Page 1

1

NOURISH The Nutrition Center at the Summit Bechtel Reserve

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


NOURISH

The Nutrition Center at the Summit Bechtel Reserve


OVERVIEW

2

The Nutrition Center will provide a hands-on educational experience to youth that will improve their understanding and implementation of healthy eating habits. The center will provide two main focuses in the Boy Scouts of America’s campaign against childhood obesity: 01

02

The Nutrition Center will impart handson education through a customized curriculum developed by certified nutritionists and dieticians under the supervision of the Summit Bechtel Reserve Chief Medical Officer. The Nutrition Center will help guests recognize healthy food choices and appropriate portion sizes during their meal and snack times.

Through design elements such as culinary classrooms and outdoor gardens, participants will learn the basics of meal preparation and planning to improve the nutrition levels of their everyday diet. Youth and adults will return to their homes, schools, and communities armed with the knowledge and desire to improve their everyday diet, and their new healthy eating habits will inspire their families and friends to implement change in their own lives.


3


WHY IS THE NUTRITION CENTER NEEDED?

4

Americans eat less than the daily recommended amounts of vegetables, fruits, whole-grains, dairy products, and oils. More than 23 million Americans, including 6.5 million children, live in food deserts – areas that are more than a mile away from a grocery store. In 2008, an estimated 49.1 million people, including 16.7 million children, experienced food insecurity (limited availability to safe and nutritionally adequate foods) multiple times throughout the year.

Empty calories from added sugars and solid fats contribute to 40% of total daily calories for 2–18 year olds, and half of these empty calories come from six sources: soda, fruit drinks, dairy desserts, grain desserts, pizza, and whole milk. US per capita consumption of total fat increased from approximately 57 pounds in 1980 to 78 pounds in 2009, with the highest consumption being 85 pounds in 2005.


The US percentage of foodinsecure households, those with limited or uncertain ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways, rose from 11% to 15% between 2005 and 2009.

The annual cost of being overweight is $524 for women and $432 for men; annual costs for being obese are even higher: $4,879 for women and $2,646 for men.

Obesity-related illness, including chronic disease, disability, and death, is estimated to carry an annual cost of $190.2 billion.

Obesity is also a growing threat to national security – a surprising 27% of young Americans are too overweight to serve in our military. Approximately 15,000 potential recruits fail their physicals every year because they are unfit.

Projections estimate that by 2018, obesity will cost the U.S. 21 percent of our total healthcare costs - $344 billion annually.

5

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


ABOUT THE PROJECT

6

The Nutrition Center is located within Scott Summit Center’s Lonnie C. Poole, Jr. Gateway Village. The Nutrition Center’s architectural design is reminiscent of the regional and climatic conditions of West Virginia. Local materials such as wood siding, site harvested sandstone, and rammed earth blocks contribute to the regional feel of the building. A conscious effort to utilize local and regional trades furthers a sense of place and can contribute to the regional economy. Large windows will allow ample daylight into the Nutrition Center while connecting to outdoor terraces in the natural setting. The large, open façade expanse is framed with expressive wood columns and steel rod trusses to give it a rustic but intentionally contemporary look. The outdoor covered terraces will allow participants and guests to connect with the sights and sounds of nature and fellow guests enjoying the venues of Scott Summit Center. All aspects of the Nutrition Center will be designed to ensure the maximum possible water and energy efficiency. The Nutrition Center will be LEED and Well Building certified, and use ENERGY STAR rated commercial appliances in the kitchen and teaching kitchens.


7

The kitchen roof will include solar panels to produce energy to supplement the needs of the Nutrition Center while the production roof gardens and greenhouse help to reduce solar gain. The Nutrition Center uses ideal solar orientation, along an east-west axis, as a way to achieve the project’s sustainable design principles. The solar orientation and large thermally optimized windows take advantage of passive solar energy, allowing the buildings to be warmed in the winter and kept cool in the summer while operable windows allow for ample natural ventilation when desired. Motorized solar screens will provide glare control and the ability to darken the space for banquets and presentations. The building systems are designed to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the lowest energy demands and highest comfort. Air conditioning and heating will be provided by a geothermal system and an expanded Central Plant at the Scott Visitor Center. The Nutrition Center is designed to enable and advance interactions between visitors and nature—while also demonstrating its own interactive relationship with the West Virginia climate and ecosystem.


