballet Orchestras, and the Louisville Orchestra. Mr. Bekker is an adjunct faculty member of the College of Charleston School of the Arts as conductor of the College of Charleston Orchestra. He has also been artistic advisor to the Piccolo Spoleto Festival for the last three seasons. Recently, he was given an Outstanding Artistic Achievement award from the city of Charleston for his cultural contributions to Charleston. As a guest concertmaster, avid chamber musician and critically-acclaimed soloist, Yuriy Bekker has performed worldwide including with the Vancouver Symphony (BC, Canada), the Ulster Orchestra in Northern Ireland, Chicago Chamber Music Society, European Music Festival Stuttgart (Germany), the Pacific Music Festival (Japan), Spoleto USA, Piccolo Spoleto, the Aspen Music Festival, at the Kennedy Center, and in cities including New York City, Chicago, Miami, Orlando, Asheville, Flagstaff, Scottsdale, and Graz, Austria. He has collaborated with Herbert Greenberg, Claudio Bohorquez, Alexander Kerr, Andrew Armstrong, Robert DeMaine, Sara Chang, Gil Shaham, Joshua Roman, JoAnn Falletta, and Andrew Litton. Upcoming solo engagements include performances with the Midland Symphony (Michigan) of “Under an Indigo Sky,” a violin concerto written for him by composer Edward Hart. Additional engagements include concerts throughout South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, South Dakota, Texas, and New York City. Mr. Bekker earned a Graduate Performance Diploma from the Peabody Conservatory under the tutelage of Herbert Greenberg. His bachelor’s and master’s degrees were acquired from Indiana University’s School of Music. There he studied violin with Nelli Shkolnikova and Ilya Kaler. A native of Minsk, Belarus, Bekker is now a US citizen and is married to Charleston native, Dr. Jenny Glace Bekker.  

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Affiliates Chorus

T

he Charleston Symphony Orchestra Chorus is composed of auditioned, volunteer singers drawn from greater Charleston. Promoting the enjoyment of fine choral music in the Lowcountry, the CSOC Dr. Robert Taylor performs a diverse choral repertoire including classical, pops, and Music Director, recent works by contemporary local composers. The CSOC Chamber CSO Chorus Singers, a division of the chorus, provides a smaller ensemble to perform chamber repertoire works. As an affiliate of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, the Chorus has provided the choral component for Masterworks concerts for over 30 years. The Chorus was founded in 1978 by Miss Emily Remington as the Charleston Singers Guild. In 1998, Dr. Robert Taylor joined as Music Director. He also serves as Director of Choral Activities at the College of Charleston, and Founder and Artistic Director of the Taylor Music Group and Taylor Festival Choir, inspired by Bob Taylor, the conductor’s late father - a distinguished choral pedagogue. For more information please visit: www.CSOchorus.com.

Upcoming Performances

Music with our Friends Requiem by Gabriel FaurĂŠ and recently commissioned by CSO Chorus Dover Beach by Edward Hart and Night Eyes by Yiorgos Vassilandonakis Friday, February 21, 2014 7:30 pm Second Presbyterian Church, 342 Meeting Street, Charleston Dr. Robert Taylor, conductor Tickets: www.CSOChorus.com or at door Accompanied by the Charleston Symphony Orchestra

CSO Chorus Spring Concert Friday, April 25, 2014 8:00 pm Grace Episcopal Church, 98 Wentworth Street, Charleston

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PepsiCo is proud to support the National Young Artist Competition and wish all the young artists the best of luck!

Š 2013 PepsiCo, Inc. All Rights Reserved. This Ad contains valuable trademarks owned and used by PepsiCo, Inc. and its subsidiaries and affiliates to distinguish products of outstanding quality.


Message from Founder and President CSO Gospel Choir and CSO Spiritual Ensemble

B

oth the CSO Gospel Choir and CSO Spiritual Ensemble are an extension of African-American artists who brought their Black Church experience to wider audiences, including the classical music stage. We are proud to play a role in ushering in a new tradition as host organization for the recently debuted Colour of Music Festival returning October 22–26, 2014. On behalf of these dynamic groups that so proudly represent the CSO and the state of South Carolina here and abroad, we look forward to bringing these vital musical offerings to our ever-expanding audience in 2014! Lee Pringle Founder and President, CSO Gospel Choir and CSO Spiritual Ensemble

CSO Gospel Choir

CSO Spiritual Ensemble

Candace B. McLeod, Music Director

David A. Richardson, Music Director

F

N

ounded in 1999, the 80+ member Charleston Symphony Orchestra Gospel Choir is one of Charleston’s most sought-after groups performing gospel, spirituals and sacred music.

For tickets and more information: www.CSOgospel.com

ow it its fifth season, the CSO Spiritual Ensemble honors the spiritual–the historical musical form born of the endurance of African slaves that helped form African-American cultural traditions.

For tickets and more information: www.CSOspiritual.com

Upcoming Performances

Upcoming Performances

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Vincent L. Danner, Guest Conductor with CSO Spiritual Ensemble and Charleston Symphony Orchestra Saturday, January 18, 2014 • 7pm Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist Church, North Charleston

Annual Spring Performance Honoring Robert Nathaniel Dett Saturday, April 5, 2014 • 6pm Centenary United Methodist Church

6th Annual Charleston International Festival of Choirs Dr. Greg Jessop, Guest Conductor April 24–27, 2014 Circular Congregational Church 2014 Piccolo Spoleto Saturday, May 24, 5pm Emanuel AME Church

6th Annual Charleston International Festival of Choirs April 24–27, 2014 Circular Congregational Church 2014 Piccolo Spoleto Saturday, May 31, 5pm Centenary United Methodist Church 2014 U.S. Capital Tour July 19–25 Washington DC and Virginia

2014 U.S. Capital Tour July 19–25 Washington DC and Virginia

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CANDACE B. McLEOD DIRECTOR

Saturday, May 24, 2014 • 5pm Emanuel AME Church 110 Calhoun Street, Charleston GENERAL ADMISSION $21, STUDENTS $11. TICKETS AVAILABLE AT CSOGOSPEL.COM, (866) 811-4111, OR AT DOOR (CASH OR CHECK ONLY). DISCOUNT CODE FOR 10 OR MORE: GR SPONSORED BY

JOHN & JEAN FELDMAN

CONCEIVED & PRODUCED BY

THE CSO GOSPEL CHOIR IS AN AFFILIATE PARTNER OF THE CHARLESTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA OF CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA


Charleston Symphony Orchestra League Dear Friends, The mission of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra League, Inc. (CSOL®) is three fold: to support the Charleston Symphony Orchestra (CSO) through music education programs, audience development and to provide financial assistance through fund raising projects. We have been fulfilling this mission for 49 years, creating memorable events filled with fun, friendship, and music. We support music education in the Lowcountry through scholarship and summer study funds, awarding $30,000 every year to talented young music students, many of whom are students of CSO musicians. In our 2012-2013 season we provided $4,000 in scholarship funds to CSO core musicians for advanced study. We provide assistance at the Young People’s Concerts for school children in the tri-county area. Our Arts Advocacy Committee is dedicated to work with arts advocacy in the local and statewide arena along with the South Carolina Arts Commission. Through the Southeastern Orchestra Volunteers Association, (SOVA), we work hand in hand with other orchestra volunteers in the Southeast to keep our orchestras in the forefront of public awareness and further the cause of music education for all students. The CSOL® supports audience development for the CSO in many ways--encouraging subscription purchases, assisting at concerts with ushers, information tables and renewal nights. Our Instrument Petting Zoo (IPZ) provides opportunities for children to handle a variety of orchestral instruments and create musical sounds with them. The CSOL® warmly welcomes the public to our monthly Coffees with the Maestro which take place on Thursday mornings before each of the Masterworks Concerts. The candidates for Music Director of the CSO will be at the Coffees this year, speaking about their lives and their love of symphonic music. Our fundraising efforts are well known and respected in the community. The Designer Showhouse and Symphony Island Tour of Homes have been enjoyed for many years. We are producing our first annual Golf Tournament this year. Our Car Sponsorship project runs throughout the year and our Revels parties offer enjoyable outings for members and guests in many different and intimate venues. Our 300 plus membership is dedicated and passionate about their support of the CSO. Won’t you join us? Check out our website, CSOLinc.org. Become a member and share your passion as we work together to support symphonic music everywhere. Sue Ingram President, Charleston Symphony Orchestra League, Inc.

CSOL ® Calendar 2014 February 6.................. Coffee with the Maestro March 13..................... Coffee with the Maestro March 19..................... Designer Showhouse Preview Party March 20..................... Designer Showhouse Opens April 3......................... Coffee with the Maestro May 4.......................... Scholarship Recital May 16........................ Spring Luncheon May 23........................ Car Sponsorship Drawing

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A Premier Golf Event on The River Course at Kiawah Island

Sincere thanks from the Charleston Symphony Orchestra League, Inc. to our Tournament Sponsors and Donors Host Sponsor: Kiawah Island Real Estate Concertmaster Sponsor: Skanska/Trident Construction Instrumental Sponsors: Frank & Kate Hayn, Jr. Terminix Service, Inc. Wilmington Trust Company Beverage Cart Sponsor: Lisa Quadrini/UBS Financial Services

Watch for information on the 2014 Swing for the Symphony Golf Tournament!


EDUCATION

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he CSO has many exciting plans for our Education Programs this season. These programs will be interactive, engaging, and, most importantly, impactful. Much of the musicians’ time is spent performing and interacting with young students. These programs provide opportunities for students of all levels, from those who are just hearing classical music for the first time, to students who are preparing for careers in music. Take a look at the impactful programs we have planned for the upcoming season!

Young People’s Concerts:

These engaging concerts reach more than 2,500 students each year. Teachers prepare their students in advance using CSO-provided curriculum. This year’s program is called “Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle.” This year’s Young People’s Concerts and January Family Concert is sponsored by The Boeing Company.

Family Concerts and CSOL® Instrument Petting Zoos: Family Concerts offer affordable programs appropriate for children. Accompanying Instrument Petting Zoos, sponsored by the CSOL®, provide our youngest concertgoers with an invaluable hands-on musical experience.

In-School Programs: CSO small ensembles travel to public and private schools throughout the tri-county area at no cost to participating schools. These programs include both an educational and performance experience for students.

Classical Fusion: A new program this year, the Bridging Peace Fund of Tides Foundation has generously sponsored local hip-hop violinist, Seth Gilliard. Seth will travel to Title 1 schools with CSO ensembles and be a featured performer at CSO’s Young People’s Concerts and family concerts to expose students to classical music by way of popular hip-hop and pop.

represent characters in a fictional storybook. Students have the opportunity to hear their compositions being performed by the CSO musicians. This program grew out of a Kennedy Center Partners in Education partnership between the CSO and the Charleston County School District.

Share the Stage™: Share the Stage™ is a competition for high school string players in South Carolina that gives students the chance to play alongside CSO musicians, work with world-renowned conductors, and perform challenging orchestral repertoire.

PepsiCo National Young Artists Competition: A new, national competition for exceptionally talented young musicians (ages 14-18) to earn a chance to perform with the CSO. We hope that you will be as thrilled with these programs as we are, take the opportunity to attend a performance, and enthusiastically continue to support our educational outreach initiatives. Sincerely, Stephanie Silvestri, Education Coordinator Dr. James Braunreuther, Charleston County Fine Arts Learning Specialist

Composition and Critique: Composition and Critique allows students to discover the parallels between composition in writing and music. Composers selected from the College of Charleston Music Theory/Composition Department assist the students in composing music to

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Bridging Peace Fund of Tides Foundation

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The Joanna Foundation


Remix is the Charleston Symphony Orchestra’s circle of young supporters dedicated to developing and inspiring the next generation of classical music listeners through innovative and diverse performance experiences. Join Remix and enjoy benefits like invitations to special musical experiences, discounted tickets and so much more! Membership Pricing Individuals / $100 and Couples / $150

Upcoming Events! Spring Fusion Series blend multiple art forms and aesthetics to produce innovative, impactful evenings. Through partnerships with some of the most progressive players in town, the Remix Quartet promises to reshape what you think you know about classical music. CSO’s Remix @ The Mezz: an evening of cocktails, conversation, music March 27, 2014 I 7 pm and 9 pm The Mezz Join the CSO Remix ensemble at The Mezz for an evening with some of the most progressive players in town. CSO Remix musicians join Quentin Baxter and friends to explore the realm between classical, jazz and contemporary. Remix Salon Series brings classical music home. Beginning centuries ago in living rooms, parlors and drawing rooms surrounded by family and friends, house concerts enabled the audience to connect with the musicians as they share insights and thoughts on the pieces. CSO Remix puts the modern edge on the intimate, informal and personal setting. Relax with a glass of wine in a cozy room and enjoy a live performance of inspired classical music. See performers up close as you’ve never seen before. Enjoy conversation, commentary and some laughs along the way. It’s a truly unique experience. 2014-2015 Salon: Stay tuned… more information to come! Visit www.CharlestonSymphony.org/Remix for the latest information on upcoming Remix concerts!

