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Canberra’s No.1 entertainment guide #391MAR28

E L A V I N R A L A C V I T IC FES

T K L S O F E L MAJAT THE NATIONA


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Wanna see two rappers on top of two scantily clad women? Sure you do! Turn to page 43. #391MARCH28 Fax: 02 6257 4361 Mail: PO Box 713 Civic Square, ACT 2608 Publisher Scott Layne Allan Sko General Manager Allan Sko T: 6257 4360 E: advertising@bmamag.com Advertising Manager Paul Foley T: 6257 4360 E: sales@bmamag.com

Editor Julia Winterflood T: 02 6257 4456 E: editorial@bmamag.com Accounts Manager Yu Xie T: 02 6247 4816 E: accounts@bmamag.com Super Sub-Editor Josh Brown Graphic Design Cole Bennetts / Tom Combe Exhibitionist Editor Julia Winterflood E: editorial@bmamag.com Film Editor Melissa Wellham NEXT ISSUE 392 OUT APRIL 11 EDITORIAL DEADLINE APRIL 2 ADVERTISING DEADLINE APRIL 5 Published by Radar Media Pty Ltd ABN 76 097 301 730 BMA is independently owned and published. Opinions expressed in BMA are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or staff.

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Yes, as the wholly unprofessional title says, purveyors of high-pitched swearing and Queen-esque stadium rock The Darkness are coming to the ANU Refectory on Thursday May 10 as part of their Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us tour. The tight-panted quartet are a perennial favourite here at BMA Mag HQ – many a deadline has been soundtracked by super loud replays of Permission to Land and One Way Ticket to Hell... and Back – so this news sees us all violently polluting our leopard-print britches with delight. Add to this the news that Canberra favourites Fun Machine will support and we’re in for one helluva night of fun. It’s been four years since The Darkness strutted the Aussie boards. In that time they broke up and reformed and, blessedly, we will be getting the original line-up in all their snowflecked glory – Justin Hawkins (eyewear-shattering vocals/ guitar), brother Dan Hawkins (guitar/backing vocals), Frankie Poullain (bass) and Ed Graham (drums). To celebrate the occasion, the group are giving us all a free download of latest single Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us, which you can grab from www.theactualdarkness.com. Tickets for the show – which will be the closing night of the tour – are $72 + bf from Ticketek and are on sale from Wednesday April 4. Grab one as soon as you can motherfuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuc-KAAAA!

Corinbank Take 2! Rain will not dampen the Corinbank spirit, and, after copping an unprecedented 370mm in the Brindabellas over the scheduled festival week, Corinbank is making a courageous comeback from November 30 to December 2. All purchased tickets are valid for the new date. Corinbank’s celebration of life, music, art and creativity has earned it a strong allegiance, which saw an outpouring of generosity following the agonising decision

The Gum Ball Festival second round line-up The Gum Ball is pleased to announce its second round artist line-up joining the likes of Custard, Jinja Safari and Ash Grunwald in the secluded bushland surrounds of Belford in the Hunter Valley NSW from Friday-Saturday April 27-28. The line-up now boasts Mat McHugh, frontman and the creative force behind The Beautiful Girls, ARIA winning Aussie rock stalwarts Front End Loader, the ’60s inspired rhythm and soul spectacle Clairy Browne and Bangin’ Rackettes, Melbourne’s ferocious and infectious ones to watch The Delta Riggs, alternative electro hip-hop master The Tongue, Seattle based alt-rockers Massy Ferguson, Aussie meets Caribbean big band Eucalypso, and from the other side of the

stream The Perch Creek Family Jug Band who will be bringing their unique blend of bluegrass/ country blues and old time jazz. The Gum Ball offers a friendly hassle free festival experience over one main stage for a seamless musical feast. It’s BYO and offers camping, great food, markets and open spaces, all with an eclectic mix of music suitable for all ages. Playing times are now up on www. thegumball.com.au .

Canberra’s first expat picnic On Saturday March 31 Canberra’s first expat picnic, Growing Roots in Canberra, will be held at the National Botanic Gardens. The woman who’s making it happen, Henrike Schreer, remembers what it was like to move to Australia. “It seemed like all of a sudden I was thrown into a whole new world. I was nervous, worried and felt incredibly lonely. At the same time, I was excited beyond belief – every kangaroo, lorikeet and cockatoo reminded me of the amazing adventure I had just embarked on. Crazy times full of contradicting emotions.” Of the picnic intended to unite newly arrived expats she says, “With Annie and the Armadillos, Canberra’s most popular jazz, swing and blues band, hot Latin rhythms by the award-winning Salsabor Dance Company and fun kids’ activities, the picnic promises to be a great day for the whole family.” So if you’ve recently moved to Australia, head to the beautiful surrounds of the Botanic Gardens to meet people you’ll be able to share stories with while enjoying sumptuous sounds. Check the the Facebook event page for more info.

The Motherfucking Darkness are coming to Canberra you cuuuuuuu ah hunt!

The Mother-Flippin’ Darkness Are Coming To Effing Canberra

to postpone the event to ensure the safety of patrons. “Everyone’s been fantastic,” said General Manager Amy Moon. “We’ve had offers of support from artists and musicians as far afield as New York, our suppliers have been very cooperative, and we’ve received nothing but praise from our patrons for what proved to be the correct decision to postpone with no complaints or requests for refunds from unhappy campers. It’s unheard of in the industry, and we’d sincerely like to thank our loyal patrons for their support.” That’s the magic of Corinbank and our super supportive music community. In the words of Director Dan Watters, “Like the alpine ash forest on our site, Corinbank was born from bushfire. Water will only make us grow.” www.corinbank.com .


FROM THE BOSSMAN

YOU PISSED ME OFF!

I have just returned - flushed of cheek and swollen of brain - from the thoroughly real Accredited Council for Ruling Over New Innovations in Mouthings (or ACRONIM for short). Us word wizards meet every second trimonder when Venus - the known giver of words - rests in the fertile celestial grammar quadrant to debate and deliver new words and terms for common useage. No longer must we struggle for needing a word for ‘that thing’ or ‘you know that strange feeling you get when’s. Joining known faves Funstop (thinking of the funny thing you should have said after the moment has passed) and Inserthere (being unable to think of a second example in a comedy skit) here are the latest additions to the human canon. Enjoy. And as we say at ACRONIM, Don’t be a Sangefreunde!

Has someone yanked yer chain recently? Well send an email to  editorial@bmamag.com and have your sweet vengeance. And for the love of God, keep it brief! [All entries contain original spellings]

Scheissefrusten - the frustrating moment that occurs a split second after showering and putting on clothes when you realise you need a poo

To my neighbours who own the labrador that BARKS NON STOP. How the hell can you live like that, with the non stop WOOF WOOF WOOF all the freaking time!? What, do you guys not have EARS? Seriously. You need to grow some ears. Ignore this if you’re actually all deaf. Which you probably are. In which case I’m sorry. Kind of.

Eurekargh! - the moment of realisation that occurs when you’re just far enough away from a location to make it annoying that you’ve left something important behind Thorpedoed - a subtle blend of smug self satisfaction and genuine human sympathy experienced when someone who has big-noted themselves fails in the public spotlight. Also known in some regions as A Woodsian Slip Splart - when an overwhelming desire grows to publicly blurt out a confession such as “I wear my wife’s knickers!” but realise that it’s probably not the best idea to do so at a funeral

To my friend who is always late... Turn the fuck up on time for once! We’re meant to be mates; I’m not here at your beck and call. If YOU want to meet for lunch, have the bloody decency to get there when we agree; wafting in 15 minutes late with a nonchalant flick of the eyes is not sassy or cool, it’s arrogant and rude. Stop getting off on the waft on your own minge and pay more attention to your damn watch!

To the “you pissed me off column”, you pissed me off! Promote positivity! Stop whining! [Bossman: Well, my dear ironically pissed off friend, you are in luck. Everyone’s favourite spleen venting section will continue its frothy ways, but joining it will be a brand new section. Stay tuned next issue]

Furbrained - being the only person to witness a household pet do something utterly remarkable, only to have people not believe you and consider you increasingly mad as you relentlessly, over a period of years, try to make Fluffy balance a pen on his nose again, eventually leading to a deep seated feeling of separation in the house, often followed by divorce Occstupation - doing something stupid at work. Includes sending an inflammatory email about someone to the person you’re badmouthing and annoying all your contacts by accidentally using the Cc instead of the Bcc field for a mass mailout Wop-Whoops - when a thoroughly good-hearted, tolerant person is accidentally racist (“Hey Ken! I brought some sushi as I know it’s the cultural dish of Japan”// “Yes, Jim, it is, although I’m Korean.”) Frutile - a child’s failed attempt to convince their parents they have enough room in their stomach for dessert but not for fruit Slurvian - the tongue adopted by drunkards, prevalent in ‘sch’ and ‘ssss’ sounds. (“Fanschy a kebab?”// “Schoundsss like a plan.”) Faux-setto - describes that special high pitched octave that enters the voice when running into someone you don’t really want to converse with and yet still need to be polite to, such as your sibling’s ex girlfriend Seeyagit - the expletive uttered immediately after putting down the phone and ending a superficially pleasant conversation (“OK mate, so redo the whole thing, yeah? I’ll get right on that for you. Cheers, bye!... ...Twat”) Groundhog Dismay - the infuriating habit of making the same quirky, time-wasting mistake on a daily basis, such as forgetting your mobile, leaving the milk out of the fridge, or staring at an object you need to bring with you convinced you’re going to remember it only to forget about it later ALLAN SKO - allan@bmamag.com

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WHO: Doc Holliday Takes The Shotgun, Sweet Teeth and Waterford WHAT: BMA Mag Present The Bootleg Sessions WHEN: Mon April 9 WHERE: The Phoenix

For the next BMA Mag Bootlegs we’ve done something a little different and invited some mates from interstate. We’ve rounded up Doc Holliday Takes The Shotgun and Sweet Teeth from Sydney to join beloved local boys Waterford. Paying homage to debauchery and misadventure with their swamp-swagger set-on-fire sound, DHTTS care not for gimmicks. The blues-punk thrashabilly band’s live show is guns blazing from the get go. Unapologetic in their expression, unforgiving in their execution and refusing to be ignored, they often take their shows into the crowd for a wildly penetrating, sweat driven experience. Sounds like a bloody good Bootlegs to us. 8pm, free.

WHO: Mudd Promotions WHAT: Final Lies, Activate Jetpack, My Own True Love WHEN: Thurs March 29 WHERE: Transit Bar

After a much publicised stint at the infamous Maram, followed by a break to regain some sanity, Jeff and the team at Mudd Music have saddled up again ready to launch some new projects. One such project involves a partnership with Jem and the Transit team to bring some rock back to the city. Kicking off on Thursday March 29 they are hosting a series of free shows to showcase some of the region’s best guitar driven bands. The first line-up consists of Final Lies who are killing it at the moment, those indie rock comic book super heroes Activate Jetpack, and Global Battle of the Bands Australasian finalists My Own True Love. 8pm.

WHO: Breaking Hart Benton and The Pirate Brides WHAT: Nude Folk WHEN: Thurs April 5 WHERE: The Front

Nude Folk will feature Breaking Hart Benton and The Pirates Brides (in town for the National Folk Festival) playing stripped back and acoustic at The Front. Formed out of a mutual love of British Isles folk and Appalachan music, Breaking Hart Benton have a uniquely modern indie/folk sound with undeniably strong Celtic/Americana influences and an equally strong focus on melodic, lyrically rich songwriting. Their Australian themes and observations sit comfortably beside murder ballads and traditional tunes and they’re partial to the occasional raucous romp. The Pirate Brides are a lively bluegrass band that deliver fantastic four-part harmonies and well

WHO: Smitty & B. Goode WHAT: Rock ‘n’ roll baby WHEN: Sat March 31 WHERE: The Phoenix

After rocking the country in 2011 with their second album, Hello Rock ‘n’ Roll, Smitty & B. Goode decided to leave their jobs to focus all their energy on the band. The result is the brand new self-recorded EP, We’ll Take It From Here. If the EP has a theme, that theme is living free. It sounds cheesy, but it’s true. Early in 2012, Smitty & B. Goode left the world of nine-to-five, bosses, office politics, rush-hour commuting, working overtime and poor pay to follow their rock ‘n’ roll dream. The songs on this EP are a celebration of their new-found freedom. Free.

WHO: Ben Salter and Joe McKee WHAT: Co-headline solo tour WHEN: Fri April 6 WHERE: The Front

After ten years touring Australia with The Gin Club and Giants as well as acts such as The Wilson Pickers and The Young Liberals, Ben Salter (pictured) released his debut solo album last year. Produced by Gareth Liddiard and Robert F. Cranny (Sarah Blasko, 78 Saab) its combination of striking arrangements, unusual instrumentation and classic melodies has slowly but surely won Salter a whole new slew of fans. Joe McKee’s previous outfit, Snowman, were significant. Praise, wide ranging and effusive, came from all corners of the globe. Catch them both in the intimate atmosphere of The Front. 8pm, $10.

WHO: Rachel Haircut WHAT: Double A side launch WHEN: Sun April 8 WHERE: Transit Bar

James Hewson and Hayden Quinn have been making ’90s throwback electronica as paqman since 1998, but it’s been two years since they’ve made any official releases. It’s no secret they’re stuck in the past; their most recent work’s eclectic to the point where the listener really can’t decide when the music was made. On March 20 they released a double A side single entitled #AQUAFLASH // #NICODEINE CRUSH. The tracks are exactly what the boys would have made in 1998. They’re a throwback to ’90s rave music; colourful and dance floor ready, and come under the new moniker Rachel Haircut. Check the new stuff at Transit. Free.


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MORGAN RICHARDS Let’s start with a confession: I’ve never actually been to THE NATIONAL FOLK FESTIVAL (or The Nash, to give it its beloved colloquialism). Shock, horror! I know. But here’s the thing; in the writing of this story, I’ve gone from almost complete ignorance of its existence to strong resolve to make the trip from Melbourne and experience the magic and madness firsthand. Let me count the ways... My first assignment is Fingal Capaldi, pirate captain of Melbourne’s most outrageous gyspy-folk corsair crew, Rapskallion. This year will be their second appearance at the festival; more specifically, in The Majestic tent. Fingal is a quick, friendly man with a luxuriant waxed moustache and an assortment of colourful paisley scarves about his neck. When I ask him to describe Rapskallion’s music, he leans back and attempts to recall every response he has ever given to this question. “Let me see... A party in a Romanian tavern set adrift on the high seas. A vaudevillian cabaret extravaganza of epic proportions. Buccaneers gone electric... Alright, here’s one I just thought of… Blackbeard pole-dancing in the skin of Kermit the Frog.

I looked down. Sure enough, my pants were completely enveloped in flames

“As a band,” Fingal continues, “I’d say we lean more towards Dionysian orgiastic revelry rather than the ordered jazz chords of Apollo. We even have this guy, Mysterio, who plays the pan pipes. In fact, Mysterio is probably one of the closest manifestations of Pan on Earth at this moment. Lives in caves, eats weeds. Has hordes of nymphs.” Hordes of nymphs aside, a Rapskallion performance is a worthy sight indeed. “There’s definitely a lot of gyrating, sweating, confetti flying... You know, just general rowdiness.” And their rabid, slavering fans have another thing to look forward to with their brand new album. “We’re smashing that out now,” Fingal confirms. “It’s called The Vagabond King. We’ll definitely be playing some of the new songs at The Nash.” Next on my list is the strange and delightful Adam Hadley, stalwart of the Canberra arts scene. Poet, musician, entertainer and organisational wizard, Hadley has been the manager of The Majestic (his “weird circus tent baby”) since its debut in 2010, but has been a part of the festival for over a decade. “[The Folk Festival has] always had a lot of really weird, fringey stuff,” Hadley says. “The Majestic is about making a focal point for it all.” He quickly runs through some of the musical highlights at The Majestic this year. Besides the boisterous buccaneers of Rapskallion, there’s also Melbourne sextet Tiger and Me; Ghostboy, a Brisbane spoken-word artist (or “spoken weird artist” as he prefers); sea-shanty legends Mikelangelo & The Deep Sea Gentlemen, and many more. But it’s not just rollicking tunes at The

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Majestic. There’s also Adam’s poetry slam, a long-time institution at The Phoenix. “Plus,” he adds, “there are circus performers, there’s fire-twirling, and there’s another new thing this year called Dance Jam. It’s not so much a workshop as facilitated free dance first thing in the morning. It’s a great way to start the day!” Also among the musical talent this year is local eight-piece that are, according to the group’s singer and guitar player Luciana Harrison, “most often classed as folky pop, but we like to dabble in everything. I’ve gone to The Nash ever since I was a little kid,” she continues. “I’ve always loved it. There’s delicious food and dancing and other mind-blowing stuff. As I got older, though, I felt like I really needed to be more involved in the festival. This is the first opportunity to do that. I’m really excited about it!” Travelling minstrel Joe Oppenheimer also has fond memories. “I went a few years ago, and I remember this one moment in particular. We were outside the Sessions Bar, jamming out for ages. I realised I was very hungry and went up to get some pizza. I said to the guy, ‘Hey, Mr Pizza Man! What do you reckon about me singing a song for my pizza?’ Or maybe it was the other way around. Anyway, he ended up giving me free pizza in return for an extremely loud rendition of Oh Darling that actually brought over a lot of customers. That was pretty cool.” Right. Having talked to the players, the punters, the movers and the shakers, I sit down at my desk to begin writing up the article. I’m about halfway through when there is a violent crashing noise as an unshaven man in a Cossack hat bursts into my room. He is carrying a bottle of Scrumpy and yelling incoherently. This is my good friend Rhys, and he often makes his entrance in such a manner. I ask him if he has ever been to The Nash. “Have I ever!” he smiles, proffering the Scrumpy. I take a swig of the foul stuff and grimace. “I went a lot when I was younger. I was a bit of a hippy kid and was pretty good at fire-twirling. One year there I was busking, eight years old, spinning a flaming staff around with my hat on the ground at my feet, when suddenly someone shouted, ‘Rhys, your pants are on fire!’ “I looked down. Sure enough, my pants were completely enveloped in flames. My immediate reaction was to pull them down to my ankles - I don’t exactly know why. I managed to get the fire out, then slowly realised I was standing pantsless in front of about 60 people. I decided to go with it, so I made a bow and went around with my hat. People loved it. I think that’s the most money I’ve ever made busking.” We drink some more Scrumpy and Rhys tells a few more stories. I’m starting to feel like I know this place. “Hey man,” says Rhys, “what are you doing over Easter?” I put the empty bottle of Scrumpy on the table and leaned back in my seat. “Do you really have to ask? I’m going to The Nash.” This year’s National Folk Festival plays out over April 5-9 at Exhibition Park, Canberra. For a full programme and tickets head to www.folkfestival. org.au .