CONTEXT AND POTENTIAL

8

Situated in the wilds of West Virginia, the Summit Bechtel Reserve is a training, Scouting, and adventure center for the millions of youth and adults involved in the Boy Scouts of America—and anyone who loves the outdoors. It is home to the James C. Justice National Scout Camp and the Paul R. Christen National High Adventure Base, which complements the three existing bases: Philmont Scout Ranch, Northern Tier and Florida Sea Base. With incredible facilities and amazing outdoor programs, the Summit Bechtel Reserve is a place that takes Scouts and Venturers to the limits of what they think they can do, and then pushes them further. The Summit Bechtel Reserve is more than just a place for Scouts; it’s where future leaders are shaped. New facilities, such as the Nutrition Center, will enliven The Walter Scott Summit Center, the 100-acre adventure and educational hub of the Summit Bechtel Reserve, in order to prepare young people for an active and healthy life. With up to 80,000 visitors at the quadrennial National Scout Jamboree and the 2019 World Scout Jamboree, Scouts and their families will be flocking to the Summit Bechtel Reserve. With the excitement and adventure they will encounter, there is enormous potential to expose an entire generation to healthy nourishment and good eating habits that are a natural pairing with outdoor fitness and adventure.


9


VISION

10

The Nutrition Center acts as both a dining facility and an educational classroom. Through the culinary classrooms and outdoor gardens, Scouts and visitors will learn the basics of meal preparation and planning to improve the nutrition levels of their everyday diet. By using the finest quality ingredients possible for meal preparation and consumption, the Nutrition Center will teach both youth and adults that healthy eating habits are easy, affordable, and tasty.


11

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


THE NUTRITION CENTER GOALS

12

Childhood obesity rates in America have tripled over the last three decades. Today, nearly one in three children in America are overweight or obese. If nothing is done, one third of all children born in 2000 or later will suffer from diabetes at some point in their lives or face chronic obesity-related health problems like heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer, and asthma. We can help our children lead healthier lives by making a few, simple lifestyle changes so that they have the ability to make healthy choices to foster the energy and passion they need to follow their dreams.

Demonstrate leadership in sustainable and healthy building practices.

Engage users in the selection and preparation of nutritious foods.

Engage users in the connection between foods, bodies and communities.


13

Maintain the Summit Bechtel Reserve standards for materials and performance.

Maximize flexibility and utility.

Maintain positive connection to the outdoors. NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


14

THE THREE PRINCIPLES

Educate “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.� William Butler Yeats Scouts and visitors have already taken an important step in connecting wellness to their lifestyle by participating in the outdoor activities and adventure at the Summit Bechtel Reserve. At the Nutrition Center, they will learn nutrition principles such as the importance of limiting the intake of carbohydrates and protein along with sugar-dense sodas and snacks so that they can put them into action. Knowledge is power.


15

Camp Naish Dining Hall in Bonner Springs, KS (BNIM)

Experience “The only source of knowledge is experience.” Albert Einstein Experience is the best teacher. By teaching participants how easy it is to engage in healthy eating using the finest quality ingredients, the Nutrition Center will prove time and again to both youth and adults that healthy eating habits are easy, affordable, and tasty. With a strong connection to the natural surroundings and the abounding activities of the Summit Bechtel Reseve, the Nutrition Center will strengthen the connection between fitness and food.

Reveal “Our life is composed greatly from dreams, from the unconscious, and they must be brought into connection with action. They must be woven together.” Anais Nin As we connect the dots between healthy foods, our bodies and our communities, Scouts will discover the reward in being active and eating healthy. Revealing the connection between physical activities, balanced eating and a healthy lifestyle will empower visitors and to prepare them for a lifetime of good choices.

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


BUILDING + LANDSCAPE High Performance Human-Purposed Integrated Design


18

Omega Center for Sustainable Living, Rhinebeck, NY (BNIM) Site Plan and Concept Diagrams


DESIGN CONCEPTS

19 gate

way

entry

gate

way

plaza

views to lake / amphitheater

seco

nda

1 prim

3

ary

2

ry a

xis

axis

views to plaza 1 kitchen 2 service bar 3 dining

cu l co inary nn ec trail tio n culinary center

Tillerson Leadership International NutritionCenter Center BNIM

berkebile nelson immenschuh mcdowell architects

17 3 5 B a l t i m o r e A v e S u i t e 3 0 0 K a n s a s C i t y M O 6 4 1 0 8

growing wall green roof vertical greenhouse

SD-08 Concept Unnamed Diagrams | A-03

integrated rainwater systems Schematic Design | BNIM Project No. 10052.07 | 04/16/15 Copyright Š 2015 BNIM Architects