Steering Committee Hugh McDaniel, chair Kari Kistler, artistic advisor

Jessica Buchanan Matt Fitzgerald Bratton Riley

Byron Stahl Cameron Stoll Bright Williamson

Join today by visiting: www.CharlestonSymphony.org/Remix facebook.com/CSORemix

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iii JANUARY 24 & JANUARY 25, 2014

7:30 PM SOTTILE THEATRE

Yuriy Bekker, conductor Emily Rozek, guest vocalist Nicole Parker, guest vocalist

Wicked Divas Overture to Gypsy

JULE STYNE, arr. Robert Russell Bennett

Selections from Carmen GEORGES BIZET “Prelude” and “Aragonaise”, Suite No. 1 “Habanera”, Suite No. 2 “Les Toreadors”, Suite No. 1 “Introduction” and “All That Jazz” from Chicago

JOHN KANDER, orch. Paul McKibbins

“I Could Have Danced All Night” from My Fair Lady “Don’t Rain on my Parade” from Funny Girl “Ragtime” from Ragtime

ALAN JAY LERNER & FREDERICK LOEWE JULE STYNE STEPHEN FLAHERTY, arr. Steven Reineke

“Think of Me” from Phantom of the Opera

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER, arr. D. Cullen

Ring Them Bells

JOHN KANDER & FRED EBB, arr. Paul McKibbins

Conga

ENRIQUE GARCIA, arr. Steven Reineke

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i n t e r m i s s i o n ———————–––––——————-

I Hear a Symphony: Symphonic Sounds of Diana Ross

Various, arr. Steven Reineke

No More Tears (Enough is Enough)

PAUL JABARA & BRUCE ROBERTS, arr. Fred Barton

“Gimme Gimme” from Thoroughly Modern Millie

JEANINE TESORI & DICK SCANLAN

“Diva’s Lament” from Spamalot

DU PRUZ/ERIC IDLE, arr. T. Firth

“Over the Rainbow” from The Wizard of Oz

HAROLD ARLEN & YIP HARBURG, arr. Skitch Henderson/Dick Lieb

“Popular” from Wicked

STEPHEN SCHWARTZ, arr. William David Brohn

“Defying Gravity” from Wicked

STEPHEN SCHWARTZ, arr. Randall Craig Fleischer

“For Good” from Wicked

STEPHEN SCHWARTZ, Orch. Torrie Ziyo

Supporting Sponsor:

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Yuriy Bekker conductor

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uriy Bekker has led the Charleston Symphony Orchestra as concertmaster since 2007 and has been orchestra’s acting artistic director for the past three seasons. Bekker has also held the position of concertmaster for the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra and AIMS Festival in Graz, Austria, and has held additional positions with the Houston Symphony and the Houston Grand Opera and Ballet Orchestras. Mr. Bekker is an adjunct faculty member of the College of Charleston as conductor of the College of Charleston Orchestra. He has also been artistic advisor to the Piccolo Spoleto Festival for the last three seasons. Bekker has performed worldwide including with the Vancouver Symphony, Ulster Orchestra, Chicago Chamber Music Society, European Music Festival Stuttgart, Pacific Music Festival, Spoleto Festival USA, Piccolo Spoleto Festival, Aspen Music Festival, and at the Kennedy Center. He has collaborated with Herbert Greenberg, Claudio Bohorquez, Alexander Kerr, Andrew Armstrong, Robert DeMaine, Sara Chang, Gil Shaham, Joshua Roman, JoAnn Falletta, and Andrew Litton. 2013-2014 season solo engagements include a performance with the Midland Symphony Orchestra (Michigan) of “Under an Indigo Sky,” a violin concerto written for Bekker by composer Edward Hart. Other performances include conducting the Charleston Symphony Orchestra Pops Series in January 2014 and leading the Charleston Symphony Chamber Orchestra Series. Mr. Bekker earned a Graduate Performance Diploma from the Peabody Conservatory under the tutelage of Herbert Greenberg. His bachelor’s and master’s degrees were acquired from Indiana University’s School of Music where he studied violin with Nelli Shkolnikova and Ilya Kaler.

Emily Rozek vocalist

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mily Rozek was most recently seen starring as Glinda in the Broadway hit Wicked. Upon her graduation from the Boston Conservatory she made her professional debut as the principle role of Winnie Tate in Annie Get Your Gun starring Bernadette Peters. She went on to understudy and perform the lead roles of Millie Dillmount and Miss Dorothy in Broadway’s Thoroughly Modern Millie. She has also been on National Broadway tours such as Sunset Boulevard as Mary and South Pacific as Nellie Forbush. Regional Credits include Marta in Company, staring with acclaimed and award winning actress Donna McKechnie, Maggie in A Chorus Line, Lizzie in Baby and, most recently, Polly in Crazy for You. She spent 4 years in Los Angeles making appearances in various concerts such as Two’s Company, a tribute to the great composers, Alan Menkin and Stephen Schwartz. She was also featured in the Ford Theatre’s Broadway Unplugged Concert. She has also appeared as a guest soloist in Wicked Divas with the St. Louis Symphony, Fresno Philharmonic, Vancouver Symphony, Arkansas Symphony, Hamilton Philharmonic and the Reno Philharmonic. Upcoming performances include Santa Rosa Symphony, Elgin Symphony, Anchorage Symphony and Springfield, MO.

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Nicole Parker vocalist

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icole Parker is best known for her portrayal of Elphaba in the Broadway production of Wicked, where she then portrayed the green witch on the First National Tour. Nicole’s other Broadway credits include Martin Short: Fame Becomes Me and The People in the Picture with Donna Murphy. Regionally, Nicole played Juliet in The Second City’s Romeo and Juliet Musical at Chicago Shakespeare Theater, for which she received a Jeff Award nomination. She also appeared as Rosemary in How to Succeed In Business Without Really Trying at Reprise Theater, and Pamina in The Magic Flute at the Falcon Theater. For six years, Nicole was a cast member and contributing writer on Fox’s MADtv. For two years, Nicole was a performer and writer for Boom Chicago, an all American sketch and improvisation theater in Amsterdam. Nicole’s film credits include Funny People, Weathered, and Sitting Babies. A frequent soloist with orchestras around the country, recent and upcoming performances include Peter Nero and the Philly Pops, Houston Symphony, Phoenix Symphony, Utah Symphony and Opera, Colorado Symphony, Greensboro Symphony, Kalamazoo Symphony, Santa Rosa Symphony, Pueblo Symphony, Charleston Symphony, Sarasota

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Orchestra Roster POPS III JANUARY 24 & JANUARY 25, 2014 7:30 PM SOTTILE THEATRE

Violin

Flute

Trombone

Micah Gangwer Alexander Boissonnault Frances Hsieh Rex Conner Seth Gangwer Julia Gessinger Tomas Jakubek Mayumi Nakamura Mao Omura Doug Pritchard Mary Taylor

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh Regina Yost Tacy Edwards

William Zehfuss Kate Jenkins

Oboe

Thomas Joyce

Viola

Katherine St.John Sandra Nikolajevs

Keyboard

Horn

Guitar

Brandon Nichols Anne Holmi Debra Sherrill Ella Agrest

David Grimm

Trumpet

Percussion

JoAnn Lamolino Susan Messersmith

Ryan Leveille Matthew Masie Michael Haldeman

Jan-Marie Joyce Alex Agrest Ben Weiss Ruth Goldsmith

Cello Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer Terry Muir Elizabeth Murphy

Bass

Kari Kistler

Clarinet Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper

Bassoon

Bass Trombone Tuba Chris Bluemel

Harp Kathleen Wilson

Ghadi Shayban

Timpani Beth Albert

Thomas Bresnick Michael DiTrolio

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Classical Fusion Family Concert JANUARY 25, 2014

11:00 AM

SOTTILE THEATRE

Yuriy Bekker, conductor Seth Gilliard, violin Amy Goto, cello Satya Tranfield, dancer

W. A. Mozart (1756-1791)

Overture to Le nozze di Figaro, K.492

Georges Bizet (1838-1875) Selections from Carmen “Aragonaise, Suite No.1 “Habanera”, Suite No. 2 “Les Toreadors”, Suite No.1 Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) Concerto for Violoncello, Hob.VIIb, No.1 in C major I. Moderato

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) Symphony No. 5, op. 67 in C minor I. Allegro con brio

Sam Hyken (b. 1981)

(Beethoven) 5th Symphony Remixed

J.S. Bach (1685-1750) Concerto for Two Violins in D minor, BWV 1043 I. Vivace arr. by Seth Gilliard, Jonathan Milord, and Cyrus Givianpour

Three Hip-Hop Variations

“Harry’s Wondrous World” from Harry Potter

John Williams (b. 1932)

Generously sponsored by :

and Bridging Peace Fund of Tides Foundation

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Yuriy Bekker conductor See BIO on page 13.

Seth Gilliard violin

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eth Gilliard is a twenty-three year old native of Charleston, South Carolina and 2012 graduate of Furman University. An aspiring young musician, Seth graduated from Furman with a Bachelor of Music degree in Violin Performance. He was concertmaster of the Furman Symphony Orchestra from 2009 until 2012, and was also a three-year member of the Gladden String Quartet, one of two scholarship quartets within the Furman Music Department. Seth has received numerous awards and scholarships from the Charleston Music Study Club, Charleston Symphony Orchestra League and the Furman University Music Department. He has been featured as a soloist with the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Southcoast Symphony Orchestra and the Anderson Symphony Orchestra. He made his professional orchestral debut as a sub with the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra in 2011. Seth has been classically trained for seventeen years, but comfortably embraces various genres of music from jazz to pop. He was the lead member of the Gilliard Quintet in 2011 and a member of the Snow Quintet in 2012, which opened for Wynton Marsalis at the Peace Center in Greenville, SC. Both these groups were jazz combos coached by Furman jazz professors. Alongside his classical and jazz experience, Seth also has a budding career as a contemporary violinist. In 2009, Seth performed for Oprah Winfrey and a host of other celebrity guests at a retirement party in New York City for Susan Taylor, former editor of Essence Magazine. Seth has also had great success on YouTube with his improvisatory covers of hip-hop, R&B and pop songs, reaching well over a million cumulative views on his videos. He gained national attention in 2012 after being featured in online articles by ABC and CBS News. Since graduating college, Seth has been focusing on his career as a contemporary violinist, releasing a mixtape of his most popular covers and an EP of original songs.

Amy Goto cello

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orn in 2004 to Japanese parents in Columbia, SC, Amy Goto began playing the cello at the age of three. She spent two years in San Francisco Bay Area with her family and took private lessons at the Crowden School of Music in Berkeley, CA. Then she came back to Columbia in Fall 2009, and started taking private lessons with Mrs. Mary Ann Watson, a principal emeritus at the South Carolina Philharmonic. Since Fall 2011, Amy has been taking private lessons with Professor Natalia Khoma at the College of Charleston, an internationally renowned cellist. In 2013, Amy has played in the Extraordinary Young Artists Concert sponsored by the town of Kiawah Island Arts Council; in the Cello Mania (college student recitals) at the College of Charleston; in the opening performance for the Piccolo Spoleto Rising Stars program in Charleston: and in the Young artist series at the Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts. Amy is a fourth grader at the Montessori School of Columbia. Her favorite subjects include Latin and Math. She loves watching classical ballets.

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Satya Tranfield dancer

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atya Tranfield, age 10, born in Gunma Japan has started ballet lessons at the age of four. Currently she trains at what she calls her “second home”, Charleston Ballet Theatre Center for Dance Education under the direction of Patricia Cantwell, Don Cantwell and Jill Eathorne-Bahr. Additionally she studies with Deanna McBrearty, former dancer with New York City Ballet. Last season she won the top honor given in her age category, the Hope Award at regional Youth American Grand Prix held in Atlanta, Georgia. Recently she was featured as “Maria” in Jill Eathorne- Bahr’s premiere production of “Twas the Night Before Nutcracker” with CBT. No stranger to the stage she has been also highly inspired by our late Robert Ivey. And under his tutelage with the Footlight Players she appeared as “Gretl” in Sound of Music in 2009 and “Ngana” with her brother Michael as “Jerome” in South Pacific in 2011. Academically she is a 4th grader at J. B. Edwards Elementary School. During her free time she enjoys crafts and reading and choreography. Due to her unconditional faith and support from her teachers and family she aspires to become a principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre someday.

Orchestra Roster Violin I

Bass

Trumpet

Micah Gangwer Asako Kremer Frances Hsieh Mao Omura Tomas Jakubek

Thomas Bresnick Michael DiTrolio

JoAnn Lamolino

Flute

William Zehfuss Kate Jenkins

Violin II Alexander Boissonnault Mayumi Nakamura Seth Gangwer Rex Conner

Viola Jan-Marie Joyce Alex Agrest Ruth Goldsmith

Cello Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer Terry Muir Elizabeth Murphy

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Jessica Hull-Dambaugh Regina Yost

Oboe Kari Kistler

Clarinet Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper

Bassoon Katherine St.John Sandra Nikolajevs

Horn Brandon Nichols Anne Holmi Debra Sherrill Ella Agrest

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Trombone

Bass Trombone Thomas Joyce

Tuba Chris Bluemel

Timpani Beth Albert

Percussion Ryan Leveille Matthew Masie


IV FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2014 7:30 PM DOCK STREET THEATRE

Yuriy Bekker, violin and conductor Volodymyr Vynnytsky, piano Jessica Hull-Dambaugh, flute

Bach, Mendelssohn and Schumann: Masters from Leipzig, Germany Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809-1847) Concerto for Violin, Piano, and Strings I. Allegro II. Adagio III. Allegro molto Robert Schumann (1810-1856) Piano Quartet in E-flat, op. 47 III. Andante Cantible J.S. Bach (1685-1750) Brandenburg Concerto No.5, BWV 1050 I. Allegro II. Affettuoso III. Allegro

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809-1847)

Herbrides Overture

Generously sponsored by Henry & Sylvia Yaschik Foundation, Inc.

CSO Partners ($500+) and Conductor’s Club members ($1,500+): Please join us for a post-concert reception in the Drawing Room and Tap Room (2nd floor) the Dock Street Theatre. For more information on how to become a Conductor’s Club member, turn to page 65.

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Yuriy Bekker conductor See BIO on page 13.

Volodymyr Vynnytsky piano

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nternationally renowned pianist Volodymyr Vynnytsky is laureate of the Margueritte Long-Jacques Thibaud International Piano Competition in Paris. Vynnytsky has performed with leading orchestras and appeared in solo recitals in many prestigious concert halls, including Carnegie Hall, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Merkin Concert Hall, Steinway Hall, the Phillips Gallery in Washington D.C., the Great (Bolshoi) Hall at the Moscow Conservatory, the Theatre Champs d’Elysees, Amphitheatre Richelieu de la Sorbonne, Salons de Boffrand de la Presidence du Senat in Paris, St. John’s Smith Square in London, Philharmonic Big Hall of Columns (Kyiv), Odessa Philharmonic Theatre in Ukraine, Tsai Performance Center (Boston), Teatro de Santa Isabel in Recife, Brazil, Linder Auditorium in Johannesburg and Baxter Theatre Centre Concert Hall in Cape Town, South Africa among many others. He has also performed in recital in such countries as France, England, Denmark, Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Brazil, Canada, South Africa among many others. A popular television and radio guest he has also been featured on NHK-TV (Japan) and in the Unite States on WQXR-FM in New York, and nationally on NPR. Born in Lviv, Ukraine, Volodymyr Vynnytsky studied at the Lviv Music School for Gifted Children and later at the Moscow Conservatory. After earning his doctorate from the Moscow Conservatory, he taught at the Kiev (Kyiv) Conservatory and concertized extensively throughout Ukraine, the other republics of the former Soviet Union, Europe,the USA, Canada, Central and South America and South Africa.