5 DAY FESTIVAL PROGRAM NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE!

www.folkfestival.org.au

FEATURING: ELIXIRFEAT.KATIENOONAN-HARRYMANX-JEFFLANG-APRIL VERCH - BATTLEFIELD BAND - ZULYA AND THE CHILDREN OF THE UNDERGROUND - RIOGH - CIRCLE OF RHYTHM - DANIEL HO - FLAMENCO FIRE - FRANK YAMMA - FRENCHAM SMITH GLENY RAE & HER TAMWORTH PLAYBOYS - KRISTINA OLSEN - LONDON KLEZMER QUARTET - MIC CONWAY AND ROBBIE LONG - RORY ELLIS - SHOOGLENIFTY - STRINGMANSASSY - THE ALAN KELLY GANG - UNCLE BILL - VICTOR VALDES - VOLATINSKY TRIO - THE ELLIS COLLECTIVE - THE LURKERS - DAN HANNAFORD - GO SET - SARAH HUMPHREYS - SIMPSON THREE - RICHARD PERSO...PLUS MANY MORE! AND...OVER 100 FOOD & MARKET STALLS - DANCE DISPLAYS - STREET PERFORMERS - KIDS FESTIVAL - COMMUNITY ARTS - TRADITION BEARERS - SESSION BAR - BOHEMIA BAR - THE LABYRINTH - THE POETREE - MAJESTIC FRINGE - STOCKMANS CAMP - MUSIC, DANCE & ART WORKSHOPS!

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ALL AGES I am sad to announce that the seventh annual Regrowth Festival has been postponed due to severe weather conditions that have deemed the event’s location unusable. Luckily, the Regen team were quick on their feet and have already locked in new dates for the event. Regrowth will now take place from Friday September 28 until Monday October 1, at the same spectacular Braidwood region property as last year. The festival will suffer some minor changes to the musical line-up due to the date changes, although the rest of the event schedule and format will remain the same. You will still enjoy a peaceful four days and three nights of music to please all tastes, fun workshops, tree planting, arts, market stalls and great food. Tickets go on sale soon, so stay posted to www.regen.org.au for ticket sales, prices and more event information. On Friday March 30 we are being given a great opportunity to both witness the mind-blowing split launch of two rising and very much loved Canberra acts, as well as offer our support to a venue in need. Recently the Tuggeranong Youth Centre was under the threat of being unable to host musical events in 2012, but to our delight, Hands Like Houses and When Giants Sleep will give us and the team at the Tuggeranong Community Centre a chance to keep their great gigs going over the year. Supporting acts will include yet more amazing local bands including Love and Satellites, Ameliah Brown, Transience Invalid, Sharptooth, Indistrict and Castilia Lane. Tickets cost just $15. Doors open at 4pm.

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It is extremely rare that world renowned DJs make all ages appearances, particularly in the ACT. Multi-award winning French electro house artist and producer David Guetta is known as one of the world’s best. Guetta will be taking over Stage 88 in Commonwealth Park on Friday May 4 with supporting artists Timomatic, Bombs Away, Jared De Veer and Rawson. This event is a very rare sort in Canberra and particularly in the all ages scene. First round tickets cost $64.95 (+ bf) and second round tickets will be pushed up to $79.95 through Ticketek or Moshtix outlets. Every cent will be worth your while. In 2012 British funny man Ross Noble will bring his skilful improv and raving tangents to Canberra on his Nonsensory Overload tour. From Thursday-Saturday April 26-28 he will do nightly performances at The Canberra Theatre Centre, bringing to us unique rants unfound in any other comic act. Tickets cost $44.90 for adults and $39.90 for children or with concession, through Canberra Ticketing. Tickets are very quickly running out for An Evening With John Cleese. In fact, two evenings with John Cleese have already sold out! This English comedy legend, most famous for his works with Monty Python and as Basil Fawlty in Fawlty Towers, his face is recognised worldwide as an icon of British comedy. The hilarity will take place at The Canberra Theatre Centre. Seats are still available on two dates; Thursday April 12 and Monday April 16, but are selling quickly. A reserve tickets cost $116.90 and B reserve costs slightly less at $94.90, through Canberra Ticketing. Don’t miss your chance to experience An Evening With John Cleese. Tickets will disappear soon, so get your seats while you can! NAOMI FROST allagescolumn@gmail.com


LOCALITY

Around four o’ clock last deadline Thursday the staff at BMA HQ were in a somewhat manic mood. Our ever delightful Accounts Manager Yu Xie was trapped in the phone conversation web of an evil printer cartridge saleswoman. Because we publish a magazine these black widows assume we print on site and reckon this warrants an unwelcome sales call every freaking hour. With each polite declination the flustered Yu became further entangled in the saleswoman’s merciless clutches. By the time she was done with him he’d probably ordered a hundred boxes of cartridges. The Bossman returned from lunch to find poor apologetic Yu in a panic. “Back on the phone Yu,” he calmly suggested. “Cancel that order. You need to show those cartridge people we here at BMA are not so easily swayed.” Yu took a deep breath, puffed out his chest, stamped his foot and declared “Yes! You’re right Allan. I will cancel that order!”

While the cartridge kerfuffle was playing out our upstanding Advertising Manager Paul Foley got a ding. That is, an ad booking. When someone books an ad Paul dings a silver bell like Lloyd Braun in Seinfeld. It’s cheesy but it’s good for morale. Paul did honk a rubber chicken* for a while there but it made such a god awful sound it got old pretty quick. This wasn’t any old ding, however. It was a big ding. It was the most exhilarating ding we’ve ever received. But Paul could hardly break the news when Yu was being eaten alive telephonically, and then cancelling the hundred boxes of cartridges, so he had to sit on it for 20 minutes or so. How he did that I will never know. For the ad booking was for a band that excites and unites BMA staff both past and present like no other. A band whose two albums are the only albums to religiously get cranked up to 11 every time they’re spun at HQ, and always one after the other. No other band gets this kind of treatment. Cos there’s no other band like The Motherfucking Darkness. THE DARKNESS ARE COMING TO CANBERRA. When Paul finally dropped the bombshell we could barely believe it. The BMA dream had come true! Allan and I were speechless. Allan was floored. As in he literally dropped to the floor. I screamed. We hugged. I got teary. Productivity was shot for the rest of the day. We blasted Permission to Land and One Way Ticket to Hell… and Back and sang along to every word. ‘Twas bliss. To add to the sonic sunshine not only was this the most exciting tour news we’d ever received, but the timing could not be more perfect. The show kicks off the weekend we’ve earmarked for my BMA farewell! The Darkness are playing ANU Bar on Thursday May 10, supported by Fun Machine. A match made in music heaven that is. For ticket deets check the News page. At the gig BMA Mag staff will be sheathed in red PVC onesies. That was always our plan if we were ever to see The Darkness together… JULIA WINTERFLOOD - julia@bmamag.com

*this is not a euphamism

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DANCE THE DROP

Remember the good old days when all that was required to magically metamorphose into an industry professional was a hit of red cordial, a discarded tree branch and a skull full of childish imagination? “Look at me mum! I’m a fireman!”, “Dad! DAD! Look, I’m an internationally touring headlining DJ!” Well folks, I am proud to announce that those days have returned, although former catalysts ‘sugar and stick’ have been replaced by the engrossing medium of television. Ladies and gentleman, I present to you ‘the celebrity DJ tour’. In the past few years, we have enjoyed ‘DJ sets’ from a variety of arbitrary thespians including Naboo from The Mighty Boosh and Ronnie from Jersey Shore but the biggest ‘WTF’ DJ tour of 2012 would definitely be awarded to Pedro from Napolean Dynamite. The dopey sidekick, who I am advised is playing ‘in full character’, has been booked for a series of shows across the country in April. Don’t believe me? Google it my friend. As far as I know, The Upbeats (NZ) and Mark N (Melb) have never starred in a TV series or cult movie. It must be assumed that their set at The Clubhouse on Saturday March 31 has been gained through pure musical talent, an absurd notion in today’s industry. The drum heavy double threat are supported by local bass wizards Centaspike, Benjammin, Tidy, Delux and Skully. Leave the Prada slip-ons at home – it’s a proper jungle affair, innit.

By god it’s almost Easter! It seems like only yesterday we were all draped in Australian flags and attempting to find national pride at the bottom of a pint glass. Pang! and Party By Jake have joined forces to bring you a pre-Good Friday double deal on Thursday April 5 at Trinity Bar. Sydney disco don Cassian appears alongside our latest local superstar duo Peking Duk for the messiest celebration of the year. With three whole days to recover, you really have no excuse not to get egg-specially inebriated. For those of you who are allergic to sleep, why not hang around at Trinity for The Freestylers on Easter Saturday (April 7)! The infamous British breakbeat boffins will be tearing the roof off the Dickson dancehall with another epic set of anthems and bassbin bangers sure to wipe out the remainder of your long weekend with one humungous punch in the liver. Never thought you’d be on a boat? Well then hop about the SS Academy for a night of ‘naughty-cool’ mashup mania on Friday April 20 hosted by the lovable duo, The Yacht Club DJs. If you like your weekend club experience seasoned with a dash of cheeky old school flava, look no further than this.

SINSATIONAL MIDWEEK DEAL! Half price entry, $4 basic beers and $5 basic spirits when you show your student ID card on Wednesday and Thursday nights. Exotic dancers four nights a week. Fully licensed bar. Non stop podium shows and lapdances available. Sinsations is the home of Miss Centerfold Australia and Exotic Angels Australia competitions! We cater for bucks’ nights, birthday parties or any occasion that requires a great time. Ladies very welcome. Positions available. Like us on Facebook Sinsations Adult Nightclub Canberra. 32 Grimwade St Mitchell ACT | 02 6242 9996

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Both hot releases this month have a distinct Australian flavour. fRew’s latest record has received a huge re-work by man of the moment Tommy Trash. While closer to home Canberra superstars Karton have had their stellar release tweaked into a deep techno anthem by Tiger Stripes. Enjoy! TIM GALVIN tim.galvin@live.com.au


Where Did We Go Wrong? happened as a result of me trying to keep a panic attack at bay

THE DUKE OF JUKE ALLAN SKO In 2011 North Carolina born and Berlin-based Travis Stewart released Room(s) under his MACHINEDRUM moniker – it was a modern electronic masterpiece boasting intricate drum patterns and meticulous vocal manipulation that was album of the year for both myself and Tha Realness columnist Roshambo.

– you can really tell their influence by listening to the newer shit coming out – DJ Rashad, Manny, Spin, plus a lot of ‘90s hardcore and jungle.” With such a broad palette and thirst for musical exploration, what can we expect from future projects? Some hardcore accordion maybe? “I have no plans like that,” he laughs. “I want a permanent space so I can get a baby grand piano. I really miss having a piano. I grew up with one in my parents’ house and it’s one of the most powerful tools for learning how to write a song. Spending a few days at their place over Christmas I ended up writing a song using the piano and it’s one of my favourite things I’ve ever written.” Us lucky Canberrans can catch Machinedrum and the mighty Jacques Greene this Easter Friday. As well as some tasty tunage, can we expect some juke dancing? “I can do my lame whiteboy interpretation of it,” he laughs. Machinedrum and Jacques Greene will play a massive bass music double header at Trinity Bar on Easter Good Friday April 6, along with interstate guests Onetalk, Rachel Haircut (formerly Paqman), Elliot and Able8, plus local artists Ced Nada and 2fuddha. Tix are $25 + bf from Moshtix.

With the underground Chicago movement infiltrating bass music and juke going global it’s a record of its time that exudes surprising emotion. “Music for me is therapy; without it I think I would succumb to the manic depression that runs in my family,” Stewart reveals. “A melancholic song [of mine] may be a result of some issues I’ve been dealing with getting out. [Album closer] Where Did We Go Wrong? happened as a result of me trying to keep a panic attack at bay. I had a lot of stressful things going on at the time and I felt, ‘Alright, I need to make music right now before I fucking explode’. Before long you forget what you’re even freaking out about.” Stewart’s music rich background – he is proficient in acoustic, classical and electronic instruments – gives his genre skipping sound a joyous unpredictability. Moving from experimental hip-hop to embracing the broad spectrum of bass music over the years has been a truly organic process. “The BPM normally dictates the feel, but I might start with footwork and it turns into a jungle tune, so I never really know where it’s gonna go,” Stewart says. “I’ve been experimenting with techno and more Berlin-like sounds but I can start three new tunes in a day and they’ll be dynamically different. I’ve even started playing and incorporating my guitar more often. Berlin influences me in a productive way; people listen to all different kinds of music and I have a circle of friends constantly playing me new stuff and inspiring me. I’ve been listening to a lot of The Ghetto Technicians from Chicago

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Rod has been quoted as saying that his photographs, as a body of work, mirror a “genesis of a particular genre of portraiture which dates from the very beginning of photography itself… That self conscious stare into the camera [common] in early 19th century photography, was no doubt intensified by the very slow exposure times required back then.” To Rod the exposure time and pose prompts us, and in this case perhaps Jack, to question ideas of mortality. If you were to look back on this particular image in 100 years the gumption, cheek and liveliness in Jack (our living subject) would be charged with something totally different; the photograph would then function as a momento mori (a reminder of mortality). In art, and especially photography of the 1970s, a genre, or field of interest sometimes known as the ‘death awareness movement’ began. It was explored in a 2007 exhibition called Reveries held at The National Portrait Gallery, in which Rod participated.

STEADY GAZE Chloe Mandryk The 2012 NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAIT PRIZE was awarded to Rod McNicol for his enigmatic image of Indigenous elder and actor Jack Charles. The winning work is set against a textured denim-blue backdrop. Jack stands in a pressed and polished outfit but delivers a piercing, streetwise gaze with a wry smile. There are no props, staged action or laboured symbols. As a consequence the composition might seem simple or accidental but it carries great significance for the artist. Photographer Rod McNicol favours images of artists, vagabonds and even himself where his subject stares out. This stare indicates that he (or she) is conscious of the fact that a photo is being taken, that an audience will see it and that they hold the key to present themselves however they’d like to be seen – almost like a mug shot or commissioned portrait. Jack’s steady gaze is embellished with his wonderful head of hair, a luminescent white ‘fro. The crisp white vest Jack wears is like a spotlight in the centre of the canvas. The proliferation of white leads us to think of cleanliness, spiritualism and as NPG Director Louise Doyle noted, a sense of optimism. Perhaps these elements were emphasised through a long exposure, which is a technique Rod has used in the past as it pays respect to ‘time’ as a character in the scene. Rod has said that “a slow exposure time dictates stillness, and for me stillness is a blessing. Although stillness virtually eradicates spontaneity, it does heighten engagement.”

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Jack was part of the Stolen Generation and met Rod in the 1970s at The Pram Factory, Melbourne, when Jack was establishing Nindethana, an Indigenous theatre group. However Jack has taken on other roles in life – notably his drug addiction and crimes that supported the habit. He has weathered the rise from “infamy to fame” and is the first to talk about his “colourful life”. A former series of photographs by Rod focused on the duality and change inevitable in life. Titled A portrait revisited series 1986–2006 two images of a single sitter were hung together, one photograph was taken in the 1980s and another 20 years later. Jack was one of the subjects and this work was acquired by The NGV. The 46 works in this year’s National Photographic Portrait Prize strike an interesting balance between race, gender, age, personal narrative and historical tides. What stands out are the majestic, sunken and crinkled images of older men whose life lessons, treasured tall stories and tangible links to arts and culture can be appreciated at face value. See; Edmond Capon AM OBE by Gary Grealy, John Bell by Daniel Boud, Richard Neville by Graham McCarter, Dr Hassan Rahimby by Andrew Campbell, Tom Keneally by James Brickwood, Jeffrey Smart by David Tacon, and Trevor Murphy by Alex Frayne. And we continue down a nostalgic road with works of the supreme matriarchs of Oz, such as Margaret Olley by John McRae, Tami Jakobson by Peter West, Sasha Trajik-Mole by David Kelly, Narayani Palmer by Dale Neill, Alamelu Ganesan by Sandra Ramacher, and Patricia Harry by Mark Tedeschi. As for the prize-taking work, because Rod has known Jack in the best and worst of times, the image is all the more engaging and honest. About Jack, Rod has said to the press “‘He’s never hidden the fact that he’s had a very troubled life… Jack has blossomed. This portrait, to my mind, is a quiet celebration of that late blossoming. That strong engagement with the viewer is the nature of the way I work.” Rod McNicol is a Melbourne-based artist and his works are in the collections of The Art Gallery of New South Wales, National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria, National Library, Canberra and Bibliotheque Nationale, France among others. The 46 finalists of The National Photographic Portrait Prize can be viewed from Tuesday March 20 to Sunday May 20 at The National Portrait Gallery.