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


BUILDING PROGRAM

20

The Nutrition Center facility is composed of three main architectural components creating a total building area of approximately 16,700 sf. The Nutrition Center is designed to achieve LEED and Well Building certification. Kitchen The Nutrition Center features a world-class kitchen that is daylit by garden-integrated skylights above the space. There is high visibility to and from the dining hall and serving area and a pleasant atmosphere for volunteers and full-time staff. • Full hot food preparation • Staff offices and lockers • Composting and material sorting • Concealed loading dock with storage • Dual line servery with views into the kitchen Dining Hall This is a grand multi-purpose space featuring large windows, natural ventilation, and spectacular views of Lonnie C. Poole Jr. Gateway Village. The screened dining porch offers a panoramic view of Goodrich Lake, Augustine Twelve-Points Ceremonial Plaza, and AT&T Stadium. The mezzanine provides breakout space for VIP seating and lounge area and connects the dining hall to the roof garden. It also features: • Interior conditioned dining room seating 220 • Screened dine-in area for 150, convertible to interior dining in the winter • Production roof garden with greenhouse • IT and A/V infrastructure and moveable furniture to support lectures, conferences, and banquets Culinary Center This area features two culinary teaching kitchens coupled with a dining area for students to enjoy their creations. The adjoining grocery store provides a curated selection of foods where students can gain healthy shopping skills. The outdoor classroom and greenhouse associated with the Culinary Center provide an opportunity to harvest fresh, seasonal, produce for the culinary lesson and literally plant the seeds for the future.


KEY EDUCATIONAL ELEMENTS

22

Education Kitchen Food preparation is an important part of nutrition education. The Nutrition Center will feature the Education Kitchen to provide hands-on instruction on safe and healthy meal preparation. As designed, this culinary classroom will be a separate area from the main Nutrition Center kitchen, with smaller appliances and other kitchen accoutrement that will be more familiar to participants. Viewing stations, mirrors, and cameras will ensure that youth who come to learn food preparation, nutrition, safe food handling, and other valuable food-related skills will be able to watch—and then try—the skills they hope to acquire. These lessons may be recorded as podcasts for youth to access from home as they seek to practice and refine their cooking skills. The cooking stations will have space for 3-4 students per station, and will include individual prep space while sharing cooking equipment and storage space. The Education Kitchen will also be fully accessible to accommodate participants of all ability levels. In the Education Kitchen, participants will gain hands-on experience that will last them a lifetime.


23

Outdoor Classrooms Outdoor classrooms will provide youth the opportunity to connect cooking and nutrition to nature. An outdoor kitchen will be established for campfire-style cooking instruction. Youth will have access to gardens where they will assist in growing and caring for fresh herbs and vegetables, which will then be used as ingredients in the meals prepared in the Education Kitchen. Other fresh foods needed for meal preparation will be organic and locally sourced as much as possible through farm-to-table partnerships, and BSA will use economy of scale and its buying power to provide high quality ingredients, including non-growth-hormone milks and meats. Additionally, guests will compost non-meat food items to return nutrients back to the earth for fertilizing the gardens.

Dining Hall To serve the dining needs within the eastern section of the Scott Summit Center, the Dining Hall will provide guests with indoor and outdoor dining, with movable tables and chairs that will seat up to 400 guests at each mealtime. The Dining Hall provides interior dining for 220 in a cafeteria setting, or it can be reconfigured to seat 150 in table and chair setting. The exterior dining patio can seat 150 in table and chair seating under the roof with spectacular views across Goodrich Lake.

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


24

SITE BOUNDARY - NUTRITION CENTER

SITE PLAN 0

20’


REX W. TILLERSON LEADERSHIP CENTER

NUTRITION CENTER

SCOTT VISITOR CENTER

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


SD -7

26 1 2

4 2 1 5 UP

6

8

7

5

9

Level 0 - Culinary Center 1" = 20'-0"

N

LEVEL 0 - CULINARY CENTER 0

20’

International Nutrition Center BNIM

berkebile nelson immenschuh mcdowell architects

1735 Baltimore Avenue Suite

1 Program Office 2 Teaching Kitchen 3 DIning Hall 4 Grocery Store 5 Storage 300 Kansas City MO 64108 6 Greenhouse 7 IT/Security 8 Equipment