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh flute

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essica Hull-Dambaugh is currently the Principal Flutist of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, a position she has held since 2004. She has most recently appeared as a featured soloist in the Bar Harbor Music Festival, the Charleston Bach Festival, the College of Charleston Monday Night Concert Series, and the National Flute Association annual convention. Jessica has held positions with the Central City Opera Orchestra in Colorado, the Maryland Symphony Orchestra, and has performed frequently with the Kennedy Center Opera Orchestra in Washington, DC. She currently maintains a private teaching studio and is an active member of the South Carolina Flute Society Board. Jessica has attended the acclaimed Schleswig-Holstein Orchestral Academy in Germany, the Music Academy of the West, the National Orchestral Institute, and the Youth Orchestra of the Americas Orchestral Training Institute. Jessica holds degrees from the Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam and Carnegie Mellon University where she was a student of Jeanne Baxtresser, Retired Principal Flutist of the New York Philharmonic. Jessica currently lives in West Ashley with her husband, Sean, their 2 year old son, Kyle, and lab/boxer mix, Zoe. She also enjoys teaching aerobics around the Charleston metro area. For more information, please visit www.JessicaHullDambaugh.com.

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Orchestra Roster CHAMBER ORCHESTRA SERIES FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2014 7:30 PM DOCK STREET THEATRE

Violin 1

Cello

Bassoon

Yuriy Bekker Micah Gangwer Nonoko Okada Frances Hsieh Andrew Emmett

Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer

Katherine St.John Mike Muszynski

Bass

Horn

Thomas Bresnick Joseph Farley

Brandon Nichols Anne Holmi

Alex Boissonnault Asako Kremer Mayumi Nakamura Tomas Jakubek

Flute

Trumpet

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh Regina Yost

JoAnn Lamolino

Beth Albert

Viola

Oboe Kari Kistler

Violin 2

Jan-Marie Joyce Ben Weiss Rachel Gangwer

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Clarinet Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper

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Timpani


Masterworks iv THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 7, 8 , 2014 7:30 PM SOTTILE THEATRE

Lawrence Loh, conductor Alexander Kerr, violin

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6 Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) Fidelio: Overture, op. 72c Samuel Barber (1910-1981) Violin Concerto, op. 14 I. Allegro II. Andante III. Presto in moto perpetuo —————————————-

i n t e r m i s s i o n —————————————-

Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) Symphony No.6, op. 74 “Pathetique” I. Adagio - Allegro non troppo II. Allegro con grazia III. Allegro molto vivace IV. Finale: Adagio lamentoso

Pre-concert Conversations are held from 6:30 pm – 7:00 pm prior to every Masterworks performance from the stage at the Sottile Theatre. Hosted by William D. Gudger, College of Charleston, emeritus.

Tonight’s floral arrangement provided courtesy of: Belva’s Flower Shop of Mt. Pleasant.

Conductor’s Club Members Please join us for a post-concert reception on the mezzanine level of the Sottile Theatre. For more information on how to become a Conductor’s Club member, turn to page 74.

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Lawrence Loh conductor

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esident Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Music Director of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic and Music Director of the Pittsburgh Youth Symphony Orchestra, Lawrence Loh has established himself as one of the most versatile and exciting conductors on the classical music scene. He was brought to national attention in February 2004 when he substituted last minute for an ailing Charles Dutoit with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Conducting Stravinsky’s Petrouchka and Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique, Loh received enthusiastic acclaim from orchestra players, audience members and critics, alike. Appointed Music Director of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic in 2005, Lawrence Loh leads the Philharmonic in a wide variety of innovative programming from classical to pops. He is very active in the region as an arts leader and music advocate, and is in great demand as a guest speaker and clinician. A champion of early childhood exposure to music, Loh created a family concert series that is dedicated to the youngest of audiences. He recently established an Apprentice Conducting Program, designed to identify the next generation of leading conductors and provide them with rich professional opportunities. As Resident Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Lawrence Loh works closely with Music Director Manfred Honeck and conducts a wide range of concerts including classical, educational and pops. He is active in the PSO’s Community Engagement and Partnership Concerts, extending the PSO’s reach into other communities. He made his debut on the main classical series conducting Handel’s Messiah in December 2008. As the conductor of the enormously popular Fiddlesticks Family Series “Bringing Music to the Lives of Children,” Lawrence Loh plays the part of host and conductor. His association with the PSO began as Assistant Conductor in 2005-2006. He was promoted to Associate Conductor in 2006-2007 and to Resident Conductor in 2007-2008. Lawrence Loh also holds the position of Music Director of the Pittsburgh Youth Symphony Orchestra. Previously, he held the positions of Assistant and Associate Conductor of the Dallas Symphony from 2001-2005. From 1998-2001, he was Associate Conductor of the Colorado Symphony. In May 1998, Lawrence Loh received his Artist Diploma in Orchestral Conducting from Yale University, also earning the Eleazar de Carvalho Prize. He received further training at the worldrenowned Aspen Music Festival and School and has additional degrees from Indiana University and the University of Rochester. Lawrence Loh was born in southern California of Korean parentage and raised in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He and his wife Jennifer have a son, Charlie, and a daughter, Hilary.

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Alexander Kerr violin

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lexander Kerr’s expressive and charismatic style has made him one of the most accomplished and versatile violinists on the international music scene today. In 1996 at the age of 26, Mr. Kerr was appointed to the prestigious position of Concertmaster of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. After nine successful years at that post, he left in June, 2006 to assume the endowed Linda and Jack Gill Chair in Music as Professor of Violin at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. In addition to his teaching responsibilities in Bloomington, he maintains a busy concert schedule appearing with orchestras and in recital and chamber music performances throughout the U.S., Asia and Europe. In 2008 he began his tenure as Principal Guest Concertmaster of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and in September 2011, he assumed his role as Concertmaster of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Kerr served as Concertmaster of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra under Maestro David Stahl from 1993-1995. Regarded by the press as a masterful virtuoso with an elegant, old-world sound, Mr. Kerr has appeared as soloist with major orchestras throughout the United States and Europe, working with such renowned conductors as Mariss Jansons, Riccardo Chailly, Peter Oundjian, Robert Spano, Alan Gilbert, and David Zinman. An active chamber musician, Mr. Kerr has collaborated with Martha Argerich, Leif Ove Andsnes, Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yefim Bronfman, Edgar Meyer, Truls Mørk, Vadim Repin, Mstislav Rostropovich and Maxim Vengerov in performances at festivals in Aspen, Santa Fe, Caramoor, Stavanger, and throughout Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Switzerland, Austria and the Netherlands. Highlights this year feature a series of piano quartet concerts with renowned pianist Menahem Pressler and esteemed colleagues Lawrence Power and Paul Watkins, performances of the Barber Violin Concerto with the Charleston, SC Symphony Orchestra, as well as performances of Beethoven’s Triple Concerto with cellist Alisa Weilerstein and pianist Martin Helmchen. He has also launched a collaboration with cellist Eric Kim and the Dorothy Richard Starling Foundation, showcasing the enormous wealth of talent at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. The “Starling Chamber Players,” a mixture of faculty and students will tour chamber music venues throughout the nation. Mr. Kerr’s CD releases include the Dvorak Piano Quintet with Sarah Chang and Leif Ove Andsnes on the EMI label, music by Dutch composer Julius Röntgen on the NM Classics label, and the Shostakovich Romance on a series of discs including “Violin Adagios” and “Evening Adagios” released by Decca. A live DVD and CD recording of Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben with Mr. Kerr, the RCO and Maestro Mariss Jansons was released in 2005 on the RCO’s own label: RCOLive! Raised in Alexandria, Virginia, Mr. Kerr began his studies at age seven with members of the National Symphony Orchestra. He went on to study with Sally Thomas at the Juilliard School, and with Aaron Rosand at the Curtis Institute of Music where he received his Bachelor of Music degree in 1992.

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Orchestra Roster MASTERWORKS IV

THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 7, 8 , 2014 7:30 PM SOTTILE THEATRE

Violin

Cello

Horn

Yuriy Bekker Micah Gangwer Alexander Boissonnault Asako Kremer Frances Hsieh Karel Abo Ruben Camacho David Edwards Andrew Emmett Kristin Figard Tracy Figard Shannon Fitzhenry Seth Gangwer Tomas Jakubek Kenny Lambert Christiana Liberis Mayumi Nakamura Liviu Onofrei Tiffany Rice

Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer Timothy O’Malley Erin Ellis Terry Muir Samuel Swift

Brandon Nichols Ella Agrest Anne Holmi Debra Sherrill Russell Williamson

Bass

JoAnn Lamolino

Viola Jan-Marie Joyce Alex Agrest Ruth Goldsmith Rachel Gangwer Taliaferro Nash Benjamin Weiss

Thomas Bresnick Michael Ashton Joseph Farley Jan Mixter Cody Rex

Flute

Trumpet Trombone William Zehfuss Kate Jenkins

Bass Trombone Thomas Joyce

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh Regina Yost Tacy Edwards

Tuba

Oboe

Timpani

Kari Kistler

Beth Albert

Clarinet

Percussion

Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper

Ryan Leveille Mathew Masie

Bassoon

Piano

Katherine St.John Sandra Nikolajevs

Ghadi Shayban

Chris Bluemel

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Program Notes MASTERWORKS IV, FEBRUARY 6, 7, 8, 2014 Program notes by William D. Gudger, College of Charleston, emeritus

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) Overture to the opera Fidelio, opus 72

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eethoven struggled to find a congenial opera libretto to set, and after some false starts he settled on the French drama “Leonore, or, Conjugal Love” by J.-N. Bouilly. This up-to-date story of the faithful wife who risks her life to save her wrongfully imprisoned husband attracted Beethoven due to its emphasis on undeserved suffering and heroic resolve. The heroine is named Leonore but she disguises herself as the man “Fidelio” (“faithful one”) in order to gain access to the prison where her husband is incarcerated. An opera in French by Gaveaux and two Italian versions by Paer and Mayr had already been produced, and Liugi Cherubini’s Les deux journées (on a similar subject) had just been successful in Vienna. The overtures now known as “Leonore No. 2” and “Leonore No. 3” served for the first two productions of Beethoven’s opera in 1805 and 1806 in Vienna (neither a great success), and “Leonore No. 1” was written for a projected performance in Prague which never materialized. When Beethoven returned to his opera in 1814 he must have realized that all of the “Leonore” overtures, which presage much of the dungeon-scene rescue with the famous off-stage trumpet, gave away too much of the drama in advance. So he wrote what is now called the “Fidelio” overture as his definitive solution to this problem. It sets the mood for the opera, but does not quote any of the music that will be heard once the curtain rises. The usual plan for an overture to a serious opera involved a slow introduction followed by a faster section in sonata form. Beethoven integrates these two elements from the outset by starting with the motive of the fast section, which stops abruptly; then follows the slower, nobler sound of the winds (horn and clarinet; later with bassoons and oboe). These two elements thus represent the excitement of the rescue contrasted with the noble spirit of Leonore’s love for her husband. A second time we hear the fast fragment, but this time the slower section builds gradually from soft to loud; the faster theme takes over and is presented in full sonata form. The slow theme returns one final time, just before the presto race of the coda.

Samuel Barber (1910-1981) Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, opus 14

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his was Barber’s first major commission, being ordered by the soap magnate Samuel Fels for his adopted son, Iso Briselli. Barber composed it during 1939 and 1940 in Switzerland, Paris, and Pennsylvania. Briselli was not happy with the results: the reason varies from account to account—it always centers on the last movement that Briselli found too hard, too lightweight, or too unmatched to the earlier movements. In any case the Philadelphia Orchestra presented the premiere in 1941 with another violinist, and Barber did some revisions in 1948, though keeping the virtuoso last movement. Its brilliance balances the beautiful lyricism of the first two movements.

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Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) Symphony No. 6 in B minor, opus 74 (“Pathétique”)

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espite the turbulence in his personal life, in 1893 Tchaikovsky was at the height of his powers as a composer. That year he went to Cambridge, England, to accept an honorary doctorate. There he met the young American conductor Walter Damrosch. Tchaikovsky agreed that Damrosch should conduct the first American performance of a new symphony he was composing. True to his promise the score and parts arrived in New York in November, 1893, ironically just after the news of the composer’s death. The 1893 score was to be Tchaikovsky’s sixth, and last, completed symphony. Most of the work on the Sixth Symphony was done at the composer’s new country house in Klin, near Moscow. Despite the gloom and despair that seem to be part and parcel of this Symphony, Tchaikovsky worked on it simultaneously with the light-hearted music of the Nutcracker Ballet. When planning to compose, Tchaikovsky wrote his favorite nephew “Bob” (Vladimir Davidov) that his new symphony would have “a program, but with such a program that will remain a mystery to everyone--let them guess ... the program itself, whatever it may be, is imbued with subjectivity, and quite often during my wanderings, composing it in my mind, I wept terribly.” All of Tchaikovsky’s associates and friends assumed that the content of the Sixth Symphony was autobiographical. The designation “A Program Symphony (No. 6)”” left the audience of the October 28, 1893, premiere in St. Petersburg confused--Tchaikovsky himself was the conductor. He then consulted his brother Modest about a title; “Tragic” was rejected in favor of “Pathétique,” a title it shares with Beethoven’s famous C-minor Piano Sonata. The second performance was very successful and the title has stuck. But before the second performance Tchaikovsky was dead from cholera, brought on by drinking unboiled water. (Accounts published a few years ago that Tchaikovsky committed suicide are not supported by the documentary evidence, now freely available to scholars in post-Communist Russia.) It is unclear whether he wanted the title “Pathétique” to be on the printed score of the Sixth Symphony, though the dedication to his nephew Bob was his wish. From the start of composition Tchaikovsky planned to end the Sixth Symphony with a slow movement; his task then was to create a sequence of three essentially fast movements at the start. The tragic nature of the unspoken program made it natural for the first movement to begin and end quietly. It starts with a slow, sad version of the first theme in the bassoon. The main tempo arrives with the first theme played by the divided lower strings and then a group of woodwinds. But the emotional climax of the first movement is its second theme, played by muted strings, marked “teneramente, molto cantabile, con espansione” (“tenderly, very singing, with effusion”). The orchestration of this theme is greatly intensified each time it reappears. The coda of the movement, in a major mode, suggests quiet confidence. For a dance-related second movement, Tchaikovsky included a waltz-like piece “Allegro con grazia,” and it is indeed “graceful” and suave despite being cast in 5/4 (rather than the standard 3/4 time of waltzes). The third movement is even more lively--even lighthearted. It starts with a skittering dialogue between the strings and winds in the mode of scherzo, but gradually through the course of the movement a march theme takes over. The climax of this movement would seem to be the finale were it not for the slow movement that is lacking up to this point. The pathos in this movement restores the sad mood with which the first movement began. Since music speaks an emotional language stronger than words Tchaikovsky’s impassioned music stands on its own, certainly a case where the music is all the more powerful if the programmatic intent is left unexplained.