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SUITABLY AMUSING ZOE PLEASANTS JAY SULLIVAN has packed a lot into his 33 years; he’s grappled with a few of life’s big issues including religion, marriage, fatherhood and divorce. And he’s had at least three career changes, the latest of which, in September last year, saw him give up the security of the public service to become a full-time comedian. To celebrate, last week on his birthday Jay launched his debut comedy CD Whatever Suits. What better training ground for comedy than life’s big issues? Whatever Suits was recorded over two nights at The Civic Pub in April last year and it’s “the best bits of my first five years,” Jay tells me, “with no laughter track added!” It’s called Whatever Suits for two reasons. First, Jay usually performs in a suit, which stemmed from a time management issue back when he juggled comedy with a day job. “I was often heading out the door straight to a gig,” laughs Jay. Secondly, to date, Jay’s comedy career has been built on whatever people want him to do, “so it’s like whatever suits you,” explains Jay, “but as I develop as a performer, my next album will be whatever suits me!” Jay’s comedy career started in 2006 at an open mic night in Mawson. He competed in Raw Comedy later that year and gave what’s been described as a raw, angry performance; the emotion of which had something to do with being recently cheated on and dumped. But a spark was ignited that night and on the strength of that performance Jay was asked to do other gigs. Also about this time, he started cultivating the upstairs room at The Civic Pub as a comedy club which has since become Canberra’s most popular comedy venue. Success breeds success and other venues opened up, but back in the day, before these venues, performing comedy “felt a bit like you were showing up and crashing people’s after work drinks with a mic,” recalls Jay. In 2008 Jay reached the finals of Raw Comedy and won the Green Faces competition at Canberra’s Irish Club. He spent his winnings from this on a two month trip to New York to develop new material and try his hand at the New York comedy scene. And next week, Jay is off to Melbourne to put on his first solo show at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival. Called I’m a Drunk Monk, “the show is about my journey to enlightenment,” explains Jay. “It’s about accepting yourself. Why beat yourself up about your failings?” Funny, I heard the same message in my pre-natal yoga class the night before. And while Jay tells me that “comedy comes back to the laugh; making people laugh is all that matters,” isn’t it good to know you get the same wisdom from having a beer and listening to comedy as you can from a spiritually enlightening yoga practice? Whatever Suits is available on iTunes or at Jay’s shows, or just accost him in the street because he’s always got some with him.

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WHERE’S OUR NATIONAL FILM PRIDE? MELISSA WELLHAM Australian film has a pretty bad reputation within, well, Australia. There seems to be some sort of misconception among audiences that all Australian films are depressing kitchen-sink dramas set in rural Australia. Courtney Dawson – a former Canberran, now Sydneysider, and up and coming filmmaker – noticed that none of her friends cared about Australian film, and decided to do something about it. Her solution? To begin work on a documentary, ADVANCE AUSTRALIAN FILM, which aims to explore the relationship between Australian audiences and Australian film and find out why it has been 20 years since an Australian film has reached number one at our box office. Courtney says about the project, “It ultimately hopes to find ways to help reinvigorate the passion for our national cinema. While we have been producing many critically acclaimed films over the years, interest in Australian films has been declining for too long. It’s time to make a change.” The lack of interest Australian audiences have for local cinema is actually quite intriguing – especially considering how patriotic Australians can be about other aspects of our culture. When I ask Courtney why she thinks this is, she says she plans to find out – straight from the audience’s mouth. “That’s what I want to find out! While I will be interviewing filmmakers, actors and industry professionals, I also want the public to get involved and share their own thoughts and views on the subject. What type of films do you actually want to see? What do you think is wrong with the way our films are made? There is a forum on the website and social media platforms for readers to utilise.” While Courtney doesn’t have a finish date for the project in mind yet – although she would like to complete the film within a year – she has raised enough funds for the next round of interviews. Rather than applying for government grants to gain assistance in making the documentary, Courtney turned to “crowdfunding,” a relatively new platform that allows artists, organisations and others to run an online donation scheme. But why should people donate to the project – let alone genuinely care about the Australian film industry? Because we’ve made some pretty great films over the years. “We have experienced high peaks of success in the ‘70s with films such as Mad Max, the ‘80s with Crocodile Dundee and the ‘90s with comedies such as Muriel’s Wedding, Priscilla and The Castle.” But of these, Courtney considers the best to be Mad Max. “I think Mad Max is a fantastic film. It is really demonstrative of the type of big-scale genre films that Australia could be producing. We need to start making more films like that!” To donate to the cause, make sure to check out the documentary’s website at www.advanceausfilm.com/donate. You can also check out the doco’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/advanceaustralianfilm .


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YOU ARE HERE Petite Public Art Canberra Museum and Gallery, and in and around the CBD Thursday-Sunday March 8-18 Canberra’s CBD has been unknowingly hijacked. The culprits are miniature art installations. You Are Here have invited a range of artists to create and distribute small artworks around the city centre. This comes as a reaction to the millions spent on bigger public artworks which often seem out of place, and are laughed at by visitors to our capital (the giant sculpture of Optimus Prime’s pubic hair, along the GDE, springs to mind). The shame Canberrans have felt for so long over these embarrassing artworks is over! Petite Public Art flies against the traditional, and takes its viewers to a new level of appreciation and respect. Armed with only a map, the art must be hunted down. But be warned, the map acts only as a rough guide, and while the hints from the artists are vitally helpful, you may draw a few odd looks from those not in the know. Yolande Norris, one of the producers of You Are Here, described searching for the artworks as “looking like you’ve lost your marbles… looking under park benches”. This I soon found to be true, as I wandered down alleys, rummaged in pot plants, and peered into tree tops. But I’ve not had as much fun since I was a child on an Easter egg hunt. The thrill of suddenly spotting a tiny creation is like seeing a hidden chocolate egg! You’ve won! But with the triumph of finding a piece, comes the disappointment of realising what you thought was an artwork, is actually just a half-eaten finger bun. But it is seeing that finger bun, staring at the beer bottle, and judging the artistry of a tap, which is truly the art in this whole endeavour. This project enables us to look, and see Canberra like we’re seeing it for the first time. But when a finger bun can be mistaken for art, what is the expected quality of the art? The answer is modest, but revolutionary in its simplicity. The beauty of the art comes from appreciating the materials used, the creative position of each piece, and in the joy it takes to find them. Amelia Drew

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YOU ARE HERE After Work Roasters: Tokyo Tween Knife Brawl Lonsdale Street Roasters Tuesday March 13 David Finnigan climbed up on to the wobbly stools, cleared his throat, and announced to the tightly packed crowd squeezed into Lonsdale Roasters: “This is not some detached, ironic commentary – this is about how we feel when we watch it.” “We” was himself, Jess Bellamy, and fellow festival producer Adam Hadley; “it” was all things Disney. As the strains of a dubstepped mash-up of classic Disney songs faded, Finnigan began a reading of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Sunflower Sutra – and I was sceptical that the night wasn’t going somewhere terribly hipster. Bellamy read Edward Dyson’s Bashful Gleeson, and Hadley read an assortment of Grimm and selfpennedw fairy tales. In a matter of minutes the culture switched from high to low as the speakers launched into their monologues: retellings of some of Disney’s more ill-advised tween offerings. Finnigan gave a rapid fire account of his experience watching Selena Gomez vehicle Monte Carlo while trapped on an international flight. He pondered how “freedom” is inevitably represented by a ride on the back of some young hunk’s scooter, and extolled the virtues of grand musical finales. He declared: “Disney doesn’t kiss you – or if it does kiss you, it doesn’t kiss with tongue, and if it does kiss with tongue, then it doesn’t kiss with finesse”. He parted with Jonas Brother-bestowed wisdom (the Camp Rock gem “Everybody grab a mic and a hat and follow me”), breakdanced, and bowed out. The crowd was in absolute hysterics. Jess Bellamy was drier – though equally foul-mouthed – as she summarised Lindsay Lohan’s Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen. A self-described LiLo anthropologist, Bellamy quickly, calmly, and with deadpan delivery, tore the film to shreds. She saw the film as a parable: Lindsay, darling, this is what not to do. Lohan’s character in the film is something of a teetotaller, persuading the rock star male lead to give up his wild partying ways. Anyone with even a passing knowledge of Lindsay’s scandalous nightlife will see the irony in this. Bellamy’s ultimate conclusion: a list of films, writers, actors, and uses of your time better than watching Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen.

ALL PHOTOS: ADAM THOMAS

And then Hadley took to the stage to dissect Mean Girls 2, the sequel most didn’t know existed beforehand. If you’re perplexed about why he’d bother talking about this waste of celluloid, by the end it didn’t matter – listening to Hadley’s rant was infinitely more entertaining than watching the film could ever hope to be. This absurd recap of the equally absurd regurgitation of the first Mean Girls was a marvel to witness; Hadley’s brow dripped with sweat as he screamed what everyone who had ever seen Mean Girls 2 had all thought: “Where is Lindsay? Where is anybody? WHO THE FUCK ARE THESE PEOPLE!?” At the end of each speech the crowd screamed like the trio were rock stars. Tokyo Tween Knife Brawl was exactly what was promised: a visceral, emotional response to some of the most uninspiring Disney films in existence. lauren strickland

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YOU ARE HERE Now Hear This The National Film and Sound Archive courtyard Tuesday March 13 Now Hear This was an evening of enlightening, hilarious, but at times slightly waffly, real life stories. Eight performers were tasked with telling a story about ‘The First Time…’ doing, seeing or achieving anything, in less than ten minutes. The arriving audiences were serenaded by Zach Raffan’s marvellous musical talents, and as the sun set, the spectators settled down in the intimate courtyard of The National Film and Sound Archive. The weather was in favour of the outdoor event, and stayed pleasantly rain-free. Unfortunately the mosquitos seemed to enjoy the change in weather as much as the crowd. But the mosquitos were soon swept aside when Joel Barcham began to recall childhood memories of catching and ‘pacifying’ a fish with his father, a traumatic event he described as arising from a “biological desire to impress my dad”. Stephan Walker sent spines tingling at the Indian funeral of Indira Gandhi. Ben O’Reilly spun a tale about suffering a botched hair extension job, after getting desperate living with “Marge Simpson” hair. Jane Vincent told of the pride in winning a bronze medallion. And an inspirational walk along the Kokoda Trail was on the menu thanks to Nick Peddle. The cringeworthy account of Rod Saciler holding up cricket at the MCG with an announcement blunder made the audience laugh. An honourable mention must go out to Kylie Walker and Jeff Thompson. Walker who tugged at our heart strings as she shared her pain and joys in overcoming cancer, and Thomas by retelling the first time he experimented with “nightly emissions”, and almost being caught by his evangelical family, in a can’t help but pee your pants funny story. Between these tales of delight, Melanie Tait, our host from the ABC and whose brainchild Now Hear This is, explained to us the rigorous process the speakers undertook in order to take to the stage. The procedure involved scrupulously auditioning and workshopping their tales, and most notably memorising their scripts. Indeed the memorised stories enabled the tellers to become more animated in their movements, but disappointingly only a few of the performers took the opportunity. Instead the rehearsed lines led to some of the acts feeling slightly stale at times. Another fault of the overall show was the time limit. Where at times I felt a conclusion had been reached, many of the storytellers continued to press on, presumably to fill in the allotted ten minutes. Perhaps a more succinct time limit would be more entertaining, and lead to crisper climaxes? Pardon the pun! Amelia Drew

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YOU ARE HERE We Gotta Get Out Of This Place Smiths Alternative Bookshop Thursday March 15 I headed over to Smiths Alternative Bookshop for You Are Here and Scissor Paper Pen’s debate, We Gotta Get Out Of This Place, which posed the question: as an artist in Canberra, do you stay or do you go? My personal question up for debate was: aren’t debates terribly boring? Will anyone attend? I was sorely mistaken. I arrived to find a large and enthusiastic crowd packed into Smiths Alternative Bookshop to hear the debate, which ended up being a combination of debate and entertainment: debatertainment. With this description in mind the first speaker of the affirmative team, Sam Townsend, aka drag queen Venus Mantrap, began with fervour. A product of Canberra, Townsend voiced harsh words for his hometown, such as the opinion that “Canberra and its people weren’t willing to nurture its soul”. BMA editor Julia Winterflood opened the negative team’s debate with finesse; humorously tearing shreds off the fortunately absent Julia Johnson, the missing third speaker for the affirmative team and famed songstress. She described Canberra’s community by saying “We’re young, but we’re keen!”, which drew cheers and whoops from the crowd. Following Winterflood was affirmative team’s Andrew Galan, local yeller and published poet. I mostly had no idea what he was saying (or spraying; at one point an umbrella was erected in the front row by a wet patron), and the only part I fully understood was a two second impression of Uma Thurman’s dance from Pulp Fiction. However, I saw others in hysterics, hanging onto bookshelves for support, which made it all worthwhile. Next, journalist Eleri Harris began illustrating (quite literally) her arguments for the negative team. Armed with her cartoonist talents, marker, and easel, Harris highlighted the benefits of Canberra’s lack of hipsters, its abundance of time, and the fact that “I [Harris] am standing here with a shitty biro, and saying shit but people are loving it!” The final speaker for the affirmative, and last minute ring-in, was Rosie Stevens, writer, poetry advocate, and operator of the absent Julia Johnson’s cardboard cut-out face. In a speech that was indeed more poetry than vicious debating, she mused that it was necessary to leave the ACT to ensure a roof over one’s head, and that “we need to leave to anticipate our return”. The debate closed with Fun Machine’s Chris Endrey who brought the debate to its pinnacle by comparing *NSYNC to The Beatles. He described the capital as a “beautiful melting pot of people coming and going” and that it’s nice not “being shot at”. With vigorous applause, the wildly entertaining debate came to a conclusion and it was no surprise that Canberra herself was the winner. The entire event echoed the success of the You Are Here festival; the city has been enlivened by local writers, musicians, and performers, and faith in Canberra has been wholeheartedly restored. Amelia Drew

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YOU ARE HERE The Landlords: Going to Hell in This Handy Basket The Phoenix, Thursday March 15 You might recognise Professor Richard Pritchard and Doctor Arthur Downwards of The Landlords from their promotional vid dropped right before the You Are Here festival. It featured the two dramatist/comedian/rappers, known in the real world as Melburnians Jordan Prosser and Sam Burns-Warr, prancing in front of Melbourne alleyways and spitting rhymes about Canberra’s better features. Sure, they were trapped in the labyrinth of stale Canberra references – swans, public servants, blandness as a lifestyle choice – but they manage to mine some unexpected gold in there as well: “This city needs a fringe scene, desperately, madly / the feds are busy spending all their cash on Frankie Valli”. Their show, Going to Hell in This Handy Basket, trod much the same knife-edge. They’d picked one of the stalest topics in the world – religion – and sat comfortably on the shoulders of previous comedic giants for most of the show. They even did a pretty good faux-British Footlights-style ‘authority figures who know nothing really’ thing, including accents. The crowd were there with them throughout the whole set, and it was wonderful to see comedy making some ground in The Phoenix, a venue so music-focussed that there are afterimages of guitars burned into the plate-glass windows. Still, the material was old news – how crazy it is the Catholics worship graven idols in the form of the saints and follow the Pope, who can seem a bit inherently creepy; how the Mormons were founded by a serial con-artist; how Jewish people talk strangely and dance to klezmer music. This angle got a lot of its laughs from the enduring political correctness of the Canberran – and in a larger context, Australian – audience. Ultimately, and this should be a no-brainer in comedy, it was when they deviated from the script that they really won over the Phoenix crowd. Some unexpectedly spot on slides provided belly laugh punchlines, and seemingly impromptu rap-stylings showed off quick wits that are a real asset. They sparred off of the crowd, and their timing was best when it was set up to catch everyone off guard. Maybe I shouldn’t have turned up to a pub comedy gig sober, but in the end it wasn’t quite enough. The Landlords got a good rolling laugh out of the crowd, but I wished they had a bit more to work with than playing off of religious stereotypes for an hour. Making a final judgement should really be left up to God or Gods or materialism or someone, so I’ll leave it at: go see The Landlords. They’re good, and they’re going to get better. JAMES FAHY

ALL PHOTOS: ADAM THOMAS

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IN REVIEW YOU ARE HERE Poetry Is The Real Winner The Phoenix Sunday March 18

In the ordinary world, poetry isn’t the real winner. My poetry lecturer frequently laments the fact that Tim Winton outsells him 500 to one, and most aspiring poets would find it difficult to convince their neighbours to switch off the television and listen to a spoken word performance instead. Most aspiring poets’ neighbours don’t know what they’re missing. The final event of Canberra’s You Are Here festival brought together the capital’s finest spoken word poets for an afternoon to prove that yes, poetry can be the real winner. Poetry slams aren’t a more cultured version of the rap battles in movies like 8 Mile, as some (me) may have been anticipating. They’re poetry readings, but with more attitude than the ones you encountered in high school. At Poetry Is The Real Winner (the brainchild of slam poetry family patriarchs Andrew Galan from BAD! SLAM! NO! BISCUIT! and Julian Fleetwood from Traverse Poetry) the audience was treated to poems about the city of Cocksville, sex with Lego and talking breakfasts. Raphael was the star of the afternoon. His poems had depth that defied his youthful appearance, including a haunting but brilliant poem about the night that Canberra burnt down and “we didn’t notice because we were in The Phoenix reading poetry”. There is nothing like hearing about the silver goon bag in Garema Place shaking off its blanket of homeless people and soaring into the sky while those odd metal sheep statues outside the Canberra Centre Subway come to life. The audience loved Malcolm’s piece about poets and authors in a mock horse race, read in horse racing commentary style. He also performed a very sweet, longing poem about the class divide in Canberra and sneaking glances at upper class women on Murray’s buses. The lack of female performers was a little disappointing. Surely there are more lady performance poets in the nation’s capital than the sole female poet, Ali McGregor? Her poems, particularly her piece on why solace trumps hope, were strong and heartfelt, but it would have been lovely to see some more girls on stage too. It was heartening to see that poetry can exist (and thrive, judging by the packed Phoenix bar) outside of classrooms and musty textbooks. It’s events like these that will help your bogan neighbours to come around to the idea that poetry can be the real winner, as long as they’re back in their lounge room before Home and Away kicks off.

ARTISTPROFILE:

Bettina Hill

What do you do? I build artworks by reworking household and garden objects such as furniture, crockery and grass, and construction materials such as paper, cardboard and wood. Each artwork is based on a small yet extraordinary moment I have found in everyday experiences, everyday objects and everyday materials. When did you get into it? Art? I never got out of it. I’ve followed art as a kid, through school and uni, to now. Who or what influences you as an artist? My life, the objects in it and the way I interact with them. I like to deconstruct various elements in my life to create artworks. What’s your biggest achievement/proudest moment so far? I felt proudest of my art practice when my peers and friends found a genuine connection with my latest artworks All Folded Up (Fireplace), Kitchen Bench and The Shape of Paper: Arcs and Lines. These artworks were integral developments in my practice, and the wonderful responses were my most satisfying moments. What are your plans for the future? After finishing my artist residency with Canberra Contemporary Art Space, I plan to do another in 2013 at the Fremantle Arts Centre in Western Australia. My residency experience, working in a studio at an Art Centre, was wonderful. I met other artists and felt part of a community rather than a lonely artist in my shed. In the next five years anything can happen; I want to go large scale, install art works throughout houses and then manipulate the buildings themselves. What makes you laugh? Art jargon. It’s hilarious that so much can be written without saying a thing. Even funnier, when I find myself writing it. What pisses you off? Art jargon. It depends what mood I’m in. What’s your opinion of the local scene? There are some real gems when it comes to Canberra’s art scene. As I delve further into it I am finding all the energetic people who bring thoughtful contemporary art into our galleries and streets, through events like You Are Here and our many accessible galleries. What are your upcoming performances/exhibitions? Art At Home opening at 6pm on Thursday March 29 at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, Manuka. My debut solo exhibition will feature sculptures inspired by my home life. The artworks are built from furniture, kitchen items and food packaging. Each incorporating the shape of boxes and containers, in a playful modification of objects found within our own homes. Contact info: bettinahill.com.au, bettina@bettinahill.com.au

AMY BIRCHALL

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bit PARTS WHO: Travis Urquhart and Canberra ex-pats Callum Padgham and Sam PK Smith WHAT: Frienddad WHEN: Thurs April 5 WHERE: Dendy Cinemas “When your mother needs a lover and you wake up to discover that your friend is now your father... it’s Frienddad” Frienddad is an Australian made independent sitcom parody, which tells the story of Travis Little (played by co-creator Tavis Urquhart) who wakes up one morning to find that his best friend Cameron Biggs (played by co-creator and Canberra ex-pat Callum Padgham) has not only slept with his mum, but has now taken it upon himself to be the best dad that he can be. Featuring a musical score by Canberra ex-pat and Berklee graduate Sam PK Smith, Frienddad premieres in our nation’s capital at Dendy Cinemas on Thursday April 5. There’ll also be live sketch comedy from Freshly Ground Theatre’s Sam Floyd and Sal Bensley. Tickets are $17/$14.50. Bookings on 02 6221 8900 and through the box office. 8pm.

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WHO: Naked Boys Singing! WHAT: Exactly that WHEN: Sat-Sun April 13-14 WHERE: Canberra Theatre Centre The Canberra season of the Off Broadway hit Naked Boys Singing!, kicks off at the Canberra Theatre Centre for two nights only on SatSun April 13-14. This all Australian production of Naked Boys Singing! will include eight all singing, all dancing, all gorgeous, all Australian, and unashamedly, all naked boys. This hilarious musical revue kicks down the taboo of the male body; you’ll blush at first, but then be thoroughly entertained with a collection of toe-tappin’ songs including Gratuitous Nudity, Fight the Urge about an errant erection and the laughable lyrics about how-to tenderise- your-meat in Jack’s Song. Bookings through the venue. WHO: Talented young emerging artists WHAT: The ins and outs of Space WHEN: Opening Wed March 29, 6pm. Running until April 15 WHERE: M16 Gallery The ins and outs of Space exhibits talented young emerging artists working in painting, drawing and 3D glass, which explores the impact space, both interior and exterior, has on the individual. Linzie Ellis employs intuitive and contemplative approaches to her ink, oil and pastel works. Jacklyn Peters uses line, tone and shape to describe surfaces and the patterns she sees in peoples’ movements through public spaces, as they seek out repetition, connections and familiarity. The layered patterns on Erin Conron’s blown glass vessels evoke a lifetime of experiences and memories of space that have built up to shape the identity of an individual. WHO: Local and interstate artists WHAT: Material World WHEN: Wed March 28 – Sun April 8 WHERE: ANCA Gallery, Dickson

WHO: Wouter Van de Voorde WHAT: 15 WHEN: Fri March 30 – Sun April 29 WHERE: The Photography Room The Photography Room continues to bring Canberra a remarkable exhibition program of contemporary photography and this exhibition continues to up the stakes. In his most recent body of work, 15, photographer Wouter Van de Voorde has created a series of photographs that are incredibly captivating and mysterious. Wouter has recently moved from Belgium to Australia and sees the landscape – which is so familiar to locals of the area – with a fresh and investigative eye. Wouter portrays fragments of reality that carry the mood of a place in this brooding body of work. www. thephotographyroom.com.au .

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ANCA Gallery will be transformed once again with ephemeral artworks by local and interstate artists. Curated by Martine Peters and Narelle Phillips, the exhibition has challenged artists to interact with the gallery space and to produce works which are environmentally conscious, having been made with reclaimed, repurposed and recycled materials. The resulting installations provoke audiences to consider the new environment created within the gallery space, as well as promoting an awareness of sustainability within art practices and the broader community. Exhibiting artists include Ampersand Duck (ACT), Tracey Deep (NSW), Mandy Gunn (VIC), Ruth Hingston(ACT), Ro Murray (NSW), Flossie Peitsch (NSW), Tony Steel (ACT) and Fiona Veikkanen (ACT). WHO: Canberra Environment Centre WHAT: Canberra Harvest Festival WHEN: Sat March 31 WHERE: Canberra Environment Centre, near the National Museum of Australia On Saturday March 31 from noon to 5pm the Canberra Environment Centre will be hosting the fourth annual Canberra Harvest Festival to promote and celebrate local food and its many benefits. The Festival will take place in front of the Canberra Environment Centre (just before the National Museum), and will host a variety of eco stalls, community displays, free workshops, organic and local food, all to the sweet sounds of local musicians. So take your pick of the harvest of delights as you go forth and support our local and sustainable food producers, while cutting back on your food miles. For more information visit www.ecoaction.com.au .


BUSH MINSTREL SINEAD O’CONNELL Having just woken up at 7am (his time), over a broken phone connection, sitting in an airport bound for Kalgoorlie, JOHN BUTLER spoke of how one of his favourite gigs was just the other day, jamming with friends on a small stage to a very intimate atmosphere. He offered that quiet sensitivity creates, even between strangers, a sense of friendly familiarity. It’s when you speak to artists like these that you know there is something all together outstanding about them. The trio are known famously as one of Australia’s best roots and jam bands, Butler himself known all too well in the domestic arena with his long fingernails violently strumming out some of the most intricate manoeuvres man may perform. The image accompanies that of him on stage, on a We always make stool perhaps, eyes closed at it work so that intervals, falling in love with the everyone gets peace of each moment residing best of both there, doing what he loves best.

the worlds

Despite clearly being exhausted, he enthusiastically chatted with me about his career in the music industry and described his niche for making music. “For me personally, my process is very mysterious. I don’t really understand it. Mainly the music comes first, and then the melody and rhythm come afterwards” So too is his lyrical journey off the beaten track some. “Lyrically… well that ride is really interesting. I may write a song three or four times before it feels like it’s natural. Sometimes I just mumble or talk gibberish as I’m playing. Then it evolves and I start to know what it is I’m speaking about.” With a slight American accent he spoke passionately of his friends and of his somewhat demanding, but worthwhile career, never once wavering in a quite obviously sound positive nature. In spare time he can’t get enough of just hanging out with mates in the shed at his home. “We make things. Like knives and crafts!” He laughed. So too does he value with high esteem being with his family at the beach or at home. “Although music is my life, we always make it work so that everyone gets the best of both worlds.” Post touring he’s heading off around Northern and North Western Australia. Through the Kimberly and somewhere in nowhere land he hopes to find some solace for the latter part of 2012. Only starting to walk this particular path at the age of 21, Butler admitted that he felt like a late bloomer in this vast and travelled land of music. “I was in a band in ‘94 or ‘95, we were called Vitamin and we’d just hang out and experiment with sound and instruments. That’s when I knew I wanted to make music my deal.” Now more than a decade later he is certainly a seasoned traveller, having succeeded for years in new territory and surpassing many a voortrekker before him. John Butler, playing solo and intimate, with support from Mama Kin, will play The Canberra Theatre Centre on Friday April 13. Tickets cost $50.50 and are available from the venue’s website.

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BACK FROM THE DEAD

LIKE WILDFIRE

Sinead O’Connell

Sinead O’Connell

1989 was an eventful year. One particularly important event however stands out concerning the general psyche and rehabilitation of post-Cold War Europe. I think we all know what I’m referring to. The formation of the band ‘The Cranberry Saw Us’ – that is… THE CRANBERRIES. “It was a wacky guy that lived around the corner from us that coined ‘The Cranberry Saw Us’. We don’t know how he came up with it, but eventually everyone just started calling us The Cranberries!”

Melburnians Tom Iansek and Jo Syme of BIG SCARY are the dynamic duo everyone’s been talking about of late. Upfront the band likes everyone to know they are not, in fact, big and scary. Regardless however, I think it best for everyone to know that in a similar vein, they are overwhelmingly talented (big) and spreading like wildfire both at home and abroad (scary). They’ve toured with The Vasco Era and Florence and the Machine – to name a couple – and are now yet again on to even bigger things. “Vasco was the time of our lives, it was our first proper national tour. Three years later we still all hang out, they are three of the Being a support funniest, most genuine friends.” Of supporting, Jo also admitted band is the best – you just “being a support band is the best get to chill and – you don’t have to worry about have fun and see anything. You just get to chill and have fun and see great shows!” great shows!

They formed as a few keen kids – Noel Hogan (guitar), Mike Hogan (bass) and Fergal Lawler (drums and percussion) plus lone vocalist, guitarist and pianist Dolores O’Riordan – from the West of Why don’t we With a combination do it? We aren’t Ireland. of melodic jangle from postgetting any Smiths guitar pop, trance younger! worthy textures and Celtic tones, it is no wonder the successes of their ‘93 debut album Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? and the ‘94 follow up No Need To Argue sold millions. By ‘96 with the addition of distorted guitars to a sonic palette they began socially critiquing in lyricism. Despite causing some controversy, they released another successful album in ’99 – Bury The Hatchet. The reunion began at Dolores’ son’s confirmation in 2009. They were all together in the same room again after almost six years, when, after a few pints, they started to entertain the idea of ceasing their mutually agreed hiatus. Finally it was Mike who made it a priority: “Why don’t we do it? We aren’t getting any younger!” Noel then gave me some background on their old friend and former producer, Stephen Street. He told them upfront that he wanted “to capture the way we used to be”, to “get back to what we were doing in the early days”. Noel commented, “Dolores and I are the primary songwriters, and I had been working on my own, writing with other people getting ideas for songs that I thought would work with her voice.” He assures that despite having “drifted from the roots as time went on” himself and Dolores had been collaborating for a while prior to the reunion so by the time the tour started they had already written 17 new songs, all derived from their original rock persuasion. On that note we said farewell. But is it enough, to merely say hello and goodbye to a band that has played such a huge role in your heritage and your musical orientation? Maybe it’s because St Patrick’s Day just passed or because Mary Black’s Song For Ireland is playing on my iTunes, but I guess what I’m trying to say is, The Cranberries are an outstanding band sporting more than just a fleeting reunion tour. They are timeless, transcending and most of all fecking talented. The Cranberries’ new album Roses came out on Friday February 24 and is available from all good record stores.

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The duo started back in school, having stumbled upon one another as likeminded musicians. Soon enough Tom rocked up on Jo’s doorstep one day with a guitar in hand, eager-eyed and ready for their exceptionally bright future. From there their music developed groove and melodic undercurrents, familiar ‘90s mod tones, “fuzzed out” garage rock and pastoral instrumentals – all permeated with an effortless sensitivity granting them sound reception. Although critiqued as ‘minimalist pop music’ it maintains that element of vital dexterity that proves less can almost always be more. Jo warned that their music is not necessarily consistent, they experiment a lot, and they hardly ever sport the same sound twice. This theory is all too evident for example in the sounds of Summer with its unparalleled piano intro. If you stumble across any of their bios you’ll repeatedly find the comment “they have an endless fascination with the natural world”. So, naturally, I wondered where that ethos stemmed from. Some reviews alluded to their September 2009 album which was born out of the horrific weather that year. Though once the question was pitched, Jo waited a second and replied timidly, “We recycle?” I reassured her I wasn’t out to find their flaws and we laughed. She relaxed and thought about it a little longer. Once decided on the clarity of the question I could hear her get comfortable with the content she was describing. “Like right now, we’re down pretty southeast, there is howling winds and relentless rain, all of which accompanied by an amazing view of this enormous, glassy lake. In that way, the natural world, as a concept, it’s pretty incredible.” Other than the natural world, Big Scary enjoy cooking and eating good food, going to gigs and watching a lot of TV. An ideal life, I say. It’s that kind of quiet simplicity that brings forth substance in a person, which was the impression I got when talking to Jo and certainly the vibe present when listening to their music. Catch Big Scary live at Groovin The Moo at The Meadows, University of Canberra on Sunday May 13. Tickets cost $99.60 + bf and are available through Moshtix.


HITTING IT OUT OF THE BALL PARK Peter Krbavac It’s day two of tour and, calling from his bunk bed at The Great Northern in Byron Bay, BALL PARK MUSIC guitarist Dean Hanson has already settled into life on the road. “We started last night in Coolangatta and then drove down to Byron and got here at 3.30 in the morning,” he blearily reports. “Then we had to get up really early this morning to do the Like a Version for triple j” - which yielded a winning cover of The Flaming Lips’ Do You Realize??. The six members of Ball Park Music first assembled while studying music performance at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane. “In our course they encouraged us to be as crazy as possible,” Dean remembers. “The more outrageous and crazy you were – and sometimes terrible-sounding – the better marks you got just for exploring that.” And considering lore exp ly You slow all the members shared and nd sou your classes, band activities come to grips with occasionally overlapped what sort of band with course requirements.

you want to be

“We definitely used it to our advantage,” Dean says. “Once we’d found likeminded musicians, we did double up with our assessments and things, just because it’s good to have people who can accompany you for your exam pieces.” Towards the end of 2011, the band released their debut Happiness and Surrounding Suburbs. A bubbling LP of infectious guitar pop, Dean explains it charts the band’s musical growth over the two years leading up to its release. “When we started out, we hardly knew each other personally so we couldn’t really get that balance and be on the same page,” Dean says. “Then you slowly explore your sound and come to grips with what sort of band you want to be and what you sound like. The idea for our first album was an album of stuff that we think best represents our journey. The later tracks on the album steer more towards the direction we want to go in the future.” When it comes to influences however, Dean is unable to nail down any key names. “We have a fairly eclectic mix of favourite bands and musicians. [Dan and I] spent all our years as teenagers jamming our own music downstairs and not really paying attention to what other people were doing, so our influences are terrible. I think Sam, Daniel and I all used to share a pretty strong interest in nu-metal bands when we were back in our teens,” he chuckles. Perhaps there’s a hint as to Ball Park Music’s new direction there – with Limp Bizkit just in the country, the genre may well be due a revival. “Maybe,” he chuckles. “We all went to Soundwave and saw them and relived those days. It was good fun.” Ball Park Music play Transit Bar on Saturday March 31 with Nantes and Cub Scouts. Pre-sale tickets are sold out but a small number of door sales will be available on the night.

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THE REALNESS Big ups to Omar Musa. Dude has been consistently putting in work for years. Be it with his poetry, publicly discussing issues of national importance or writing and performing as a hip-hop artist, one could never say that the OBM has ever rested on his laurels or doubt his raw energy and commitment to his craft. His latest release, the self-titled debut album Moneykat – a collaboration with California’s Mighty Joe – is another notch in his belt. Co-signed by Obese distro, the album continues Omar’s quest for no holds barred, full blooded political, personal, social and poetic expression. Joined by Mighty Joe – the perfect counter to Omar’s baritone flow – the two have worked hard to deliver a versatile yet cohesive ‘international’ full length album. Featuring production from Fire & Ice, Ishu, Lotek, Geoff Stanfield and Count, the album is full of diverse flavour and good vibes aplenty. Guest appearances come from Mantra, Senbei and Candice Monique Make sure you grab a copy and support! Karsniogenics have announced the new single from Jake Biz entitled Deuce Deuce in the lead up to his debut album Commercial Hell. To celebrate the release, the label has put together a limited edition 7 inch vinyl package of 300 copies only! Hit up Karsniogenics before they are all gone and keep your eyes peeled for the Jake Biz full length later this year. Perth overlords Clandestien return this March with Weapons Grade, an album much anticipated in the local hip-hop scene. Full of all the dark medieval imagery that the trio have been known for, they are joined by Hunter (RIP), Brad Strut, Funkoars, Vents, Billy Bunks, Briggs, Ciecmate, Tornts, Maggot Mouf, Defyre, FlashOne, K21, Motion, Evolve and Adroit Effusive. Take a breath… it’s going to be a big one. Whereas previous Clandestien albums were helmed exclusively by Mortar on the production tip, this time they’ve also enlisted the sonic weaponry of Suffa, Trials, Tornts and Conseps. The album is out Friday March 30 so get on that. The new full length to come courtesy of the ever-reliable Rinse imprint is from Brackles. He’s been quiet for the last few years so it’s great to see him return, and with a full length album no less. Rinse Presents Brackles is his debut and features all brand new tunes. It’s out Monday May 7. Finally this month is the huge news that, following their stellar work with Treehouse bringing HudMo and Ras G to Canberra, Blahnket are not resting on their laurels and have the mammoth duo of Machinedrum and Jacques Greene lined up for Good Friday (Friday April 6) at Trinity Bar. You’ll recall that Machinedrum’s Room(s) was both mine and Allan Sko’s fave album of 2011 here in BMA and Jacques Greene was responsible for my fave single of the year with Another Girl, so without question I am super hyped for this one. If you are a fan of colourful, emotive, creative and riddim-heavy bass music then this is a must see show. Don’t be a chump and miss out. See you there in the dance! Grab your tickets from Moshtix now! To hear music from all these releases, artists and much much more, tune to The Antidote on 2XX 98.3FM every Tuesday from 9.30pm. Your eardrums will thank you! ROSHAMBO AKA CED NADA roshambizzle@yahoo.com.au

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FEELING BLUE ALLAN SKO I had a healthy list of questions to ask BLUEJUICE’s affable Jake Stone. I got to ask two. The man is at a crossroads in life it seems, and the enigmatic vocalist and bringer of energy was in a mood to talk about it. The Jake we know and love is the one thrashing around on stage or lovingly compromising himself in music videos by competing in a skipping contest (Broken Leg), French kissing someone who looks disturbingly like my own mother (Act Yr Age) and marrying musical cohort Stav in Vegas (Shock). “We generally go to hell for the videos,” Stone says. “It’s fun to see the finished product but mostly they’re long, technically tricky days of trying to get something right. It’s not the hardest work in the world but it’s definitely a bit of an ordeal. [The vids are] less about trying You can’t hit your 30s and not to come up with something whacky think ‘What am than coming up with a good idea that’s I doing with my conceptually not been done before. life?’ With Shock I don’t think we did that. It’s fine, but not really us. Our best have been Broken Leg and the current video for On My Own. The last video I really enjoyed was Chairlift’s Amanaemonesia. “I was watching Channel V last night and there’s a lot of boring-ass R&B videos that look exactly the same,” Stone continues. “I would love to do a rip off. Stav would be perfect for it. There’s a lot of boring stuff out there so I’m glad and proud that at least we’ve managed to do something a little different. In many other areas of our career we haven’t succeeded but in that I feel like we’ve done OK <sings> ‘One out of ten ain’t baaaaaaaaad...’” A Bluejuice R&B vid to come, perhaps. You heard it here first. When talk turned to the theme of Company, Stone’s chirpy demeanour darkened. Where sophomore album Head of the Hawk concerned itself with infidelity, latest album Company deals with the fallout. “I’m a very negative person I guess,” Stone says, perhaps surprising many. “I tend to risk manage everything. I’m not a very good singer and I’m aware of the fact that it could end, the band could end, everything could just end at any time, and then what the fuck do I do? Those thoughts have especially happened since my long term relationship has come to an end, which has forced me to assess everything. “Company is about ongoing relationships and the effect that infidelities have, about moral choices you make in your life and what the real repercussions of those actions are,” Stone says. “Of course it’s sentimentalised and fictionalised – it’s a song after all – but to some degree that’s right. You can’t hit your 30s and not think ‘What am I doing with my life?’ If anyone hasn’t they’re either a big success already or they’re lying.” Despite Stone’s concern, we the people will ensure Bluejuice will be around for the foreseeable future. Make sure you pop along to their set at GTM to cheer the man up. I know I’ll be flinging my knickers stagewards. Bluejuice play at Groovin The Moo which stops off in Canberra on Sunday May 13. Tix are $99.90 + bf from Moshtix.


METALISE Macabre FINALLY played their first Australian tour ahead of signing with Melbourne label High Voltage for their Grim Scary Tales record that was released not too long after their shows in Australia two winters back. Well given that they’re on an Aussie label, it makes sense that they come back again and almost two years to the day from their first Aussie tour, they’re back at The Bald Faced Stag in Sydney on Friday June 29 with the line-up being finalised now. Murder metal good times! Kill For Satan have plenty of battle hardened experience in their ranks with members that go back to the early days of Canberra death metal through guitarist Yuri Ward, an ex-member of Armoured Angel, Psychrist, Lord Kaos and a live member of Myrddraal. Joined by former fellow Psychrist member Kel on drums and vocals and Brad on bass and vocals, they’re finally releasing their follow up to the excellent Thy Kingdom Undone record on Saturday March 31 at The Basement in Belconnen with Rise, Reign of Terror and Aeturnus Dominion. The new album is called The Final Conflict and you should be able to pick up a copy at the show on the night. Infinitum have released their new nine track opus with around 45 minutes of unrelenting brutal technical death metal from exmembers of bands like Psychrist and Dehuman. Produced locally and mostly mixed by guitarist and songwriter Geoff Bailey, the record is an utterly vacuum-tight display of world class technical death metal and well worth the 15 dollars they’re asking for it. The album is entitled The SiXth Extinction and you can order your copy from the online store at www.extinction.bigcartel.com. Why not pick up a copy of their previous full length or EP while you’re at it, both entitled Behold Eradication. Law Of The Tongue are a devastatingly heavy new sludge band featuring members of Pod People, LOG and Boonhorse and brings to mind comparisons to Iron Monkey or Eyehategod. They’re playing at The Pot Belly in Belconnen on Friday March 30 with Mammon. While on a sludge doom vibe, Melbourne’s Clagg have a new guitarist and bass player with Dave Byrne of Agonhymn on guitar and Dase Beard from Encircling Sea on bass. They’re going to start gigging again in June. I Exist have a new 7” available for pre-order now through their label www.resistrecords.com. The Resist Records Record Store Day is on Saturday April 21 and the 7” release is the first announcement leading up to the event. The 7”, featuring a new original song and a Melvins cover, was recorded locally at Riff Mountain Studios by vocalist Jake Willoughby who also recently recorded and engineered Newcastle band Dropsaw’s latest release (due out soon). Unkle K’s band of the week: The Windhand record has been on high rotation at camp Kronoz of late and is an early contender for Kronoz’ album of the year. Check it at www.windhandva.bandcamp.com . JOSH NIXON doomtildeath@hotmail.com

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the word

on albums

album of the issue

QUAKERS QUAKERS [Stones Throw]

When news filtered through some years ago of a collaboration between Australia’s production whizz Ashley “Katalyst” Anderson and both Portishead’s Geoff Barrow (Fuzzface) and engineer Stuart Matthews (7Stu7) with a mantra of making raw hip-hop the way it used to be with artists they admire, it was almost too good to believe. Three years, 35+ artists and 41 tracks later and we have Quakers’ self-titled debut released on the mighty Stones Throw label. Was such a highly anticipated release worth the wait, or would Quakers slip through the cracks of its own expectation? As this review is framed as Album of the Issue it will not shock you to learn the answers are ‘a resounding yes’ and ‘hell no’. At 41 tracks the album never lingers long in one place, building and keeping momentum whilst deftly gliding through the gamut of hip-hop. We have bold and brassy (highlights Fitta Happier, What Chew Want and Earth Quaking), electroinfused urgency (RIP, Dark

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City Lights), dusty boom-bap (Mummy, R.A.I.D.), Edanesque stakeout music (There It Is), stripped back hypnotic (My Mantra), spoken word poetry (Lost and Found) and 20 second interludes like pseudo ad jingle Fresh that will stick in your head for days afterwards. It sounds like Prefuse 73, Deckwrecka, Edan and Cut Chemist; it’s sounds like Madlib, Dilated Peoples, Dangerdoom and The Roots. It sounds like everything and like nothing else all at once. The inherent risk with covering a broad spectrum of styles is that not everything will work for everybody. For mine, the repeated laughing sample at the start irritates, the Obama lyrics will date quickly (but then that’s hip-hop, always the social commentator) and Chicken Liver with FC Truth is a bit dour. But this is a moot point on a truly epic undertaking. This is one of the most exciting, community-minded, engaging, and flatout enjoyable hip-hop records in recent years and will be safely snuggling into my Top Ten by year’s end. ALLAN SKO

Bleeding Knees Club Nothing to Do [Oh You Records]

dEUS Keep You Close [Liberator]

Bleeding Knees Club, whose moniker derives from skateboarding culture and a liking for knee slides during gigs, put their best Y fronts forward in this hyperactive, testosteronedriven celebration of teenage obsessions. The Gold Coast duo started out as a garage band in early 2010, wacked out the EP Virginity, toured internationally and have now recorded their debut long player in NYC. Their punk delivery is cleverly morphed into a generationcrossing sound by weaving ‘60s beach music elements into the track list. But it’s done in a very tongue in cheek fashion as BKC laugh at both the romantic surf genre and themselves. With the fuzzy vocal from Alex Wall and the ragged guitar of Jordan Malane, the boys keep it simple with short, fast songs suitable for crazy dancing. Jordan’s backing vocals, with Beach Boy overtones, add character and a few laughs to the songs. While the sound gets a bit samey, simple, repetitive lyrics delivered to a quick catchy beat has always been a sure fire recipe for success. Lyrics bellow out the stereotypically ambivalent teenage boy attitude to girls, coupling obsession (“Teenage girls, you’re my world”) to contempt (in Beach Slut). Whatever! Girls are still going to bop to this music, especially Girls Can Do Anything with a catchy chorus drawn from the ubiquitous bumper sticker. It’s fun and totally unpretentious. You can make your own judgement when they strut their stuff at Transit Bar on Thursday April 12.

Evolving through a series of ever-shifting line-ups over the last two decades, Belgian band dEUS initially formed back in the early ‘90s as a more art-rock styled incarnation influenced by Beefheart and Zappa, before undergoing a shift towards straightforward indie rock circa 2005’s Pocket Revolution. That said, this fifth album easily represents some of the most meticulously arranged and lushly textured pop I’ve heard in quite some time, with the likes of Tindersticks and Elbow being some of the most obvious comparison points. With its swirling Gainsbourgesque orchestral flourishes and massed timpani, the opening title track does a good job heightening the levels of theatricality around Tom Barman’s vocals, while elsewhere The Final Blast offers up a French chanson-tinged jazz shuffle bolstered with flecks of burnished blues guitar. In many ways it effectively sums up the undercurrents of tension and uneasiness swirling beneath many of the nine tracks, and indeed this is definitely an album suited to late night headphone listening, preferably with the fancy European cigarette of your choice. Given the above factors, the appearance of Twilight Singers/ Afghan Whigs frontman Greg Dulli on two tracks here comes across as an almost obligatory move, while closing track Easy unleashes cinematic guitar arrangements Radiohead fans would salivate over, complete with curtain-closer strings. Might be the album that pushes dEUS past the core fanbase.

RORY MCCARTNEY

chris downton


The Brian Jonestown Massacre The Singles 1992-2011 [A Recordings]

The Shins Port of Morrow [Aural Apothecary/ Columbia Records]

Ugly Duckling Moving At Breakneck Speed [Ear Shot Music]

Wonky represents the first new album in eight years from the recently reconvened Hartnoll brothers, but while the title suggests the increased influence of the wonky likes of Hudson Mohawke, Zomby and UK funky creeping in, in fact this is a collection that sees them staying true to their hallmark style. Longtime Orbital fans will instantly feel at home amidst the elegant icy synth arrangements and jittery electro of opener One Big Moment, which sets the stage for a typically widescreen selection that takes in peaktime dance floor fuel such as Stringy Acid, which offers up a Pacific State-esque ride through shimmering Chicago-house pads, dark bass pulses and streamlined house rhythms. Elsewhere, Beelzedub sees contemporary dubstep influences exerting a hold as things wander down into menacing sub-bass buzzes and steel-plated rhythms more akin to the likes of Datsik in what’s easily the most ferocious moment – junglist breakdowns included – before the title track enlists the grime MC vocal skills of Lady Leshurr for its surging collision of electro rhythms and out of control rave synth squeals. It’s a pity though that Zola Jesus’ appearance on New France feels like a missed opportunity more than anything else, relegating her to the role of generic dance diva over an admittedly solid backdrop of syncopated breakbeats and shimmering proggy synths. Longtime Orbital fans should be more than happy, with the tasty live disc proving a nice bonus.

Since his less than flattering portrayal in Ondi Timoner’s arguably distorted Dig! documentary and a series of highly publicised fallings out with an ever changing cast of band members, it seems BJM bandleader Anton Newcombe’s erratic behaviour has become the focus for many people upon mention of the band’s name. It’s a situation that ranks amongst the biggest musical crimes currently going because behind the media circus lurks one of the most agile and talented pop/rock minds of the last 20 years, something that’s laid out in sharp relief by this sprawling two CD singles retrospective. It provides a chance to chart the band’s ongoing diversification into a broad range of areas spanning psychedelia, folk rock and rhythm and blues, as well as Newcombe’s bowerbird-like skill for incorporating styles and influences from the masters. While early tracks such as Evergreen and Convertible capture a band primarily occupied with the then current UK shoegazer scene, it isn’t too long before the tendrils of psychedelia start snaking their way in, with Their Majesty’s 2nd Request offering up a woozily disturbing descent into reversed instrumentation and sampled revivalist preachers. While it’s easily the most avant moment here, elsewhere the likes of Hide And Seek and Last Dandy On Earth showcase some of the sharpest pop hooks in the BJM’s intimidatingly large back catalogue. A little something to whet your appetite for their upcoming Canberra show.

Last week on triple j there was a call-in for listeners’ favourite use of a song in film. Garden State, I thought unoriginally. “This song will change your life.” On first listen, this album won’t do that. Listening to it a third time I suspect first impressions are fickle but not unfair.

It pains me to say so but with each passing release I care a little less about Ugly Duckling. It pains me because I used to love these guys. When the three from UD emerged in the late ‘90s they were a breath of fresh air. Along with groups like the newly formed Jurassic 5, Ugly Duckling delivered funky, stripped back, tight looped production and positive-tipped surprisingly swear-free rapping that focused on wordplay and storytelling rather than heavy socio-political issues. It was fun, friendly and different. Debut Fresh Mode EP and album Journey To Anywhere were sparkling, exciting additions to the hip-hop canon, and are still proverbial party-starters to this day.

chris downton

chris downton

ASHLEY THOMSON

Orbital Wonky [ACP/Liberator]

It’s been five years since The Shins’ last album, the highlight of which (and of albums before it) were songs that had a stumbling, eclectic fragility. They flew or lurched engrossingly. Port of Morrow is a different creature. My inclination is to use the word ‘conventional’. In many ways it would be justified. The song structures, the melody progressions, the bridge/chorus set-ups and the choruses themselves are all a far, far cry from Oh, Inverted World. The appeal of this album is not in its form but its content and delivery. The Shins seemed to know this. Some of the songs (No Way Down) come on strong as hell, sounding just a pitch too close to boy band edibility. However, the same strength of commitment carries the album’s single, A Simple Song, among others. The growers on this album tend to be slower numbers like It’s Only Life and 40 Mark Strasse. Mercer wafts gently through the verses and smashes open great ballad choruses with his wiry falsetto. Conventional, yes, but it’s great song writing. The delivery will preserve the highlights of this album with the best of The Shins.

Then around Meat Shake, things started to go wrong. It all just sounded the same. It ceased being clever, funny, or original. The same kind of funk samples, the same kind of rapping. Fourth album Bang For the Buck was largely forgettable and so it is with this, their first album in seven years. Nothing stands out from the malaise except for maybe track 11 Sprint! which finally switches the tempo, but all too late. UD are lovely blokes with a brave hip-hop ethos and I wish them all the success in the world. Unfortunately their music is also tired and far too samey to make the same impact they did 14 years ago – it’s time for them to emerge into a beautiful swan. Right, I’m off to listen to my Fresh Mode EP to cheer up. ALLAN SKO

35


the word

on films

WITH MELISSA WELLHAM

Is there anything better than a Shakespeare adaptation on the silver screen? This particular genre has resulted in some truly great films. Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet and Kenneth Branagh’s Hamlet are two such examples. But I admit, I also tend to enjoy the barely-even-Shakespeare adaptations of Shakespeare. 10 Things I Hate About You, that ‘90s teen classic, still makes my top ten films of all time. And this month, Ralph Fiennes bring us Coriolanus. Though be warned, it’s quite different in tone…

quote of the issue “Anger’s my meat; I sup upon myself. And so shall starve with feeding.” Volumnia (Vanessa Redgrave), Coriolanus

John Carter

21 Jump Street

Coriolanus

Andrew Stanton, the director of John Carter, was the screenwriter of Toy Story 3, the director and screenwriter of Wall-E, and the screenwriter and director of Finding Nemo. How then, if he can imbue animated dolls, machines and fish with such life and humanity, is it possible that his directorial effort involving living and breathing humans lacks any sort of life?

When I heard about this movie remake of the classic TV series that launched Johnny Depp, I was horrified. Even more horrified when I heard the casting – Channing “When can I flaunt my abs” Tatum and Jonah “People are confused about what kind of actor I am now that I’m thin” Hill?! No no no.

Based on Shakespeare’s play and directed by Ralph Fiennes, Coriolanus is a brutal and bloody re-imagining of the Bard’s gut-wrenching verse, where Rome is a Balkan-like state torn apart by war and corruption.

John Carter is a Civil War veteran with a haunted past who – through a strange encounter with a mysterious dude in a robe – finds himself transplanted to Mars. Or, as the locals like to call it, Barsoom. Once there, he must fight bad guys and save a princess. It’s never exactly explained how John Carter can breathe on Mars. Nor is it explained why everyone has to dress so scantily. But these mysteries of science fiction, quite typical for the genre, are not nearly as confusing and convoluted as the plot for this film. I spent at least the first hour unsure about which clan of people were supposed to be the good guys, and which the bad guys. John Carter features some nice special effects, and delivers some typical sci-fi action thrills – but it is let down by it’s clichéd and clumsy script. Plus, the film is so poorly paced that even once you do figure out what’s going on – you just want it to be over anyway. Melissa Wellham

So I went into this expecting it to be thoroughly awful but maybe moderately entertaining – perhaps Tatum would do an out-of-place dance number; maybe Hill would make one too many poor taste dick jokes. But the joke (dick or otherwise) was on me - 21 Jump Street is actually very funny, and a lot of fun. Tatum and Hill play two cops sent undercover at a high school to expose a drug ring – part of a special unit for young-looking/ immature cops who can pass for teenagers. Tatum is charismatic and Hill amusing, and the bromance between them seems genuine. The plot is hardly original, but the film is peppered with clever cultural references and observations that succeed in making this more than your average “I’m pretending to do this perp from behind” police flick. There are some good references and in-joke nods for 21 Jump fans, as well as plenty of your usual low-brow jokes. All in all, 21 Jump Street is the film equivalent of a boisterous, crass teenager, who’s actually kind of smart and sensitive underneath it all. MEGAN McKEOUGH

The film follows Caius Martius Coriolanus (Ralph Fiennes), a banished hero of Rome who joins forces with his worst enemy, Tallus Aufidius (Gerard Butler) to bring his own city to ruin. Although Ralph Fiennes as Coriolanus certainly has the most screen-time devoted to him, we also get to see great performances from Jessica Chastain as Virgilia, his wife; and Vanessa Redgrave as Volumnia, his mother. The updated setting allows Coriolanus to not only explore themes of power, politics and pride – as in the original text – but media and spin, and the cult of personality in politics. Fiennes has shot the film with a shaky, handheld camera style, so that the audience feels almost as if they are watching footage from the frontlines of war. Television broadcasts are interspersed as a way to progress the story. In this way – although very different in tone – Coriolanus resembles Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet. Luhrmann, too, used ‘media footage’ to progress his tale, while also commenting on the media-saturated modern age. It’s 400 years since Shakespeare wrote Coriolanus – but with Fiennes’ steady directorial sense and modern style, the story still feels fresh. MELISSA WELLHAM

36


the word on dvds

Twin Peaks – Fire Walk With Me [Madman]

Sherlock [Roadshow]

Chuck – Season 4 [Warner Home Video]

It’s been 23 years since David Lynch and Mark Frost’s Twin Peaks revolutionised television, forever changing the parameters for what a major network would allow and screwing with the expectations of once placid viewers. The search for Laura Palmer’s killer was zeitgeist stuff, but once ‘solved’ the show was fatally wounded. So unhappy was he with the way the show ended, two years later Lynch reassembled the core cast and had another stab with Fire Walk With Me which is neither a prequel or a sequel, yet both at the same time. Yes, exactly.

Sherlock writers Mark Gatiss and Steve Moffat tried incorporating ideas drawn from the famous detective’s novels into their other jobs writing Doctor Who. Gatiss’ obsession with the macabre and Victorian era sensibility defined the groundbreaking League of Gentlemen and he’s a wellversed aficionado of the crime/ horror genre to boot. Moffat has helmed dating sitcoms, the Jekyll and Hyde remake for BBC (Jekyll) and co-wrote the recent Tintin feature. But it soon became obvious the know-it-all London detective demanded his own forum.

After a disastrous third season in which the most dreaded of all TV tropes boiled to the surface (pairing off two of the major characters – Chuck and Sarah) spoof-spy caper Chuck was on shaky ground. Creatively, it was running on empty and plodding through episodes with futile energy. It had failed to remove itself from the TV death watch list and was listing, badly; a rabid fan base is one thing but falling audience figures make already impatient network execs very shifty.

The film starts linear enough as Agents Desmond Chester (Chris Isaak) and Sam Stanley (Kiefer Sutherland) investigate the death of a teenage girl. They too disappear, David Bowie pops up, and the action jack-knifes to Twin Peaks where the last week of Laura Palmer is unravelling and familiar faces emerge. Especially BOB’s.

There’s plenty this series gets thoroughly right. Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman as Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson are pitch-perfect, aware of their characters’ history but not bound by it. One of the best running gags is a paparazzi photo of Holmes in his famous hooded cap, worn briefly only to avoid a pack of reporters. He’s at pains to point out the hat wasn’t his; quite a way to treat an enduring sartorial legacy. The cinematography is spectacular; symmetrical framing of shots linger, as if they’re throwing off clues. And each episode revels in clues, invariably solved in rapid-fire manner by Cumberbatch’s Sherlock – a tall, gaunt, unsociable and openly hostile crime solving freak.

Lynch’s artistic vision holds up remarkably well two decades later; he’s a painstaking assembler of imagery, but it often comes at the cost of a comprehensible plot. His supporters laugh at your inability to grasp the intangible – detractors remain antagonistically baffled. But Fire… is answering questions people had long since forgotten caring about. It looks fantastic and there are some typically shrill and unnerving Lynchian moments (Ray Wise’s brilliantly unhinged Leland Palmer mostly) but it arrives stale. In reality we didn’t care who killed Laura Palmer, the characters were the attraction and the story hasn’t been bettered knowing how she died. For a man who shrouds most every screen moment with such willing obfuscation and mystery it’s quite unusual that Lynch “returned to the scene of the crime”. Some things are better left untouched, wrapped in their own enigma. JUSTIN HOOK

But then capitalism saved the day. Sorta. A certain famous sandwich that had already struck up a deal with the show was so happy with the outcome of its previous product placement that it sunk more money into Chuck. In keeping with the irreverent charm of a show that knows its limitations well (small budget, ropey sets, no location shots) subtlety was replaced with obvious and so in big bold brush strokes, you’ll see aforementioned sandwiches stick out like sore thumbs in dialogue and plot. It’s patently absurd but you can’t begrudge the creative team behind the show and if you have to use product placement better to do it with tongue planted firmly in cheek, right?

All this would be for nought if there was nothing to hang it on, but Gatiss and Moffat have updated the original stories with just the right amount of reverence. Technology is a big part of the show; mobile phones figure large, text messaging is a major plot driver and Watson blogs – the modern equivalent of a diary. It never feels tacked on or gimmicky. I underestimated Sherlock, writing it off as another tired detective story cashing in on an insatiable public demand for crime stories. I was wrong.

The financial security of one more season – and a full 22 episode run at that – rebooted the writer’s room. Snappy, sharp dialogue has returned, the spy sub-plots are goofy again, the cameos are playful (Summer Glau, Olivia Munn, Gary Cole, Ray Wise, Robert Englund and Bronson Pinochet… Yes, Balki Bartokomous!) and Chuck’s rivalry with Alexis Volkoff is a breathe of insane fresh air; Timothy Dalton is a showstopper pulling out every erratic trick and accent from his hitherto well hidden comedy bag. Chuck has manufactured a late career resurgence and is back to its remit – affable silly fun.

JUSTIN HOOK

JUSTIN HOOK

37


the word

BLACKBOX

on games

Journey Developer: thatgamecompany Platform: PS3 (via PSN) Length: 1-2 hrs Rating: Take or leave

If you’ve got Foxtel, look out for the brilliant new drama Awake starring Michael Britten as a detective who wakes up in two different realities, and Justified, based on a short story by Elmore Leonard. If not, queue up at the video store like the rest of us and spend Sunday might watching NCIS reruns (SCTEN, Sun Apr 1, 8.30pm) after the year’s best drama Homeland winds up.

Following the release of Flow and Flower, thatgamecompany have established a reputation for creating truly beautiful games. In that regard, their latest game offering doesn’t disappoint. Journey is a stunning game. As you direct the mysterious cloaked character around the sun-drenched desert landscape, every frame looks lovingly crafted and carefully composed. The music accompaniment matches perfectly, making for a complete artistic package. Given the care and effort that’s obviously gone into Journey, I really wanted to adore this game. Unfortunately, the game’s beauty just isn’t matched by the gameplay.

Ob docos and lifestyle programming are usually not Chez Blackbox faves but exceptions can be made for Toughest Place to be a… (SBS1, Wed Mar 28, 8.30pm) which follows a UK binman, fisherman and train driver doing their job in Jakarta, Sierra Leone and Peru respectively, Seven Dwarves (ABC2, Wed Apr 4, 9.30pm) which looks at the lives of seven little people acting in a pantomime, How to cook like Heston (SBS1, Thu Mar 29, 8pm) which, as you’d expect, drops a bit of science in the mixing bowl and Jamie’s Fish Suppers (SCTEN, Sat Mar 31, 6.30pm) because we all should be eating more of it and we may as well do it right.

The actual ‘game’ part of Journey is pretty lacklustre and I fear it may be because they’ve focused too heavily on the visuals. Now I don’t wish to place this game in the same basket as those other style over substance blockbusters. Instead, I think their ideals were, rather honourably, more artistically driven.

Docos to check out include In The Name of The Family (SBS1, Thu Mar 29, 7.30pm) which looks at honour killings in the west, Martin Scorsese: Emotions through Music (SBS1, Sat Mar 31, 8.30pm) in which the legendary director talks about the influence of music on his life and work, Sunday Best: Thrilla in Manila (ABC2, Sun Apr 8, 8.30pm) about the infamous boxing match, The Cove (ABC2, Sun Apr 1, 8.30pm) about the dolphin hunt in Japan, and Insight: Nineteen (SBS1, Tue Apr 10, 8.30pm) – a recent Aussie version of 7Up.

The game never looks to challenge the player. The puzzles, for instance, will have most experienced gamers groaning upon realising it’s the same simple shit they’ve completed hundred times over, albeit in a beautiful guise. The result though is that you won’t find yourself re-treading old ground, reattempting puzzles or even dying for that matter. In that sense, the integrity of the artistic experience remains unscathed as there’s a nary a game element to remind us we’re playing something here. The downside is that nagging feeling asking us ‘hey, might this actually be boring?’ This game also falters somewhat with regards to its pacing. Understandably it starts slowly, which really works well to set the mood. Before long we’re learning a few skills and building some speed. A few minutes later, we’re sliding down immense sand dunes and whisking our way through breathtaking cities. There was a moment mid-way through where I thought it was about to become something brilliant. Moments later though, we’re back to strolling around, the momentum lost and the grandeur never really recaptured. While the game still manages to pull out a few cool moments all the way up to end, overall I didn’t feel swept up in the experience. The game is also short, as in 1-2 hours short. While I admire a game that focuses on the artistic content so much so that it ends up being quite brief, with a $20 price tag, it feels pretty pricey. For that money, you may get more visual bang for your buck watching a film or just buying a tab of acid for that matter. All that said, there’s much to admire here. If you happen to have a spare 20 and a free evening, it’s worth grabbing. If nothing else, it’s a good way to show your mate there’s more to gaming than guns, explosions and angry freaking birds. Torben Sko

38

Also look out for new seasons of Shameless (SBS1, Mon Apr 9, 9.30pm) and Being Human (ABC1, Tue Apr 10, 9.30pm), sadly without Mitchell.

Filming has started on a couple of new tele-movies and miniseries including Devil’s Dust, which follows the story of Bernie Banton’s fight against James Hardie, and Cliffy, starring Kevin from Seachange as marathon runner and sheep farmer Cliff Young. Filming on season 2 of Rake starts in April which means an airdate is still way too far away. Movies to keep an eye out for include Dog Day Afternoon (WIN, Sat Apr 7, 11.50pm), Samson and Delilah (ABC2, Sat Apr 7, 8.30pm), The Muppets’ Wizard of Oz (Prime, Sat Apr 7, 1.30pm), The Big Steal (ABC2, Sat Mar 31, 8.30pm), The Black Balloon (ABC2, Sat Mar 31, 10.10pm), Come Fly with Me (GEM, Sat Apr 7, 12.40) about three air hostesses made in the golden age of commercial flight – the ‘60s, The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima (GEM, Good Fri Apr 6, 12pm) – one of the lesser known religious epics of the ‘50s, The Addams Family (Go!, Good Fri Apr 6, 7.50pm) and Anna and The King (SCTEN, Sat Apr 7, 1pm) – the Jodie Foster version or better still find the Yul Brynner original. Stuck at home bored at Easter? Try a marathon of Glee (SCTEN, Good Fri Apr 6, 8pm) or 2 Broke Girls (Go!, Thu Apr 5, 9.30pm). Don’t miss the first ever mass same sex TV wedding on Adam Hills in Gordon St Tonight (ABC1, Wed Mar 28, 8.30pm) with Adam Ant (who Blackbox can report still has it) as the wedding singer. @ChezBlackbox TRACY HEFFERNAN tracyherrernan@bigpond.com


the word

on gigs

WOMADelaide Botanic Park, Adelaide Friday-Monday March 9-12 Dear Womad, Hi, how have you been since last time we spoke? This is kind of awkward for me because I’ve never written a letter like this before... so I’m just going to come right out and say it. I love you. Feels good to get that off my chest. Yes, I love you, and I think you love me too. If you didn’t love me, why did you seduce me so? Why did you use all my favourite things to lure me into a hot, steamy affair that will be in my heart forever, why Womad, why? It’s because you feel the same way too. From the moment I set foot on your grassy interior I knew I had found something special, something that was meant for me. Perhaps it was all the people – young and old – happily walking around barefoot with adequate sun protection, or the ample toilets and water stations that did it, but all I know is I fell for you the moment the gates opened. You followed up your winning first impression with a relaxing meditation in front of the incredible Shivkumar Sharmar (India) and then a night of dancing to Electric Wire Hustle (NZ) and Barons of Tang (Aus), combining my love of gypsy punk/ folk with electric/soul, and that was only the opening night. Like many young lovers in the throes of passion, most of my memories are a colourful blur of sweat, beer and the faint smell of sunscreen, but the first full day of my bare and un-manicured feet sensually rubbing your now slightly yellow grass is clear in my mind. What a day that was. Le Trio Joubran (Palestine) were disgustingly charming, and their music was sweet and full bodied, much like the local cider available in your many bars (you weren’t even trying to get me drunk!). To show me your ‘alternative’ side you gave me Kimmo Pohjonen (Finland) and my deepest regret was that I wasn’t allowed to take him home afterwards. The plucky Fin and his modified accordion brought some gothic drama and amazement to the evening and some feverish YouTubing to my ride home. But you weren’t done there, oh no, you still had Dirty Three (Aus) up your sleeve (which I would wash by the way, you don’t know where they’ve been). It’s lucky we have an open relationship Womad, because that night I would’ve removed Warren Ellis’ pants with my teeth if I’d been given the opportunity, such was the sexiness of their music. What more could you give me Womad? How much more love could you give?! You gave me DJ Krush (Japan) and the subsequent four hours of dancing with room to move in a massive crowd and no shoving or uninvited grabbing of my lady bits. Oh and, did I mention he was AMAZING? You gave me the British sweetness of Penguin Cafe, the silliness of The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain and the yumminess of the Taste the World tent, where the musicians cooked for their giddy fans.

photos: gerry and holly orkin

There was sunlight and stacks of delicious food and drinks, South Australian police mingling amongst the 15 year old fippies (festival hippies) and their mothers, who were united in the cry of, “but darling, you’ll never wear it!” and complete strangers rubbed glitter on my face and hugged me under Adelaide stars. Womad, I’ll say it again, I love you. Now just get rid of the homeopathy tent and I’ll see you next year. Holly Orkin

39


the word

on gigs

Canberra Punk and Beyond Presents Rock Against Boredom Revisited The ANU Bar Saturday March 10 If you say the words “punk scene” and “Canberra” in the same sentence, you’re likely to be met with raised eyebrows and incredulous comments. (“Yeah, sure, public servants really know how to rock.”) As a city we often find it difficult to escape our quiet, leafy, suburban reputation. Canberra Punk and Beyond, a punk collective formed in the ‘70s, banded together in order to challenge the notion that Canberra was a hardcore wasteland. Their event Rock Against Boredom Revisited, held at The ANU Bar, looked back at some of the punk offerings from the scene’s rich history. The line-up included veterans The Young Docteurs and Capital Punishment, as well as some younger blood with the addition of Life & Limb and Call to Colour. Call to Colour kick-started the night with a neo-‘70s, bass-driven Rage Against the Machine lovechild of a set, plus a light show heavily influenced by the classic rage intro. The four bands that followed let loose a more purist punk performance; Vacant Lot had a sound The Sex Pistols would be proud of, and the Capital Punishment faithful filled the floor (and created the night’s only mosh pit) as the band ripped through punk classics, churning out The Ramones’ I Wanna Be Sedated, The Sex Pistols’ Pretty Vacant, as well as a slew of their own punk rock gems inspired by the aforementioned legends. The Real Gone Lovers were practically vibrating off the stage with an unadulterated nostalgic energy. Songs were dedicated to “anyone in the crowd who remembers [ANU Bar] when it was still upstairs” and to punk rock comrades loved and lost. The next band, The Young Docteurs, were even darker and more melancholy, growling out their own dedications to those lucky enough to have caught the original 1978 Rock Against Boredom show. The Young Docteurs and Vacant Lot were both part of that original line-up, as were members of The Real Gone Lovers and Capital Punishment. The sixth and final band Life & Limb had the difficult job of closing out the night, and sadly seemed less than up to the task. With weak vocals and a seeming reluctance to even be on the stage (no one seemed willing or brave enough to step up to the centre mic, or speak to the crowd at all), their set made for an anti-climactic end to the showcase. The younger bands lacked the strong vocals that the Canberra Punk and Beyond veterans provided; Life & Limb seemed to be missing their vocals entirely, and Call to Colour screamed with a generic kind of rage. Vacant Lot were a standout, with the lead singer’s deadpan delivery offsetting his absurdist lyrics about the coming household appliance apocalypse – “white goods are coming to take you away”. The light show mirrored the bands on stage perfectly throughout the night, evolving from neon scrawl with the Call to Colour lads, a dig through drawers-full of old photographs projected behind Vacant Lot and Capital Punishment, and a strobe-fractured darkness to accompany The Young Docteurs.

photos: adam thomas and konrad lenz

Rock Against Boredom Revisited pitched itself as a retrospective, an opportunity to revisit the golden age of the punk rock scene – the ‘70s are pretty much where it’s at in punk rock terms, whether you were in Canberra at the time or not. So it was a disappointment that the night offered the audience no sense of progression; bands simply appearing on stage, playing their set, and disappearing without a word. Ultimately Revisited made me sad I wasn’t there the first time around. Lauren Strickland

40


GIG GUIDE March 28 - March 30 wednesday march 28 Arts Exhibition - Embark

Six recent graduates from Melbourne and Canberra. BILK GALLERY

National Photographic Portrait Prize 2012 NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

Open Work – Textiles Inspired Glass The work of two of Australia’s most awarded artists, Giles Bettison and Jenni Kemarre Martiniello. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Through a Looking Glass

Presented by CYT and Serious Theatre. cytc.net . C BLOCK THEATRE, GORMAN HOUSE

Midsummer (a play with songs) Starring Matthew Pidgeon and Cora Bisset. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Alliance Française French Film Festival A new generation of filmmakers will be showcasing the latest trends in contemporary French cinema. ARC CINEMA AND GREATER UNION MANUKA

Exhibition - Material World

Environmentally conscious works, having been made with reclaimed, repurposed & recycled materials. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Dance Latino Wednesdays From 9pm.

MONKEY BAR

Live Krystle Warren

The soul singer has a deep, smoky, boundless voice. THE STREET THEATRE

The Bon Scotts

A unique brand of folk-pop full of sarcastic rebellions and sweet melodies. 8pm, $10. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Something Different

Midsummer (a play with songs)

Karaoke

Starring Matthew Pidgeon and Cora Bisset.

THE DURHAM

Art At Home

From 10pm.

Trivia 6pm.

P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

Transit Trivia

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential. 7.30pm start. TRANSIT BAR

thursday march 29 Arts American Movie Treasures: Elia Kazan

A retrospective look at the work of Elia Kazan: Boomerang. 2pm. ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

The ins and outs of Space

Talented young emerging artists working in painting, drawing and 3D glass. M16 ARTSPACE

Transference – By Melinda Willis

Recently awarded the Australian and Decorative Fine Arts Society Award. ‘Til May 3. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Exhibition - Embark

Six recent graduates from Melbourne and Canberra. BILK GALLERY

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

An exhibition by Bettina Hill. Continuing until 8 April.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Alliance Française French Film Festival A new generation of filmmakers will be showcasing the latest trends in contemporary French cinema. ARC CINEMA AND GREATER UNION MANUKA

Exhibition - Material World

Environmentally conscious works, having been made with reclaimed, repurposed & recycled materials.

Trash Thursdays

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Open Decks 9pm.

THE CLUBHOUSE

Nathan Kleyn

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Cube Thursdays

9pm ‘til 5am with DJ Pete. Two for one drinks ‘til 11pm plus free pool all night long. CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Live

Her last concert in Canberra along with a live DVD and album recording. 7pm.

The work of two of Australia’s most awarded artists, Giles Bettison and Jenni Kemarre Martiniello.

Jonno Zilber Album Launch

Through a Looking Glass

Live Music

BMA’s favourite blues pilot launches his album in style. 7.30pm. NATIONAL PRESS CLUB, BARTON

Presented by CYT and Serious Theatre. cytc.net .

In the garden from 5pm.

BCS Staff Exhibition

“Fisting the Classics”. 9pm.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Mudd Music Presents...

Final Lies, Activate Jetpack, and My Own True Love. 8pm start, free entry. TRANSIT BAR

friday march 30 Arts Exhibition - Material World

Environmentally conscious works, having been made with reclaimed, repurposed & recycled materials. Talented young emerging artists working in painting, drawing and 3D glass.

MIC VENUE, CIT SOUTHSIDE

Mixed media artworks by staff of Belconnen Community Service. ‘Til April 10.

His music is distinctively different and undeniably beautiful. 8pm, $5.

Dance

Open Work – Textiles Inspired Glass

C BLOCK THEATRE, GORMAN HOUSE

Munro Melano

ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Natalie Magee - A New Chapter Begins

CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

National Photographic Portrait Prize 2012 NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

Charles & Dave

MINT GARDEN BAR

Mikelangelo

THE PHOENIX PUB

The Skronks, Swamp Dogs Howboy Cats

Mounting a three-pronged rock attack! 9pm. $10. THE BASEMENT

The ins and outs of Space

M16 ARTSPACE

Transference – By Melinda Willis

Recently awarded the Australian and Decorative Fine Arts Society Award. ‘Til May 3. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Standing Up, Speaking Out and Fighting Back @ 7.30pm, $15/$10.

QL2 THEATRE, GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Embark

Six recent graduates from Melbourne and Canberra. BILK GALLERY

Exhibition - 15

Wouter Van de Voorde creates brooding photographic narratives of the Australian landscape. THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

National Photographic Portrait Prize 2012 NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

Open Work – Textiles Inspired Glass The work of two of Australia’s most awarded artists, Giles Bettison and Jenni Kemarre Martiniello. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Through a Looking Glass

Presented by CYT and Serious Theatre. cytc.net . C BLOCK THEATRE, GORMAN HOUSE

41


GIG GUIDE March 30 - March 31 friday march 30 Arts BCS Staff Exhibition

Mixed media artworks by staff of Belconnen Community Service. ‘Til April 10. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Art-Is-An Bread Conclusion and Auction Robert Guth’s ‘swapping art for bread’ movement comes to a close. 5.30pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE - GORMAN HOUSE

Midsummer (a play with songs) Starring Matthew Pidgeon and Cora Bisset. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Art At Home

An exhibition by Bettina Hill. Continuing until 8 April.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Alliance Française French Film Festival A new generation of filmmakers will be showcasing the latest trends in contemporary French cinema. ARC CINEMA AND GREATER UNION MANUKA

Mozartmania

A cheeky miscellany of stories, songs and games that reveal a very human, and very likeable Mozart. THE STREET THEATRE

Midsummer (a play with songs)

POT BELLY BAR

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Canberra’s newest doom metal band. Supported by Mammon. Free.

Art At Home

CALWELL BAR N BISTRO

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Powerhouse Obsessions return to the Calwell for another big Friday night. 8.30pm.

Acacia Suitcase

With Duncan N. Sargeant, Mike Holburton. 6-9pm, free. Being Vincent D’Onofrio tour. With Raw City Rukus, Old Skool Al and Mattrix. Tix through Mosthix.

ARC CINEMA AND GREATER UNION MANUKA

THE GREENROOM, WODEN TRADIES

Dance

Special K

La Musique

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Ruth O’Brien - Light and Shade Jazz, cabaret, funk, soul. Bookings 02 6293 1443.

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

One Night in Brazil

Live samba performances from 9pm. MONKEY BAR

Nathan Frost

The epitome of a true cocktail connoisseur, now in DJ form. KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

The Clubhouse Presents Marten Horger 9pm.

THE CLUBHOUSE

Purple Sneakers

Your favour late late late night indie indie disco spectacular. 8pm start, free entry. TRANSIT BAR

Frost

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Our Sound Featuring Boy 8-Bit

With Deepcuts, Girl Shaped Love Drug, Cheese, Mickey Foxx, Nay Nay. $15 before 10pm. TRINITY BAR

REV

Indie DJs from 10 ‘til late. $5 before midnight. BAR 32

Live

Poetry Slam

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

7.30pm, free.

With Jared de Veer.

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Urban Playground

Hands Like Houses and When Giants Sleep

MONKEY BAR

Joined by Love and Satellites, Ameliah Brown, Transience Invalid, Sharptooth and more. $15. TUGGERANONG YOUTH CENTRE

saturday march 31

A cheeky miscellany of stories, songs and games that reveal a very human, and very likeable Mozart. THE STREET THEATRE

Exhibition - Material World

Environmentally conscious works, having been made with reclaimed, repurposed & recycled materials. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

The ins and outs of Space

Talented young emerging artists working in painting, drawing and 3D glass. M16 ARTSPACE

Transference – By Melinda Willis

Recently awarded the Australian and Decorative Fine Arts Society Award. ‘Til May 3. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Exhibition - Embark

Six recent graduates from Melbourne and Canberra. BILK GALLERY

Exhibition - 15

Wouter Van de Voorde creates brooding photographic narratives of the Australian landscape. THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Open Work – Textiles Inspired Glass The work of two of Australia’s most awarded artists, Giles Bettison and Jenni Kemarre Martiniello. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Through a Looking Glass

ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

C BLOCK THEATRE, GORMAN HOUSE

With Lamexcuse and Yoko Oh No. $23+BF through Oztix. 8pm.

Presented by CYT and Serious Theatre. cytc.net .

Jez Lowe

BCS Staff Exhibition

THE MERRY MUSE

TRINITY BAR

Love Saturdays

Dead to Me / Cobra Skulls

With Jo Cresswell and Lachlan Green. 7.30pm, $22/$18/$16 (MFS members).

Dave Norgate, Offtapia, Bobby Rush Vs Daron K, Andrea Kay.

TUGGERANONG ARTS CENTRE

Mozartmania

With The Twins (DJs).

Alliance Française French Film Festival

Funkoars

Martin Horger

Beauty & The Geek Theme

An exhibition by Bettina Hill. Continuing until 8 April.

A new generation of filmmakers will be showcasing the latest trends in contemporary French cinema.

SOUL BAR

Arts

THE CLUBHOUSE

Starring Matthew Pidgeon and Cora Bisset.

Obsessions

Dance Presented by The Clubhouse.

42

Law Of The Tongue

Mixed media artworks by staff of Belconnen Community Service. ‘Til April 10. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Feat. Karma, Joeyjoe, Hypnotic. From 10pm.

The Upbeats (NZ) and Mark N (Melb) 9pm.

THE CLUBHOUSE

Beth n Ben 8-11pm.

THE ITALO-AUSTRALIAN CLUB

Cube Saturdays

10pm ‘til 5am with DJs Matt & Pete. Two for one drinks and free entry until 11pm. CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Jemist

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

The Upbeats (NZ) + Mark N (Melb)

Presented by True Jungle Souljahs and Tremor. 9pm. THE CLUBHOUSE

DJ Fergus 9pm.

HELLENIC CLUB IN THE CITY

Jemist KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Spring Lounge Session

Talented DJs and a late night pizza menu. 8-11pm. NEWACTON COURTYARD

Live Oscar

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

music, coffee

Bass, violin, looped vocals and a morning coffee. 10 – noon.

MOCAN AND GREEN GROUT, NEWACTON

Hands Like Houses

ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Kill For Satan

Aeternus Dominion, Rise, Reign Of Terror. $10. THE BASEMENT

Ivoj Nob

The ultimate Bon Jovi tribute band. ‘80s rock attire a must! Tix through Moshtix. THE GREENROOM, WODEN TRADIES

Oscar

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC


43


GIG GUIDE March 31 - April 05 saturday march 31 live Smitty B. Goode

Pirate Satellites. 9.30pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

urban live music

Soulful acoustic performances for brunch or lunch. 10am – 2pm. URBANFOOD STORE + CAFE

Ruth O’Brien - Light and Shade Jazz, cabaret, funk, soul. Bookings 02 6293 1443. TUGGERANONG ARTS CENTRE

Packwood + The Falls

Innovative folk singer Bayden Packwood Hine delivers his self-titled debut EP. With The Falls. 8pm. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Ball Park Music

The 180 Degree coming on down with Nantes and Cub Scouts. 8pm start, Moshtix. TRANSIT BAR

Something Different Canberra Harvest Festival

Celebrate Canberra’s bounty of local and sustainable food. Markets, local produce and so much more. CANBERRA ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY CENTRE

Canberra Roller Derby League - Bout 1 Red Bellied Black Hearts vs Brindabelters. Doors 5pm.

Open Work – Textiles Inspired Glass The work of two of Australia’s most awarded artists, Giles Bettison and Jenni Kemarre Martiniello. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

BCS Staff Exhibition

Mixed media artworks by staff of Belconnen Community Service. ‘Til April 10. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Art At Home

An exhibition by Bettina Hill. Continuing until 8 April.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Dance Hospitality Sundays

10pm ‘til late with DJ TJ. Free entry, free pool and discounted drinks.

Ensemble Offspring

“A revelatory concert going experience” - Resonate Magazine. 6pm.

Exhibition - Material World

Environmentally conscious works, having been made with reclaimed, repurposed & recycled materials. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Out of the West: Art of Western Australia A unique look at the art from Western Australia from pre-settlement until today. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

National Photographic Portrait Prize 2012 NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

44

Dead Meadow

With Silver Sprine Arkestra. $35 on the door (no presales). ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Mixed media artworks by staff of Belconnen Community Service. ‘Til April 10.

Truckstop Honeymoon

Art At Home

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

An exhibition by Bettina Hill. Continuing until 8 April.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Truckstop Honeymoon are a world renowned festival favourite. With Dr Stovepipe. 8pm, $5.

Skippy’s Brain Jarek. 9pm.

THE PHOENIX PUB

Something Different Karaoke

From 10pm.

7.30pm.

THE DURHAM

Tuesday Movie Night

6pm.

THE PHOENIX PUB

Trivia

Son of Rut

THE DURHAM

Funky fusion of reggae and folk. 5-7.

NEWACTON COURTYARD

Karaoke Love

Something Different

TRANSIT BAR

From 2.30pm.

monday april 02 Dance Biscuits

Post-weekend sounds from Ryz, Peekz, Kimosabi, Steve On Weekends and more. 9pm, free. TRANSIT BAR

Croon and wail your heart out on the Transit stage. 9pm start.

wednesday april 04

CMC Presents The Bootlegs 8pm.

THE PHOENIX PUB

Something Different Trivia 6pm.

P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

Art At Home

An exhibition by Bettina Hill. Continuing until 8 April.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - Material World

Environmentally conscious works, having been made with reclaimed, repurposed & recycled materials. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Transference – By Melinda Willis

Recently awarded the Australian and Decorative Fine Arts Society Award. ‘Til May 3. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

thursday april 05 Arts Frienddad

Australian made independent sitcom parody. With live sketch comedy.

Dance Trash Thursdays

Easter Thursday Special. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Jemist

We shall entertain.

Environmentally conscious works, having been made with reclaimed, repurposed & recycled materials.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

The ins and outs of Space

MONKEY BAR

Easter Thursday

RnB/Latin/dancehall/reggae. 6 big DJs. 9pm.

Talented young emerging artists working in painting, drawing and 3D glass.

LLIK LLIK LLIK

Transference – By Melinda Willis

TRANSIT BAR

M16 ARTSPACE

Recently awarded the Australian and Decorative Fine Arts Society Award. ‘Til May 3. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

tuesday april 03

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential. 7.30pm start.

DENDY CINEMA, CIVIC

Arts

ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Live

Transit Trivia

From 7.30pm.

A BITE TO EAT CAFE

Exhibition - Material World

Wouter Van de Voorde creates brooding photographic narratives of the Australian landscape.

Live

TRANSIT BAR

Transference – By Melinda Willis

Exhibition - 15

MONKEY BAR

Fame Trivia

Soulful acoustic performances for brunch or lunch. 10am – 2pm.

Arts

CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

9pm.

URBANFOOD STORE + CAFE

urban live music

M16 ARTSPACE

Recently awarded the Australian and Decorative Fine Arts Society Award. ‘Til May 3.

BCS Staff Exhibition

Latino Wednesdays

P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

THE STREET THEATRE

The ins and outs of Space

Talented young emerging artists working in painting, drawing and 3D glass.

CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Dance

You choose a deckchair, they’ll choose a movie. Drink and pizza specials by Bicicletta Cafe.

sunday april 01

THE STREET THEATRE

The work of two of Australia’s most awarded artists, Giles Bettison and Jenni Kemarre Martiniello.

Trivia Night

THE DURHAM

A cheeky miscellany of stories, songs and games that reveal a very human, and very likeable Mozart.

Open Work – Textiles Inspired Glass

Live

Karaoke

Mozartmania

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Something Different

Sunday Arvo Trivia

Arts

Wouter Van de Voorde creates brooding photographic narratives of the Australian landscape.

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

TUGGERANONG SOUTHERN CROSS STADIUM P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

Exhibition - 15

Exhibition - 15

Wouter Van de Voorde creates brooding photographic narratives of the Australian landscape.

Techno and house music all night, baby. Featuring Biggie, SVRT, Anjay and more. 8pm, free.

Phetsta

Presented by Electrosex. 10pm. THE CLUBHOUSE

Cube Thursdays

9pm ‘til 5am with DJ Pete. Two for one drinks ‘til 11pm plus free pool all night long. CUBE NIGHTCLUB

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Live

Open Work – Textiles Inspired Glass

National Folk Festival

CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

EXHIBITION PARK

The work of two of Australia’s most awarded artists, Giles Bettison and Jenni Kemarre Martiniello.

Feat. Katie Noonan, Harry Manx, dancers, food, everything folky under the sun. folkfestival.org.au

BCS Staff Exhibition

Live Music

Mixed media artworks by staff of Belconnen Community Service. ‘Til April 10. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

In the garden from 5pm. MINT GARDEN BAR

Truckstop Honeymoon 9pm.

THE PHOENIX PUB


GIG GUIDE April 06 - April 11 friday april 06 Dance

Cube Saturdays

Rachel Haircut

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

TRANSIT BAR

10pm ‘til 5am with DJs Matt & Pete. Two for one drinks and free entry until 11pm.

Dance

Totally-not-Paqman celebreates the launch of their new single #AQUAFLASH. 8pm, free.

Biscuits

M.A.N.D.Y & D-Cup

Post-weekend sounds from Ryz, Peekz, Kimosabi, Steve On Weekends and more. 9pm, free.

TRINITY BAR

TRANSIT BAR

Havana Nights

With Celebrity Sex Tape, Princi, Less Than Three and more. 8pm, free entry.

Live

Live

MONKEY BAR

B-tham

Irish Jam

BMA Mag Presents The Bootleg Sessions

KREMLIN BAR

National Folk Festival

Project XO

Presented by XOXO & Friends. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Easter Fiesta DJ Trent Richardson. 9pm.

Buick

And friends on some turntable ish. 8pm, free entry. TRANSIT BAR

Being Good on Good Friday

Door takings going to flood relief fund. 9pm.

Party by Jake: Fat Cat Social Club TRANSIT BAR

Fresh tech grooves all night.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Freestylers

With Buick, Anjay, Cheese, Hubert, Stunami. $20 before 10pm.

Feat. Katie Noonan, Harry Manx, dancers, food, everything folky under the sun. folkfestival.org.au

Spring Lounge Session

urban live music

TRINITY BAR

Soulful acoustic performances for brunch or lunch. 10am – 2pm.

NEWACTON COURTYARD

URBANFOOD STORE + CAFE

Live

Something Different

Indie DJs from 10 ‘til late. $5 before midnight.

music, coffee

Sunday Arvo Trivia

Live

MOCAN AND GREEN GROUT, NEWACTON

Machinedrum

With Jacques Greene. TRINITY BAR

REV

BAR 32

National Folk Festival

Feat. Katie Noonan, Harry Manx, dancers, food, everything folky under the sun. folkfestival.org.au EXHIBITION PARK

Live @ BAC

Unwind on the first Friday of each month to local acoustic music. Check the website for more. BELCONNEN THEATRE

Salter and Joe McKee (coheadline solo tour) Salter is formerly of Gin Club and McKee, Snowman. 8pm, $10. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

saturday april 07

Bass, violin, looped vocals and a morning coffee. 10 – noon.

National Folk Festival

Feat. Katie Noonan, Harry Manx, dancers, food, everything folky under the sun. folkfestival.org.au EXHIBITION PARK

urban live music

Soulful acoustic performances for brunch or lunch. 10am – 2pm. URBANFOOD STORE + CAFE

Killing The Sound

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Dance Urban Playground

sunday april 08

Feat. Karma, Joeyjoe, Hypnotic. From 10pm.

Dance

Nathan Frost

Sultry, smooth, and musically delicious.

10pm ‘til late with DJ TJ. Free entry, free pool and discounted drinks.

Love Saturdays

Buick

MONKEY BAR

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

With Levi Howes.

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Trivia Night

THE DURHAM

7.30pm.

THE PHOENIX PUB

monday april 09

Tuesday Movie Night

You choose a deckchair, they’ll choose a movie. Drink and pizza specials by Bicicletta Cafe.

Dance BCS Staff Exhibition

NEWACTON COURTYARD

Mixed media artworks by staff of Belconnen Community Service. ‘Til April 10.

Fame Trivia From 7.30pm. THE DURHAM

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Karaoke Love

The ins and outs of Space

Transference – By Melinda Willis

P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

tuesday april 10 Dance

Something Different Karaoke

Feat. Katie Noonan, Harry Manx, dancers, food, everything folky under the sun. folkfestival.org.au

From 2.30pm.

Carbs, Mornings. 9pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

National Folk Festival

EXHIBITION PARK

Talented young emerging artists working in painting, drawing and 3D glass.

Intentions

THE PHOENIX PUB

EXHIBITION PARK

Talented DJs and a late night pizza menu. 8-11pm.

THE CLUBHOUSE

Doc Holliday Takes The Shotgun, Sweet Teeth, Waterford.

Croon and wail your heart out on the Transit stage. 9pm start. TRANSIT BAR

M16 ARTSPACE

wednesday april 11

Recently awarded the Australian and Decorative Fine Arts Society Award. ‘Til May 3.

Dance

Exhibition - 15

MONKEY BAR

Latino Wednesdays 9pm.

CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Wouter Van de Voorde creates brooding photographic narratives of the Australian landscape.

Something Different

Hospitality Sundays

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Karaoke

THE DURHAM

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Open Work – Textiles Inspired Glass The work of two of Australia’s most awarded artists, Giles Bettison and Jenni Kemarre Martiniello.

Canberra’s reigning turntablist supreme, on some funk, disco, and hip-hop tip.

CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

From 10pm.

Transit Trivia

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential. 7.30pm start. TRANSIT BAR

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

LOCAL BAND BONANZA! OUT APRIL11 ICE CUBE DEAD MEADOW

YACHT CLUB DJS KRAFTY KUTS ...and more!

45


FIRST CONTACT

SIDE A: BMA band profile

My Own True Love Where did your band name come from? Ally came up with it because she is obsessed with love and all of the strong emotions that it entails. Group members: Ally Cowell (vox), Lauree Inez (vox), George Pass (keys), Michael Walsh (guitars), Adrian Tonkovic (drums) and Adam Brown (bass). Describe your sound: As a band we draw from a vast array of influences, from A Perfect Circle, Porcupine Tree to Florence and the Machine, Regina Spektor and Tori Amos. We’re heavy, but there are a lot of delicate layers to the music. In a phrase: quirky and heavy everything! Who are your influences, musical or otherwise? Sting. The music he’s created over the years; we don’t really listen to it, but the fact that he’s making it, we respect that. What’s the weirdest experience you’ve had whilst performing? Mike had to modify Adam’s belt for use as a guitar strap. And I’ll tell you, they don’t make them like that for a reason. What’s your biggest achievement/proudest moment so far? Becoming a finalist in the Global Battle of The Bands was awesome, but our proudest moments are generally when we write new material that we are all happy with or when we’re performing. What are your plans for the future? Since our first EP we’ve suffered from the opposite of songwriter’s block, so we’re planning on getting into the studio and laying down a few new tracks for the next EP and then we’ll be touring around the east coast area and NZ before the year is out. What makes you laugh? Ladder Goat, Vegan black metal chef, Facebook fails and Stephen Fry. What pisses you off? Amateur sound guys. What’s your opinion of the local scene? Plenty of musicians but not enough gigs for original music unfortunately. With The Greenroom making a comeback and PJ’s in Tuggeranong now doing lots of original music things seem to be improving, which is great to see. What are your upcoming gigs? Our next show is on Thursday March 29 at Transit Bar with Activate Jetpack and Final Lies, organised by Mudd Promotions. Contact info: www.facebook.com/myowntruelove aroha.inez@gmail.com, www.facebook.com/ muddpromotions.jeff

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Aaron Peacey Aaron 0410 381 306 Activate Jetpack activatejetpack@ hotmail.com Adam Hole Adam 0421 023 226 Afternoon Shift Adam 0402 055 314 After Close Scotty 0412 742 682, afterclose@hotmail.com Alcove Mark 0410 112 522 Alice 0423 100 792 Allies ACT (Oxfam Group) alliesact@hotmail.com/ myspace.com/alliesact Amphibian Sound PA Clare 0410 308 288 Amplif5’d Classic rock covers band Joy 0407 200 428, joybarac-heath@hotmail.com Annie & the Armadillos Annie 6161 1078/0422 076 313 The Ashburys Dan Craddock 0419 626 903 Aria Stone, sax & flute, singer/ songwriter (guitar) Aria 0411 803 343 Australian Songwriters Association (Keiran Roberts) 6231 0433 Arythmia: Ben 0423 408 767/ arythmiamusic@gmail.com Backbeat Drivers Steve 0422 733 974, www.backbeatdrivers.com Big Boss Groove Andrew 0404 455 834, www.bigbossgroove.com.au Birds Love Fighting Gangbusters/DIY shows - bookings@birdslovefighting.com Black Label Photography Kingsley 0438 351 007 Blister Bug Stu 0408 617 791 Bridge Between, The Rachel 0412 598 138, thebridgebetween.com.au Bruce Stage mgr/consultant 6254 9857 Caution Horses Nigel 0417 211 580 Chris Harland Blues Band 0418 490 640 chrisharlandbluesband@yahoo.com.au Clear Vision Films rehearsals/film clips/stunts - 0438 647 281 wcoulton.clearvisionfilms.com Cole Bennetts Photography 0415 982 662 /colebennetts.com Cris Clucas Cris 6262 5652 Crooked Dave 0421 508 467 Danny V Danny 6238 1673/0413 502 428 Dawn Theory Nathan 0402 845 132 D’Opus & Roshambo hifidelitystyles@yahoo.com DJs Madrid and Gordon 0417 433 971 DJ Latino Rogelio 0401 274 208 DJ Moises (RnB/Latin) 0402 497 835 or moises_lopez@hotmail DNA Vic 0408 477 020 Drumassault Kate 0414 236 323 Easy Mode Daz 0404 156 482, easymodeband@gmail.com Entity Chris 0412 027 894 Epic Flagon band@epicflagon.com Fighting Mongooses, The Adam 0402 055 314 Final Warning Brendan 0422 809 552 Fire on the Hill Aaron 0410 381 306/ Lachlan 0400 038 388 4dead Peter 0401 006 551 Freeloaders, The Steve 0412 653 597 Friend or Enemy 6238 0083, www.myspace.com/friendorenemy Gareth Hailey DJ & Electronica 0414 215 885 GiLF Kelly 0410 588 747, gilf.mail@gmail.com Groovalicious Corporate/Weddings/ Private functions 0448 995 158 groovalicious@y7mail.com Guy The Sound Guy live & studio sound engineer, 0400 585 369, guy@ guythesoundguy.com HalfPast Chris 0412 115 594 Hancock Basement Tom 6257 5375, hancockbasement@hotmail.com Happy Hour Wendy 0406 375 096 Haunted Attics band@hauntedatticsmusic.com Hitherto Paul 0408 425 636 In The Flesh Scott 0410 475 703 Inside the Exterior Nathan 0401 072 650 Itchy Triggers Andrew 0401 588 884

Jacqui Seczawa 0428 428 722 JDY Clothing 0405 648 288/ www.jdyclothing.com Jenn Pacor singer/songwriter avail. for originals & covers, 0405 618 630 Jim Boots 0417 211 580 Johnny Roadkill Paulie 0408 287 672, paulie_mcmillan@live.com.au Karismakatz DJ Gosper 0411 065 189/ dj@karismakatz.com Kayo Marbilus myspace.com/kayomarbilus Kurt’s Metalworx (PA) 0417 025 792 Little Smoke Sam 0411 112 075 Los Chavos Andy 0401 572 150 los.chavos@yahoo.com.au Manilla Green Herms 0404 848 462, contactus@manillagreen.com, Mario Brujo Gordon world/latin/ reggae/percussionist and DJ. 0405 820 895 Martin Bailey Audio Engineer 0423 566 093 Words for You: writer/publicity/events Megan ph 6154 0927, megan@wordsforyou.com.au Mercury Switch Lab Studios mercuryswitch@internode.on.net Missing Zero Hadrian Brand 0424 721 907 hadrian.brand@live.com.au Moots aspwinch@grapevine.com.au Huck 0419 630 721 MuShu Jack 0414 292 567, mushu_band@hotmail.com MyOnus myonusmusic@hotmail.com/ www.myspace.com/myonus No Retreat Simon 0411 155 680 Ocean Moses Nigel 0417 211 580 OneWayFare Chris 0418 496 448 Painted Hearts, The Peter 6248 6027 Phathom Chris 0422 888 700 The Pigs The Colonel 0422 412 752 Polka Pigs Ian 6231 5974 Premier Audio Simon 0412 331 876, premier_audio@hotmail.com Rafe Morris 0416 322 763 Redletter Ben 0421 414 472 Redsun Rehearsal Studio Ralph 0404 178 996/6162 1527 Rhythm Party, The Ross 0416 010 680 Rob Mac Project, The Melinda 0400 405 537 Rug, The Jol 0417 273 041 Samsara Samahdi 0431 083 776 Sansutra J-Ma 0403 476 350 Simone Penkethman (Simone & The Soothsayers, Singing Teacher) 6230 4828 Soundcity Rehearsal Studio Andrew 0401 588 884 Solid Gold Peter 0421 131 887/ solid.gold@live.com.au Super Best Friends Matt 0438 228 748 Surrender Jordan 0439 907 853 Switch 3 Mick 0410 698 479 System Addict Jamie 0418 398 556 The Morning After (covers band) Anthony 0402 500 843/ myspace.com/themorningaftercovers Tiger Bones & The Ferabul-Zers Danny feralbul@aapt.net.au Tim James Lucia 6282 3740, LUCIAMURDOCH@hotmail.com Top Shelf Colin 0408 631 514 Transmission Nowhere Emilie 0421 953 519/myspace.com/ transmissionnowhere Udo 0412 086 158 Undersided, The Baz 0408 468 041 Using Three Words Dan 0416 123 020, usingthreewords@hotmail.com Voodoo Doll Mark 0428 650 549 William Blakely Will 0414 910 014 Zero Degrees and Falling Louis 0423 918 793 Zwish 0411 022 907


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BMA Mag 391 March 28 2012