9 Mechanical 10 Convertible Dining 11 Circulation 12 Ware Wash 13 Covered Dining 14 Men’s 15 Women’s 16 Serving

17 Walk-In 18 Waste/Recycle 19 Dock / Storage 20 Toilet 21 Pot Wash 22 Beverage 23 Kitchen 24 Dry Storage

25 Janitor’s Closet 26 Dock 27 Tool Storage 28 Mezzanine / VIP 29 Convertible Mezzanine 30 Production Greenhouse 31 Raised Vegetable Beds 32 Roof Garden

Le

Programming | BNIM Projec


DINING HALL CONFIGURATIONS

3

10

13

11

6

5

12 16

15

22

14

23

21

17 17

17

17

17

24

5

20

18

25

19

26 LEVEL 1 - DINING CENTER 0

20’

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


28

29 28 6

27

5

5

32

31

30

MEZZANINE 0

20’

1 Program Office 2 Teaching Kitchen 3 DIning Hall 4 Grocery Store 5 Storage 6 Greenhouse 7 IT/Security 8 Equipment

9 Mechanical 10 Convertible Dining 11 Circulation 12 Ware Wash 13 Covered Dining 14 Men’s 15 Women’s 16 Serving

17 Walk-In 18 Waste/Recycle 19 Dock / Storage 20 Toilet 21 Pot Wash 22 Beverage 23 Kitchen 24 Dry Storage

25 Janitor’s Closet 26 Dock 27 Tool Storage 28 Mezzanine / VIP 29 Convertible Mezzanine 30 Production Greenhouse 31 Raised Vegetable Beds 32 Roof Garden


29

ROOF

Roof Plan

0

20’ N

1" = 20'-0"

International Nutrition Center BNIM

berkebile nelson immenschuh mcdowell architects

Roof Level 1735 Baltimore Avenue Suite 300

Kansas City MO 64108

Programming | BNIM Project No. 10052.

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE

Copyright ©


30

South 1" = 20'-0"

SOUTH ELEVATION

North 1" = 20'-0"

NORTH ELEVATION

International Nutrition Center BNIM

0

Building 20’

berkebile nelson immenschuh mcdowell architects

1735 Baltimore Avenue Suite 300

Kansas City MO 64108

Programming | B


31

West 1" = 20'-0"

West

WEST ELEVATION

1" = 20'-0"

East 1" = 20'-0"

East 1" = 20'-0"

EAST ELEVATION

International Nutrition Center BNIM

berkebile nelson immenschuh mcdowell architects

Building Elev 1735 Baltimore Avenue Suite 300

tional Nutrition Center

rkebile nelson immenschuh mcdowell architects

Kansas City MO 64108

Programming | BNIM Proje

Building Elevations | A-10 1735 Baltimore Avenue Suite 300

Kansas City MO 64108

Programming | BNIM Project No. 10052.07 | 03/19/15 Copyright Š 2015 BNIM Architects

NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


ARCHITECTURAL MATERIALS AND SPACES

32


ncrete

LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM Site harvested stone Polished concrete Dining hall in cafeteria setting Polished concrete with pattern Wood rainscreen siding Reused siding Teaching kitchens Wood trellis at entry porch and north roof edge Steel and wood stair Glulam structure, gapped plant decking, curtainwall/storefront Vertical planting trellis Raised planting beds and roof paving Raised planters Packaged greenhouse structure

Polished Concrete with Pattern

Polished Concrete withwith Pattern Polished Concrete Pattern

Wood WoodRainscreen RainscreenSiding Siding

Wood Trellis at Entry Porch and North Roof Edge

ellis at Entry Porch and North Roof Edge

at Entry Porch and North Roof Edge

sed Planting Beds and Roof Paving

Wood Rainscreen Siding

Steel and Wood Stair

Steel and Wood Stair

Steel and Wood Stair

Glulam Structure, Gapped Plank Decking, Curtainwall/Storef

Glulam Structure, Gapped Plank Decking, Curtainwall/Storefront

Glulam Structure, Gapped Plank Decking, Curtainwall/Stor

Packaged Greenhouse Structure


1 Stormwater detention garden 2 Hardwood bridge over stormwater swale 3 Weir wall and stormwater detention garden 4 Culinary Center Entry Plaza 5 Existing boulder fields 6 Existing gravel path 7 Vertical greenhouse 8 Terraced regional food production garden 9 Regional orchard trees 10 Raised vegetable beds 11 Greenhouse (60’ x 20’) 12 Composting, storage and workshop spaces 13 Roof garden 14 Flagstone paving with planted joints 15 Canopy and understory trees in flagstone paving 16 Large tables in crushed stone paving 17 Monolithic stone seat wall 18 Stairs 19 Flagstone paving on slab 20 Large canopy trees 21 Lawn 22 Concrete path