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iv FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14 & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2014 7:30 PM SOTTILE THEATRE

Matt Catingub, conductor Nicci Canada, guest vocalist

Back to Romance Favorite songs performed such as: “When I Fall In Love”, “As Time Goes By”, “Unforgettable”, “Night and Day”, “It Had to be You”, “You Go to My Head”, “Our Love is Here to Stay”.

Supporting Sponsor:

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Matt Catingub conductor

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att Catingub wears many hats: conductor, performer, composer, and arranger. Matt is the Artistic Director/ Conductor of The Hawaii Pops, The Glendale Pops, and The Macon Pops, and was previously Pops Conductor of the Honolulu Symphony, The New Mexico Symphony, and The New Hampshire Music Festival. Catingub has conducted for some of the most significant Orchestras and Artists in the country, and has orchestrated the music for diverse artists such as Kenny Loggins, James Ingram, Boz Scaggs, the Righteous Brothers, Rosemary Clooney, Vertical Horizon, Toni Tennille, Michael McDonald, Dave Koz, Toto, Pat Benatar, and many others. Matt, a Concord Records artist with many CD’s to his name, also wrote and performed the music for the George Clooney film, “Goodnight and Good Luck” which won a Grammy. Matt is considered to be at the forefront of a new and innovative movement to reinvent Pops into a more fun and accessible format.

Orchestra Roster Violin

Oboe

Trombone

Micah Gangwer Asako Kremer Alexander Boissonnault Frances Hsieh Mei Gawlik Seth Gangwer Tomas Jakubek Daniel Kurganov Christiana Liberis Mayumi Nakamura

Kari Kistler

William Zehfuss Kate Jenkins

Viola

Jon Phillips Robert Weidick

Alex Agrest Ben Weiss Ruth Goldsmith Ben Weiss

Clarinet Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper

Bass Trombone

Bassoon

Tuba

Sandra Nikolajevs Katie Holland

Chris Bluemel

Alto Sax

Kathleen Wilson

Tenor Sax

Thomas Joyce

Harp Timpani Beth Albert

Simon Harding

Percussion

Cello

Bari Sax

Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer Timothy O’Malley Terry Muir

Jonathan Kammer

Ryan Leveille Matthew Masie Michael Haldeman

Horn

Drum Set

Brandon Nichols Anne Holmi Debra Sherrill Ella Agrest

Steve Moretti

Trumpet

Rhythm Bass

JoAnn Lamolino Susan Messersmith

Jeremy Wolf

Bass Thomas Bresnick Peter Berquist

Flute Jessica Hull-Dambaugh Regina Yost Tacy Edwards

Guitar Tyler Ross

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7:30 PM

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2014 SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, CHARLESTON

Dr. Robert Taylor, conductor CSO Chorus and Charleston Symphony Orchestra

Music with Friends Edward Hart (b. 1965) Dover Beach Yiorgos Vassilandonakis (b. 1969) Night Eyes Gabriel FaurĂŠ (1845-1924) Requiem, op. 48 I. Introit and Kyrie II. Offertorium III. Sanctus IV. Pie Jesu V. Agnus Dei VI. Libera me VII. In paradisum

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V TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014

7:30 PM

DOCK STREET THEATRE

Alexander Boissonnault, violin Hosted by Yuriy Bekker

Time Machine: Tchaikovsky’s Dreams and Journeys Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) String Sextet in D minor “Souvenir de Florence” op. 70 II. Adagio Cantabile e con moto

Melodie in E-flat Major for Violin and Orchestra, op. 42

Valse-Scherzo for Violin and Orchestra, op. 34 Serenade for Strings in C Major, op. 4 I. Pezzo in forma di Sonatina II. Walzer III. Élégie IV. Finale (Tema Russo) Orchestral Suite No.4, op. 61 in G Major “Mozartiana” IV. Theme and Variations

Supporting Sponsor:

and generously supported by: Henry & Sylvia Yaschik Foundation, Inc.

CSO Partners ($500+) and Conductor’s Club members ($1,500+): Please join us for a post-concert reception in the Drawing Room and Tap Room (2nd floor) the Dock Street Theatre. For more information on how to become a Conductor’s Club member, turn to page 74.

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Alexander Boissonnault violin

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lexander Boissonnault joined the Charleston Symphony in November 2012. Originally from Buffalo, New York, Alexander Boissonnault started playing the violin at age three and quickly displayed an affinity for the instrument. Before his graduation from high school, Mr. Boissonnault appeared as a soloist with the Orquestra Filarmonica do Espirito Santo in Victoria, Brazil, and Orchestra del Teatro Regio in Torino, Italy. In 2007, at age 17, Mr. Boissonnault was invited to appear on the NPR program “From the Top�, performing the Wieniawski Violin Concerto No. 2 with the Buffalo Philharmonic. Mr. Boissonnault continued his studies at the prestigious Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University, studying under Alexander Kerr, former Concertmaster of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam. Mr. Boissonnault has participated in numerous music festivals, including the Encore School for Strings, Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival, Aspen Music Festival, and Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival in Germany, where he was Concertmaster of the Festival Orchestra. In his spare time, Alexander enjoys biking, reading, and hiking.

Orchestra Roster Violin 1

Bass

Horn

Yuriy Bekker Micah Gangwer Frances Hsieh Tomas Jakubek

Thomas Bresnick Jonathan Rouse

Brandon Nichols Anne Holmi

Flute

Trumpet

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh Regina Yost

Jo Ann Lamolino

Oboe

William Zehfuss

Violin 2 Alex Boissonnault Asako Kremer Mayumi Nakamura-Smith Shannon Fitzhenry

Viola Jan-Marie Joyce Alex Agrest Jill King

Cello

Kari Kistler

Clarinet Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper

Bassoon Katherine St.John Mike Muszynski

Trombone Bass Trombone Thomas Joyce

Timpani Beth Albert

Percussion Ryan Leveille

Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer

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Charleston Symphony Orchestra’s

CHAMBER MUSIC Musical Journey to Germany

This beautiful one hour chamber music concert for the string quartet and brass quintet features Beethoven’s String Quartet opus 18 and Bach’s “Little” Fugue in G minor and other works.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014 AT 7 PM BISHOP GADSDEN, CHARLESTON THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 AT 7 PM ST. PAUL’S SUMMERVILLE, SUMMERVILLE FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 2014 AT 7:30 PM FIRST (SCOTS) PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, CHARLESTON SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 2014 AT 7 PM PROVIDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH, DANIEL ISLAND SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 AT 4 PM ST. BENEDICT’S CATHOLIC CHURCH, MT. PLEASANT

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CSO Brass Quintet

CSO String Quartet

JoAnn Lamolino, trumpet Brandon Nichols, horn William Zehfuss, trombone Thomas Joyce, bass trombone

Micah Gangwer, violin Asako Kremer, violin Alex Agrest, viola Damian Kremer, cello

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SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR CORPORATE SUPPORTERS:

The Hood Law Firm

Radiate Technology

Uricchio, Howe, Krell, Jacobson,Toporek, Theos & Keith Law Firm

In addition to concerts, sponsorships of receptions and fundraisers are also available. For more information on Corporate Support, please contact the Development Office at 843-723-7528

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Masterworks v THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, MARCH 13, 14, 15, 2014 7:30 PM SOTTILE THEATRE

Ken Lam, conductor Natalia Khoma, cello

The Firebird Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958) Five Variants of “Dives and Lazarus” Edward Elgar (1857-1934) Concerto for Violoncello in E minor, op. 85 I. Adagio II. Lento III. Adagio IV. Allegro Richard Strauss (1864-1949) —————————————-

Tod und Verklärung, TrV 158, op. 24 (Death and Transfiguration) i n t e r m i s s i o n —————————————-

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) The Firebird Suite (1919 Version) 1. Introduction 2. L’Oiseau de feu et sa danse & Variation de l’oiseau de feu 3. Ronde des princesses 4. Danse infernale du roi Kastcheï 5. Berceuse 6. Final

Pre-concert Conversations are held from 6:30 pm – 7:00 pm prior to every Masterworks performance from the stage at the Sottile Theatre. Hosted by William D. Gudger, College of Charleston, emeritus.

Tonight’s floral arrangement provided courtesy of: Belva’s Flower Shop of Mt. Pleasant.

Conductor’s Club Members Please join us for a post-concert reception on the mezzanine level of the Sottile Theatre. For more information on how to become a Conductor’s Club member, turn to page 74.

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Ken Lam conductor

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en is the winner of the 2011 Memphis International Conducting Competition, Education Conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Resident Conductor of the Brevard Music Center in North Carolina, , Artistic Director of the Baltimore Symphony Youth Orchestras and Director of Orchestra at Montclair State University in New Jersey. Ken was a featured conductor in the League of American Orchestra’s 2009 Bruno Walter National Conductors Preview with the Nashville Symphony and made his US professional debut with the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center in June 2008 as one of four conductors selected by Leonard Slatkin. In recent seasons he led performances with the symphony orchestras of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Pops, Baltimore, Detroit, Memphis, Illinois and Meridian, as well as he Hong Kong Sinfonietta, Hong Kong Philharmonic, and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra. In opera, he directed numerous productions of the Janiec Opera Company at Brevard and led critically acclaimed performances at the Spoleto Festival USA, Lincoln Center Festival and Luminato Festival (Toronto). His production of Massenet’s Manon at Peabody Conservatory was hailed by the Baltimore Sun as a top ten classical event in the Washington D.C/Baltimore area in 2010. Ken has been Artistic Director of Hong Kong Voices since 2000 and held positions as Assistant Conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and Principal Conductor of the Hong Kong Chamber Orchestra. Ken studied conducting with Gustav Meier and Markand Thakar at Peabody Conservatory. David Zinman and Murry Sidlin at the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen and Leonard Slatkin at the National Conducting Institute studying with Leonard Slatkin. He read economics at St. John’s College, Cambridge University and was a practicing solicitor for ten years before becoming a conductor.

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Natalia Khoma cello

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atalia Khoma is an internationally renowned cellist. Since winning the All-Ukrainian competition, Khoma has won top prizes at the Budapest Pablo Casals International Competition, Markneukirchen Competition in Germany, and the Tchaikovsky International Competitioni n Moscow, as well as First prize at the Belgrade International Cello Competition. A native of Lviv, Ukraine, Ms. Khoma studied for eight years at the Moscow Conservatory and in the United States, received an Artist Diploma from Boston University. The first and only Ukrainian cellist to become a laureate of the Tchaikovsky Competition, Natalia Khoma has since distinguished herself as a recitalist and soloist with orchestras throughout Russia, as well as the U.S., Canada, South America, Germany, Norway, Belgium, Italy, France, Spain, Switzerland, Eastern Europe, South Africa and the Middle and Far East.

Orchestra Roster Violin Yuriy Bekker Micah Gangwer Alexander Boissonnault Asako Kremer Frances Hsieh Nonoko Okada Kathleen Beard David Edwards Andrew Emmett Seth Gangwer Julia Gessinger Tomas Jakubek Jeanne Johnson Mayumi Nakamura Mao Omura Philip Payton Tiffany Rice Stephanie Silvestri Jenny Weiss

Viola Jan-Marie Joyce Alex Agrest Ruth Goldsmith Jill King Douglas Pritchard Benjamin Weiss

Cello Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer Erin Cassel

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Elizabeth Murphy Terry Muir Lee Richey

Debra Sherrill Mary Beth Orr

Bass

JoAnn Lamolino Susan Messersmith

Thomas Bresnick Peter Berquist Joseph Farley Jan Mixter Jonathan Rouse

Trumpet

Trombone William Zehfuss Kate Jenkins

Flute

Bass Trombone

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh Regina Yost Tacy Edwards

Thomas Joyce

Oboe Kari Kistler

Clarinet Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper Paul Schimming

Bassoon

Tuba Chris Bluemel

Timpani Beth Albert

Percussion Ryan Leveille Mathew Masie Scott Pollard

Katherine St.John Sandra Nikolajevs Ashley Geer

Harp

Horn

Piano

Brandon Nichols Wei-Ping Chou Anne Holmi

Chee Hang See

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Kathleen Wilson Jacqueline Marshall


Program Notes MASTERWORKS V, MARCH 13, 14, 15, 2014 Program notes by William D. Gudger, College of Charleston, emeritus

Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958) Five Variants of “Dives and Lazarus”

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cored for strings and harp, this composition was written for Adrian Boult to conduct in New York during the 1939 World’s Fair. Vaughan Williams first found this folksong in 1893 or so, and later said: “I had the sense of recognition—here’s something which I have known all my life, only I didn’t know it.” The opening version of the song is the one he found in the village of Kingsfold in Sussex. (“Kingsfold” is the name given the hymn-tune derived from the song.) His composition presents various versions of the folksong, from his further collection of folksongs and those of others; like many folksongs in the oral tradition there are many variant versions. The text associated with the tune is the Biblical parable of the rich man (“Dives” in Latin), who gives nothing to the beggar Lazarus at his gate. There is a reference to this folk ballad around 1600, so it was indeed an old tune by the time Vaughan Williams encountered it. An Irish version of the tune is known as “The Star of the County Down.”

Edward Elgar (1857-1934) Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra in E minor, opus 85

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ome twenty years spans the main creative period of Elgar as a composer, from the “Enigma” Variations of 1899 to the Cello Concerto of 1919. The years of the First World War were particularly sad ones for Elgar, and the nostalgia for times past dominates the mood of the Concerto. Elgar’s wife died in 1920 and he could not complete any further major works though he could bask in the success of his earlier music, even conducting a number of his works for that newfangled device, the gramophone. The composition of the Cello Concerto was begun in the winter of 1918-19 in Elgar’s London home, and it was finished the next summer at his country cottage in Sussex. Like many of Elgar’s works, the Cello Concerto suffered a bad first performance; conductor Albert Coates was to blame: he spent too much of the rehearsal time on the Scriabin “Poem of Ecstasy.” Nevertheless, slowly the Concerto won over performers and audiences; Elgar, who had played in an orchestra under Dvorak in the 1880s, was pleased that it was compared with his Cello Concerto. As in the Dvoˇrák concerto, Elgar was careful not to let the orchestra overpower the soloist. The brass are used sparingly and full orchestra is seldom heard. There are four movements, all but the third quoting the motto theme heard in the solo cello at the beginning of the first movement. The four movements work in pairs: the first and second movements are linked together, and the beautiful Adagio third movement serves as a slow introduction to the finale. The finale ends the work on a more confident note and includes references to the themes from earlier movements. There is a written-out cadenza with accompaniment for the soloist, which includes a flashback to the Adagio. The recitativelike motto theme returns another time at the end of the movement just before a brief restatement of the main theme of the finale.

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Richard Strauss (1864-1949) Tod und Verklärung, opus 24

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hortly after he had his first great success at age twenty-five with the tone poem Don Juan, Strauss completed Tod und Verklärung (Death and Transfiguration). It was finished on November 18, 1889, dedicated to Friedrich Rösch (who would later supply the program of Ein Heldenleben). As was common for tone poems, Strauss put a poem by Alexander Ritter at the head of the score; however, this was supplied by the poet after Strauss had written the music. The scenario for Death and Transfiguration, obviously akin to the “Love-death” and “Transfigurations” in Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde, was Strauss’s own. This he explained in a letter of 1894, which will serve admirably as a guide to the events in the music, with some references to particular instruments and themes inserted into Strauss’s narrative. “It occurred to me to present in the form of a tone poem the dying hours of a man who had striven toward the highest idealistic aims, maybe indeed those of an artist. The sick man lies in bed, asleep, with irregular breathing [tentative rhythm in the strings]; friendly dreams conjure a smile on the features of the deeply suffering man; he wakes up; he is once more racked with horrible agonies; his limbs shake with fever; as the attack passes and the pains leave off, his thoughts wander through his past life; his childhood passes before him [oboe and harp], the time of his youth with its strivings and passions [horns] and then, as the pains begin to return, there appear to him the fruit of his life’s path, the conception, the ideal which he has sought to realize, to present artistically, but which he has not been able to complete, since it is not for man to be able to accomplish such things. The hour of death approaches [gong], the soul leaves the body in order to find gloriously achieved in everlasting space those things which could not be fulfilled here below [the soaring majorkey hymn which builds at the end].” For those who prefer a more poetic description, here are portions of Ritter’s poem as published in the score: “In the small, poverty-stricken room, only dully illuminated by a candle end, lies the sick man on his cot. . . . The quiet ticking of the clock on the wall is all you can hear in the room, in which the fearful silence is a premonition of the approach of death. . . . Sleepless as if in feverish delirium, the sick man now sees his life, trait by trait and image by image, passing by his mind’s eye. . . . the dawn of childhood . . . the bolder games of the young man . . . Coldly and scornfully the world places one barrier after another in the path of his efforts. . . . Thus he strives, thus he climbs, does not abandon his sacred impulse. . . . Then the last blow of death’s iron hammer rings out, breaks the earthly body in two and covers his eyes with the night of death. … But he hears mightily resounding from heaven that which he sought here longingly: world-redemption, worldtransfiguration!”

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Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) Firebird Suite (1919 version)

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he son of a leading bass with the Imperial Russian opera, Stravinsky might have been expected to make operatic music his main attention but it was in fact in the world of the ballet that he gained his international reputation. After study with Rimsky-Korsakov, some early works so impressed the impresario Sergei Diaghilev that Stravinsky was commissioned to write a ballet score on a Russian theme for Diaghilev’s newly formed Ballets Russes. With the trio of works which followed, The Firebird (1910), Petrushka (1911), and The Rite of Spring (1913), Stravinsky developed a modern musical language out of the Russian nationalism from which he sprang. The Firebird was composed in St. Petersburg from November, 1909, through May, 1910. The premiere of the ballet was in Paris, with Gabriel Pierné conducting, on June 25, 1910. The scenario and choreography was by Michel Fokine. As is typical for ballet scores, Stravinsky extracted a suite for concert use. His 1910 version of the Suite uses the same huge orchestra of the original ballet, requiring quadruple woodwinds, three harps, and other instruments to balance. The size of the orchestra was preventing many normal-sized orchestras from taking up the work, so Stravinsky issued a Suite in 1919 with the more usual double woodwinds and slightly reduced brass. This is the version which is usually encountered now in the concert hall. A 1945 version slightly revised the orchestration and expanded the contents of the suite; like many of Stravinsky’s later versions of his earlier works, it was issued mainly to secure copyrights, a legal problem which had plagued the exiled composer all of his life. Drawn from Russian folklore, the scenario for The Firebird goes as follows: the evil King Kaschei (a green-taloned ogre) holds sway over his people through the power of a magic egg, kept in a special casket. When the young prince Ivan Tsarevitch comes on Kaschei’s garden, he captures a Firebird who gives him a magic tailfeather in order to be released. The prince then finds thirteen enchanted princesses. Wanting to marry the prettiest one, the prince is lured to the palace and captured by Kaschei’s infernal subjects. The next day the prince is to be placed under a spell, but he uses the magic feather to summon the Firebird and learn the secret of Kaschei’s egg. The prince is then able to open the casket in which the egg is kept and smash the egg. This breaks the power of Kaschei, who dies. The prince will then marry the beautiful princess and rule the kingdom. Stravinsky’s score for The Firebird contains some of his most glittering orchestral effects and is replete with material drawn from Russian folkmusic and the music of his Russian predecessors, especially the fine-tuned orchestration of his teacher Rimsky-Korsakov. The music of the Suite opens by evoking the mood of Kaschei’s magic garden. The Firebird’s dance uses a Russian folksong, which is varied with ornate decorations in the woodwinds. The round dance of the princesses, too, quotes folksongs; this is interrupted by the highly rhythmic Infernal Dance of Kaschei. Here one can detect some of the visceral, primitivistic rhythms that would be developed further in The Rite of Spring. The berceuse (lullaby) softens the mood, scored for violin solo over a quiet accompaniment. The finale, with its big crescendo at the end, became one of the most imitated things Stravinsky ever wrote: in it we can hear the “big ending” every Hollywood film-score composer tried to effect, none of them ever quite matching what Stravinsky achieved.

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FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 2014 8:00 PM SIMONS CENTER, COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON

Yiorgos Vassilandonakis, conductor

The Carolina Connection II: New music by composers with ties to the Palmetto State

Jonathan Schwabe (1957 - )

Morning of the Curious Hoarfrost (world premiere, Magnetic South Commission)

Ayala Asherov-Kalus (1968 - )

Bereshit-In the Beginning (world premiere, Magnetic South Commission)

New Work, Magnetic South Commission

Andrew McKenna Lee (1974 - )

Orchestra Roster Violin

Flute

Trumpet

Yuriy Bekker Micah Gangwer Asako Kremer

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh

JoAnn Lamolino

Oboe

Trombone

Kari Kistler

Thomas Joyce

Clarinet

Keyboard

Charlie Messersmith

Volodymyr Vynnytsky

Bassoon

Timpani

Kathy St.John

Beth Albert

Horn

Percussion

Brandon Nichols

Ryan Leveille

Viola Alex Agrest

Cello Norbert Lewandowski

Bass Thomas Bresnick

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Yiorgos Vassilandonakis conductor

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omposer/Conductor Yiorgos Vassilandonakis is the cofounder and artistic director of Magnetic South. His compositions span across a wide range of influences and genres, driven by a strong dramatic sense, revealing a mastery of timbre, sonority and temporal space, and a deep interest in sound itself as physical entity. His music has been commissioned by the New York New Music Ensemble, SFCMP, the Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, the Juilliard Percussion Ensemble, ALEA III, Neophonia, Ensemble Cairn, Meridian Arts Ensemble, Ensemble In Extensio, the Athens Camerata, and the Hellenic Contemporary Ensemble. His one-act opera Chorevoume was commissioned and staged by the National Opera of Greece in 2008. Awards include the Aaron Copland Prize, 1st Prize at the Mediterranean Music Center 3rd International Composition Competition, the Henry Mancini Award, the Eisner Prize in Music, and several ASCAPlus awards, as well as grants from Meet-the-Composer, the American Music Center and the French Ministry of Culture. His earned his PhD at the University of California, Berkeley, and studied with Philippe Leroux in Paris, as the recipient of the George Ladd Prix de Paris. He taught at UC Berkeley and the University of Virginia, before joining the faculty at the College of Charleston in 2010.

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Masterworks vi THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 4, 5, 2014 7:30 PM SOTTILE THEATRE

Michael Butterman, conductor Marina Lomazov, piano

Saint-Saëns “Organ” Symphony Franz Liszt (1811-1886) Les Preludes, S. 97 Edvard Grieg (1843-1907) Piano Concerto in A minor, op. 16 I. Allegro molto moderato II. Adagio III. Allegro moderato molto e marcato —————————————-

i n t e r m i s s i o n —————————————-

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921) Symphony No.3, op. 78 “Organ” PART I Adagio - Allegro moderato Poco adagio PART II Allegro moderato - Presto Maestoso - Allegro

Pre-concert Conversations are held from 6:30 pm – 7:00 pm prior to every Masterworks performance from the stage at the Sottile Theatre. Hosted by William D. Gudger, College of Charleston, emeritus.

Tonight’s floral arrangement provided courtesy of: Belva’s Flower Shop of Mt. Pleasant.

Conductor’s Club Members Please join us for a post-concert reception on the mezzanine level of the Sottile Theatre. For more information on how to become a Conductor’s Club member, turn to page 74.

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Michael Butterman conductor

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aking his mark as a model for today’s conductors, Michael Butterman is recognized for his commitment to creative artistry, innovative programming, and to audience and community engagement. He is in his eighth season as Music Director for both the Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra and the Shreveport Symphony Orchestra, and is in his 14th season as Principal Conductor for Education and Outreach for the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, the first position of its kind in the United States. He is also the Resident Conductor of the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, a post he has held since 2009. As a guest conductor, Mr. Butterman made his debut with the Cleveland Orchestra in the spring of 2012, and was immediately reengaged for two concerts the following season. Other recent engagements include appearances with the Detroit Symphony, Houston Symphony, Colorado Symphony, Oregon Symphony, Kansas City Symphony, Hartford Symphony, San Antonio Symphony, Syracuse Symphony, New Mexico Symphony, California Symphony, Louisiana Philharmonic, Spokane Symphony, El Paso Symphony, Santa Fe Symphony, Mobile Symphony, Peoria Symphony, Winston-Salem Symphony, Pensacola Opera and Asheville Lyric Opera. Summer appearances include Tanglewood, the Bravo! Vail Valley Music Festival in Colorado and the Wintergreen Music Festival in Virginia. In the 13-14 season, he will make his debuts with the Charleston Symphony and the Phoenix Symphony. Mr. Butterman gained international attention as a diploma laureate in the Prokofiev International Conducting Competition and as a finalist in the prestigious Besançon International Conducting Competition. As the 1999 recipient of the Seiji Ozawa Fellowship, he studied at Tanglewood with Robert Spano, Jorma Panula, and Maestro Ozawa, and shared the podium with Ozawa to lead the season’s opening concert. In 1997, Mr. Butterman was sponsored by UNESCO to lead the National Philharmonic Orchestra of Moldova in a concert of music by great American masters. From 2000 to 2007, Mr. Butterman held the post of Associate Conductor for the Jacksonville Symphony in Florida. For six seasons, he also served as Music Director of Opera Southwest in Albuquerque, NM. Prior to joining the Jacksonville Symphony, Mr. Butterman was Director of Orchestral Studies at the LSU School of Music for five years, and was Principal Conductor of the LSU Opera Theater. Previously, he held the post of Associate Conductor of the Columbus Pro Musica Orchestra, and served as Music Director of the Chamber Opera, Studio Opera, and Opera Workshop at the Indiana University School of Music. For two seasons, he was also the Associate Music Director of the Ohio Light Opera, conducting over 35 performances each summer. At Indiana University, Mr. Butterman conducted a highly acclaimed production of Leonard Bernstein’s little-known 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in a series of performances at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, receiving unanimous praise from such publications as The New York Times, Washington Post, Variety, and USA Today. He was subsequently invited to New York at the request of the Bernstein estate to prepare a performance of a revised version of the work. Michael Butterman’s work has been featured in five nationwide broadcasts on public radio’s Performance Today, and can be heard on two CDs recorded for the Newport Classics label and on a new disc in which he conducts the Rochester Philharmonic and collaborates with actor John Lithgow.

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Marina Lomazov piano

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raised by critics as “a diva of the piano” (The Salt Lake City Tribune), “a mesmerizing risk-taker” (The Plain Dealer, Cleveland), and “simply spectacular” (Chicago International Music Foundation) Ukrainian-American pianist Marina Lomazov has established herself as one of the most passionate and charismatic performers on the concert scene today. Following prizes in the Cleveland International Piano Competition, William Kapell International Piano Competition, Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition, and Hilton Head International Piano Competition, Ms. Lomazov has given performances throughout North America, South America, China, England, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Austria, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Russia, Japan and in nearly all of the fifty states in the U.S. Marina Lomazov has given major debuts in New York (Weill-Carnegie Hall) Boston (Symphony Hall), Chicago (Dame Myra Hess Concert Series), Los Angeles (Museum of Art), Shanghai (City Theater) and Kiev (Kiev International Music Festival). She has performed as soloist with the Boston Pops, Rochester Philharmonic, Eastman Philharmonia, Chernigov Philharmonic (Ukraine), KUG Orchester Graz (Austria), Bollington Festival Orchestra (England), Piccolo Spoleto Festival Orchestra, Brevard Festival Orchestra and South Carolina Philharmonic, to name a few. New York Times chief music critic Anthony Tommasini describes a recent New York performance as “dazzling” and Talk Magazine Shanghai describes her performances as “a dramatic blend of boldness and wit”. Ms. Lomazov is Ira McKissick Koger Professor of Piano at the University of South Carolina where she is Founder and Artistic Director of the Southeastern Piano Festival. She is a National Panelist for the National Foundation for Advancement of the Arts, the organization that nominates Presidential Scholars in the Arts. Marina Lomazov is a Steinway Artist.

Orchestra Roster Violin

Viola

Flute

Yuriy Bekker Micah Gangwer Alexander Boissonnault Asako Kremer Frances Hsieh Kathleen Beard Ruben Camacho Rex Conner Seth Gangwer Kristin Figard Tracy Figard Shannon Fitzhenry Tomas Jakubek Jeanne Johnson Mayumi Nakamura Liviu Onofrei Marius Tabacila Mary Taylor Jenny Weiss

Jan-Marie Joyce Alex Agrest Jill King Ruth Goldsmith Rachel Gangwer Benjamin Weiss

Jessica Hull-Dambaugh Regina Yost Tacy Edwards

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Cello Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer Timothy O’Malley Greg Homza Elizabeth Murphy Terry Muir

Bass Thomas Bresnick Peter Berquist Michael DiTrolio Jan Mixter Cody Rex

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Oboe Kari Kistler Andrew Ripley

Clarinet Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper Paul Schimming

Bassoon Katherine St.John Sandra Nikolajevs Ashley Geer

Horn Brandon Nichols Anne Holmi Ella Agrest Russell Williamson


Program Notes MASTERWORKS VI, APRIL 3, 4, 5, 2014 Program notes by William D. Gudger, College of Charleston, emeritus

Franz Liszt (1811-1886) Les Préludes, Symphonic Poem No. 3, after Lamartine’s Méditations poétiques

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hat is our life but a series of preludes to that unknown song of which the first solemn note is sounded by Death? Love is the enchanted dawn of all existence; but who is lucky enough not to have his first delights of happiness interrupted by some storm, the mortal blast of which dissipates Love’s illusions, the fatal lightning of which consumes its altar; and where is the cruelly wounded soul, which on issuing from one of these storms, does not seek to rest his remembrance in the calm serenity of the life of the fields? However, man does not resign himself for long to the enjoyment of the beneficent warmth which at first charmed him in the bosom of Nature, and when ‘the trumpet sounds the alarm’ he rushes to his dangerous post, whatever the war may be which calls him to its ranks, in order to find in battle the full conscience of himself and the entire possession of his energies.” The preceding is Liszt’s own program note to Les Préludes, referring to the ode by French poet Alphonse de Lamartine (1790-1869), “Méditations poétiques.” Les Préludes started life as an overture to another work, but soon it became a stand-alone work in its own right. Liszt was the inventor of the “symphonic poem” or “tone poem,” in which a literary work provides the inspiration (even ex post facto) for a single-movement orchestral work. He composed some dozen of these while in Weimar, Germany, where he could try out the works with the orchestra he led at the ducal court. Completed in 1854, Les Préludes is dedicated to his muse (and mistress) during this period, Princess Carolyne Sayn-Wittgenstein. The three-note motive heard at the outset (similar to Wagner’s “fate” motive in the Ring operas) is the obvious (or not-so-obvious) source for all of the themes in the work. Like a multi-movement symphony Les Préludes encompasses contrasts of tempo and mood, love themes, a scherzo-like section, a stormy developmental section, and eventual restatement and apotheosis of the opening material.

Edvard Grieg (1843-1907) Concerto in A minor for Piano and Orchestra, opus 16

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rieg, who rebelled against the rather straight-laced approach he encountered at the Leipzig Conservatory, created a nationalistic musical style for Norway, a country independent of Denmark only since 1814, and attached to Sweden until 1905. His work with disciples of Robert Schumann in Leipzig is evident in the choice of key for his piano concerto (A minor, like Schumann’s) and even the opening gesture in the solo piano. It was composed in 1868, just after Grieg’s marriage, and first performed in 1869 in Copenhagen. There are Lisztian touches in this concerto as well; on a trip to Italy Grieg showed the concerto to the venerable master, who sight-read it perfectly and suggested some orchestral scoring changes which Grieg adopted temporarily. Australian pianist Percy Gainger (1882-1961) played the concerto as well as anyone, and it is his edition, incorporating some of Grieg’s final ideas, which is usually performed.

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The overall form of the concerto is the conventional three movements, with the middle slow movement connecting directly into the finale, whose main theme is derived from the Norwegian folk-dance known as the halling. The piano writing is brilliant throughout the concerto. The contrasting themes of the first movement are particularly effective, and everyone agrees it was wise of Grieg to let the cellos (not a solo trumpet as in Liszt’s suggestion) state the second theme. The slow movement begins with quiet, muted strings, followed by a rhapsodic passage for the piano. The last movement, like the first, effectively uses a faster tempo at the end, the duple meter dance giving way to a fast dance in triple meter. As one commentator points out, by the end any traces of Schumann are obliterated by Lisztian bravura.

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921) Symphony No. 3 in C minor, opus 78 (“Organ Symphony”)

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aint-Saëns was a musical prodigy whose skills rivaled those of Mozart. He championed the music of other composers as a performer, conductor, teacher, and writer. He had a photographic memory and such skill as a sight reader that he could play Wagner’s complex Tristan und Isolde perfectly from the multi-staff full score, even though he had never heard the music. Saint-Saëns promoted the music of Franz Liszt, who returned the compliment by proclaiming Saint-Saëns the greatest musician alive when he heard one of his famous extended organ improvisations. As a composer Saint-Saëns was facile and prolific. Two early symphonies remain unpublished; of the three published symphonies, only the Third, nicknamed the “Organ Symphony,” because of its prominent (if brief) use of that instrument, is heard. It was commissioned by the London Philharmonic Society and composed in 1886. Saint-Saëns conducted the first performance in London on May 19, 1886. On the same program he was the piano soloist in Beethoven’s Fifth Concerto (“Emperor”); the conductor was none other than Sir Arthur Sullivan! Liszt, whose use of thematic transformation and telescoped form is adopted in the work, died just after this on July 31, so when Saint-Saëns published the Third Symphony, it bore a dedication to Liszt. It was not only Liszt but also Beethoven who was a spiritual ancestor for Saint-Saëns as a composer: the Third Symphony follows the same key sequence as Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony: fast movement in C minor, slow movement in A-flat major, scherzo in C minor, finale in C major. Like the Beethoven Fifth, there is no pause between the third and fourth movements, and further more Saint-Saëns combines the first two movements into one. Thus, as he described it, “the symphony is divided into two parts. Nevertheless it embraces in principle the four traditional movements, but the first is altered in its development to serve as the introduction to the adagio, and the scherzo is connected by the same process to the finale. The composer has sought to avoid some extent the interminable reprises and repetitions which are leading to the disappearance of instrumental music.” All of the music is tied together in the Lisztian fashion by a short motive, played in a number of ways through the course of the whole symphony. Pipe organs were a standard feature in 19th-century concert halls, and a number of symphonic works, notably Mahler’s Second and Eighth Symphonies, make use of them. In Saint-Saëns’s Third Symphony the organ provides rich accompanimental chords for the long-spanned melody of the slow movement, and full organ chords signal the start of the finale. The piano is also used, with some brilliant scales and arpeggios in the scherzo and then again in the finale. These touches, plus the other aspects of Saint-Saëns’s scoring, melody, and harmony, give the whole symphony an undeniable French flavor.

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VI TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014

7:30 PM

DOCK STREET THEATRE

Charles Messersmith, clarinet Gretchen Roper, clarinet

CSO Virtuosi Anthony DiLorenzo (b. 1967) Fire Dance Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990) Dance Suite for Brass Quintet Carl Stamitz (1745-1801) Concerto for two Clarinets in B-flat, No. 4 I. Allegro II. Andante moderato III. Tempo di minuetto Edward Elgar (1857-1934) Introduction and Allegro, op. 47 Edward Hart (b. 1965) April Interlude (CSO Commission, World Premiere) W. A. Mozart (1756-1791) Divertimento in D Major, K. 136 I. Allegro II. Andante III. Presto

Generously supported by The Marlies G. Tindall Charitable Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC and the Henry & Sylvia Yaschik Foundation, Inc.

CSO Partners ($500+) and Conductor’s Club members ($1,500+): Please join us for a post-concert reception in the Drawing Room and Tap Room (2nd floor) the Dock Street Theatre. For more information on how to become a Conductor’s Club member, turn to page 74.

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Charles Messersmith clarinet

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harles Messersmith, Principal Clarinet of the CSO, began playing the clarinet at the age of 8. He attended the Cleveland Institute of Music and received a Bachelor of Music degree (while studying with Franklin Cohen) in 1991 and his Master of Music degree from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music while studying with David Breeden (San Francisco Symphony). After graduation, he became the Principal Clarinet of the Augusta Symphony and performed there for four years. In 1998 he was appointed by national auditions to the Second Clarinet position with the Charleston Symphony, and in 2005 to the Principal Clarinet position. Along with regular performances with the Symphony, he performs throughout the year with local, national, and internationally renowned chamber musicians. He has often been a featured performer as part of the Piccolo Spoleto Festival. In the summers he performs in Virginia at the Wintergreen Music Festival in the Blue Ridge Mountains. He has been featured as soloist with the Charleston Symphony on numerous occasions. Mr. Messersmith is on faculty at the College of Charleston and Charleston Southern University, has a thriving private teaching studio, and travels around the greater Charleston area leading masterclasses and clarinet sectionals in elementary, middle schools, and high schools. In his free time he and his teenage son Andrew drive his wife Susan crazy by talking about cars and food.

Gretchen Roper clarinet

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retchen Roper is the Second Clarinetist with the Charleston Symphony Orchestra and has played with the CSO since the 2006-07 season. Gretchen has performed with Chamber Music Charleston, the Piccolo Spoleto Festival, the Spoleto Festival, and regularly performs with the Hilton Head Symphony Orchestra, The Long Bay Symphony, and the Beaufort Symphony. Gretchen is a woodwind repair apprentice at The Instrument Doc, LLC, teaches privately, and works at several schools, coaching clarinet sectionals and chamber ensembles. She also recently joined the faculty of Coastal Carolina University in Conway, SC as adjunct clarinet instructor. Gretchen pursued a Master of Music degree at the University of Minnesota and earned her Bachelor’s Degree from Duquesne University, in Pittsburgh, PA. Her primary teachers include Michael Rusinek, Ron Samuels, Burt Hara, and David Weber. Gretchen has performed with The Wintergreen Festival Orchestra, The Banff Festival Orchestra, The Minnesota Orchestra, and was featured on NPR’s “Performance Today”. When she isn’t working, Gretchen enjoys spending time with her husband, John Samuel, her dog Buster, and her two cats, Scat and Scooter.

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Orchestra Roster Violin 1

Cello

Horn

Yuriy Bekker Micah Gangwer Tomas Jakubek Jeanne Johnson

Norbert Lewandowski Damian Kremer Terry Muir

Brandon Nichols Anne Holmi

Violin 2

Bass

Jo Ann Lamolino

Thomas Bresnick Michael DiTrolio

Alex Boissonnault Asako Kremer Mayumi Nakamura-Smith Shannon Fitzhenry

Trumpet Trombone William Zehfuss

Oboe Kari Kistler

Viola

Clarinet

Jan-Marie Joyce Alex Agrest Jill King

Charles Messersmith Gretchen Roper

Bass Trombone Thomas Joyce

Timpani Beth Albert

CHARLESTONCIT Y PA PER.COM

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PepsiCo’s 2014 National Young Artist Competition SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2014, 3:00 PM

MEMMINGER AUDITORIUM

Charleston Symphony Orchestra, with the generous support of PepsiCo, has launched a brand new National Young Artist Competition this season for exceptionally talented young musicians (ages 14-18) to earn a chance to perform with the CSO. Applicants are sending in their concerto of choice videos by March 2014 and our expert judges will choose six young finalists to perform at our semi-finals in Charleston on Friday, April 25, 2014. Three finalists will earn the opportunity to perform with the Charleston Symphony Orchestra on Sunday, April 27, 2014, at Memminger Auditorium in Charleston. Each finalist will perform in the first half of the concert and then at intermission, the judges and audience will be able to vote for the 2014 PepsiCo National Young Artist. The CSO will perform the second half as the votes are tabulated. The winner will be announced at the end of the concert. Don’t miss out on the beautiful music and excitement!

What:

Concerto Competition for students who permanently reside in the United States, ages 14-18. Three top winners will perform a movement of a concerto of their choice with the Charleston Symphony Orchestra.

Who: All instruments are eligible, excluding voice and percussion. Where: Charleston, South Carolina When: Semi-finals with six semi-finalists will be on Friday, April 25, 2014.

Final round will take place on Sunday, April 27 at 3 pm in Memminger Auditorium. Finals will be open to the public. Tickets are available at CharlestonSymphony.org or at (843) 723-7528 ext. 110. More information at: CharlestonSymphony.org/PepsiCoNYAC

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Charleston Symphony Orchestra Membership Benefits 2013-14 Annual Fund Member $1 - $249

Musicians’ Circle $5,000 - $9,999

• Listing in the Annual Report and Bravo! Program Book • A copy of the CSO’s Annual Report • Subscription to bi-annual CSO newsletter

All the benefits listed above, plus…

• Access to behind-the-scenes Open Rehearsal

• Opportunity to sponsor a Musician’s Chair (naming applies for the duration of your annual donation – receive program and online recognition, photo opportunity upon request, and access to sponsored musician) • Invitation to Artistic Delights: Annual Dinner with Yuriy Bekker

Partner $500 - $1,499

Principal’s Circle $10,000 - $24,999

All the benefits listed above, plus…

All the benefits listed above, plus…

• Invitations to attend receptions with CSO musicians following the Chamber Orchestra concerts at the Dock Street Theatre

• Opportunity to sponsor a Principal’s Chair (naming applies for the duration of your annual donation – receive program and online recognition, photo opportunity upon request, and access to sponsored musician) • Private back stage tours • Access to the Sottile President’s Box for Masterworks or Pops! performances (subject to availability)

Friend $250 - $499 All the benefits listed above, plus…

Conductor’s Club $1,500 - $2,999 All the benefits listed above, plus… • Complimentary parking for CSO performances at Sottile Theatre • Invitation to post-concert receptions throughout the season at Sottile Theatre, with CSO musicians and guest artists • Special invitations to Meet the Maestros events • Opportunity to purchase single tickets prior public on-sale date • VIP ticket concierge service and priority seating when available

Concertmaster’s Circle $25,000+ All the benefits listed above, plus… • Opportunity to sponsor the Concertmaster’s Chair (naming applies for the duration of your annual donation – receive program and online recognition, photo opportunity upon request, and access to sponsored musician when available)

Symphony Circle $3,000 - $4,999

-OR-

All the benefits listed above, plus…

• Underwrite a CSO Concert – receive additional benefits such as complimentary tickets and a reception, with recognition for a concert in your name or in dedication to a loved one

• Invitation to the CSO’s Board of Directors’ Annual Meeting • Access to exclusive events plus private meet and greets with CSO guest artists and members of the Orchestra

-OR• Host a CSO quartet in your home/private 30-45 minute concert

For more information, please contact the Development Office (843) 723-7528 Membership benefits are valid for 12 months from date of gift. continued >>

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Thank You! The Charleston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges supporters from the following individual, corporate, foundation, and government entities for generously supporting the organization’s Annual Fund between December 10, 2012 and December 9, 2013. CONCERTMASTER’S CIRCLE

MUSICIANS’ CIRCLE

Gifts of 25,000+

Gifts of $5,000 - $9,999

Claire and James Allen Family Foundation BlueCross/Blue Shield of SC The Boeing Company John & Jill Chalsty City of Charleston Charleston Symphony Orchestra League, Inc. Herzman-Fishman Foundation/Leo and Carol H Fishman Ms. Martha Ingram PepsiCo Piggly Wiggly Carolina Company SC Arts Commission Mr. and Mrs. Burton R. Schools Speedwell Foundation Symphony Permanent Endowment Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC

Dr. Cynthia Cleland Austin Mr. and Mrs. T. G. Burke Ilse Calcagno Barbara Chapman Colbert Family Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Comcast Cable Dr. and Mrs. William T. Creasman Cumbaa Family Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Estate of Margot S. Freudenberg Ms. Suzanne Gemmell Cindy and George Hartley Dr. and Mrs. Todd J. Harvey Rebecca and Paul Hilstad Ilderton Contractors Sue & Ken Ingram Dr. and Mrs. Mariano F. La Via The Lasca & Richard Lilly Fund of Vanguard Charitable Endowment Valerie & John Luther Mr. and Mrs. John F. Maybank Mr. and Mrs. Michael Moody City of North Charleston Jeffrey and Lorain Place Post and Courier Foundation SCE&G Joseph & Claire Schady Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Schlau Byron and Anna Stahl Albert & Caroline Thibault Mrs. Andrea Volpe

$

PRINCIPAL’S CIRCLE Gifts of $10,000 - $24,999 Anonymous (1) John T. and Elizabeth K. Cahill Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Mr. and Mrs. Stuart A. Christie Judith & L. John Clark Detyens Shipyards, Inc. Mr. Ronald H. Fielding and Ms. Susan Lobell Ted & Joan Halkyard Henry & Sylvia Yaschik Foundation, Inc. Clyde & Jill Hiers Legasey Family Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Elizabeth C. Rivers Lewine Endowment of Coastal Community Foundation of SC MeadWestvaco Mrs. Phyllis Miller Town of Mt. Pleasant Sonoco South Carolina Bank and Trust Bridging Peace Fund of Tides Foundation The Marlies G. Tindall Charitable Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC

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SYMPHONY CIRCLE Gifts of $3,000 - $4,999 Mrs. Nella G. Barkley Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Black Frank & Kathy Cassidy Dr. James L. and Judy E. Chitwood Barbara Christie Eliza Chrystie Mr. and Mrs. Larry Codey County of Charleston Nicholas & Eileen D’Agostino, Jr. Ellen & Tommy Davis Mrs. Clementina Edwards Jerry H. Evans and Stephen T. Bajjaly

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Mr. and Mrs. John Evans Friedlander Family Fund The Gray Charitable Trust Richard and Ann Gridley JoAnne & Nelson Hicks Bob and Marcia Hider The Joanna Foundation Katherine Kelsey The Ethel and W. George Kennedy Family Foundation William & Corinne Khouri Dr. and Mrs. Fritz Lorscheider Dr. and Mrs. Michael Maginnis Capt. & Mrs. Nat Malcolm Sarah & Stuart McDaniel Merrill Lynch Wealth Management Dr. and Mrs. John Palms Publix Super Markets Charities Mr. and Mrs. G. Richard Query Mr. and Mrs. Mayo Read Mr. John M. Rivers, Jr. Foundation Paul and Mary Jane Roberts Charitable Gift Fund Mr. David Savard Dr. and Mrs. Del Schutte, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Sparkman Roger & Vivian Steel

CONDUCTOR’S CLUB Gifts of $1,500 - $2,999 Mr. and Mrs. Roger Ackerman Ms. Susan Parsons and Dr. Angus Baker Lees and John Baldwin Charles & Sharon Barnett Ms. Georgia Bell Blackbaud Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Bland, Jr. Dr. Tina and Mr. David Brollier Dr. and Mrs. G. Stephen Buck Mr. and Mrs. John E. Cay, III John & Lucia Childs Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm C. Clark Dr. Harry and Mrs. Jennifer Clarke CMMC, LLC Mrs. William H. Cogswell, III Dr. and Mrs. John A. Colwell Bill & Sherry Cook Gail & David Corvette Sally and Colin Cuskley The Ceara Donnelley & Nathan Berry Fund Ralph and Nancy Edwards Dr. and Mrs. Haskell S. Ellison Hal & Jo Fallon Julie & John Fenimore William & Prudence Finn Charitable Trust The Francis Marion Hotel Dr. and Mrs. Samuel C. Franklin, Jr. Richard J. Friedman, M.D. and Sandra Brett Richard & Neva Gadsden Joe & Sylvia Gamboa Dr. and Mrs. Frederick J. Goulding Dr. and Mrs. Mark Green Dr. William D. Gudger Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin A. Hagood Mr. and Mrs. James C. Hare, Jr. Robert & Catherine Hill Bill & Ruth Hindman Harold & Jackie Jacobs Dr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Jenrette, III

Bettie & Jim Keyes Kiawah Seabrook Exchange Club Charles & Brenda Larsen Mr. John R. Lauritsen Susan and Robert Leggett Anne & Cisco Lindsey Jan and Larry Lipov Mr. James D. Lubs Mrs. Cathy Marino Marion Rivers Cato Endowment Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Drs. H. W. and Carolyn B. Matalene Mr. David H. Maybank, Jr. and Dr. Keri T. Holmes-Maybank Ms. Harriet P. McDougal Jack & Cathy McWhorter Mr. and Mrs. Charles Measter Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mesel Mr. and Mrs. Jay Messeroff Ms. Anne Olsen The Opalack Foundation Bobby & Pam Pearce Lt. Col. Wilson R. Pierpont Plastic Surgery of the Carolinas Mr. and Mrs. Everett Presson Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur J. Prezzano, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. A. Bert Pruitt Radiate Technologies Dr. and Mrs. James M. Ravenel Mr. and Mrs. Donald Reid The Richards Foundation The Harriet and Linda Ripinsky Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Robert Bosch Corporation Mr. and Mrs. Richards Roddey Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rosenzweig Mr. Patrick Rutledge and Dr. Rochelle Rutledge Gretchen & Fritz Saenger Mr. Christian Schwabe Ginger & David Scott Mrs. Mindelle Seltzer SC Green Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Norman & Merinda Smith Mr. and Mrs. George W. Smyth, Jr. Mary Ann & Cliff Solberg Drs. Deborah and Carl Stanitski Mr. James V. Sullivan Dr. and Mrs. George Taylor TD Bank Mrs. Ann Hurd Thomas Dr. S. Dwane Thomas The Reverend and Mrs. Al Votaw Ms. Patience D. Walker Mr. and Mrs. John H. Warren, III Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Way, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Weber Mr. Bright Williamson Shawn Pagliarini & Russell Williamson Mr. and Mrs. Bonum S. Wilson, Jr.

PARTNER Gifts of $500 - $1,499 David & Mary Allen Mr. Ivan V. Anderson and Dr. Renee Dobbins Anderson Robert & Kathleen Anderson BB&T Home Mortgage Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Barkley, Jr. Ms. Karin Beckert continued >>

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Gary & Karen Beeler Charles and Bonnie Bensonhaver Mr. and Mrs. John T. Benton Serena and Robert Blocker Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Boswell Anna M. Boulden Boylston Family Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Mr. and Mrs. Jack Brickman Mr. and Mrs. Edward Buchan Ms. Jessica Buchanan Dr. and Mrs. William Y. Buchanan Ethel-Jane W. Bunting Foundation Mr. and Mrs. James A. Cathcart, III Ms. Jane Cheshire Mr. and Mrs. James L. Coker Colliers International Ethel A. Corcoran Ms. Catherine Couch Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Cox, Jr. Croghan’s Jewel Box Phyllis & George Dickinson Ms. Carol Drowota Dunes Properties Mr. and Mrs. Calvin H. East Elizabeth C. Bonner Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Eustis John & Jean Feldman Mr. Paul Fink Sallie & Stephen Fuerth The Fulton Lewis Co., LLC Dr. and Mrs. Charles C. Geer Mr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Gherlein M. Boyd & Charlotte Gillespie Carroll & Peggy Gilliam Mr. and Mrs. Ben Goldberg Dr. and Mrs. E. David Griffin Mr. and Mrs. Gero von Grotthuss Mrs. Lou Hammond Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Heckelman Henry M. Blackmer Foundation, Inc. Virginia and Jean Hiestand The Hood Law Firm Peter & Judy Hubbard Joan Jenkins Judith Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Kash Sheila & Tony Kelly Abigail M. Kent Dr. and Mrs. George Khoury Mrs. Joan Ladd Lenhardt Foundation Drs. Walter and Leonie Leventhal Charles & Joan Lipuma Mr. Charlie Luce Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Malabre, Jr. Clarence & Judy Manning Mr. David Masich Mr. and Mrs. Tom Massey Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Mastrandrea Gwen & Layton McCurdy Mr. and Mrs. John McTavish Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence D. Middaugh Dr. and Mrs. Francis G. Middleton Paul and Jane Ann Mougey Ms. Martina Mueller Mrs. Carol Mysel Weesie and Tradd Newton Nucor Steel Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Pagliaro

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Dr. and Mrs. Leonard L. Peters H. Dickman Pfann South Carolina Ports Authority Dr. and Mrs. William H. Prioleau, Jr. The PRS Group, Inc. Mr. Mark Reinhardt Mr. and Mrs. Clark L. Remsburg Mr. and Mrs. William R. Richardson, Jr. Mr. Bratton Riley Ms. Katherine O. Roberts Billie B. Roble Dr. and Mrs. Fred C. Sales Alex & Zoe Sanders Mr. and Mrs. Walter Schlauch Dr. and Mrs. Fredric Schuh Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Schwartz Mr. and Mrs. William P. Seaborn Elaine & Bill Simpson Jeanne Smith Mr. and Mrs. Henry Smythe Kate & David Stanton Mr. and Mrs. Al Straub Mr. and Mrs. John L. Strauch Dr. and Mrs. Charles Tremann Richard & Martha Ulmer David Wallace Frederick & Constance West Doris Gelzer Whitaker Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Ziff

FRIEND Gifts of $250 - $500 Herbert & Barbara Ailes Mr. and Mrs. James P. Anderson Mr. and Mrs. John Anderson Anonymous (3) The Henley Foundation William E. Blevins Boatwright Family Charitable Fund Mr. and Mrs. John D. Bowe Martin Bowen Brooks Family Foundation James & Barbara Buckley Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bunn Wayne & Joyce Burdick Anne & Will Cleveland William & Ann Connellee Dr. H. Paul Cooler Ms. Angela Klehe Creed Ms. Jacqueline P. Cunningham Marilyn W. Curry The Decker Family Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Durlach Associates Dr. Lydia Engelhardt Mr. and Mrs. F. Beaven Ennis Mr. Jeffrey A. Foster Ms. Susan Friberg Gilbert Galle Mr. and Mrs. F.R. Goldmeyer Michael Griffith and Donna Reyburn Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin A. Hagood, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Halsey David & Patricia Hannemann Mr. and Mrs. Brian Hellman Mr. and Mrs. Timothy W. Hughes Robert L. Jaegly

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Dr. Wendell S. Johnson Mrs. Annette Kibler Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kirk Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Kronick Ken & Theresa Kwochka Ms. Lauren Law Mr. Edmund LeRoy Limehouse Produce Co., Inc. Dr. Carla Lowrey Mr. and Mrs. M. Joel Mandelbaum Mr. Tony Mazurkiewicz Mr. William L. Milligan Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Allston Moore, Jr. Valerie Morris & Boris Bohun-Chudyniv Michael J. Mrlik Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Notari Gene & Jocelyn Notz Ms. Catherine O’Brien Mr. Anthony R. Oglietti Ms. Susan Parsell Ms. Claudia Porter Michelle Powell Ms. Carol Rashbrook Rick and Grace Reed Barbara L. Reed and Robert L. Day Ms. Porter Remington and Ms. Martha Scharnitzky Cynthia & Dave Rosengren Mr. and Mrs. Alwyn Rougier-Chapman Ms. Nancy Rudy Henry Sawyer and Gail Peeler Ms. Rosann Scanlon Dr. and Mrs. Paul Schulman Herk & Sherry Sims Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Sloggett Ms. Tamar Small and Mr. Jon Greif Carol Ann & Bryan Smalley Mr. and Mrs. William H. Spencer, III Dr. and Mrs. Anthony Speno Christopher and Mary Ann Spivey William and Patricia Staempfli Dr. and Mrs. Robert M. Steinberg Mrs. Ursula Stocko Mr. Derrick Sullivan Uricchio, Howe, Krell, Jacobsen, Toporek, Theos & Keith Law Firm Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vanderwege Al Weinrich Mr and Mrs. David L. Wertz Elizabeth M. White Dr. and Mrs. William C. Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Workman Mr. Joseph L. Wright, Jr. Shelley & Marty Yonas Mrs. Park Smith

MEMBER $

1 - $249

Andy & Karen Abrams Sue and Bob Adden Mrs. Gloria Adelson Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Alford Altschul Fund Mrs. Louis Anderson Anonymous (8) Marylou & Doc Ardrey Travers & Ann Auburn Ms. Nancy Austin

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Baarcke, Jr. Adm. and Mrs. Albert Baciocco, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Donald Backer Ms. Barbara J. Baker Mr. and Mrs. Nat Ball Ms. Betty Gore and Dr. Robert T. Ball Bank of South Carolina Mr. and Mrs. Ronald S. Banks Jim & Maryann Bannwart Mr. Weldon P. Barker Ms. Georgia Lucas Barnett Mr. H. Walter Barre Ms. Donna Barrio Bass / Bradford Gift Fund of Fidelity Charitable Mr. Carmine Battista Dr. and Mrs. Norman H. Bell Anne & Andrew Benbow John & Rose Benecki Enid & Jack Benezra Mr. Stevenson Bennett Linda Bergman Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Berretta The Reverend James P. Blalock Mr. Myles Bland Mr. Derek Borden Col. and Mrs. Raymond F. Borelli Mr. and Mrs. Timothy W. Bouch Dr. D. Oliver Bowman and Dr. Robert Sauers Ms. Frances Boyd Max Braun Ms. Betty F. Breedlove Ms. Meredith Breen Ms. Tracy Brokes Mr. Peter Brooke Judith W. Bruce Ms. Dianne S. Burden Ms. Barbara Burgess Lawrence Burpee Margaret and William Cain, Jr. Dr. Joseph R. Cantey Ms. Patricia Cathcart Mrs. Joanna Cawley Themy & Nena Chakeris Mrs. Carmel M. Chamier Charleston Physical Therapy Mr. and Mrs. Ronald H. Charron Ms. Sarah E.H. Christian Mr. Joe Christie Ron & Sue Ciancio Marjorie Clark Mr. and Mrs. Joe Clarke Ms. Susan Coggins Mr. and Mrs. David L. Cohen Mr. Ray Collier Mr. John D. Connolly Ms. Patricia Cook Mr. Samuel Cooper Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Corcoran Dr. and Mrs. John Corless The Country Club of Charleston Mr. Thomas Cronier Mr. H. Capers Cross Ms. Cathy Curtis Mrs. Jeanne F. Dalton Mrs. Janet Fryman Davis Mrs. Rachel Davis Mr. Ted Davis Mrs. Gisela Dawson Dr. and Mrs. Victor E. Delbene continued >>

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Frances Van Dolah Walter V. Duane Carol Ann-Roberts Dumond Alan Duncan Mr. and Mrs. John Dunnan Dr. and Mrs. George G. Durst, Jr. Mr. Steve Eames Christopher and Erin East Ms. Ruth Edwards Morris & Deborah Ellison Patricia & John Ernstrom Alan & Rella Eysen Dr. Lynn E. Ezell Ms. Lisa Farmer Kenneth & Karla Farrar Dr. and Mrs. Lynn F. Feldman Gail & Evan Firestone Mr. John Fisher Mrs. Billie F. Floyd Ms. Sara Jane Foltz Judith Frey Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Garfinkel Mr. and Mrs. Gordon H. Garrett Allison Gerrits Capt. and Mrs. Dean Glace Mr. and Mrs. Barry Goldsmith Marion & Ken Goodman Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Greenebaum Ms. Beth Guenther Ms. Marcella Hair Col. and Mrs. Frank Hamilton Shirley & Keitt Hane Brenda W. Hart Mr. and Mrs. William Hart Mr. and Mrs. Winslow Hastie Bruce & Nedra Hecker Mr. and Mrs. William C. Helms III Marcella T. Hickey Brian & Bridget Hill Paul & Judy Hines Mr. and Mrs. Baron Holmes Mr. and Mrs. William Holtz Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Hood Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hoopman Dr. and Mrs. Edward D. Hopkins, Jr. Ms. Elizabeth Hostutler Mr. Elwood G. Housand Ms. Maureen Huff and Mr. Larry Millhouse Mr. and Mrs. William D. Humphrey Mr. Jerry Humphries Mrs. Alice M. Hurst Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Hylander Grace and Will Cleveland Mr. Jay Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Jackson Ms. Adrienne N. Jacobsen Kathy & Michael St.John Mr. and Mrs. Darryl G. Johnson Mrs. Lois Johnston Mr. Robert Johnston Mrs. Elizabeth Jones Dolores Jones Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Jones Charles and Judy Kaiser Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth S. Kammer Mary Kaplan Mr. William Kelso Ms. Betty B. Kinard Mrs. Louise King Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Kirkland

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Mr. Michael J. Kochamba and Dr. Diane M. Kochamba Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Koches Lincoln and Gloria Ladd Jonathan R. Lamb Julia Lamson-Scribner Dr. James L. Lancaster Tori Langen Mr. and Mrs. Hugh C. Lane, Jr. Jarrell S. and Glenn C. Larew Ms. Meggett B. Lavin and Mr. Malcolm M. Crosland, Jr. Ms. Kay B. Lawhon Mrs. Bess Lawton Ms. Cynthia Leighton Caroline Lesesne Theodore & Rose Levin Mr. Kent Lewandowski Drs. Julian M. and Alice Q. Libet Harriet Little Mr. and Mrs. Curtis W. Loftin Mr. and Mrs. Wade H. Logan, III Ms. Marilyn Long Ms. Sally Lovejoy Mr. and Mrs. G. Lindsay Luke, Jr. Mr. Carl Lundquist Mr. and Mrs. Percy Lyon Mr. and Mrs. George Maas Mrs. Jan MacDougal Mr. Fred Madan Dr. and Mrs. John C. Maize Ted & Jackie Mappus Ms. Anita K. Marciniak Ms. Courtney Santa Maria Ms. Emma Marshall Ms. Carol Martin Mr. John Martin Mr. and Mrs. Louis Matagrano Maryann Matthews Dennis & Ann Maxwell Mr. Girard Mayer Deanna & Scott McBroom Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McDaniel Kathleen McElhannon Bob & Barbara McKenzie Mrs. Martha McNeil Ms. Dorothy H. Meacham Ms. Patricia Meinen Mr. Lewis Middleton Mr. Steve Middour Mrs. Carmen Miles Ann Miller Mrs. Judith Miller Terry & Martha Miller Mr. David Milli Mr. and Mrs. Thad Mitchum Drs. Jamie and Dorothy Moore Mrs. Margaret Moore Dr. Terrence N. and Mrs. Millicent M. Moore Ms. Carol Morris Mr. and Mrs. Howell Morrison Tom and Nan Morrison Ms. Claudia H. Morton Ms. Anne B. Moss Mr. Donald Muglia Ms. Mary A. Mullis Dr. and Mrs. William M. Murphy, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Myers Mr. and Mrs. Felix von Nathusius Ms. Murray Neale John and Sally Newell Mr. and Mrs. Joseph T. Newton, III

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Mrs. Zoe Newton Dr. and Mrs. Ronald Nickel Mr. Marcus Noble Alan & Barbara Nourie Ms. Elizabeth Ochoa Dr. Patrick O’Neil Ed & Charlotte Overton-Moran Dr. Traute Page Mr. Scott Parr Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Patrick John & Carolyn Pelletier Mrs. Louise R. Perry Mr. and Mrs. Esmond Phelps II Ms. Patricia Phillips Ms. Eloise Pingry Ms. Janet Pitner Ms. Ann C. Platt Ms. Christel G. Platt Jason Poe Ms. Elizabeth Popoff Mr. David Previle Mr. Warren Pyle Mr. Raymond Rapaport Mr. Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Ms. Louise R. Ravenel Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Ravenel Mr. and Mrs. Bill Raver Mrs. Marygrace Redfern Ms. Alexis Reeder Mr. Axel Reinert Edgar & Charlene Rennoe Ms. Susan B. Reynolds Dr. and Mrs. Edmund Rhett, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm M. Rhodes Ms. Barbara Richardson Mrs. Carroll W. Rivers Mr. Claron A. Robertson, III Ms. Marilynne Roche Robert and Freda Rohloff Mr. Larry Rubin M. Traylor Rucker Cass Ryan Carlos Salinas & Maria Córdova Ms. Joan Schlemmer Ms. Patricia Schneider Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Schreadley Mr. and Mrs. Gordon D. Schreck Mr. Reginald Scott Karen & Bob Serenbetz Mrs. Margaret Seres Mr. and Mrs. Charles Setterlund Mr. Art Sgambelluri Ms. Linda M. Shortridge Donald S. & Donna L. Smith The Rev. Colton Smith and Mrs. Angela Smith Mr. and Mrs. George Smith Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth B. Smith Maria C. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Smith Mr. Andrew Sohor Ms. Jean Spencer Carol A. Spitznas Duane and Lee Spong F. T. & Cicely Stack Dr. and Mrs. Douglas B. Stalb Mrs. Harriet S. Stein Cynthia Stetzer Cameron Stoll and Matt Fitzgerald Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth W. Strehle Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Tasker

Dr. and Mrs. H. Simmons Tate, Jr. Nancy and Ferdinand Tedesco TenMed Advisors, LLC Ms. Sarah Teuscher Tyler Thomas Mr. Thomas E. Thornhill Andrew Tracy Ms. Rachel Tuuri Ms. Claudia Updike Joan and Martin Ustin Ms. Eileen D. Van Horn Ms. Maricela Villalobos Mr. and Mrs. John Vogel Mr. and Mrs. Harold Wade Mr. David Waldron Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Wallace Keeling & Barbara Warburton Theodora Warren Mr. and Mrs. Warren D. Watts Mr. and Mrs. William M. Webster III Marti & Curt Weeden Stewart Weinberg Mr. Steven Weintz Dr. and Mrs. James D. Wells, III Ms. Doris Welsch Mr. and Mrs. Lee Westbrock Mr. and Mrs. Killough H. White, III Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wichmann Ms. M. P. Wilkerson Mr. and Mrs. James B. Wilkinson Charles & Marlene Williamon Mr. and Mrs. Bret Williams Mrs. Shelia Williams Dr. Jerry Winfield Mr. Jerry Wolfe Mr. and Mrs. West Woodbridge, Jr. Ms. Cheryll Wood-Flowers Mr. and Mrs. William R. Zehfuss Mr. Dave Zoellner Kathy & Eric Zolman Stephen Zwickert Melinda Zwickert Mrs. Jessie Bryan Mr. Eric Owens

MATCHING GIFTS Bank of America The Boeing Company Eaton Corporation Eli Lilly and Co. Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation GE Foundation IBM Corporation The Kraft Foods Foundation Merck Foundation Pfizer, Inc.

IN-KIND GIFTS Belva’s Flower Shop Jean F. Carlton Crave Catering Fox Music House High Cotton James Island Cleaners Newton Farms continued >>

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Ogletree Deakins Alex Pagano Mr. Bratton Riley Salthouse Catering Sugar Bakeshop

COMMUNITY PARTNERS BB&T Charleston Wine + Food Festival Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist Charles Towne Landing Charleston Library Society Charleston Southern University Church of the Holy Communion College of Charleston First Scots Presbyterian Church Good Food Catering Harbour Club Historic Charleston Foundation Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church Lutheran Church of the Redeemer The Mezz Downtown Redux Contemporary Art Center St. Andrew’s Church St. Benedict Catholic Church St. Johannes Lutheran Church St. Paul’s Summerville St. Theresa the Little Flower Southeastern Wildlife Exposition

HONOR/MEMORIALS In honor of Yuriy Bekker Dr. and Mrs. Mark Green Valerie & John Luther Mrs. Andrea Volpe In memory of Barbara Belknap Mr. Larry Rubin In honor of Jean F. Carlton Mr. and Mrs. Al Straub In memory of Jerry Chapman Barbara Chapman In honor of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin H. East, Jr. Christopher and Erin East In memory of Frieda W. Marriott Dr. and Mrs. Fred C. Sales In memory of John F. Maybank Andy & Karen Abrams Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Baarcke, Jr. Ms. Barbara J. Baker Mr. and Mrs. Nat Ball Bank of South Carolina Mr. H. Walter Barre Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Berretta Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Black John T. and Elizabeth K. Cahill Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Margaret and William Cain, Jr. Dr. James L. and Judy E. Chitwood Ms. Sarah E.H. Christian The Country Club of Charleston

Croghan’s Jewel Box Ellen & Tommy Davis Dr. Lynn E. Ezell Dr. and Mrs. Charles C. Geer Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin A. Hagood Mr. and Mrs. William C. Helms III Mr. and Mrs. Baron Holmes Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Hood Dr. and Mrs. Edward D. Hopkins, Jr. Mrs. Alice M. Hurst Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Kirkland Mr. and Mrs. Hugh C. Lane, Jr. The Lasca & Richard Lilly Fund of Vanguard Charitable Endowment Mr. and Mrs. Curtis W. Loftin Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Malabre, Jr. Mr. David H. Maybank, Jr. and Dr. Keri T. Holmes-Maybank Mrs. Martha McNeil Mrs. Margaret Moore Mr. and Mrs. Howell Morrison Ms. Mary A. Mullis Mrs. Louise R. Perry Mr. and Mrs. Esmond Phelps II Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Ravenel Dr. and Mrs. James M. Ravenel Ms. Susan B. Reynolds Dr. and Mrs. Edmund Rhett, Jr. Mr. John M. Rivers, Jr. Foundation Ms. Linda M. Shortridge Mr. Derrick Sullivan Ms. Patience D. Walker Mr. and Mrs. William M. Webster III In memory of Sue Metzger Ms. Suzanne Gemmell In memory of Claire K. Nussbaum Bank of South Carolina Themy & Nena Chakeris Charleston Physical Therapy Mr. and Mrs. Hugh C. Lane, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Mariano F. La Via Mr. and Mrs. Joseph T. Newton, III Ms. Ann C. Platt Rick and Grace Reed Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm M. Rhodes Mrs. Harriet S. Stein In memory of Robert Rice Altschul Fund In honor of Drs. Paul and Mary Jane Roberts Carol Ann & Bryan Smalley In honor of Bob and Freda Rohloff Jason Poe In memory of David Stahl Mr. and Mrs. M. Joel Mandelbaum Byron and Anna Stahl In memory of Ila Rose Walls Sue and Bob Adden Jarrell S. and Glenn C. Larew In honor of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Warren III Tom and Nan Morrison Ms. Murray Neale Weesie and Tradd Newton Theodora Warren

We apologize if your name has been inadvertently omitted or listed incorrectly. Please call the administrative office at (843) 723-7528 to notify us of any changes you wish to make. Thank you again for your generosity.

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Thank you to the generous members of our

As a Conductor’s Club Member, your benefits include… • Complimentary parking in George Street Parking Garage for CSO performances at Sottile Theatre • Invitation to post-concert receptions throughout the season at Sottile Theatre, with CSO musicians and guest artists • Meet the Maestros Private Receptions during Masterworks performance weeks • VIP ticket concierge service and priority seating when available • Access to behind-the-scenes Open Rehearsal • Year-long recognition in Bravo! Program Book • Invitations for two to exclusive receptions with CSO musicians, following Chamber Orchestra concerts at the Dock Street Theatre • Listing in the Annual Report • A copy of the CSO’s Annual Report • Subscription to bi-annual CSO newsletter

Interested in becoming a Conductor’s Club Member? For more information on giving, contact the CSO Development Department at (843) 723-7528. All memberships are valid for 12 months from date of gift.

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A healthy community is more than just healthy people.

It’s performing well at whatever we do.

Artists and musicians teach us to appreciate the beauty of life in many expressions — and to use our talents to enhance the lives of others. By embracing the arts, BlueCross helps promote the good things that life — and the communities we live in — have to offer.

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Building healthy communities. It’s the business we’re in.

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Cso program book 2014