23 Natural resin-bound pavement 24 Sub-canopy trees 25 Concrete retaining wall 26 Boulder fields and understory planting 27 Existing Woodlands 28 Existing Lawn 29 Dining Terrace REX W. TILLERSON LEADERSHIP CENTER 28 25 < Existing Zip Landing 1

34

3

2 21 17

17

3

24

22 20 23

22

22 18

4

19

5

26 29 4

17

17

3 16 NUTRITION CENTER 6

7

13

8

10

9 9

15

11

14 12

FUTURE TRADING POST

EXISTING SCOTT VISITOR CENTER


LANDSCAPE DESIGN

27

Existing Treehouse

6

The landscape surrounding the Nutrition Center builds on materials already employed at the Summit Bechtel National Scouting Reserve. The existing boulder fields are extended to the East to support the elevated grades around the Scott Visitor Center and the Nutrition Center. These boulder fields are designed to be built into existing steep slopes so that they are reinforced and provide informal areas for seating and planting.

35

In the main gathering areas paving consists of large, native, flagstone pavers that can support a vehicular load and pedestrian traffic. These areas of flagstone are surrounded by arcing concrete paths that are 5’ 10’ in width and connect the southern part of the site across the main circulation path to the northern half of the site. These concrete paths have concrete steps where in order to accommodate grade change when going through the boulder fields. There are several large, split face ‘quarry stone’ benches situated along the arcing concrete paths with a sawn seating surface. Collectively, the landscapes surrounding the International Nutrition Center, and adjacent Leadership Center, serve as a unifying element, simultaneously unique to the Summit Village Core and familiar to the forms, materials and character of Summit Bechtel Reserve as a whole. The site vegetation is comprised of native trees, shrubs, grasses and groundcovers.

27

Additional landscape spaces associated with the Nutrition Center include a productive roof garden with raised galvanized steel vegetable planters, a 60’ x 20’ green house and several small structures for seed prep, storage and composting. Agricultural terraces are located at ground level on the western side of the building separated by low board formed concrete walls and will be planted with native edible crops. An entry plaza to the Culinary Center located at the lower level of the northwest corner of the building with include board formed concrete seat walls and planters associated with the stormwater conveyance system.

< Future Landscape Associated with Trading Post NUTRITION CENTER AT THE SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE


PLANTING CONCEPTS AND MATERIALS

36

Concrete weir wall within raingarden planting

Hardwood bridges over raingardens

Hardwood bridges over raingardens

Rock face ‘quarry stone’ seat walls

Arcing ‘quarry stone’ bench

Arcing ‘quarry stone’ bench

Galvanized steel raised vegetable planters

Concrete weir wall within raingarden planting

Concrete weir wall within raingarden planting

Existing boulder fields on slope with planting

Rock face ‘quarry stone’ seat walls

Rock face ‘quarry stone’ seat walls

Productive ro

Galvanized steel raised vegetable p

Galvanized steel ra

Natural resin-bound paveme

Existing boulder fields on slope with planting

Existing boulder fields on slope with planting


ed steel raised vegetable planters

lanting

LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM Hardwood bridges over raingardens Productive roof garden with trellis and seating Concrete weir wall within raingarden planting Arcing ‘quarry stone’ bench Rock face ‘quarry stone’ seat walls Existing boulder fields on slope with planting Natural resin-bound pavement Existing flagstone paving w/ mortared and open gravel joints Existing flagstone with sand swept joints and concrete banding Trees and planting within permeable pavement Shade trees and seating in crushed stone pavement

Productive roof garden with trellis and seating

Natural resin-bound pavement


BE THE CHANGE Join the Food Revolution.


ABOUT THE TEAM BNIM Founded in 1970, BNIM delivers beautiful, integrated, living environments that inspire change and enhance the human condition. The 2011 National Architecture Firm Award Winner, BNIM is an innovative leader in designing high performance environments. Through an integrated process of collaborative discovery, we create transformative, living design that leads to vital and healthy organizations and communities. This commitment has intersected the lives of many BNIMers, who meld their personal passions and involvements into the architectural and communitybased work of the firm. For us, this means the avid involvement of several BNIMers in Scouting, which carries through into the work that BNIM is involved with at the Summit Bechtel Reserve. As the Designer and Architect of the Nutrition Center, BNIM brings a passion for the interconnectedness of human nature and nature, our communities, and our world. BNIM brings to bear work aligned with the mission of the Nutrition Center for the Greater Kansas City Food Policy Coalition as part of the KC Food Hub Working Group. This multidisciplinary coalition of organizations and local food advocate working to advance local food system issues including urban farming, farm-to-school, healthy food access and expanding local specialty crop production. With this project BNIM fulfills the Boy Scouts of America’s vision for impact of environments on heightening human health. Nelson Byrd Woltz Founded in 1985, Nelson Byrd Woltz (NBW) is a 40-person landscape architecture firm with offices in Charlottesville Virginia and New York City. Committed to education and conservation, the firm has been involved in a broad array of public

and private projects including botanic gardens and zoos, public parks, private gardens and estates, academic institutions, corporate campuses, and town planning. The firm’s work has garnered over 80 national and regional awards and has been widely published. Current projects include Hudson Yards in Manhattan (NY), Memorial Park in Houston (TX), Centennial Park in Nashville (TN), Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Cornwall Park in Auckland (New Zealand), Devonian Botanic Garden in Edmonton (Canada), and Brooklyn Navy Yard Naval Hospital Cemetery Memorial Landscape (NY). The work of the firm has been featured in numerous national and international publications and is the subject of a recently released monograph published by Princeton Architectural Press.

buildings. We provide a full range of building system design, sustainability consulting and energy analysis services. Located in thirteen offices across North America, along with an international network of affiliates, our passion for sustainable design runs deep. The organization is designed to accelerate critical change in sustainable building practices and our integrated approach to building systems design allows us to enhance opportunities that nature provides, working in harmony with a building’s environment to reduce its reliance on outside energy sources. Projects engineered by the Integral group have been recognized with the highest honors from both the US Green Building Council, the American Institute for Architects and the Living Building Challenge.

Mar Structural Design Mar Structural Design takes an expanded view of structural engineering, applying the highest levels of technical and practical skill and an appreciation of good design to bring the greatest value in seismic and sustainable design to our clients’ projects. Their approach emphasizes early collaboration with architects and contractors and draws upon the technical expertise of our staff and our trademark ingenuity. By working together from the outset, value engineering becomes built into the design process. From a simple straw-bale house in China to a complex performance-based seismic design, our advanced understanding of structural behavior results in construction savings, expedited schedules, improved performance and pure aesthetic appeal. Their work has been recognized with the highest honors from the Integral Group American Institute of Architects, US Green Integral specializes in the design of simple, elegant, Building Council and the National Council of cost-effective systems for high-performance Structural Engineers Association. Ricca Design Studios Ricca Design Studios is a fifty-person team of chefs, food and beverage directors, nutritionists, restaurant designers and sustainability experts actively building the future of culinary design. With over thirty years of experience in projects that enhance our relationship with food.. From the back of house planning services that improve the lives of chefs and kitchen staff to integration with the dining experience, Ricca holistically considers all aspects of the dining experience. Over the last forty years, these practices have earned them more than thirty national design awards and a client list that includes institutions from Harvard, to Yellowstone National Park to the headquarters of several Fortune 100 companies.


Copyright Š 2015 BNIM Do not reproduce without permission. Book Design BNIM Copy and Editing Erin Gehle, Brad Clark, Sam DeJong, Carly Erickson Renderings/Visualization Dan Siroky Design & Coordination Beena Ramaswami Imagery istockphoto.com Front and Back Covers Summit Bechtel Reserve 2-3, 8, 9, 10 NBW Landscape Architects 34-35, 36-37 Assassi Productions 11, 12-13, 14-15, 18, 22, 23 Mike Sinclair 12, 13, 23 BNIM All Others Special thanks to Allison Schapker (Trinity Works) and Nathan Foley (Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects) and to the Office of Philanthropy National Council Boy Scouts of America.


summitbsa.org

Profile for BNIM

NOURISH  

The Nutrition Center at the Summit Bechtel Reserve

NOURISH  

The Nutrition Center at the Summit Bechtel Reserve

Profile for bnim

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded