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INSIDE: eeper >>Seeker Lover K >>Eddie Izzard >>Tim Freedman >>The Phoenix’s 18th Birthday

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It’s the ALL HADLEY ALL THE TIME issue!

# 3 8 3 N O V 0 9 Fax: 02 6257 4361 Mail: PO Box 713 Civic Square, ACT 2608 Publisher Scott Layne Allan Sko General Manager Allan Sko T: 6257 4360 E: advertising@bmamag.com Advertising Manager Paul Foley T: 6257 4360 E: sales@bmamag.com

Editor Julia Winterflood T: 02 6257 4456 E: editorial@bmamag.com Accounts Manager Yu Xie T: 02 6247 4816 E: accounts@bmamag.com Super Sub-Editor Josh Brown Graphic Design Cole Bennetts Exhibitionist Editor Julia Winterflood E: editorial@bmamag.com Film Editor Melissa Wellham NEXT ISSUE 384 OUT NOV 23 EDITORIAL DEADLINE NOV 14 ADVERTISING DEADLINE NOV 17 Published by Radar Media Pty Ltd ABN 76 097 301 730 BMA is independently owned and published. Opinions expressed in BMA are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or staff.

The gorgeous April invites all her dearest blossoms to a garden party on Saturday November 12 at April’s Caravan on Wattle Street (opposite the Lyneham chemist). It’s time to return to the Astro Turf for another delightful afternoon tea party with an abundance of vintage delights. There’ll be everything on sale from 1940s satin gowns to 1980s lurid knitwear, sweet spring frocks for the lasses and rockin’ summer shirts for the lads, two and three piece suits, vintage kiddy clothes, shoes, bags, scarves, hats and plenty of retro bric a brac. There will also be vintage sounds to get you rocking and rolling provided by Little Mac and the Monster Men at noon, and The King Hits at 1. Feel free to bring along a picnic; tea and scones provided. O goody! Find Aprils’ Caravan on Facebook for all the info.

Arriving with the same effortless charisma as their post-punk influences, the four members of Nantes came together in late 2010 and burst onto the scene in 2011 with the commanding single Fly. The song’s drum-driven, keys-laden sound and pulsating backbone demanded the attention of both radio and audiences alike. With the band just turning a year old the accomplishments are certainly stacking up. Slots at Parklife and triple j’s Unearthed digital radio launch in Sydney have been highlights but the best is still to come. Catch them at Transit on Sat Nov 12.

Gum Ball Festival applications open

After the Fall at Bar 32

The time has come for the gates of the great Gum Ball Festival to swing open and welcome in a new posse of performers and stall holders. The Festival will run from April 27 – 28 2012 and applications are open ‘til the end of November. Situated in the Hunter Valley, Gum Ball is loved by fun loving folk who enjoy the pleasure of a 2,000 capacity boutique festival with room to dance and kick back with your friends. Open fires, two stages under the stars and amongst the trees equals a whole lot of good vibes. First round tickets go on sale on Nov 16 with the line-up announced mid-December. Gum Ball proudly supports The Black Dog Institute. For more info go to thegumball.com.au .

Established in 2003, After The Fall (USA) play melodic hardcore in the vein of Bad Religion, Paint It Black, NOFX, Propaghandi and Kill Your Idols. After crisscrossing the USA many times ATF topped off 2010 with a tour of Central America alongside Millencolin and A Wilhelm Scream before hitting Europe and are tidying the end of this year up with their inaugural Australian tour covering the East Coast of Australia. Joining them fresh off

Capital Dub and Strangehours Present Heart Tribe Heart Tribe are a slammin’ dance band with spicy world and reggae flavours hailing from Bellingen, NSW. Their fresh sound, tight improvisatory style and frequent changes in tempo

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Nantes at Transit Bar

the boat from a Japanese tour will be Melbourne’s sweatiest dudes Anchors, along with Yoko Oh No and Snakepit. Check ‘em out at Bar 32 on Wed Nov 23.

Mission To Launch Bands and DJs Comp Mission To Launch is giving Canberra bands the chance to play at this year’s New Year’s Festival alongside some of the biggest names in Australian music. The competition kicks off on Wednesday November 9 and voting is open to everyone. Head to the Mission to Launch Facebook page for more info.

Greg Haines at The Loft Greg Haines is an English musician and composer currently living in Berlin who specialises in exploring the middle-ground between the academic world of contemporary classical music and the freedom found in the desire to manipulate and experiment with sound itself. In the wake of his debut Slumber Tides, Greg toured Europe extensively and began to develop as a live performer, and in particular as an improviser. With his most frequent collaborator, Danny Saul, the duo Liondialer was formed around the concept of purely improvised music. On Thursday November 17 at The Loft in Dickson, hellosQuare presents a special evening of contemporary classical and improvised music featuring Greg Haines on his first Australian tour and Pollen Trio in support of their upcoming album Roll Slow. 8pm, $15/$12.

Greg Haines performing along with Pollen Trio at The Loft in Dickson on Thurs Nov 17

April’s Caravan Garden Party

lead to spontaneous explosions of dancing, and the addition of a sexy jazz flute is sure to have punters busting a groove. Joining them will be local Latin reggae legends Los Chavos who blend Latin rock, cumbia, ska, reggae, and samba, a funky fusion that always keeps audiences on their feet. It’s all happening at Transit Bar on Thurs Nov 17. $12 at the door.


FROM THE BOSSMAN With Eddie Izzard’s Canberra gig almost sold out, and Carl Barron now at a staggering seven ACT shows, it seems an apt time to focus the Spare a Thought section on Comedians. Since the time of court jesters, where a mistimed joke could see a harlequin burned at the stake, the world of comedy has been a perilous one. Pratfalling and insightful witticisms on the King’s mead appear effortless when done well, but are far from easy. And bubbling underneath it all is a fate worse than feeling flames lick at your flesh; the Stony Silence… Of Death! (SSOD). There’s not much worse than the SSOD. It happens in all forms of entertainment, but is arguably the most painful, the most excruciating, the most acutely toe-curling for a comedian. A bad band can be ignored. A poor play you’re forced to watch but the reverence of the theatre dictates respectful silence throughout. And there’s usually an ensemble cast to share the blame. But as a stand up, you’re out there on your own, a piercing spotlight burning your eyes, blotting out the audience so they’re a cruel faceless void of hungry black, lusting for laughter, demanding it, making you painfully aware of every bead of sweat that has just been summoned through your itching pores, perversely finding yourself having to conjure over an hour of talking – talking, for Chrissakes, a whole goddamn hour of it! – peppered with witticisms, insights, gags, puns, social commentary, wordplay, all the while above you hangs the proverbial Sword of Damocles and beneath you roars the Pit of Fire that is the SSOD. There are none too many things more painful than a comedian bombing on stage, and there’s no person more painfully aware of this than the comedian themselves. Unless your name is Geoff Setty.*

YOU PISSED ME OFF! Has someone yanked yer chain recently? Well send an email to  editorial@bmamag.com and have your sweet vengeance. And for the love of God, keep it brief! [All entries contain original spellings] To the ARSEHOLES who think it is their god-given right to drive around Canberra: you are not threatening me when you rev your Hyandai at me when I am riding my bike across the crossing. You are simply parading your small-minded neanderthal attitude. When you rev your car and nudge it forward at me aggressively, well what - am i supposed to quiver? I especially like it when you feel the need to do this at peakhour (yes that 10 minute period), when you are moving at a 5km/h crawl, and the fact that I am riding across the crossing actually makes me quicker! And don’t pretend you’re looking out for my own safety - I’m only going at the same pace as the pedestrian who is walking right next to me and who you would have had to stop for anyway! I pay more attention to the road than you numbskulls anyway - and I’m quite aware of the fact that you haven’t seen me - so don’t try and abuse me when you get startled by my presense at the side of the crossing because you haven’t been paying attention! Grow some balls and go and get yourself a bicycle.

And old hands at the game are not immune to this either. Many years ago I had a lengthy chat to the lovably bumbling Brit comic Bill Bailey. “I had a rule,” Bailey revealed of his formative years strutting the boards of Bath, UK. “If I had three bad gigs in a row, I’d take it as a sign to quit, that this wasn’t for me. I’d had two. Luckily, the third went really well.” The world was one bad gig away from being robbed of the mighty Bill Bailey. Tough gig. Comedy is maddeningly subjective too; anyone who has born witness to Bailey’s musically tinged surrealist comedy could understand why someone else simply may not get it. In music, a good song is a good song and people turning up to a Rolling Stones concert are going to go nuts when Satisfaction is played. A jape that may have King Edward III roaring with laughter and slapping his fat thigh may have Henry VIII calling for the executioner. There’s no accounting for taste, and nowhere is this adage more terrifying than in the world of comedy. And my-my aren’t we all so quick to point out, berate, and in many cases positively crucify an unsuccessful comedian. For some reason, biological I’m sure, if we turn up to see something funny and it doesn’t tickle the relevant bone, we resort to murderous rage. Bands get underwear and beer thrown at them. Comedians get heckling and insults. Sheesh, even Shakespeare has to marry everyone off at the end of his comedies to keep the rotten veggies from being hurled. Tough crowd. If we as a human race rank Public Speaking as a greater fear than Death, then imagine throwing Trying To Be Funny into the mix. That shit’s positively terrifying. So hat’s off to those brave enough to give it a punt. ALLAN SKO - allan@bmamag.com *joke endorsed by Geoff Setty

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WHO: The Monotremes and Gabe Gilmour WHAT: A strange Canberran five-piece and one of Canberra’s most prized young electronic personalities WHEN: Fri Nov 25 WHERE: Check Facebook

The proudly Canberran band Monotremes, The would like to present a highly enjoyable evening of charming original music. Bring your ears and/or brain to hear them artfully juxtapose disparate musical styles and intriguing ideas distilled into an exciting listenable format, in greater clarity than vinyl, cassette and even MP3! Gabe Gilmour, Esq., a celebrated local traveller of the workings of your mind, will then invite you on a cerebral road trip wherein your limbs will fall off because you have been dancing so hard, and your brain will dribble out of your ears because you are having just the best time. Check Facebook for more details.

WHO: Anarchist Duck WHAT: The Gold Coast’s finest reggae/funk trio WHEN: Nov 20 and Nov 24 WHERE: The Polish Club and Transit Bar

The Gold Coast’s finest reggaefunk trio swoops into Canberra this November to rock the city with their world music grooves and powerful messages. They will play a show at the White Eagle Polish Club on Sunday November 20 from 3pm and also one at Transit Bar with Beth n Ben and fellow Queensland crooner Reichelt on Thursday November 24. Anarchist Duck are renowned for their explosive live shows, which fuse funk, reggae and groove with soaring vocal harmonies. Having recruited Dan Briffa (Roger That) on drums, the Ducks are pumped to bring their new sound back to their favourite haunt.

WHO: Hatchet Dawn WHAT: Playing at Metal Fiesta WHEN: Sat Nov 19 WHERE: The Basement

Melbourne’s Hatchet Dawn have just released a debut album of spooky dark modern heavy rock and metal titled Rebirth. After touring the south coast of Oz with Marilyn Manson in ‘09, Hatchet Dawn are now inviting you into the creative world that has attracted the failsafe collaboration of celebrated Grammy award-winning mixer Neil Kernon (Cannibal Corpse, Nile, Sex Pistols) and the mastering genius of Alan Douches (Mastodon, Misfits, Killswitch Engage). Catch them at Metal Fiesta at The Basement which features ten bands across two stages, including Frankenbok, Witchgrinder, House Of Thumbs, Na Maza and more.

WHO: Hoodlum Shouts WHAT: Single launch WHEN: Fri Nov 25 WHERE: The Potbelly Bar

Canberra’s Hoodlum Shouts return with their new single Guns Germs Steel, taken from their upcoming debut album. Embracing the charms of bands such as Midnight Oil and Fugazi, this corrosive three minute blast follows on nicely from their first EP Horses And Human Hands as it trawls through the history of domination. hellosquare Recordings are offering Guns Germs Steel on 7” and digital. They will be joined by Melbourne’s Harmony who kick off a tour in support of their new single Heartache; with Sydney punks EPICS (Of Grand Fatal fame) and local sluggers Outcome Unknown rounding out what should be a cracker of a night. 8pm.

WHO: Alison Avron WHAT: Playful and upbeat tunes WHEN: Thurs Nov 10 WHERE: The Loft, new jazz venue in Dickson

Alison Avron makes her way back to her old stomping ground of Canberra to show off tracks from her recently released debut EP Wrong Notes & Anecdotes. It was recorded and produced with the super sound engineer Richie Belkner at Free Energy Device Studios in Sydney and is a collection of playful, upbeat but sometimes heart-wrenchingly beautiful tunes inspired by SIA, Muse and Massive Attack. The gig is being held at The Loft, the hip new jazz venue found in the upper room studio of the Majura Medical Centre. Entry $15/$12. Doors at 7.30pm.

WHO: Sunchaser & the Wayward Orchestra WHAT: Film clip launch WHEN: Sat Nov 12, 8pm WHERE: The Maram Bar

A collaboration between Canberra film and video production company SilverSun Pictures and local band Sunchaser & the Wayward Orchestra has resulted in a film clip set to be released in mid-November. Frontman Jason Campbell-Smith says “it’s been an amazing creative journey. SilverSun Pictures have given us an opportunity to do something we could not afford to do otherwise!” The film clip is directed and edited by Douglas Kirk and filmed by Roger Price, and features the animation of Katie Ryan and brilliant character designs by illustrator Kieron Pratt. The launch is $10 and will also feature an array of local bands.


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E M H T I W E C N A TR Tim Galvin Genuine superstars are usually known by a lone autonym. The level of success required to uncouple your surname like an empty trailer and drive away with only a few lazy syllables is incredibly hard to achieve; just ask Bono, Madonna or Jesus. In the same way rock, pop and religious fiction fans embrace those celebrities with inconceivable levels of worship, fans of trance music also have their own deity in ‘Armin’, who initially seems a little hesitant to acknowledge his status. “I am not worthy!” he says shyly. “I am a DJ, I play other people’s music and I get paid for it so if you think about it too long it’s actually ridiculous. Of course I have had success with my records and with my shows and so on and so forth but you should not forget that I work with a great team of people around me.” Alongside countrymen DJ Tiesto and Ferry Corsten, ARMIN VAN BUUREN has been the driving force behind the trance genre since he began broadcasting his solo radio show A State of Trance in 2001. The weekly broadcast is predicted to have over 30 million listeners across 40 countries all over the world, and just in case you were wondering, in over ten years and 500 shows he has never missed one.

I play other people’s music and I get paid for it so if you think about it too long it’s actually ridiculous

“We are actually making plans for the 550th show celebrations right now! It is a lot of work but I get so much back from it you know, I think everything I do all comes together in my radio show. It’s really exciting and it really keeps me on my toes which is really good, I think,” says Armin. “I have to say that I didn’t start it to become a commercial success; when I started I just wanted to hear a radio show that I would enjoy as a 17-year-old. It would be somewhere that you could hear all the latest in trance and progressive and I can honestly with my hand on my heart say that this is still the case today.”

mind: to educate and to entertain. The most personally rewarding achievement for him so far has been the Armin Only tour. This unique event involved Van Buuren performing an inhumanly long nine hour set from the beginning of the night until the very end, sometimes without a toilet break. “I don’t usually go,” he laughs. “There is a little moment near the opening where I can go underneath the stage and there is a toilet for me there but I only have a few minutes,” says Armin. “I love it though, you have complete control over the night. I see it like Christmas dinner! Don’t get me wrong, sometimes I love to go to McDonalds or Burger King for a hamburger but playing a full nine hour set is like the best experience you can have.” Van Buuren is noticeably excited about returning to Australia in November, packing a completely new show to unveil during his headline slot at Foreshore Summer Music Festival. “I’m not the type of DJ who prepares my set in advance so I’m not sure exactly beforehand what I’m going to play but I could play a lot of things from my new CD. I could even play all my own tracks, a completely new set [or] a completely instrumental set; it really depends on the people,” he says. “Regardless though I can guarantee that we will deliver the best show we possibly can!” The most impressive thing about the man behind the dazzling lights and enormous crowds is that he is surprisingly devoid of ego. Van Buuren is a grounded, intelligent and polite family man who is currently juggling his burgeoning career with his most recent ‘release’, his four 1m04444444444444onth old daughter Fenna.

“Honestly I have spoken to a lot of promoters who really don’t care about the result of the poll but on the other hand it is a list that matters and it is a list that people look up to,” says Armin. “In a way it is comparing apples to oranges. Like as much as I respect Guetta, I mean how can you compare his music to mine? It’s completely different.”

“Of course there is a little bit of adjusting,” he says. “It’s a little bit yin and yang you know? I think you can only excel in what you do if you have a stable thing at home. This is such a crazy life that I lead and I mean it is completely unreal! To come home to a family and someone that loves you unconditionally even though a gig went wrong or something technically went wrong but they still love you is such an important foundation for me.”

The endless energy that fuels Van Buuren’s popularity has always flowed from his uncompromising live shows. Each is a forceful, almost obstinate extravaganza designed with only two things in

See Armin Van Buuren live at the Foreshore Music Festival in the Parliamentary Triangle on Saturday

For the latter part of the last decade, Van Buuren has held down top spot in DJ Mag’s coveted Top 100 DJ poll, the absolute industry zenith for any top class dance music professional. In 2011, he was famously expunged from the throne by floppy haired Frenchman David Guetta, a final wake up call for all of those who refused to acknowledge the commercial baton change in modern day dance music.

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ALL AGES From Thursday November 10 until Monday November 21 is the 2011 Japanese Film Festival, celebrating its 15th year. This event will bring a range of spectacular award winning films to The National Film and Sound Archives. From drama to comedy, animation to live action, the Japanese Film Festival has something to suit all tastes. To get more for your money you can buy a Max pass giving you ten tickets for $80 or if there are just one or two films that take your fancy, standard ticket prices are $11 and $9 concession. The festival has attracted huge crowds in the past, so to avoid disappointment reserve your tickets in advance. For more info head to nfsa.gov.au .

Iconic Australian comedian Carl Barron is coming to the capital on his newest stand-up tour A One Ended Stick! In December, the man himself will bring to us comedy-hungry fiends his refreshing brand of observational humour. Yes, I know, it’s a while away, but this advanced warning is coming to you for a good reason. Preparing already for the overwhelming popularity of his performances, Carl Barron will be doing seven shows, one per night (except on Monday and Thursday) from Saturday December 10 until Sunday December 18. The man will take to the stage at The Canberra Theatre Centre, with each show starting at 8pm. Tickets can be purchased through Canberra Ticketing or from the venue. Concession costs $39.90 and $44.90 for adults. The prices are raised slightly for the Saturday night show, costing $44.90 for concession and $49.50 for adult admission. These tickets will sell fast, so book as soon as you can. As yet another reminder, do not forget to buy your tickets for The Spicks and Speck-tacular - The Finale. “Adam, Alan and Myf are back on stage for the last time with a brand new show.” Now doing a third show due to popular demand, this is one of the promising shows for the remainder of the year. You can experience the dynamic trio live at The National Convention Centre from Saturday-Monday December 10-12, each with varying starting times. Specky reserve tickets cost $99, full priced tickets cost $85 and $65 for concession. You can snatch them up from any Ticketek outlet, but only if you act fast! Don’t forget to pick up your tickets for the most entertaining New Year’s Eve Party in Canberra. To usher you into 2012, Mission To Launch will bring you an exciting array of local and international artists including The Living End, Sneaky Sound System, Ian Carey, Cloud Control, The Beautiful Girls, The Herd, The Potbelleez, British India, Yacht Club DJs, Bag Raiders, Grafton Primary, Andy Murphy, The Novocaines, Naysayer & Gilsun, Softwar and some soon to be announced local acts. Enjoying the sounds of this spectacular line-up you can greet a brand new year by the shores of Lake Burley Griffin at Weston Park. There will also be a variety of different stalls and delicious food stands, thus providing you with everything you need for a great New Year’s Eve. Tickets cost $130 (+ bf) general admission. For a VIP pass (unfortunately only available to those 18+), the price rises to $165 (+ bf). This is a 16+ event and ticket sales are strictly limited. So get in fast for your ticket to the best New Year’s Eve party that the capital has to offer this year. NAOMI FROST allagescolumn@gmail.com

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DANCE THE DROP

In the clubbing world, the term ‘refurb’ is usually an audaciously fancy way of saying ‘rehab’. A ‘refurb’ is most commonly announced under the guise that wholesale aesthetic improvements are being made. Hearing the news, punters lick their lips at the prospect of an entirely new clubbing experience, although the short hiatus is often no more than a well overdue detox for the bar staff and DJs while the clammy internals receive a well overdue spit and polish. As most northsiders will know, Trinity Bar recently underwent a similar process, although the self-imposed shutdown has transformed the venue from a classy bar into an impressively dazzling club. With massive names appearing weekly and most gigs free before 10pm, it’s well worth checking out the exciting new look of Canberra’s favourite night spot.

house music. The parties are pumping out faster than Long Island Iced Teas and Friday November 11 is headlined by young stars Light Year and Emoh Instead. Saturday November 12 brings the ageless wunderkind Ashley Feraude back to the main stage and Saturday November 26 has just been announced as the official Foreshore after party. They have a word for those nights people – messy. Get these new tracks into your eardrums quick-smart. What So Not have just released one of the coolest EPs of the year in 7 Dollar Bill, Yolanda Be Cool are back with a vengeance with the deliciously bouncy Le Bump and Nu:Tone have just released one of the best remixes I have heard in the last five years with their re-work of Emeli Sande – Heaven. TIM GALVIN - tim.galvin@live.com.au

Ask your Mum what psy-trance is. Go on, ask her. It’s a well known fact that nine Mums out of ten won’t know what the blazers you are on about because, let’s face it, it’s not exactly mainstream music. The genre lives in abandoned warehouses, creepy forests and glow in the dark bedrooms and rarely clambers out of its isolated hideaways – until now. The lovely doofers at Connekt are bringing all the bells and whistles of their acclaimed private parties to the Uni Pub on Friday November 18, featuring a host of local DJs including Bizzle, Bjorn Borg, Incongruous, Somnium, Loose Cannon, Stoj, Disect, Alamout and Tarik. Two things to remember: wear something ‘glowy’ and no, they won’t play David Guetta. If bad ass bass music is more your cup o’ brown liquor, look no further than Mercury Bar on the very same night. The lads at Sub Bass are back with another round of mind-vibrating future tech on Friday November 18 with a list of evil body rockers including Crooked Sound System, Buick, Tidy and Delux, Dred, Faux Real and Ced Nada. The Canberra scene is all about contrast really, so if fluoro pants and jungle moshing don’t float your boat, there is a big sparkly cave called Academy just waiting to serve you the finest in top shelf

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LOCALITY

On Thursday October 27 I attended a workshop called Take the Lead for Canberra, held by the ACT Chamber of Commerce and the Australian Institute of Management. It was facilitated by Charles Landry, whom The Canberra Times have dubbed “the city whisperer”. He’s a “creative and urban planning guru” according to the workshop invite and an interesting character; I was initially affronted by his ostentatious air but by the end of the three and a half hour session I was mighty glad I went. There was a column in it for starters, and I feel I put up a pretty good fight on behalf of Canberra’s creatives. Landry’s developed what he’s dubbed a Creativity Index for cities. It consists of ten categories for which cities are given a score out of ten, with the average being the city’s Creativity Score. The categories range from political and public framework to distinctiveness, diversity, vitality and expression, from openness, trust, tolerance and accessibility to liveability and wellbeing, and so on. Some of the comments made when we were discussing the second category – distinctiveness, diversity, vitality and expression – really riled me. As Landry passed the mic around comments like “there’s nothing unique about Canberra” and “it’s really dead” piled up. Groan! I was sitting at the side of the room with my close friend Dave Caffery; we’d arrived late and hadn’t found a spot at a table. After the fifth comment about Canberra being devoid of vitality I nodded to Landry with my hand aloft, grabbed the mic and vented. These young people had been recognised as future leaders of Canberra for chrissakes, “dynamic people with big ideas”. There’s no need to write what I actually said as I’m sure you can imagine the myriad examples I listed to counter their complaints. Dave grabbed the mic after me and did the same, concluding with the comment “Canberra is bustling”.

Landry chided us as we became more vocal; a colluded team of two defending our city’s scene. Just like mates in a tute we were told to split up so I joined a nearby table. I can honestly say I have never been more appalled by the opinions of a stranger nor been so bold with my ripostes. One of the three young lasses, I’ll call her Jane, severely dislikes Canberra. Actually that’s putting it politely; she fucking hates the place. Why? Because there’s no shopping. Now each to their own; I know not everyone’s in love with the ‘berra like I am but to completely trash it because of a lack of retail outlets is, in my opinion, pathetic. “Perhaps we like to create more than we like to consume,” I proffered to Jane. A supercilious remark on my part, yes, but I was truly vexed by this girl, and it saddened me to think she’d been identified as a ‘young leader’ when she was actually a total non-believer. The 55 young people at the workshop gave Canberra a Creativity Score of 6.31, up from 5.43 which is what 150 “established leaders” gave it during Landry’s session last year. At least we had it over the older folk, but really, 6.31? Dave and I gave it a 9. We oft make our own fun, and you get out what you put in. JULIA WINTERFLOOD - julia@bmamag.com

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d l O Fo’srsake time

Julia Winterflood

Canberra wouldn’t be Canberra without THE PHOENIX, I say to Sean Hannigan, the manager of the much loved said pub, and Fiete Geier, the band booker. “It works the other way too,” says Geier. “Phoenix wouldn’t be Phoenix without Canberra. It’s that mix of public servants, students, bus interchange people; a lot of people who come from Europe who are searching for a nice pub in the evening and they’re lost for a few weeks until they find this place and think ‘thank god, a normal place where I can drink and just talk to people’.” The Phoenix is celebrating its 18th birthday from Monday November 21 to Sunday November 27. Not only is it a celebration of its coming of age but a joyous reminder that over the past 18 months The Phoenix has been brought back from the brink. How could we frequenters forget that fateful week in May last year when The Phoenix closed its doors, displaying only an A4 sheet of paper with an unnervingly ambiguous edict? The anxiety amongst Canberra’s live music community was palpable; panicked and fear stricken, the rumours spread fast. We provide Was this the end?

something completely different and luckily the Canberra population seems to agree

The collective angst compelled the illustrious Adam Hadley to compose a disquisition in the form of a Facebook note to quell our heartache and smooth our furrowed brows. He concluded with, “The Phoenix will return in all its ridiculous, over the top, vortex of time wasting, cider downing glory, and in the meantime I think it’s important that we draw together as a community and celebrate The Phoenix… In the end, everyone knows that the only thing that rises from the ashes of a phoenix is a phoenix.” And it did. Not without hard work though. The Phoenix copped a massive financial blow when the ACT Government changed its Liquor Licensing legislation in March last year. Because its capacity of 94 is above 80, the Government’s maximum capacity for the small pub category, it was placed in the same basket as larger venues in the 500+ capacity range. “Our license fee quadrupled,” says Hannigan. “And we found that unsustainable. So we had to get Fiete up from Melbourne to revamp the pub and the entertainment and basically turn it around, so that’s been our focus for a year.” One of the changes was the introduction of door charges for certain Sunday gigs, which, while understandably ruffling the wings of a few regular bar flies, has actually been quite successful. “It means we can get in bigger acts and give them a more intimate setting than they could get anywhere else in Canberra, except maybe The Front. We’re really happy with it because we want to keep supporting as much local original music as we can.”

Of all Canberra’s venues it is without doubt The Phoenix is the greatest supporter of local original music. The institution that is The Bootleg Sessions has seen countless young bands get their first gig beyond backyards and livingrooms, while the intimacy of the stage area offers the rare opportunity for both corybantic and cosy performances. It is truly unique in our town, I tell Hannigan and Geier. “It’s almost unique nationally,” replies the latter.

“All the touring bands that come through, they’re doing 20 gigs and the next time they come back they say [their Phoenix gig] was their favourite of the tour. When you’re touring, inevitably you’re gonna get a lot of shit gigs. Especially if it’s one of your first tours. So if you play at a pub where you get a great response and a nice setting, it’s always a good thing, and I can say from experience.” The birthday celebrations will see a swag of bands who “haven’t played [Phoenix] for a very long time, who played here many years ago,” says Geier. One act on Thursday November 24’s line-up, The Way Hip Antelopes, caught my eye. I’d never heard of them but with a name like that they had to be good; I confessed my ignorance to Geier. “You don’t know The Way Hip Antelopes? Seminal late ‘90s Canberra band. They started playing around ’97. The bass player was a barman here for about a decade. They probably stopped playing around early 2000s but now they just happened to find themselves back in Canberra. So they’ll be playing for old time’s sake.” The Phoenix fam is a close one indeed. For those who consider themselves family the trivia night on Tuesday November 22 is a must. All the questions will be Phoenix and booze related. Cardboard Charlie, who once booked Bootlegs full time are back with another instalment on the Monday; Wednesday sees the launch of Super Best Friend’s new single; Saturday is a smorgasbord of Phoenix faves old and new from 2pm, and Sunday is BAD!SLAM!NO!BISCUIT!, or as the Phoenix ad on the far left proclaims, “Canberra people who like to SHOUT poems into microphones”. If you haven’t been to a BAD!SLAM! before, go. Sean Hannigan has been with The Phoenix since ’93. “It’s been fascinating,” he says with a charming Irish smile. “To see the changes both inside and outside the bar. Canberra’s gone through a number of changes. What’s lacking around Civic… is a hole that we fill with an alternative nightlife. There are certainly plenty of bars around that will give you $2 shots but we provide something completely different and luckily the Canberra population seems to agree. We had a whole number of challenges to get through during the last year, but with Fiete’s guidance and expertise and knowledge of Canberra’s live music scene we really came through and we’re delighted with how it’s all worked out. What better way to celebrate than an 18th?” Happy birthday, Phoenix. For all the info on the week-long birthday shenanigans, find PhoenixPub Canberra on Facebook or just drop in and read the blackboard above the bar. Make sure you have a pint or two while you’re at it, mind you.

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HEAVENLY SOUNDS Josh Brown I’ve never been one to divulge too many juicy details regarding my personal life, but I think it’s time to come clean about something. I don’t mean to brag, but I had a four-way with three beautiful women a few weeks ago. That’s right, you read correctly – a fourway. Well, to be fair I should clarify a little – I had a four-way group interview with three beautiful women, namely Sarah Blasko, Sally Seltmann and Holly Throsby, the three lovely ladies who comprise all-female indie pop supergroup SEEKER LOVER KEEPER. Our interview was equal parts confusing and amusing; four-way phone conversations can be tricky beasts to tame. To avoid complete and utter interview chaos, each member would announce herself before responding to a question. The format felt necessary, if a little rigid, but as time passed and the girls began to truly open up it felt like I became a wallflower in the rehearsal room being treated to a rare chance to eavesdrop on an intimate chat between old friends.

Some places were a little bit resistant to having secular music within their walls

The tale of how these three good friends joined forces to form a band is a simple one, explains Blasko. “We were just talking about making music and writing and stuff like that one night after one of Sally’s gigs and the three of us just felt like it’d be a really nice thing to do together.” Given the trio are all used to being front and centre in their respective solo careers, how do they decide who gets prime position on stage when they play together live? “You’ll notice that we actually are just next to each other on stage,” chips in Throsby dryly, giggling and quashing any notion of inflated artistic egos. “It’s a bit of a combination of who’s singing the lead vocal but then how well can I hear myself through the monitors if I keep changing mic spots?” chips in Seltmann. To date the triumvirate has released three singles from their eponymous debut – Light All My Lights, Even Though I’m A Woman and On My Own – each featuring a different member on lead vocals and each paired with a stunning video featuring male actors (Barry Otto, Aden Young and John Waters respectively) miming to, dancing and interpreting the songs. The concept was all Blasko’s, says Throsby. “We were all at a loss for something that was really exciting and Sarah had this idea – she’d worked with Barry Otto on Hamlet, she composed the music for a Bell Shakespeare production and had seen him dancing the way he does in that clip by the stage just for fun and I guess had put that image away in her mind and thought it’d be great to bring it out sometime.”

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Seeker Lover Keeper are set to embark on a tour with a twist over the coming weeks – they will be performing around the country not in the usual pubs or theatres, but in churches and cathedrals. Entitled the Heavenly Sounds tour, the group will bring their angelic voices to a patch of hallowed ground near you soon. But what inspired the change in venues? “The album has been received really well and the [previous] tour went so well we just really felt like it would be silly not to do more shows,” explains Blasko. “But we want to do the shows in an environment that really supports the sound and so we thought it would be a nice idea to do a church tour, something a little bit different and in an environment that was really going to enhance what we were doing.” I wonder out loud whether or not the fact the shows will take place in churches might affect the ticket buying decision process for non-religious fans of the band. Throsby doesn’t seem to think so. “Well I’m not religious,” she states, “but I don’t think I feel awkward. I think our fans are quite open-minded.” Blasko laughs, before adding “it might feel awkward because they don’t think they’ll be able to drink anything there. They’ll have to drink beforehand or carry a hip flask.” The other two then begin to toss around ideas as to how punters could get around the lack of alcohol at the upcoming shows, before a light turns on in Blasko’s mind. “We could do communion!” she blurts excitedly. “Let’s do communion.” Queue everyone bursting into a fit of laughter. So the group hope their fans will be open to the idea of seeing them perform in churches, but what about the churches themselves? How receptive were they to the idea of playing host to a show of this sort? “We haven’t really had a lot of contact with it actually,” explains Blasko. “I have heard that some places were a little bit resistant to having secular music within their walls, but they seem to be okay.” As for the group’s plans following the upcoming tour, Seeker Lover Keeper will be put on the backburner and everyone intends to return to their respective solo pursuits. “I want to have a little rest and I haven’t planned too far in advance actually. Sally, what are you doing?” Throsby asks. “I’m gonna make another solo album,” responds Seltmann, with Blasko concurring, adding that she is laying the groundwork for her fourth album at the moment in London. It appears the Heavenly Sounds tour might be the last chance in a while to see these three sirens on stage together, so say your prayers and get to a nearby church quick smart. Seeker Lover Keeper will play an intimate sold out show at St Paul’s Anglican Church on Friday November 25. Support will be provided by Henry Wagons. You can catch them at Homebake Festival in Sydney on Saturday December 3. homebake.com.au .


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And if you’ve seen one of his live shows, you’d know how effectively Izzard can twist ‘it’ in a logic-defying manner that has ready, universal appeal. “I think I will always have a very alternative sensibility… talking about dinosaurs, God and Greeks and mixing all that together. But I am trying to be as commercial as I can because I’d rather get bigger audiences than just playing to seven people and a dog in a very small pub.” And so, in a masterful move to reach these wider audiences it makes perfect sense that Izzard regularly plays shows outside his native tongue. Earlier this year he undertook a successful run of French shows – 71 shows over three months – that took him all over the country, something he labels as “ridiculous ego and ambition”. He took it a step further at the Montreal Comedy Festival playing an early evening gig in English and a late show in French. Quite an accomplishment “Yes, it was pretty impressive to me actually.” Montreal may be bi-lingual, but this comedian took it quite literally.

ALTERNATIVE NOTION JUSTIN HOOK The word ‘Python-esque’ is overused. Arriving at exactly the right time – the late ‘60s – and harnessing the absurdist worldview of The Goons, Monty Python smashed through with a style of non-linear comedy that had little precedence. They were (and still are) hailed as geniuses and untouchable. But calling every stand up comic who refrains from mother-in-law jokes Python-esque is taking it too far. Monty Python also muddied the waters of mainstream and alternative humour. They were popular, their movies and TV shows were successful but they made little sense and the punch lines were hardly of the ‘boom tish’ variety. So it’s a high mark of respect when Python members refer to you as “the lost Python” which is exactly what John Cleese has said about the multi-lingual, Yemeni-born, British comedian EDDIE IZZARD. For what it’s worth, Izzard openly acknowledges the influence. “I believe there is mainstream humour and there is alternative humour – and all I am doing is tapping into the alternative audience. Monty Python already proved this, and music proves this as well. This is my theory. I just need to tap into that audience who liked Python 40 years ago or those that were too young but would if they saw it.” Yet Izzard is a performer unconstrained by definitions or genre ghettos. One minute he’s hamming it up in Ocean’s 12 and 13, the next he’s on the high-brow TV drama The Good Wife, then there’s his turn as a failed Hitler assassin in Valkyrie and his semi-regular spot on Craig Ferguson’s off-kilter, urbane Late, Late Show and a voice-over role in Pixar’s Cars 2. Restless for sure, but does he even know where he sits on the spectrum? “Yes – I think mostly alternative… actually, wait… I don’t know about this. I think I started in the mainstream. I watched very mainstream things when I was growing up. But then I gradually developed a more alternative sensibility by having watched all the comedy that was going around and starting to twist it.”

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Ever the inquisitive individual, the French shows were mere appetisers. “Well, I was born in Yemen so I have to do Arabic. As for German, I did it at school and liked it as a language plus I’m very positive on European politics so that would work. The there’s Russian because – well they had such a hell of a time in WWII and no one has given them thanks for that. We went straight into a Cold War! So I want to go to Moscow and learn Russian. Oh, and Spanish. It sounds like I’m just rattling off a list of languages but it’s not that difficult, it’s just very hard work. It’s not rocket science, you just have to learn the words and find the right ones. So that’s the plan.” Creatively, Izzard is also making amends with his past. “The beginning part of my career was nothing, it was just rubbish. I couldn’t get anything going. So I’m always playing catch up.” Off-stage, he sets equally high goals. In 2009 the professional comedian/non-professional runner tackled 43 marathons in 51 days for charity after a few months intensive training. To an outsider it looks like he is making up for lost time, cramming his life full of activities so as not to slow down, lose focus, lose steam. He agrees. “I’ve come to the conclusion that I know I’ve got this life – so let’s just go for it. I don’t believe in God. Maybe there’s reincarnation, but I’m not sure. So I will do all this stuff quite intensively.” Oddly, it turns out advertising slogans also played their part. “Oh yeah, that’s right. When I was practising for one of the marathons there was bumper sticker on a Jeep and I kept running by it – ‘One Life, Live It’. And I liked that, so I thought I’d do that.” Still, one thing Eddie Izzard has figured out after 30 years of stand up, TV, film and theatre (through most of which he was an open cross-dressing transvestite) is that despite our problems, modern society is actually doing okay. “Things do get better. Look at the world as a graph from the ancient Egyptians and Sumerians about 7,000 years ago through to today. We have gotten to a better place.” You can catch Eddie Izzard live at the Canberra Theatre on Thursday November 24. Tickets cost $89.90 and are available via the venue’s website.


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The son (and brother, and grandson, and nephew) of a farmer, Wil’s choice of career was wholly supported by a family who had watched him become the first Anderson to graduate from university. His father told him “if you find something that you would do every day for free, and you work hard at it, you will find a way to get people to pay you to do that thing.” Not that he’s going to fall back on his Dad for his next show. “Comedians call their show 20 Things I Learned From My Dad and it gets around to festival time and they realise their Dad only taught them nine things, and they’ve got to pad out the show with 11 kind of crap things their dad taught them.”

WILLINGLY HILARIOUS JAMES FAHY WIL ANDERSON has been talking shop with journalists all day, and his voice has a decidedly hoarse edge to it. Never fear: it doesn’t cast a gnat’s shadow across his signature easy-going charisma. Ever the professional, Wil sees it as an opportunity. “Maybe we can do some stuff from The Black Album… wander on the side of melancholy.” When you’re talking to him, it all seems so natural – we glide from the new show Man Vs. Wil to family history to ridiculous hypotheticals with the same natural flow, and nothing is scripted. Turns out, that’s because he’s not out for a laugh at every turn. “I’m not funny day to day,” he says. “I’m the least funny person you’ll ever meet in your life, day to day. I’m like a chef who won’t cook at home. If you want me to be funny, give me a dollar. I’m not saying I’m a high price comedian, I’m just saying I’m a professional.”

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It’s clear that Wil puts this discerning eye and hard work into his comedy, touring nine months of the year and then spending the summer writing new material for the next year’s show… and his television show, and his print columns. “Doing stand-up comedy,” he says, “is like running along behind a train, a Nor-Western – you know that if you stumble once, the train’s going to take off and you’re not going to be able to keep up with it.” He must have killer calves, ‘cause he’s been at it for 16 years – he’s got audience members who weren’t born when he started, and he’s not going to stop for a second. “You only have a brief moment where people want to listen to you, so I take advantage of that because I know at some stage someone’s going to tap me on the shoulder and say ‘oh, I’m sorry, this has all been a horrible mistake. This was all meant for Adam Hills. You can go back to journalism now.’” Wil Anderson will be appearing live at The Canberra Theatre Centre on Friday November 11. Tickets cost $45 + bf and are available via the theatre’s website.


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FALL ON ME ALLAN SKO “Nigerian writer Ben Okri wrote – ‘Writers have one great responsibility: to write beautifully, which is to say write well… to sing a little about the realities of the age, to leave some sort of magical record of what they saw and dreamt and to bear witness in their unique manner to the beauties, the ordinariness, and the horrors of their times’ (from A Way Of Being Free). So that’s what I aspire to.” So says Goulburn based writer NIGEL FEATHERSTONE, who utilised a month-long residency in Launceston, Tasmania to craft novella FALL ON ME; a story concerning father Lou Bard and his struggle to keep his café alive from stiff competition, his son Luke from harm due to Luke’s confronting artwork, and his own tragic past from enveloping him. In the words of the author: “It’s about the most important five days in the lives of a father, a son, and a potential new addition to that precarious family unit. “The genesis of the story came from seeing some quite radical work at the Canberra School of Art some time ago,” Featherstone reveals. “I just thought to myself, what do the parents of this artist think of this stuff? Once I got down to Launceston I started to think about it more deeply. What if I was the parent of a child who wanted to do radical things, things that might put my child – and myself – in danger? I’d want to support my child no matter what, but does there come a time when that support becomes qualified? Lou is forced to ask himself these questions. “Many have commented that the story seems to be inspired by the Bill Henson affair,” Featherstone continues, “but I wasn’t drawing on

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this, at least not consciously. These are complex matters and, on the whole, Australian society leapt to judgement without considering all the facts and ramifications. It is fiction’s job to go looking for complexity.” Despite its dark subject matter, the novella’s characters are loving and sympathetic and delivered to us in a warm tone. The opposite of Christos Tsiolkas’s The Slap I venture. “I like asking questions about what it means to be good, and how far does a good attitude or action go? I admire The Slap very much – I think he too is writing about good people, although his characters are particularly honest about their faults, their faults are on show and almost beg to be judged. Much of [my] drama comes from Lou’s past, what happened to Katelyn, his wife, but – importantly – Launceston becomes a very important character. How is Launceston going to respond to what Luke has done? It’s a murky old town.” Fall On Me is a simple and touching tale well told, and one that has done Okri’s mantra proud; for both Launceston, and Lou. Fall On Me is out now through Blemish Books - blemishbooks. com.au and all good independent bookshops. You can keep up with Nigel on his blog nigelfeatherstone. wordpress.com .


buttons on a lighting desk, she’s designed the space, the puppets, the suits and audience accessible lighting apparatus.” Void is unconventional on another level, as rather than starting with a script and working to bring the script to life, it began with a concept and relied upon its design to inspire a script. “It is pretty unusual. I’ve never been involved with something like that before.” That concept is “the literal void”. barb elaborates, “A space that can’t be filled. There’s a number of different ways it kind of appears in culture. For me, I’m interested in the void between being simply alive and conscious compared to being alive and sensing.”

INTO THE VOID LEON TWARDY Street Theatre, 7pm: I was slightly flustered as I started talking to barb barnett, director of serious theatre’s VOID WITHOUT VOID, described as “an immersive experience employing sound and lighting”. I’d run down to avoid being late, but halfway through my first question realised that I wasn’t even sure if I should call it a ‘play’. barb took pity on me, exclaiming “That’s one of the ongoing questions! It is theatre, but it crosses very heavily into what I’d say is visual art; an immersive installation that places the audience inside the same the environment as the character. “There are no words spoken in the piece, the emotional journey and content is described through Liberty Kerr’s amazing musical elements, and Gillian Schwab’s lighting. She isn’t just pressing

I’m wary of theatre people being horrible wankers, but barb speaks with the down to earth tone of a craftsperson, and laughs when I ask if it’s avant garde. “I don’t know what that means, to be quite frank. This is just what I find compelling. I hope that anyone who is interested in what makes human beings tick is going to enjoy the show. I think that people interested in forms that do not use language – so visual art, or dance – may be more comfortable with it than straight theatre practitioners, but we’re really trying to have at least one moment where every audience member feels something. Those are the moments as an audience member when I’m really engaged, and I want to know more, and I want there to be a connection. Being launched into space will be awesome for the audience, a journey, and for 40 minutes they can just be in that world, see what happens, then go on with their real lives.” I was sold at the thought of watching experimental music with more visuals than a laptop being occasionally prodded (in this case the brilliant Cathy Petöcz in a space suit), but now I’m damn excited. Void Without Void shows at The Street Theatre from Wednesday-Sunday November 9-13. Tickets are $25 and available via the venue’s website.

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IN REVIEW Cordelia The Street Theatre Thurs Nov 3 – Sat Nov 5

Haunting cries of grieving women huddled together on the stage. These were the sounds the audience encountered as they entered The Street Theatre to view creator and director Chenoeh Miller’s Cordelia. From the start, it was clear that this was no ordinary Shakespeare themed production, but was rather a compelling piece of contemporary theatre that drew on the classic play King Lear to create an original production. Dance and music are combined with verse and prose to bring the medieval narrative into the 21st century.

CHLOE MANDRYK NATURAL INSTINCTS, on now at M16 Artspace, elicits our shared memories, facts and flaws. Julie Bradley, Tiffany Cole, Nicola Dickson, Patsy Hely, Cherry Hood, John Pratt and Julie Ryder are exhibited as a collective inspired by the relationship between nature and humanity. Holding court as you enter the gallery are prints by John Pratt, a well established Canberra artist and lecturer in Printmedia and Drawing at the ANU. His unsexed and otherworldly figures appear to float, fall and crumble through space. Pratt presents us with a complex but highly relatable image – that of man vs ‘nature’. Nature is undefined; imagine a seascape, community pool, or the wells within us. By using strong unflinching colours he unites the image. I suggest you pause for thought at Incline III, woodcut, an emulsion of quiet control and passion. Tiffany Cole suggests our imaginings of nature, as near perfect, are propped up by material culture. In Domestic Wildlife, oil on plywood, she installs cut-out models of a deer and swan that stare out, doeeyed and Disney-esque. Much like 16th century Dutch masters who painted perfection to suggest mortality Cole’s obvious unreality highlights our complicated relationship with nature. Nicola Dickson’s work has been hatched with a distinct voice that has not gone unnoticed since she was awarded a PhD from the ANU in 2010. Four works from the series Wedgwood Blue, gouache and pencil, explore a title fight between cultures. Inspired by medallion drawings of the 1780 voyage, the portraits of James Cook and Joseph Banks, a laureled naturalist, are steadily eaten up by native plant life. These are cleverly placed beside images of two “whitewashed” profiles of the couple Truganini and Woorrady. Pastel blue gouache masks them, although a colour synonymous with the British Empire it cannot disguise their profile as leaders who fought against violent repression. These works on paper and Dickson’s paintings marry a sense of something alien with symbols of ‘nationhood’. Gould’s Australian Chintz II and III, oil and acrylic on canvas, morph creatures native to Australia with decoration, embellishment and hybridisation. The artist draws into question colonial manipulation of the Indigenous (and human) right to remain true to nature. Much of Natural Instincts finds a direct link with empirical depictions of what surrounds us from untouched to man-made landscapes but has obviously found its genesis in what lies beneath. Strangely and pleasingly what we see is familiar and earthy but also fluorescent, subversive and cute, bordering on science fiction. Natural Instincts is showing at M16 (21 Blaxland Crescent, Griffith) from Thursday October 27 through till Sunday November 13. For more details, check out m16artspace.com.au .

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Hadley’s perceptive narration is a highlight of the play. The Canberra-based writer and performer, who plays Cordelia’s lover the King of France, is captivating in his humorous and poignant storytelling. Despite his hilarious French accent, the character is the voice of reason in the play, and helps the audience navigate its way through the eclectic production. Rowan Davie as Cornwall is another standout, with his spirited dance and miming enthusiastically received by the audience. Miller has transformed him into a classic Shakespearean fool who highlights the absurdity of the situation through his antics. Much of Cordelia is told through music and dance. This works perfectly with the verse nature of Shakespeare, which suggests rhythm and movement. A familiar ‘80s soundtrack accompanies energetic dance sequences that reinforce the intensity and passion of the story, and have an important place in the play’s narrative, often replacing spoken word storytelling. The dance sequences have an organic quality that suggests that Miller has encouraged improvisation in her cast. While the music made a wonderful addition to the play, at times it was difficult to hear the actors speak over the loud soundtrack. Complementing the music, Imogen Keen’s fantastic costumes, which channel Vivienne Westwood’s grungechic, perfectly blend lavish court dress with ‘80s fashion. It is refreshing to see a piece of contemporary theatre bravely combining tradition and innovation. Judging by the critical success of the production, Cordelia and its creator are set for a bright future. Grace Carroll

Photo: Cole Bennetts

NATURAL INSTINCTS

As the title suggests, Cordelia is not about Lear. In fact, he isn’t even in the play. Through this absence, his authority over the lives of his daughters; Goneril (Erica Field), Regan (Peta Ward) and Cordelia (Noa Rotem), is powerfully conveyed. The play, like King Lear, centres on the daughters professing their love for their father, with the hope of being selected to assume the crown. In Cordelia, Miller makes no attempt to follow Shakespeare’s original. Instead, she crafts a kind of prequel that explores the troubled family dynamic of Lear’s three daughters from a new perspective. This allows for greater understanding of their characters. Field’s performance as the embittered Goneril, and Ward’s portrayal of the luckless Regan are both outstanding. Rotem conveys Cordelia’s naivety and enthusiasm for life in her energetic performance that is best expressed through dance.


touring schedules, meaning that we were seeing smaller shows less frequently. Venues such as The Gypsy Bar folded and the promised land of a cultural capital faded from view.

UNINHIBITED

Touring acts and exhibitions travel based on bottom lines – if they can’t break even, let alone show a profit, cities fall from the radar. And in a catch 22-style dance, Canberra has become a tough gig for many artists.

When I first read that Jonathan Franzen was to appear at The National Library, I thought it was a typo. Surely it meant to read John Safran. Or former ‘radio funnyman’ Jonathan Coleman. Not the most adored literary figure on the planet, the guy Obama reads on holidays, the dude who incurred Oprah’s wrath and lived to write about. But so it went – Franzen appeared, in person, in our little town, and spoke about himself for an hour. It was nice.

My rock band has supported a few big names, and all have spoken of their concerns re: Canberra shows. Audiences can’t be guaranteed like they can elsewhere. They know the fans live here. But they’re concerned that the fans have become so used to not seeing acts that when a band comes through, the audience stays away.

Clearly, at the heart of my assumption that the press release was wrong was that provincial cringe – ‘surely they couldn’t be coming to my town’. And there’s plenty of experience to back this assumption up. When I first moved here ten years ago, Canberra provided a country boy with a dream run of event options. Travelling bands would include the capital on their Australian tours (shows from Yo La Tengo, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, The Go-Betweens and The Dirty Three were early highlights of my Canberra life). And I could barely contain my excitement at seeing Sensation, the collection of work from the so-called “Young British Artists” that had torn through the UK and caused New York’s Mayor to explode in a Catholic rage. Soon enough, things changed. The NGA cancelled Sensation (in fear of a conservative backlash), and touring acts started to avoid the capital, and any other Australian city other than Sydney or Melbourne. We retained touring theatre but as part of their regional

The only thing those interested in retaining the travelling artists can do is show up. We can complain about the lack of suitable venues, the death of The ANU as a weekly hangout for smaller bands, the lack of more progressive touring exhibitions (The State Gallery of NSW gets a big Picasso show while we grab a bunch of Italian masters from the 15th century – the Italians should be interesting, but, to oversimplify, shouldn’t The National Gallery be the first stop for a significant retrospective of a modern master?), but every time we stay away from a show, we contribute to the malaise. And the effect on local artists is significant, for when a local supports a touring act, networks broaden. Your task for the fortnight? Go out. See a band, a play, an exhibition. Tell your friends what they missed. Then go again. Put us on the map. And buy the singer a beer. They always love that. GLEN MARTIN glenpetermartin@gmail.com

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bit PARTS WHO: Arc Cinema WHAT: Japanese Film Festival WHEN: Wed Nov 9 – Thurs Nov 24 WHERE: Arc Cinema, National Film and Sound Archives The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema in 2011 with a broad showcase of new, best and wildest films from Japan. This year’s program ranges from kooky comedies like Honeymoon in Hell: Mr and Mrs Oki’s Fabulous Trip (u/c18+) (pictured), through box office hit action films like the Gantz series (MA15+) to the stunning anime from Studio Ghibli, Arrietty (G) and new works from master directors like Lee Sang-il and Kobayashi Masahiro. The 2011 program also features a timely sidebar of two documentaries made 80 years apart – Yamakoshi (u/c18+) and Rebirth of the Capital (u/c18+) – showing the rebuilding of two very different Japanese communities after devastating earthquakes. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au .

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WHO: Robert Boynes WHAT: In the light of day exhibition WHEN: Until Sun Nov 13 WHERE: Beaver Galleries, Deakin In the light of day explores the sounds, sensations and movement found in our urban spaces and streetscapes. The paintings feature fractured images, shards of light and express the transience of what we see and what we record. For over four decades Robert Boynes has confirmed his place as an important artist of the urban environment. Robert was Head of Painting at the Canberra School of Art for 27 years and his work is represented in the National Gallery of Australia as well as all Australian state galleries. Apology and correction: in the October 26 issue we ran a feature on Boynes titled Street Wise. It was incorrectly credited to Ben Hermann, when the author of the feature was actually Chloe Mandryk. WHO: Hilary Wardhaugh WHAT: Photowalk WHEN: Sat Nov 19 WHERE: Opposite the National Portrait Gallery Says local photographer Hilary Wardhaugh, “I was reading about Louise Hawson’s photographic essay 52 Suburbs in which she photographed people and places in various Sydney suburbs and has recently published a book about it…”. Hilary wants to do the same thing. “I see this as an opportunity for all Canberrans of any age or ability to get out their cameras or phones and document their bit of Canberra. It is a way to show what and who we are, that there is diversity and loads of untapped creativity.” On Nov 19 she’s holding a Photowalk, so bring your cameras and take a stroll, snapping all the way. For more info email Hilary at hilary@hwp.com.au . WHO: West Australian Ballet WHAT: Cinderella WHEN: Tues Nov 15 - Sat Nov 19 WHERE: Canberra Theatre Centre

WHO: Short Sweet Family WHAT: Short+Sweet Dance WHEN: Thurs Nov 17 – Sun Nov 20 WHERE: The Courtyard Studio, Canberra Theatre Centre The exciting international festival of ten minute, bite-sized dance works was a huge success in Canberra’s 2010 season. High quality dance works created by local and interstate choreographers took the audience on a ride through various styles from contemporary to classical and themes looking at political to personal events. This year they are back with new exciting choreographers, concepts and movement, so if you’re a dance fan make sure you don’t miss out. Short+Sweet Dance is part of the ever expanding Short Sweet Family which includes programs for theatre, cabaret, song, and comedy throughout Australia and internationally including Malaysia, Singapore, New Zealand and India. For all the info head to canberratheatrecentre.com.au .

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West Australian Ballet are set to wow Canberra audiences with the highly anticipated Cinderella, brought to life in the magical full length ballet at the Canberra Theatre from November 15-19. Jayne Smeulders, currently a leading artist with West Australian Ballet, has been commissioned by artistic director Ivan Cavallari to choreograph a classic ballet with a fresh new look. The stunning set and costumes have been created by Allan Lees to conjure up a magical world reflective of a European Principality in the 1930s, performed to Sergei Prokofiev’s evocative score. The production also returns to the essence of the Grimm brothers’ fairytale, instilling a certain purity and simplicity as the classic tale unfolds. canberratheatrecentre.com.au . WHO: Paul Jamieson WHAT: The Table of Earthy Delights exhibition WHEN: Tues Nov 15 – Tues Dec 6 WHERE: The Front After a year of April’s Caravan in residence, The Front Gallery and Cafe in Lyneham has returned to an exhibition program. Owner of The Front and sculptor, Paul Jamieson brings a new selection of sculptures to The Front with an exhibition focused on and around a dining table made from a huge slab of elm wood. Paul makes sculptures and furniture from salvaged timber and found or recycled objects. The exhibition opens on Tuesday November 15 at 6.30pm and continues until Tuesday December 6. The Front is now accepting exhibition proposals for the 2012 program. front. gallery@gmail.com or 62498453.


The audience fucked up but we were ok

RADIO FIBBY

IDLE HANDS

julia winterflood

ASHLEY THOMSON

Not many groups can claim that one of their festival performances has undergone a diligent dissection in a blog almost entirely dedicated to flora. The Nature of Robertson is, as its title suggests, “a blog about the nature of Robertson, NSW… and about life in Robertson, too.” The blog’s detailed analysis (there’re dot points! there’s a photo of Hadley’s foot!) of MR FIBBY’s performance at the 2008 Robertson Irish Afternoon contains one of the most luminous lines of editorial gold I’ve read in my nigh on three years as ed: “Mr Fibby [are] an inappropriate act to stage in Robertson, on a Sunday afternoon, after a children’s dance performance.”

I like TIM FREEDMAN. His music. His jaunty, wine-tinged manner. His weathered churlishness. His political commentary. He once described meeting Kim Beazley in a roadside Burger King. His recollection of the then Opposition Leader’s assault on a Double Whopper was special. It belied fondness for the man and fortuitous melancholy that he would not go on to beat John Howard. Freedman has formed a new band, The Idle. He’s releasing his first album in six years: Australian Idle. After years with The Whitlams and solo tours with orchestras, he’s changing tack. My editor warned me that Freedman is a difficult interviewee. I heard “he’s not the man you thought he was.” The interview didn’t begin well. I was nervous, dry from a few whiskies the night before. “What are you up to today?” There was a long pause. Freedman snorted. Another pause. He laughed. “Um...” I’ve met plenty Silence continued to define Freedman’s of public servants after pacing. He would click his tongue three shows. You times into the self-made spaces; an odd, could always get drunk with a unnerving tick. Finally there was a break. Freedman addressed the new album’s Minister length, a compact 39 minutes. “There was a time when we were all trying to fill up a CD, and I think not only did it mean that albums could be patchy but it took us so long to make them.” Of the three covers on the album he quips “I could only really be bothered to write nine songs.” Freedman’s reflections on the new material also tell of a mysterious hiatus. The album cover shows him relaxing in a pool. “I’d just seen The Graduate and I liked how Dustin Hoffman escaped into the pool to escape the world, because I sort of escaped the world for the last six years.”

“Brilliant!” I bellow to Adam Hadley, whose nom de guerre is Not Important when he is fronting Fibby, possibly the world’s only sinister storytelling, ramshackle carnivale clad Slav-core quartet. The Nature of Robertson’s punitive stance on Fibby’s appearance at the Irish Afternoon is, Hadley explains, “the jumping off point” for their next big project, Mr Fibby’s Most Excellently Disappointing Wireless Adventure Time. “It chronicles our adventures on our way to the Robertson Irish Music Festival, which is a true story; we were asked and did play at it. It was one of our first tours. It was lovely, but also very surreal and bizarre.” For the uninitiated, this is the essence of a Fibby show. Yep, they’ve done it again folks; they’ve gone and made another radio play! 2009’s Ship of Fools went down a treat with Canberra audiences (“the audience fucked up but we were ok,” says Hadley, po-faced). In true Fibby fashion they’ve shaken things up the second time ‘round, and have recorded six eps to be broadcast on 2XX and streamed from their site every Saturday at 9pm from November 19 onwards. To launch the series, also in true Fibby fashion, there’ll be an “awful listening party” at Smiths Alternative Bookshop, which recently evolved into a wine bar. “People can get a bit boozy and we’ll have some stupid games and a little bit of a Fibby set. We have plans for the most cheap awful port we can find to be a little giveaway; little thimbles of port and Fibby makeovers and all kinds of stupidity. It just depends on how much dirt and ash we can bring into Smiths.” It comes as no surprise Mr Fibby have pursued the charmingly retro format of the radio play as their live performances bristle with theatrics rarely found amongst most groups today. Explains Hadley, “all of the awful banter and abuse between the four of us is completely expanded and the storytelling kind of dropped. We still have moments of that fairy tale thing and the music is still going to be very Fibby; beautiful, weird, intricate stuff.” But if Fibby are inappropriate for an Irish Afternoon, are they befitting for broadcast? “So long as there’s a solid warning at the start, we’re all right.” Here’s my solid warning: DRINK A THIMBLE OF PORT WITH MR FIBBY. Mr Fibby’s Most Excellently Disappointing Wireless Adventure Time will be launched at Smiths on Sat Nov 19 at 7.30pm. $5. Bargain. Head to mrfibby. com.au for all the info. They’re also gigging with good friends The Barons of Tang on Fri Nov 11 at the Polish Club. 7.30pm, $10/$8. Hadley also said something about a gig somewhere on Dec 8.

Freedman then answered without pulling dead air. “I used to dream of being able to go to towns I don’t live in and play music to people I don’t know, and I still get a thrill from it.” Though his affection lies with the now-dormant scene at Tilley’s Café, he spared a thought for others in Canberra. “I’ve met plenty of public servants after shows. The Department of Fisheries, Department of Customs...” he laughs. “Where was it? The Holy Grail? You could always get drunk with a Minister... well, a Shadow Minister from your past.” My time ran out. I informed Freedman. He told me to go on. Pleased and surprised, I followed up with a comment from his Facebook page. A man posted that Freedman’s music saved his life. Freedman hadn’t responded. “I used to get letters from overwrought teenagers quite a lot when Eternal Nightcap came out and if they were noticeably depressed then I would always write back to them but his life’s already been saved so it’s... um...”. I laughed and provided “not quite as pressing?” He snorted. This time I was happy to hear the sound. “Exactly.” I still like Tim Freedman. Tim Freedman and The Idle play The Street Theatre on Thursday-Friday November 17-18. Tickets are available through The Street. Australian Idle is released Wednesday November 19.

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JUMPIN’ JACK COLWELL

STIFF UPPER QUIP

Josh Brown

ZOYa PATEL

When a musician lists his type of influences as “quite dark; people like Bridezilla, Nick Cave and early Patrick Wolf”, coupled with the fact that he’s been trained as a classical pianist at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and can also play guitar, double bass, autoharp and pretty much anything else that you can throw at him, you know he’s on track to make something pretty special. The young man I’m referring to is JACK COLWELL, the Sydney-based frontman for indie folk act Jack Colwell & The Owls. Colwell is in the midst of promoting his new single Hopechest and will soon be putting it on display for audiences to hear in Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra.

Declan Melia of BRITISH INDIA has always been an intriguing interview subject. Having interviewed the man once before, I already feel a bit like we’re old friends thanks to his easygoing nature and penchant for tangential chatting. As soon as he gets on the phone, we’re engaged in an in-depth discussion about the George Harrison biopic that’s in cinemas now, and that Declan saw the night before. “It was really good,” he enthuses. “As is typical with biographies, the first half is always better than the second half. Everyone wants to see them when they’re young and sexy. Once they’re old and decaying, it’s a bit too much like real life then.”

Given his classical background, it seems a little odd that Colwell is gracing the stages of intimate I’m named pubs instead of lavish concert after a Rolling halls. “Well, I wasn’t that good at Stones song writing classical pieces,” he offers. and one of my “I was okay, but I knew a lot of middle names is people who were better. [From a young age] I found it really easy Wolfgang to write songs. I’m even named after a Rolling Stones song, Jumpin’ Jack Flash, and one of my middle names is Wolfgang, which my Mum gave me after her favourite composer Mozart. So even in my name there’s a marriage between the two genres.”

Speaking of real life, British India have been doing rather extraordinary things with theirs following the release of their third album Avalanche in April 2010. Over a year later, the album is still doing ridiculously well with fans, and the band have never been more popular. “We certainly didn’t know that Avalanche would still be kicking along at this stage, in fact we thought we’d probably have another record by this point!” Declan laughs. So why has the album been such a success, even more so than their two previous records?

Adapting genres and making them his own seems to be a bit of a trademark for Colwell, whose new single is a reworking of a song written in the ‘60s by an obscure English folk singer. “The song is an adaptation of a Vashti Bunyan song called Diamond Day,” he explains. “These days to do a rework of a song, certainly in terms of classical music – it’s not a big deal. Classical composers use themes from other people’s music to echo an idea but then take the idea further.” A technique another of Colwell’s idols, Tori Amos, has also employed on her latest album. He continues, “The melody from Diamond Day is used in Hopechest in order to echo that traditional English folk heritage, which is what my background is – being English and Welsh – but then it takes it into a view of my own.” Normally Colwell plays live accompanied by a talented backing band, but for his upcoming Canberra show he’ll be treating fans in the capital to a special, one of a kind solo performance. “They’ll probably hear a mix of older and new material, rather than just the stuff that’ll be coming out next year on my debut album Picture Window,” he says. “I think doing a solo show is probably one of the scariest things you can do because it’s just so much about you. For a very long time I didn’t really believe in myself as a solo player. But since having a successful run with the band shows, that gave me the power back in myself to have that presence for a solo show and to really make sure that when I was singing these songs I really believed in what I was singing.” Jack Colwell will play a solo show at The Front in Lyneham on Saturday November 19, alongside James Fahy and Lachlan Bryan. Tickets are $5 on the door.

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There’s just this ‘X’ factor that determines whether people are going to connect to a record, and that factor’s so intangible that you just never know!

“When we’re making records, or even when we’re just writing songs together, we’re kind of always looking at each other, a bit unsure,” Declan explains. “I don’t think there’s ever been a song where we’ve been like ‘yep, that’s a smash, that’s going to be great, people are going to like this’. But with Avalanche we certainly knew that we were making a record we liked and a record we were proud of.” It seems that regardless of how many years of experience they’ve had in the industry, it’s actually impossible to pick when something will succeed or miserably flop. “There’s just this ‘X’ factor that determines whether people are going to connect to a record, and that factor’s so intangible that you just never know!” Songwriting is still a mystery in many ways as well, he says. “I was trying to write some lyrics the other day, and it’s funny, man, I was like ‘okay, I have this song, needs some words, I need some kind of a theme’. And I wasn’t getting anywhere, because I was having an off day, I just wasn’t creative or whatever. And I thought ‘how did I used to do this?’ I can’t really remember how to do it, you know?” Apparently writer’s block is a good thing though – “it’s because it’s just never going to become (thank god), so practiced as to be automatic. You can’t do it in autopilot, you have to wait for that inspiration to hit!” Luckily for us though, British India have plans to start recording again early next year, after they finish up with their current Australian tour. And if Avalanche is anything to go by, we can’t wait to hear it! British India will be playing Mission to Launch Festival on Saturday December 31 at Weston Park. Tickets are through missiontolaunch.com.au and Moshtix from $135 a pop.


LUPINE FINERY CLARE BUTTERFIELD For most people, the word WOLFPACK draws connotations of The Hangover, the three best friends that anyone could have and the Facebook group they just joined commemorating the time they got roofied in Vegas. This is about to change. Made up of Laken (lead singer), Nina (guitar) and Tom (drums), Wolfpack are a rock ‘n’ roll three-piece from Melbourne. Their sound is “pretty manic,” says Tom, “the current mix is about 30% punk, 30% dirty rock, 10% surf, 10% stoner and 20% crooning.” According to the drummer, “the band met in the forest one night, having been adopted by neighbouring packs of wolves after being abandoned by their respective families.” Following lots of midnight moon howling sessions together they decided they needed to spread You don’t [make their sound further afield.

music] to make money or earn a living. You do it ‘cause you cannot fucking breathe without it!

They are still at the stage where a day job is required, but finding time for work and music isn’t hard. “Everyone has to work,” says Tom, “and to be honest, I don’t see music as a career. You don’t do it to make money or earn a living.” Laken adds “you do it ‘cause you cannot fucking breathe without it!” The band formed this year and despite being all shiny and new, they have toured with some pretty big names like UK punk act The Business, British India, The New Christs and The Go Set. Tom says every gig – large or small – is the same. “We love the shit out of playing live so whether there are 50 or 500 people watching we give it our all and pride ourselves on delivering a killer show and a real performance.” Up next for the band is the Women Who Rock Festival, a celebration of the contribution women make to the Australian music scene. Commenting on the gender imbalance in the Australian music industry, Tom believes it is a fear of females that drives male domination. “The Australian music industry, especially the rock scene, is just like every other industry. It always has been and still is absolutely shit-scared of strong females. As soon as there is anyone or anything in your band that challenges the insecure male ego then prepare to be treated like an outcast. That is not an attractive prospect for any young artist and unfortunately in a society driven by money, the lack of opportunities for commercial success for any female other than yet another pop princess means so much talent never gets the support it requires or the chance to develop.” Rounding out the year, Wolfpack have shows in Sydney and Melbourne. Their Christmas break will be short-lived as their debut single lands in January, with all proceeds going to an animal shelter in North Melbourne. Once the single is out, Wolfpack are planning a full national tour, followed by their first overseas shows in New Zealand. Wolfpack are playing at Women Who Rock at The Maram on Saturday November 19. Tickets are $22 and available via records.ruffnready.com.au/ womenwhorock .

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BLACK AND WHITE Lauren Bicknell Thomas Busby and Jeremy Marou of BUSBY MAROU make you want to sit in the shade on a warm, sunny afternoon with a cider and a content smile. Their tunes are genuine and honest with a warmth that feels instantly familiar. Jeremy seems gentle, easygoing and likes to laugh. On first impression, his music represents him well.

If you haven’t heard them Tom and I sort recently on the radio with of see ourselves Biding My Time, melting hearts as examples everywhere, you might have of a blackfella caught them at a live gig. As well and a whitefella as supporting the likes of Pete that actually get Murray, KD Lang, Dolly Parton and along together Birds of Tokyo, Busby Marou are about to embark on their second headline tour and are also a great festival band. Busby Marou’s self-titled album was released earlier this year and the boys promptly quit their day jobs when they were handed their first touring schedule. Jeremy says he very much likes the change in lifestyle. “Touring the country at the moment, playing music for a living, playing to different crowds – it’s amazing and I think I’m not going to get sick of it any time soon, that’s for sure. But no, I don’t miss my job one bit… I sat at a computer all bloody day!” For someone who plays so many instruments, it’s hard to imagine Jeremy just sitting at one computer day after day. He’s barely had a single music lesson in his life but he plays the guitar, bass, drums, ukulele and the piano. “The only person who sort of gave me a lesson was my Dad and he couldn’t really play either. He couldn’t really speak English, let alone play… it’s all by ear so I’ll pick it up and just sort of fiddle around with it until I work it out.” He’s like some kind of folksy Australian Jimi Hendrix but he doesn’t play guitar with his teeth. “Maybe if the music was a little bit heavier,” he laughs. But this band is not to be seen as a gimmick. There’s something too special about what they’re creating. Jeremy says that everyone gets something different from their music with songs being used for weddings and funerals alike. There are elements of Busby Marou that Jeremy hopes everyone will interpret well. “Tom and I see ourselves as examples of a blackfella and a whitefella who get along together; we see ourselves as an example of reconciliation in its best form. You know, two mates who get along, write music and do the same things.” While it wasn’t an original intention, it’s something they now take seriously. Busby Marou will be headed our way for The Corinbank Festival, held over Friday-Sunday March 2-4 next year in the Brindabella Mountains. Tickets are available now from the festival’s website.

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frameworks that we played with towards the end of the session and one of those ended up on the album.”

PERFECT POLLINATION PETER KRBAVAC It’s fitting that just as spring kicks into gear, POLLEN TRIO have sprung back into action. The local group is preparing to release its first full-length Roll Slow on local label hellosQuare this month. The three-piece – pianist Austin Buckett, drummer Evan Dorrian and bassist Christopher Pound – began in 2008 as Austin Benjamin Trio, playing an experimental brand of jazz. However, they soon decided to take a more free-form musical tack and with a change in approach came a change of name.

There’s a distinctive new timbre in the sound now

As the group’s musical ideas are generally born out of extended jams, a bit of editing is sometimes required in the mixing stages. “I think with the kind of music we play the post-production stage is pretty important as it allows you to highlight the really good moments,” Evan explains. “It’s also a necessity because we had about three hours worth of material from the session and so we had to whittle it down to what we thought was the best 50 minutes.” Upon listening to Roll Slow, the most immediate difference is the addition of trumpeter Miroslav Bukovsky, an ARIA Award-winning musician and lecturer at the School of Music who has spent over 30 years playing in various groups. “Our bass player has been living in Cyprus for a year or so now and so Austin and I were just playing as a duo,” Evan says. “Miroslav happened to be around one day and we jammed and the energy was great, so we just kept going.” Evan says they soon realised the instrument could play a different role in the band.

Their first release as Pollen Trio was six track EP 230509, a heavily improvisation-based affair. Roll Slow again sees the trio forging into the great unknown. “For 230509 Austin just brought in some piano frameworks and melodic bits that we expanded on. This time ‘round we really went in unprepared though,” Evan says.

“In a jazz context you most often hear [the trumpet] soloing on top of a rhythm section,” Evan says. “But jazz isn’t really what we’re doing, so Miroslav plays like he’s part of a strange rhythm section, very texturally and also rhythmically. In fact he also plays percussion and uses a looper. So there’s a distinctive new timbre in the sound now, but I think our collective outlook is still the same.”

“The energy in the trio was really good so within the first three months we booked time in the studio with the intention of just improvising for a day. In the end we did set up a couple of little

Pollen Trio launch Roll Slow on Thursday November 17 at The Loft upstairs at the Majura Medical Centre in Dickson, supported by Shoeb Ahmad. The album is available to pre-order through hellosquarerecordings.com .

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THE REALNESS The Australian hip-hop community is in mourning after the passing of highly renowned and much loved veteran of the scene Hunter. Hunter died on Thursday October 20 following a long battle with cancer since his diagnosis in 2009. The hip-hop community has been united in an outpouring of grief, support, solidarity and respect for one of Australia’s true hip-hop greats. Passionate, generous, sincere, intelligent and with an unparalleled sense of humour, Hunter was the full package. Since his diagnosis Hunter was outspoken about his illness, recorded ferociously and worked closely with CanTeen to put together a forthcoming compilation to raise awareness and support for children living with cancer. The compilation will feature unreleased tunes from Hilltop Hoods, Drapht, Downsyde, Koolism, Bias B, Hermitude and Hunter himself. For further information on the CanTeen Charity project, images and videos go to the project website:ozhiphopsupportscanteen.com. Make sure you go pick up all of Hunter’s back catalogue to show your support for the man, his family and the Syllabolix crew. Let’s keep his legacy alive! Rival MC and DJ Returnagain are Impossible Odds, a Brisbane Indigenous hip-hop/soul group. The fellas have just released their debut album Against All Odds. With strong Australian Aboriginal, Tongan and South Sea Island family roots, Rival’s lyrics address not only issues facing his people, but more to the point, Australian society and the global community in general. A must listen.

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Smiles Again from Mind Over Matter has just dropped his new EP How About You Stop Being So Serious & Say Something Funny. The nine tune EP is a fresh take on hip-hop from the artist, littered with sharp satirical lyrics where Smiles takes on personas different from his own to convey his messages. Production credits include DJ Ilz, Drakezilla, Konfuzion, Jon Reichardt and more. Grab a copy from whosmilesagain.com . Eloquor has been putting in some serious work of late and is set to release his new EP Human Condition on Wednesday November 9 through Myspherical Entertainment. Enlisting Suffa, Simplex, Frank Dukes, Pokerbeats and Hattori Hanzo, Eloquor has assembled a dream line-up of beat makers and is joined on the mic by 1/6 and Pegz on the tune Mr Personality. Make sure you grab a copy when it drops. Modeselektor’s 50 Weapons label is fast becoming one of my faves, consistently releasing cutting edge electronic music not bound by genre. The big news is that following the recent Anstam album (which is excellent) they’ve got full lengths planned from Phon.o, Doc Daneeka + Damage and, in massive news, Addison Groove. Addison’s as yet untitled album is due in 2012. Footcrab, footcrab, footcrab... Lots more album tidbit news as we finish the year and head into 2012 now. Gonjasufi will release a new mini album on Warp called Mu.zz.le early next year. It’s set to be a ten track affair and continue the mind-bending soul he unveiled on his Sufi & The Killer Debut. Nicolas Jaar has followed up his essential Space Is Only Noise album with a new EP through his Clown & Sunset label’s website. It’s called Don’t Break Roshambo aka Ced Nada roshambizzle@yahoo.com.au


At the moment we’re working 16 hour days – we’re being true to our name!

HERMITS AT HEART Morgan Richards and Darcy Davis Electronic music producers often lead reclusive lifestyles, cloistering themselves in studio dungeons for days on end. Hiphop beatsmiths HERMITUDE would seem to reflect this in very name. But over the past ten years, the duo – Luke Dubber and Angus Stewart, better known as Dubs and El Gusto – have moved from their caves of solitude in the Blue Mountains to packing out dancefloors in the big smoke. “We started out sneaking into Gusto’s dad’s studio and writing beats from dusk ‘til dawn,” explains Dubs. The duo’s debut album, Alleys to Valleys, was well received by fans and critics alike. It evoked a laidback, pensive mood with tracks like Splendid Isolation and Cave Styles. Their sophomore release, 2005’s Tales of the Drift, continued this pleasant meandering, until the duo took a different direction with Threads in 2008. The album made ventures into electronic music territory, with a fuller, dancier sound.

move towards more upbeat tunes. “We’ve always done more downtempo hip-hop. The new album’s got plenty of slow burners but we wanted to inject a bit of fire and energy into it. We started messing around with some faster tempos, songs that would get people moving. You realise that fully smoked-out tunes aren’t gonna get the dancefloor cranking, so it’s good to have a few bangers in reserve.” The duo will be road-testing the new material this summer, with an Australian tour including four festival shows. “We’ve been in the studio for weeks and we’ve got about three or four more tunes. We’ll see what people think, bump heads and say what’s up. Then back into the studio for more mixing. At the moment we’re working 16 hour days – we’re being true to our name!” But does the name still fit? They’re not exactly hermits these day, packing out dancefloors and getting attention from DJs around the world. Luke laughs in response. “We’d never change our name, it’ll just have to stay ironic – the most famous hermits the world has ever seen!” Catch Hermitude live at the Summer Rhythm Festival on Saturday December 10. Tickets are $95 + bf and are available through Oztix

After a two year hiatus, during which Dubs and Gusto worked on side projects, Hermitude burst back onto the scene this January with the single Get Into My Life. “We kinda just wrote that tune because we hadn’t done any releases in a couple of years and thought we’d better get our shit together to let people know that we’re still alive. We played a couple of shows and every time we dropped that track everyone went absolutely mental so we thought we better make a new album.” But they’ve taken their time – the album is due next February. Last month they dropped another single, the wickedly catchy Speak of the Devil. The track mixes warm, scratchy samples with pulsing synths and a chorus by Sydney artist Chaos Emerald. It’s about that little devil on your shoulder that pokes and prods you to get up and go dance. Dubs explains the

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METALISE Where does the year go? Metal Fiesta is nearly upon us and the huge bill of all Aussie metal is headed by a band I remember meeting as far fresher-faced young men than the bearded metal warriors covering the advertising for this show. Frankenbok had recorded Greetings and Salutations and a ‘more metal Mr Bungle’ was a fairly overused analogy for their sound back then when Five Star Prison Cell vocalist Adam Glynn was on the microphone, with a highly Mike Patton-esque delivery. Over a decade and two vocalists later (and the addition of Yeti replacing Scott and former singer/guitarist Adam on second guitar) and the band has evolved into an even more formidable live beast. Their new album The End of All You Know is available to pre-order on the band’s website (frankebok.com) and for 30 bucks you get the CD, a shirt, a stubby holder and a sticker. The Metal Fiesta show which serves as the Bok’s album launch is on at The Basement in Belconnen on Saturday November 19 and also includes House of Thumbs, Witchgrinder, Hatchet Dawn, Darker Half, Nobody Knew They Were Robots, Strict Vincent, Neanderthug and The Devilzwork. Monday November 21 at The Maram out in Erindale features the Romanian band Negura Bunget who are in Australia to headline the Sonic Forge Festival in Melbourne on Saturday November 26. A blend of their Romanian musical history and an atmospheric black metal assault, it is well worth a trip out to the south side to see them ply their trade. If Sonic Forge is more your taste, there is a HUGE 30 Aussie band bill at The Esplanade in St Kilda to complement the Romanian’s visit to Australia. Included are Dreadnaught, Eye of the Enemy, Chaos Divine, Million Dead Birds Laughing, Aeon of Horus, The Schoenberg Automaton, In Malice’s Wake, Eyefear, Circles, Ouroboros, Okera, Orpheus, Elysian, Synthetic Breed, Lynchmada, Arbrynth, Black Orchid, The Automata, Hemina, Naberus, Untruth, King Parrot, Whoretopsy, Odiusembowel, Phil Para & Band and more to be announced. Tickets are 20 bucks plus booking fee through Oztix. I know I’ve mentioned it a LOT, but god damn, Looking Glass III is the bomb. Get on that record. Claim The Throne, Perth’s most pirate metal band ever have a new webstore to buy such 666mas essentials as CTT g-strings for the little lady. Check claimthethrone.bigcartel.com for all the stocking fillers. Arrrrrr! This fortnight also sees Children of Bodom hit The Big Top in Sydney on Saturday November 12 with in-store signings featuring Alexi Laiho, Roope Latvala and Hennka Blacksmith at Icon Music in West Ryde on Friday November 11 at 5.30pm. Unkle Kronoz Band of the Week: Brainoil – Eyehategod-esque sludge of the highest (or perhaps lowest) order have a new LP on the 20 Buck Spin label. listen.20buckspin.com/album/death-of-thisdry-season . JOSH NIXON doomtildeath@hotmail.com

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GETAWAY GET BACK TOGETHER JESSICA CONWAY “The break up wasn’t nasty, we just weren’t talking anymore,” THE GETAWAY PLAN’s frontman Matthew Wright recounts, proving silence isn’t always golden. The Melburnian alternative rock band experienced a meteoric rise to fame fresh out of school, with their debut single Where the City Meets The Sea climbing to #6 on the ARIA Aussie Singles Chart. “The touring schedule was too much for us, we were too young. We were afraid of burning out, so we decided to pull the pin,” Matt explains. After a couple of years apart and experimenting with other bands, The Getaway Plan officially reformed last year. “We realised we were ready to take this on again, and do it right.” Matt’s re-entered the realm of back to back interviews, as The Getaway Plan enjoys a warm welcome back from fans and critics alike.

Living with the guys was incredible; it helped us rekindle a friendship that we lost when we broke up

Before my inner alternative-pop-rock fan gets my hopes up for a lasting reunion offering more alternative anthems and future melodic vocal rollercoasters, I had to know why Matt figured they’d stick this time. “We’ve all matured so much,” he says. “We’ve readied ourselves for the lifestyle that we weren’t ready for before. The dynamics are so much better between us as a group. We’ve realised how lucky we were to have what we had. “It was tiring and it’s really hard out there… I had to start looking after my own equipment. We didn’t have guitar techs or tour managers like we usually do with Getaway,” Matt says of his post break up reality check. The band headed to Toronto to knuckle down and create the new album, Requiem, 12 hours a day, six days a week for three months, all the while living together. “Living with the guys was incredible; it helped us rekindle a friendship that we lost when we broke up,” Matt recounts. “People would think we’d get sick of each other,” he laughs, “but we couldn’t get enough, hey!” The album is “a lot more real than our last record” says Matt. “Instead of searching for the best takes, we were searching for the most interesting and looking for energy and performance, rather than perfection,” he explains. Their latest film clip for The Reckoning is intense. Inspired by a movie scene, it depicts the murder of a child by his peers. “We never set out for it to be offensive,” Matt says of recent publicity. “We were more just like ‘let’s just do what we fucking want and if something turns wild then let’s just let it slide this time around’.” While The Getaway Plan have stuck to their successful formula of old, they have added depth by using a number of orchestral elements, with strings and wind instruments layering the tracks. Two choirs feature, adding to the emotion and effect of The Getaway Plan’s thematic, and often dramatic, songs. Their revamped, fleshed out sound is both expansive and captivating. Catch The Getaway Plan, supported by Break Even and Gatherer, live at the University of Canberra Refectory on Sunday November 27. Tickets are $37 + bf via Ticketek.


Scaramouche guitarist Leigh Barker says “I think a lot of people can find music really exciting if it doesn’t necessarily conform to a particular label, because it’s more likely to be surprising. And I personally love the psychedelic element because it provides a spatial atmosphere that adds a whole new dimension to traditionally heavy rock, and it also opens up for more interesting song structures and musical tangents. As a band, we make a conscious decision not to tie ourselves to any specific genre or label which we hope will be interesting musically.”

WILL YOU DO THE FANDANGO? DAN BIGNA In earlier days I figured that heaviness was the key to salvation and the heavier the better. I then realised intense music could also be highly psychedelic which is why mind and body expansion from the likes of Sleep and Kyuss worked a particular magic. So too does former Canberra band SCARAMOUCHE craft a fine balance between sounds that heighten consciousness as well I think a lot of as rattle the innards. people can find music really exciting if it This becomes clear on the band’s EP doesn’t necessarily Access Denied which brings on rhythms a to rm confo tight and fluid, but also lets rip with the particular label

guitars in shifting, multi-coloured patterns. The title track embraces a grungy earthiness with edgy funk driving forward understated progressive moves in case you weren’t paying attention. But that’s not all. Set Sail kicks off with hard and fat riffage from the Radio Birdman songbook with an extended mid section that allows the band to stretch out for a bit.

Scaramouche formed in ‘09 and have successfully translated these ideas into recordings and live performance. A move from Canberra to Melbourne suggests a desire to keep the momentum going and Barker’s perception is that Melbourne “feels to me like a bigger version of Canberra”, which is true to the extent that both Melbourne and Canberra embrace new sounds from bands who are into pushing boundaries. At any one time individual members of the band will embrace the progressive sounds of Motörhead, Earth and Mogwai but a unified vision remains intact. “I think each of us is constantly on the search for musical inspiration,” Barker says, “and incorporating this into our jams always keeps it interesting for us.” Scaramouche are working towards an album and Barker says that “our big challenge is to blend the raw energy we try to present onstage with a recording that also has depth and imagination which hopefully takes the listener on a journey.” The kick for the band comes from live performance which for Barker is akin to a tasty, sensual high. “We love to play live shows and we get a massive kick out of that feeling when we play well. And when we get a good response from the crowd, or when people approach and congratulate us, it makes it that much sweeter for us.” Catch Scaramouche, supported by Looking Glass and The London Circuit, live at The ANU Bar on Friday November 11. Tickets are $10 on the door.

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the word

on albums

album of the issue tom waits - bad as me [warner/anti]

An extraordinary thing happened to Tom Waits over the years – he became a scruffy cultural icon. The mad old coot still barks like a lost orphan in a dust storm but consensus holds he can do no wrong. No matter how abstract his imagery, wicked his couplings, uncomfortable his gait, unfriendly his rhythms. And he seems to have whittled down to a couple of rhythms nowadays: the tin pot bashing, Captain Beefheart-thieving, arm waving type (She Stole The Blush, Bad As Me, Hell Broke Luce) and the relaxed, contemplative, slow groove type (Pay Me, Talking At The Same Time). Throw in a brazenly referenced Red Right Hand (Nick Cave) on the syncopated Raised Right Men for good measure. It’s actually very conservative – there are no surprises. Flying off the handle is quite predictable since Waits’ early ‘90s reinvention. But this is a good thing. Especially when one of his most important sparring partners returns; Marc Ribot’s scattershot guitar phrasings are as essential to the Waits sound as the singer’s gruff growl. Guest spots abound (Keith Richards, Les Claypool, Dave Hidalgo) but the old fool is still the carnival ringleader. Wily and inscrutable as ever. JUSTIN HOOK

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Ben Lee Deeper Into Dreams [Dew Process/Universal]

CANYONS Keep Your Dreams [MODULAR]

James Blake Enough Thunder EP [Atlas]

Ben Lee’s eighth studio release marks a new creative direction with a concept album delving into the magic of dreams and the honesty that comes with the lack of control the dreamer has over the experience. The LP, recorded at the artist’s LA home studio, marks Ben’s first go at self-production. The end result is constructed with descriptions of dreams (taken from the artist’s friends and family and recorded by him) at the start, centre and end of the album, tying it all together.

One drawback of digital distribution of music is sometimes the first time you hear an album now, it’s through laptop speakers. Like my first time with this album. To me it was a soulless clatter of trebly vocals, ok beats, but just kind of nothingness. Luckily, I took the option of plugging the computer into the stereo, and that changed everything. For years I have been bemoaning the lack of complex basslines and drum patterns in modern house music, and Canyons have seemingly answered every gripe I could ever have had with the genre in 11 magical tracks.

Last year James Blake’s self-titled debut album turned millions of heads. He was and is a sensation and deserves to be. Those trademark post-dubstep wanderings strung together by soulful, moving moans and whispers creep under your skin in a way very few pasty white men have ever perfected.

It’s a self-indulgent approach, as the dream descriptions, while a curiosity when first heard, are boring fillers after that. The album’s flow is a lot like a sleeper awakening. Slow and drowsy to start with, followed by a quick stretch before the album finally takes off at track four, Indian Myna. Jaunty, brass-infused and filled with the typical irrepressible Ben Lee perkiness, this is one of the highlights; the other being the gentle ballad Glue. I Want My Mind Back, with its constantly changing shades of colour, demonstrates Ben’s willingness to explore and experiment with complex song construction. Other winners are Pointless Beauty with its catchy opening riff, the bouncy synth-driven When the Light Goes Out and The Church of Everybody Else with its rocky undertone. The music has an appealing cuteness, but the concept approach is less successful because no one is really interested in dreams except their own.

The basslines are round, varied and exciting. The beats are big but not overbearing, and the sentiment behind most of the songs is soulful and joyous. To wit, when you get jolted out of a deepening progression by what will invariably be the feel good hit of the summer, When I See You Again, it’s almost a disappointment – that is, until you finish the record and pop it on a again. You get to revel in the amazing sax of Under A Blue Sky, and if you aren’t sold on the variety, by the time the darkness of The Bridge comes around, your ears prick up with delight. Even the vocals are ok, and normally they are the thing that kills house music for me. A wonderfully varied selection from the funky and dancefloor to the dark and smokemachiney, it’s an album full of talent and imagination. A killer release, and a very worthwhile pickup for the impending summer.

RORY McCARTNEY

ALISTAIR ERSKINE

Riding the wave of hype, Blake covered Joni Mitchell’s A Case of You and collaborated with Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon on a track entitled Fall Creek Boy’s Choir and both are on this EP. The latter track, though, was a bit cracked. The strength of Blake’s music is its ability to weave a soft rope between your ears as you listen to it, literally tying you into the music to the point where the song’s end feels like the end of something far more profound. Fall Creek Boy’s Choir didn’t exactly achieve that and neither does this EP. The songs are too detached, too disjointed. They feel like slightly botched experiments rather than successful ones. Blake’s simple piano cover of Mitchell’s A Case of You may be the standout track of this record and it’s as far from any kind of dubstep as you’ll ever hear. One thing is clear: Blake is drifting in shifts and swipes away from his roots as a dubstep prodigy. Wherever he’s going is a unique and relatively unmapped place but this first step has only glimpses of the firmness and clarity of his debut. ASHLEY THOMSON


singled out

with Dave Ruby Howe

NEW EMPIRE SYMMETRY [Independent] Sydney-based pop rock group New Empire have been creating a buzz amongst their growing number of fans with the release of Symmetry, the anticipated follow up to their debut album, 2008’s Come With Me Tonight. Upon first listen, it’s evident the band have matured as songwriters and as a result have crafted a balanced album of well thought out lyrics and striking melodies. The album runs at a leisurely pace as a whole, but there is a natural charm in the minimalistic elements that is inviting after multiple listens. A genuine sense of intrigue, warmth and hope draws the listener in on many of the songs. Opener Across the Oceans sets a positive mood with its heartfelt soundscape of self-reflection and displays genuine qualities in vocalist Jeremy Fowler’s musical storytelling. Standout tracks are the more upbeat Give Me The World and Here In Your Eyes, both of which contain anthemic hooks that invoke a sing-along. Ghosts shows the band’s ability to pen a mournful tale of loss without losing the song’s integrity. Each song complements the other from start to finish as the album progresses, culminating in a well placed final song in One Heart Million Voices, a touching finish to a remarkable effort from this rising Australian band. As with most albums, there are hits and misses, but overall the band’s lyrical strength and honesty shine through to make this release definitely worth a listen. grace brooks

Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds - self titled [Sour Mash/Universal] In the wake of the recent debut from the Liam Gallagherfronted Beady Eye, Noel finally surfaces from spending over a year in the studio with his own solo outfit, the distinctly psychedelic sounding High Flying Birds. So does it sound much like Oasis? Well, if Beady Eye captured the distortion heavy, fist-pumping end of Oasis (Cigarettes And Alcohol and Supersonic) this album comes across more along the lines of atmospheric, introspective moments (Talk Tonight and Fade Away). While the familiar uplifting choruses and head-nodding strummed guitar chords remain firmly in place on tracks like Soldier Boys And Jesus Freaks and Everybody’s On The Run, it’s Dave Sardy’s impressive widescreen production that really registers an impact here. Indeed, the latter track positively glows with sweeping Morricone-esque orchestral arrangements, while elsewhere epic closer Stop The Clocks (originally written for Oasis) sees layers of uplifting choir vocals building against Noel’s acoustic guitar and drums, in a moment that rivals Champagne Supernova in the lighters aloft stakes. Elsewhere, the integration of programmed club-friendly rhythms and jangling house pianos on AKA... What A Life closely calls to mind Kasabian’s more propulsive moments, a band that Noel hasn’t shied away from praising. Non-Oasis fans probably won’t be converted but fans of Noel’s preceding work are unlikely to be disappointed. CHRIS DOWNTON

THE LAST KINECTION NEXT OF KIN [ELEFANT TRACKS] The Last Kinection have launched themselves into a prime position on the hip-hop scene with their second album. It’s a magnificent follow on from their first which didn’t get as much attention – the reason might be in now proudly having an independent label under their urban belts, giving their songs about respect for culture and fighting hate some lovely, high-quality production. The trio have been sending out their messages now for five years. It’s so nice to see them absolutely nailing this album and getting what they deserve – a place alongside the stars of Australian hip-hop, many of whom feature throughout Next of Kin, such as Ozi Batla, Omar Musa and Lotek (and wow, what amazing breaks you’ll find on that track). They combine high-class hip-hop and Naomi Wenitong’s sweet voice with traditional language and a didge for a traditional spin on modern, often digital sounds. Check out Yawar-Gu for a brilliant example of what happens when didgeridoo and traditional language meld with breaks. Goosebumps! Now, “you’ve gotta fight, for your right, to live in a country where everyone gets along” doesn’t have the familiar ring to it, but the message is a good one, a clear one, and one that I wish we saw more often in the powerful realm of music. Their passionate protest and calls for unity, with an incredible talent for cross-cultural instruments, make this an Australian hip-hop album that speaks powerful words to a younger generation. DANIKA NAYNA

Big Sean ft. Nicki Minaj Dance (A$$) [Universal] Just like the maker of the song which he softly samples here, Big Sean has a resounding air of douchebaggery akin to MC Hammer and you can’t tell if he’s a genius or he just fell arse backwards into a hit song. That image is fitting considering Sean and Nicki spend four good minutes talking in depth about butt cheeks and poo holes. As you can guess it’s just crazy enough to work.

Catcall Satellites Ivy League] If there’s any justice in the universe then this summer all the girls will be humming Catcall’s incongruous hooks about satellites and meteors instead of LMFAO garbage as this is simply gorgeous, golden pop. A guy can dream, right?

Hot Chelle Rae Tonight Tonight [Sony] I have no clue who or what (?) a Hot Chelle Rae is but this is music made expressly for white people with no taste in, well, anything.

The Black Keys Lonely Boy [Warner] Though you couldn’t say that Lonely Boy heralds a seismic shift for The Black Keys and their trademark sound, who wants the twosome to be making some fucking dense prog opera when they can still fuzz their jams out to the nines and hammer home a dirty, crunchy and ballsy rocker like this?

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the word

on films

WITH MELISSA WELLHAM

Over the course of the Canberra International Film Festival, Canberra residents were treated to 95 screenings, of 58 fantastic films, over the course of two weeks. This year the selection has included Gus Van Sant’s Restless, Lars von Trier’s Melancholia, the adaptation of Norwegian Wood based on the novel by Haruki Murakami, and the much-anticipated We Need To Talk About Kevin starring Tilda Swinton. The range of films has been incredible – personally, I made it my goal to see as many CIFF films as possible. I challenge you to do the same next year…

quote of the issue

Lucy (Francesca Gasteen): “I’m quitting you!” Jackie (Cindy Nelson): “Fine, you’re fired!” - Jucy

Jucy

Sidewalls

Norwegian Wood

Jucy is a surprisingly accomplished Australian comedy. “Australian comedy,” I hear you ask, “Does such a thing even exist?!” In recent years, the answer has increasingly been, “Yes.” It turns out not all Australian films are depressing accounts of regional isolation and emotional distance. Jucy follows two main characters – Jackie (Cindy Nelson) and Lucy (Francesca Gasteen), who together are ‘Jucy’ – and depicts the intricacies of female friendships, or “womance.”

Sidewalls is a clever and charming romantic comedy set in Buenos Aires.

In my dreams, Norwegian Wood (based on the bestselling novel by Haruki Murakami) would be beautiful, poignant and heartbreaking. In reality… I dozed off several times. Norwegian Wood just never grabs you. The story itself is full of sadness, yearning and sexuality, but this incarnation seems boring and oddly paced.

Jackie and Lucy are in their mid-20s, and fine with their status as town kooks – but their friends and family don’t approve of how the two haven’t changed since they were teens. Both have relationship hang-ups and stalled careers, but when they are challenged to grow up, the strain they put on themselves begins to put a strain on their relationship. For a low-budget production, Jucy looks great. The film is brightly coloured, and the quirkiness of Jackie and Lucy allow for some unexpected outfits that lend visual flavour. Jucy has been called a “womantic comedy,” and with so many films focusing on romantic relationships, it’s nice to see one that focuses on what can be an even more enduring bond – friendship. Some scenes are slightly stilted, and perhaps would have benefited from a few more takes – but Jucy is, overall, a very sweet and silly film. Melissa Wellham

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Reflecting on how different landscapes – whether the architecture of the city, or the digital world – can both connect and isolate people, Sidewalls explores how even in a city thrumming with people, individuals can feel completely alone. Martin (Javier Drolas) and Mariana (Pilar Lopez de Ayala) live in buildings opposite each other, and while their paths cross at many points throughout the film, it seems they are destined to never meet. Instead the audience is privy to the intricacies of their private lives, stories of their past heartbreaks and their current fears, and the quirks of each character that show just how perfectly they are suited to one another. Sidewalls has been compared to Woody Allen’s films from the 1970s: it features the same kind of characters with the same kinds of neuroses; the cityscape is an integral part of the plot; and love is bittersweet but no less necessary because of it. There is little to criticise here, except for a few moments that are slightly over sentimental. But most of the time this is a clever comedy with witty wordplay, and includes some amazing cinematography that highlights the hidden beauty of Buenos Aires – of any city, really – that can be so easy to overlook in day-to-day life. Melissa Wellham

Toru is a university student living through the turbulent 1960s in Tokyo – in love with an unreachable girl from his past, Naoko; haunted by memories of his friend Kizuki, Naoko’s one love; and struggling to come to terms with who he is. Elements of this film are wonderful – the 1960s setting is nostalgic and atmospheric, and some of the themes remain poignant. Overall, the film is just too still and unengaging. Slow films can work, but this one doesn’t have enough to keep you interested, and I felt thoroughly disconnected to all of the characters (as well as irritated by most of them). I also felt that the acting wasn’t great. Naoko was unconvincing and irritating, and Toru slightly too cardboard to empathise with. The only character worth two cents was Midori, a girl Toru befriends at university, and although she’s very annoying she is also very watchable and charismatic. I’m very sad that this film left me as unsatisfied as it did, and while it is still worth a watch, I personally was pretty disappointed. MEGAN McKEOUGH


the word on dvds

On Trial [Roadshow/ABC] Whether by design or serendipity, when On Trial first aired back in June it was up against one of the many iterations of the long-running US series Law & Order. Whilst the latter is ostensibly about the criminal justice system – honestly, it says so right in the opening credits! – it’s actually more of a formulaic hour drama with a bit of gavel banging, shouts of “order” and headlinegrabbing corpse discoveries thrown in for good measure. Whereas the former is an intense, illuminating and richly rewarding sneak peak into the Australian court system. For the first time ever, cameras were allowed into court to follow the trials of three individuals. Judges, trail lawyers, the accused, victims, relatives of victims and practically anyone connected to each case gives perspectives rarely seen in the two minute grabs on the six o’clock news. It isn’t glamorous; it’s procedural, precise, but never tedious. On Trial covers three cases – gun-related violence in one, a murder in another and finally, the robbery of a taxi driver. In each, the viewer gets to methodically track progress and slowly form opinions on guilt vs innocence. And so we begin to convince ourselves we know what’s going on and what really happened. Ultimately – as the first case proves quite adequately – picking liars is quite difficult. It’s very easy to convince ourselves of a narrative of events that conflicts with reality. Indeed we do that in our everyday lives without blinking, and probably do so with alarming frequency. On Trial reminds us that we’re mostly in the dark. As one of the Crown Prosecutors reminds us, the criminal justice system deals with events in which there are no winners. A grim footnote to an extraordinary and essential series. Hopefully there’s more on the way. JUSTIN HOOK

1991: The Year Punk Broke [Universal] You’d be hard pressed to find a better snapshot of the early 1990s alternative music scene than David Markey’s 1991 tour film The Year Punk Broke. The ‘punk’ in the title is appropriate too as the featured bands (including Sonic Youth, Nirvana and Babes in Toyland) had each taken cues from the 1980s music underground which reveals a line of continuity that belied any notion ‘grunge’ had appeared out of nowhere. In fact the line goes back much further, so it is entirely appropriate that The Ramones are on board to let the kids know that loud and rebellious didn’t wholly belong to Kurt Cobain and J Mascis. A loose narrative thread is provided by Sonic Youth who headlined a rollercoaster 1991 European tour with an entourage that to this day remains a music geek’s wet dream. The in-between concert shots mostly comprising guitarist Thurston Moore engaged in pretentious performance art are a tad annoying, but an undeniable enthusiasm is nevertheless infectious. The upside comes from those moments on stage when a band gels, the energy is pulsing and the crowd love the cascading distortion. There is lots of that in this film which is new to DVD, 20 years after the event. Witnessing Nirvana tear through Negative Creep with Kurt Cobain in full on punk rock destructo mode is sheer viewing pleasure. And what a joy it is to hear sexy Kat Bjelland from Babes in Toyland shred her vocal chords on the wild ride Dustcake Boy. Of course Sonic Youth also come up with the goods with Dirty Boots being simply delicious goo. Dan Bigna

Arthur [Warner Home Video] Let’s be honest, the reaction to this film upon release was a tad precious. Not knowing any better you’d think that Russell Brand had desecrated the Sistine Chapel. In fact all he had done was star in a remake of a forgettable but oddly exalted comedy from the early ‘80s dreamt up entirely to play on the public persona of its star (Dudley Moore) as a shambolic, alcoholic womaniser. It’s probably best remembered for Christopher Cross’ theme song than the quality of its acting or script. So please, stop all the handwringing and head nodding – this 2011 version of Arthur is perfectly fine for what it is: a formulaic screwball comedy. What it has going for it is Russell Brand and Helen Mirren. The former, like Moore, used to be a shambolic drunk womaniser (with a considerable substance abuse history to boot) but about-faced his career a few years back and has become semi-respectable. A do-nothing son of a billionaire with a pot bellied manservant, the ever reliable Luis Guzman, has been set up to marry the venal ladder climbing bitch straight out of central casting, Susan Johnson (Jennifer Garner, playing well against type). Overseeing it all is Hobson (Mirren), officially Arthur’s nanny, but really his fauxmother and chief gatekeeper for the drunk man-child. The first half hour looks like Mirren and Brand are acting in completely different films, but an easy rapport grows between the two to the point where the film is more about Arthur/Hobson than Arthur/ Susan. This is a major fault as Arthur becomes besotted with a struggling writer/unofficial tour guide from the ‘burbs (Greta Gerwig) and the tension between the three is nonexistent. That aside, Arthur is a better-than-expected romp. JUSTIN HOOK

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the word

BLACKBOX

on games

God of War Collection – Volume II (aka Origins Collection) Developer: Ready at Dawn (Santa Monica Studio) Platform: PS3 Length: 5-10hrs x2 Rating: Worth grabbing In some regards this review seems kinda pointless. If you’re like me and already like the God of War series, you’re gonna love this collection as it’s pretty much just more of the same. If however, after five GoW titles (six if you include the phone one) you haven’t been won over, then I doubt a collector’s pack is going to do much for you. That said, GoW has become renowned for being one of, if not the best, hack and slash title out there, so if you haven’t switched onto this awesome series yet, maybe now’s the time you start listening. This second GoW collection sees the two PSP titles, Chains of Olympus (2008) and Ghost of Sparta (2010), ported over to the PS3. Not looking to do things by halves, Ready at Dawn have upgraded the models and resampled textures, making the game stand up to the 1080p test, all at 60fps. Polished or not though, the games still do reflect their PSP heritage. The settings and set pieces lack the awe-inspiring grandeur of their native sibling. Likewise, the length of each is a little brisk. Despite these and various other technical inferiorities, the GoW DNA still pulses strongly through these titles. You’re still kicking ass and occasionally taking names in a way that makes for a truly entertaining experience. If you ever had any doubts, these titles show you just how much it’s the gameplay that makes this series. Spinning his blades in a manner that would make most ballerinas jealous, Kratos’ ability to reek carnage requires much more than an iron thumb. Varying it up between light, heavy and aerial attacks, grabs, reversals, projectiles and even spells, the game challenges the player’s approach on a per set-piece basis. And when I say challenge, I mean it. Struggling to stave off a wave of medusas or get that final boss blow in, the game almost always rewards your successful efforts by setting some more enemies on your ass. The result is a highly addictive experience. If it wasn’t for the fact you often have to re-watch the same cut scene or repeat some trivial bit of gameplay each attempt, I would almost be inclined to say it was perfect. Despite the near flawless nature of the gameplay, it is still just the same thing you’ve done before. As such, if you’re a veteran to the series, your time may be better spent playing a new series like My Horse and Me. Alternatively, if you’re completely new to the series, I would recommend you instead check out God of War III. For those of you though whose GoW hunger lust just hasn’t been quenched yet, make sure you drink in this double shot of awesomeness. TORBEN SKO

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This month marks a sad day in Australian television history – Spicks and Specks (ABC1, Wed Nov 23, 8.30pm) airs its finale. The upstart music quiz show that should have been a cult hit got so popular its host earned two gold Logie nominations and his own tonight show. It turned a music savant into a household name and made a triple j contributor so famous she only needed one name, like Madonna. Each moment has been played out in our living rooms – from the agony of Myf’s Nirvana blunder to the joy on Hamish Blake’s face when he finally got a question right (exactly how a radio personality can know nothing about music is in itself bizarre). Who will be able to forget a breathless Dave O’Neil on a stationary pushbike in Malvern Stars on 45, the world’s most boring text, Measurement in Australia sung to the tune of Born to be Wild by Shaun Micallef or BMA’s own Justin Heazlewood (aka The Bedroom Philosopher) performing Musical Clearance Sale. Adam, Alan and Myf, we salute you – hard to believe it’s only been seven years. Of course, there’s one option left – Spicks and Specktacular hits town for shows at The Royal Theatre from Saturday-Monday December 10-12. Some of the retro TV fare currently gracing our screens hasn’t stood up well but well-written classic British comedy even from as far back as the ‘70s is still as witty in 2011. The latest series to join the retro revolution is Yes Minister (GEM, Sun and Wed, 8pm). While more modern political comedies such as The Thick of It and The Hollowmen may cut closer to the bone, public servants about town will no doubt be aware of Sir Humphreys in their midst. How do you know summer TV is on its way? All the networks’ big budget shows are winding up. Underbelly Razor (WIN, Sun, 8.30pm), Rush (SCTEN, Thu Nov 17, 8.30pm) and Crownies (ABC1, Thu Dec 1, 9.30pm) have either just finished (time to watch on the catch up sites) or will soon. Don’t miss new series The Hour (ABC1, Mon Nov 21, 8.30pm) – a thriller set at the BBC in ‘50s Britain and telemovie The Night Watch (ABC1, Sun Nov 20, 8.30pm) based on a Sarah Walters novel about four young Londoners in 1940s wartime Britain. If you’re looking for a movie offering, check out Meryl Streep’s unconvincing Aussie accent in Evil Angels (GEM, Wed Nov 9, 9.30pm), Robert Carlyle doing comedy with his kit off in The Full Monty (SCTEN, Fri Nov 18, 9.30pm), Arnie and Jamie Lee Curtis doing comedy in True Lies (SCTEN, Sat Nov 19, 8.55pm), the 1950s reimagined ‘80s style in Back to the Future (SCTEN, Sat Nov 19, 6.30pm), Bond flick The Living Daylights (7Mate, Sun Nov 13, 8.30pm), Patrick Swayze and Charlie Sheen in Red Dawn (7Mate, Fri Nov 18, 12pm), Eric Bana’s nerd outing in Star Trek (SCTEN, Fri Nov 11, 9.30pm), X-Men: The Last Stand (SCTEN, Sat Nov 12, 9pm) and Clint Eastwood in Hang ‘Em High (7Mate, Wed Nov 16, 12pm). For Ausmusic Month, rage has a collection of Aussie acts guest programming including Boy & Bear (ABC1, Sat Nov 5, 12.15am), Horrorshow (ABC1, Sat Nov 12, 11.25am), The Jezabels (ABC1, Sat Nov 19, 11.25pm) and Bag Raiders (ABC1, Sat Nov 26, 12.10am). TRACY HEFFERNAN tracyheffernan@bigpond.com


the word

Def Leppard / Heart / The Choirboys AIS Arena Tuesday October 25

on gigs

I’m not sure what they teach kids in schools these days – my two certainly won’t tell me – but in my day our English Master, Tony ‘backs to the wall, boys’ Stafford, used to bang on at length about something called “suspension of disbelief”, whereby our enjoyment of certain classic works of literature would be enhanced beyond all imagination if only we’d stop putting our hands up in class and saying “sir, but that wouldn’t happen!”. He was right, of course – you don’t get to parade about in a cape and mortar board without at least a modicum of knowledge – and so, later on in this review I’ll be investigating and indeed applying this principal to tonight’s headliners. Of which more later. But there are other things to take our attention first, not least the impressive size of the beer queues on both sides of a steadily filling AIS Arena as local (read: Australian) support The Choirboys go about their business. Despite being a charmless shed, the AIS at least allows you to drink inside the auditorium and thousands of likeminded souls are joining your reviewer and confrere ‘big’ Allan Sko in getting as much amber liquid down our throats as is possible before the real entertainment begins. As Run to Paradise’s final chords decay into the rafters we hastily gather up as much booze as we can carry and head to our seats, eager not to miss a second of Canadian classic rock titans Heart. We’re glad we made this decision, as for the best part of an hour Heart, led as ever by sisters Ann (whose voice has somehow maintained its strength and clarity despite the passage of time) and (the very, very lovely) Nancy Wilson, give a poised lesson in high class hard rock. It’s years since they tasted success in the mainstream, but they rolled those years back in tremendous style tonight with stellar versions of radio rock hits Alone and Barracuda vying alongside marvellous versions of Crazy on You and, improbably, Farn-sy’s iconic You’re The Voice before quitting the stage to a very generous response. Personally I’d have been happy to have seen the billing reversed tonight and got to hear more from Heart but, as my good friend Mick Jagger once told me, you can’t always get what you want. And so to Def Leppard and the suspension of disbelief. Nearly 30 years ago Dante Bonutto wrote of Lepps singer Joe Elliott in heavy metal bible Kerrang! Magazine “let’s just say some great non-singers have managed to make it to the top, so why not Joe?”. The Leppard trademark – multi-layered choruses, tracked and multi-tracked to within an inch of their lives in the studio but nigh on impossible to replicate in the live arena – has always conspired to make Elliott sound like a hapless buffoon yet here, tonight, he somehow seems to be in good, not to say powerful voice – how can this be? My disbelief is well and truly strung up. Backed up stage left by guitarist extraordinaire Phil Collen and to the right by bassist Rick Savage and second guitarist Viv Campbell, Joe is in positively sparkling form tonight as he leads us through a set that is just about untouchable if it’s ‘80s pop-metal nostalgia you’re after.

PHOTOS: Caitlin Morrison fasterlouder

Foolin’, Armageddon It, Animal, Let’s Get Rocked – all are here present and correct plus a dozen more slabs of the good stuff. Unbelievably good stuff in fact, delivered with verve and style by a group that continues to set the pace in live production despite entering their fifth decade in the business. Believe it. Scott Adams

47


GIG GUIDE Nov 09 - Nov 12 wednesday NOVEMBER 09 arts Exhibition - Perception

Celebrating International Day of People with Disability. ‘Til Dec 4. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - Pagan Pop Curated by Yolande Norris.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Vestiges

Woodcut prints and drawings explore landscapes that experience significant human impact. ‘Til Nov 12 MEGALO PRINT STUDIO

Void without Void

Presented by serious theatre. Navigate the far reaches in a multi-arts production. THE STREET THEATRE

Exhibition - Practice What You Teach

An exhibition by the Visual Art Network of Educators of ACT. ‘Til Nov 13. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Japanese Film Festival

The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au . ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

Exhibition – In the light of day Robert Boynes’ works explore the sounds, sensations and movement found in our urban spaces. BEAVER GALLERIES

Comedy Pol Pot’s Belly Laughs 8pm, free.

POT BELLY BAR

Exhibition - Forever and a Day

Gold Fields

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

TRANSIT BAR

Photography by Alexander Bell Moffatt. Running ‘til November 20.

Exhibition - In the light of day

Paintings by Robert Boynes. ‘Til Nov 13. BEAVER GALLERIES

Void without Void

Presented by serious theatre. Navigate the far reaches in a multi-arts production.

Free entry, fantastic prizes, bookings are essential. 6pm. P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

Fame Trivia @ Transit

Every Wednesday, from 7:30pm TRANSIT BAR

Featuring Tom Gibson. 8pm, $15. CIVIC PUB

Dance

Japanese Film Festival

SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE BOOKSHOP

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au .

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

How meditation enhances our lives. Tix at the door, $12/$10. 7pm.

friday NOVEMBER 11

ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

arts

Exhibition - Yulyurlu

Exhibition - Perception

Celebrates the work of strong and feisty Yulyurlu Lorna Fencer Napurrurla. ‘Til Dec 18. DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Exhibition – In the light of day Robert Boynes’ works explore the sounds, sensations and movement found in our urban spaces. BEAVER GALLERIES

Scissors Paper Pen - Opening Party

Drew Walky, Andrew Galan (Bad!Slam!), Gemma Nourse, Jessie George and Ashley Orr. 9pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Theatre - The Dark Side of Midnight

Presented by Free Rain Theatre Company, set on the eve of Partition in India. From Oct 28-Nov 13.

Ashley Feraude

Fame Trivia

Karaoke

Comedy Club

Timber

P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Something Different

Something Different

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Buddhism in Everyday Life

Dance

TUGGERANONG YOUTH CENTRE

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Man vs Wil tour. One night only. Tix through the venue.

An exhibition by the Visual Art Network of Educators of ACT. ‘Til Nov 13.

Battle of the Bands Heat 5

All Ages, Tickets Avaible from Oztix

As part of King O’Malleys month of Movember. From 9pm.

Wil Anderson

Academy Fridays

Exhibition - Practice What You Teach

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Heroes For Hire

Chicago Charles

Comedy

9pm ‘til 11pm followed by DJ Pete ‘til 5am. Sing to win cash prizes.

THE STREET THEATRE

Live 8.45pm – late.

Spreading their “frantic dance-pop ‘n’ anthemic jams”. Tix through Moshtix.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Live

Celebrating International Day of People with Disability. ‘Til Dec 4.

Foreplay Fridays

9pm ‘til 5am with DJs Matt and Pete. Two for one drinks and free entry until 11pm. CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Strangeways Monsters Mash Sasquatch, Godzilla, King Kong Lochness. Get your ghoul on. Free, 8pm. TRANSIT BAR

Hook N Sling & Angger Dimas $15 before 10pm. TRINITY BAR

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Live

Exhibition – Vestiges

Breaking Orbit

Curated by Yolande Norris.

Woodcut prints and drawings explore landscapes that experience significant human impact. ‘Til Nov 12 MEGALO PRINT STUDIO

Exhibition - Forever and a Day

Photography by Alexander Bell Moffatt. Running ‘til November 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - In the light of day

Paintings by Robert Boynes. ‘Til Nov 13. BEAVER GALLERIES

Void without Void

Presented by serious theatre. Navigate the far reaches in a multi-arts production. THE STREET THEATRE

Exhibition - Practice What You Teach

POT BELLY BAR

Japanese Film Festival

9pm, free.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

King Of The North

The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au .

Gold Fields

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Exhibition - Pagan Pop

Open Mic Night

THE BASEMENT

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

An exhibition by the Visual Art Network of Educators of ACT. ‘Til Nov 13.

Johnny Roadkill, Forgotten Fridays and Critical Monkey. $10.

Feat. Light Year and Emoh Instead.

ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

Fresh from their Parklife dates Transit welcomes Gold Fields for an intimate and electric show. Tix

Intimacy and Distance

Feat. Escape Syndrome, Beneath A Broken Sky and Mandala. $10. THE BASEMENT

Scaramouche

With special guests. $10 entry. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Friday Night Acoustic Series

Feat. Bill Chambers. There’s more to him than just being Kasey’s Dad. 8pm, free. HARMONIE GERMAN CLUB

Alanna and Alicia

The twin sisters have charmed audiences with their special blend of folk/jazz/roots. 8pm, $10. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Special K

From 10pm.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

saturday NOVEMBER 12 arts Exhibition - Perception

Celebrating International Day of People with Disability. ‘Til Dec 4. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - Pagan Pop

TRANSIT BAR

Intimacy and Distance Presented by Canberra Playback Theatre. 7.30pm, $15/$10. QL2 THEATRE, GORMAN HOUSE

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

arts

2011 CIT School Stars Band Competition

Exhibition - Yulyurlu

Exhibition – Vestiges

Exhibition - Perception

MIC VENUE, CIT SOUTHSIDE

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

MEGALO PRINT STUDIO

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 10

Celebrating International Day of People with Disability. ‘Til Dec 4. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - Pagan Pop Curated by Yolande Norris.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Vestiges

Woodcut prints and drawings explore landscapes that experience significant human impact. ‘Til Nov 12 MEGALO PRINT STUDIO

48

6pm, free.

Alison Avron

Playful, upbeat but sometimes heartwrenchingly beautiful tunes. $15/$12. 7.30pm. THE LOFT, DICKSON

Henry Wagons & Joe Pug

Melbourne’s Wagons and Chicago’s Pug team up for a big night at the wee Front. 7.30pm, tix Oztix. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Celebrates the work of strong and feisty Yulyurlu Lorna Fencer Napurrurla. ‘Til Dec 18.

Curated by Yolande Norris.

Woodcut prints and drawings explore landscapes that experience significant human impact. ‘Til Nov 12

Exhibition – In the light of day

Exhibition - Forever and a Day

BEAVER GALLERIES

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Theatre - The Dark Side of Midnight

Paintings by Robert Boynes. ‘Til Nov 13.

Robert Boynes’ works explore the sounds, sensations and movement found in our urban spaces.

Presented by Free Rain Theatre Company, set on the eve of Partition in India. From Oct 28-Nov 13. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Photography by Alexander Bell Moffatt. Running ‘til November 20.

Exhibition - In the light of day BEAVER GALLERIES


49


GIG GUIDE Nov 12 - Nov 15 saturday NOVEMBER 12 arts Void without Void

Presented by serious theatre. Navigate the far reaches in a multi-arts production. THE STREET THEATRE

Exhibition - Practice What You Teach

An exhibition by the Visual Art Network of Educators of ACT. ‘Til Nov 13. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Japanese Film Festival

The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au . ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

Exhibition - Yulyurlu

Dawnheist, Nekrofeist, The Devilzwork, Engage the Fall and many more. THE BASEMENT

Guineafowl

w/ Elisha Bones & Glass Towers www. ticketek.com.au ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Offtapia & Canizares Free entry all night. TRINITY BAR

Live Sunday Best

The Gossips. All that’s jazz. 5-7pm.

Oscar

A BITE TO EAT CAFE

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Shortis and Simpson and the Worldly Goods Choir. 5pm.

From 10pm.

Belco Belto

Something Different

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Aprils Caravan Vintage Clothing Garden Party

Lots of vintage treats. Bring a picnic and listen to Little Mac and the Monster Men! 12-4, free. APRIL’S CARAVAN, WATTLE STREET

Emlyn Johnson

Allegedly the third most beautiful man in the room, his music is as unusual as his name. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Irish Jam Session From 5pm.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

sunday NOVEMBER 13

Celebrates the work of strong and feisty Yulyurlu Lorna Fencer Napurrurla. ‘Til Dec 18.

arts

Exhibition – In the light of day

Exhibition - Perception

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

monday NOVEMBER 14 arts

Robert Boynes’ works explore the sounds, sensations and movement found in our urban spaces.

Celebrating International Day of People with Disability. ‘Til Dec 4.

Exhibition - Perception

BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - Pagan Pop

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Theatre - The Dark Side of Midnight

Curated by Yolande Norris.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE - GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Pagan Pop

Exhibition - Forever and a Day

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE - GORMAN HOUSE

Presented by Free Rain Theatre Company, set on the eve of Partition in India. From Oct 28-Nov 13. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Theatre - The Dark Side of Midnight

Presented by Free Rain Theatre Company, set on the eve of Partition in India. From Oct 28-Nov 13. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Dance Nathan Frost

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Academy Saturdays with Ashley Feraude.

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Photography by Alexander Bell Moffatt. Running ‘til November 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - In the light of day

Paintings by Robert Boynes. ‘Til Nov 13. BEAVER GALLERIES

Void without Void

Presented by serious theatre. Navigate the far reaches in a multi-arts production.

Celebrating International Day of People with Disability. ‘Til Dec 4. Curated by Yolande Norris.

Exhibition - Forever and a Day

Photography by Alexander Bell Moffatt. Running ‘til November 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - Yulyurlu

Celebrates the work of strong and feisty Yulyurlu Lorna Fencer Napurrurla. ‘Til Dec 18. DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

THE STREET THEATRE

Dance

Exhibition - Practice What You Teach

Happy Happy Mondays

An exhibition by the Visual Art Network of Educators of ACT. ‘Til Nov 13.

Cube Saturdays

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au .

Every Monday is a Happy one at Transit Bar, especiall when there’s two for one pizza. TRANSIT BAR

10pm ‘til 5am with DJs Matt and Pete. Two for one drinks and free entry until 11pm.

Japanese Film Festival

Denzal Park

ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

The Phoenix Presents The Bootleg Sessions

Exhibition - Yulyurlu

THE PHOENIX PUB

Free entry before 10pm, $15 after. Ragin’ til 4am. TRINITY BAR

Live Sunchaser & the Wayward Orchestra

Film clip launch, with special guests. 8pm, free. THE MARAM, ERINDALE CENTRE

PJ Rocks Band and Guests

From 7pm. Followed by Spruce Moose. P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Celebrates the work of strong and feisty Yulyurlu Lorna Fencer Napurrurla. ‘Til Dec 18. DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Exhibition – In the light of day Robert Boynes’ works explore the sounds, sensations and movement found in our urban spaces. BEAVER GALLERIES

Theatre - The Dark Side of Midnight

Live

The Trilogy Project, Fox and Fowl. 8pm.

Something Different Trivia @ King O’s

Every Monday night. 7pm, free entry, $100 bar tab first prize. KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

tuesday NOVEMBER 15 arts

The Flat Earth Confederacy. 9.30pm.

Presented by Free Rain Theatre Company, set on the eve of Partition in India. From Oct 28-Nov 13.

Purple Sneakers Presents Fresh Prince

Dance

West Australian Ballet’s highly anticipated new production. Tix through the venue.

Hospitality Sundays

Exhibition - Forever and a Day

RJ Chops

THE PHOENIX PUB

With Nantes (Syd), Made In Japan (Syd) and Fresh Prince resident DJs. $10 on the door. 8pm. TRANSIT BAR

50

Whiplash Festival

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

10pm ‘til late with DJ TJ. Free entry, free pool and discounted drinks. CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Cinderella

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Photography by Alexander Bell Moffatt. Running ‘til November 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA


51


GIG GUIDE Nov 15 - Nov 20 tuesday NOVEMBER 15 live

EJapanese Film Festival The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au .

Irish Jam Session

ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Dance

Something Different

Faux Real

From 7pm.

Trivia @ The Phoenix

Enjoy a vague sense of accomplishment. From 7:30pm, with $10 cocktails from 9pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Karaoke Love

Every Tuesday, from 9pm. Free entry. TRANSIT BAR

wednesday NOVEMBER 16

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Live Greg Haines (UK) and Pollen Trio Album Launch

hellosQuare presents a special evening of contemporary classical and improvised music. 8pm, $15/$12. THE LOFT, DICKSON

Open Mic Night 9pm, free.

POT BELLY BAR

arts Exhibition - Yulyurlu

Celebrates the work of strong and feisty Yulyurlu Lorna Fencer Napurrurla. ‘Til Dec 18. DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Exhibition - Perception

Celebrating International Day of People with Disability. ‘Til Dec 4. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - The Table of Earthy Delights Sculptures focused on and around a dining table made from a huge slab of elm wood. ‘Til Dec 6. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

BAD!SLAM!NO!BISCUIT! Shit gon get real. 8pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Cinderella

West Australian Ballet’s highly anticipated new production. Tix through the venue. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Exhibition - Forever and a Day

Photography by Alexander Bell Moffatt. Running ‘til November 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Live Battle of the Bands Heat 6 8.45pm – late.

P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Straight To You

triple j’s tribute to Nick Cave. Tix through Ticketek.

The Trilogy Project

THE PHOENIX PUB

Tim Freedman and the Idle Two concerts only. 8pm. THE STREET THEATRE

Cold Chisel - Light the Nitro Tour

The Aussie rock legends return, with special guests You Am I. Tix on sale from Aug 4 from Ticketek. AIS ARENA

Special K

The exciting international festival of ten minute, bite-sized dance works. Tix through the venue. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Cinderella

West Australian Ballet’s highly anticipated new production. Tix through the venue. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

52

Live John Schumann (Redgum)

The man behind I Was Only 19. Tix $35 through Ticketek. CASINO CANBERRA

Sienna Skies

ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Shady Glimpse (Japan)

Feat. Alice Through The Windshield Glass, Sorathian Dawn and Wretch. $10.

Marisa Quigley and Sarah Carnege

They love bouncing off each other with their razor sharp wit and irreverent humour. 7pm, $15. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Something Different Mooseheads Schoolies Weekend

The biggest schoolies party in town.

Come get involved with Canberra’s most loved retro party. Free entry. 8pm.

The Burley Griffin

They’re ready to rock your socks off and soothe your troubled soul. 8pm, entry by donation. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Tim Freedman and the Idle Two concerts only. 8pm.

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Cinderella

West Australian Ballet’s highly anticipated new production. Tix through the venue. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

TRINITY BAR

Live Metal Fiesta

Frankenbok, Witchgrinder, House Of Thumbs, Hatchet Dawn, Na Maza plus more. $12. THE BASEMENT

THE PHOENIX PUB

Featuring all your fave indie-dance selektors plus Pelic (live) and a Readable Graffiti DJ set. Free TRANSIT BAR

Sunday Matinee Performance

Presented by Canberra Blues Society and Harmonie German Club. Feat. Jan Preston. 7.30pm, $20/$15. HARMONIE GERMAN CLUB

Mustered Courage

Mr Fibby

The biggest and longest schoolies party in town. MOOSEHEADS PUB

Should Meat be on the Menu?

What Every foodie, farmer and environmentalist needs to know about livestock. 7pm. Free. SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE BOOKSHOP

Jersey Shore Theme Foam Party You read right.

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

saturday NOVEMBER 19

Short+Sweet Dance

The exciting international festival of ten minute, bite-sized dance works. Tix through the venue. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Cinderella

West Australian Ballet’s highly anticipated new production. Tix through the venue. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Japanese Film Festival

The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au . ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

SUB

Dance

MERCURY BAR

The veteran Aussie house master gives Canberra one more spin. Free before 10pm.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

From 10pm.

Dance Bass music with sets from Crooked Sounds, Faux Real, Tidy and Delux, Dred, Ced Nada and Buick.

John Course

Original, poignant and colourful neobluegrass, playing at the Canberra Country Music Festival. 3pm.

arts

The exciting international festival of ten minute, bite-sized dance works. Tix through the venue.

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Top Shelf

THE STREET THEATRE

MOOSEHEADS PUB

friday NOVEMBER 18

10pm ‘til 5am with DJs Matt and Pete. Two for one drinks and free entry until 11pm.

Glass House Re/Presents: Juicebox

Mooseheads Schoolies Weekend

TRANSIT BAR

Cube Saturdays

DANCE

Hearttribe and Los Chavos

Capital Dub and Strangehours brings you a night of reggae/fusion/ska/Latin beats. $12, 8pm.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Rubix Cuba

From 9pm.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Jemist

THE BASEMENT

Something Different

Short+Sweet Dance

Short+Sweet Dance

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

TRANSIT BAR

A Streelight Parade, Activate Jetpack.

Fame Trivia @ Transit

arts

Nathan Frost

Celadore

arts

thursday NOVEMBER 17

TRINITY BAR

Cheese (‘80s/Retro)

THE VENUE, CIT WODEN CAMPUS

Something Different

TRANSIT BAR

The Belgian wonder conjures up some Kitsune magic. Free before 10pm, open til 4am.

Live in concert and CD release. Tix $15 or $20 with a CD. With Jungle Jerry.

ROYAL THEATRE

Every Wednesday, from 7:30pm

The Magician & Brown Bear

Academy Saturdays With Pred.

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

EXHIBITION PARK

Most Excellently Disapointing Wireless Adventure Time! 7.30pm, $5. SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE BOOKSHOP

Women Who Rock - Movember Fundraiser

With Dallas Frasca, The Vaine, Wolfpack, Final Lies, Tara Favell and many more. $20, 8pm kickoff. THE MARAM, ERINDALE CENTRE

Leanne Melmoth Band From 10pm.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

PJ Rocks Band and Guests From 7pm.

P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Something Different Mooseheads Schoolies Weekend

The biggest and longest schoolies party in town. MOOSEHEADS PUB

sunday NOVEMBER 20 arts Japanese Film Festival

The 15th Japanese Film Festival returns to Arc Cinema. For all the info head to nfsa.gov.au . ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

Short+Sweet Dance

The exciting international festival of ten minute, bite-sized dance works. Tix through the venue. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Exhibition - Forever and a Day

Photography by Alexander Bell Moffatt. Running ‘til November 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA


GIG GUIDE Nov 20 - Nov 23 Exhibition - Elements: wood

tuesday NOVEMBER 22

The dynamic conclusion to the Elements series. ‘Til Dec 17.

arts

CRAFT ACT

Dance

Artists Unite - 4 Short Plays

4 short plays by emerging playwrights and directors. www.cytc.net .

Cheese & Shaolin

Free entry all night, bumpin’ til 4am.

GORMAN HOUSE ARTS CENTRE

TRINITY BAR

Exhibition - The Table of Earthy Delights

Live

Sculptures focused on and around a dining table made from a huge slab of elm wood. ‘Til Dec 6.

Anarchist Duck

The Gold Coast’s finest reggaefunk trio. 3pm.

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Exhibition – Obsessive Tendencies

WHITE EAGLE POLISH CLUB

Wil Wagner

The creative risks necessitated by an artist’s obsession to interrogate their work. ‘Til Dec 4.

Foxtrot, 7.30pm.

THE PHOENIX PUB

Sativa Sun

Thick, murky guitars, rollicking basslines and guttural, emotive vocals. $8, 8pm. TRANSIT BAR

Mustered Courage

M16 ARTSPACE

Exhibition – Aqueous

Explores the forms of the insubstantial through drawings, photography and prints. ‘Til Dec 4. M16 ARTSPACE

Original, poignant and colourful neobluegrass. 1-3pm.

Irish Jam Session KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Dance Every Monday is a Happy one at Transit Bar, especiall when there’s two for one pizza. TRANSIT BAR

arts Artists Unite - 4 Short Plays

4 short plays by emerging playwrights and directors. www.cytc.net . GORMAN HOUSE ARTS CENTRE

Bridges

A Selection of Mixed Media Artworks by clients of BCS Bridges Program. Opening 1pm. BELCONNEN GALLERY

Exhibition - The Table of Earthy Delights Sculptures focused on and around a dining table made from a huge slab of elm wood. ‘Til Dec 6. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Exhibition – Obsessive Tendencies

Exhibition – Aqueous

M16 ARTSPACE

CRAFT ACT

Explores the forms of the insubstantial through drawings, photography and prints. ‘Til Dec 4.

Live

Exhibition - Phase

Lachlan Bryan

Happy Happy Mondays

wednesday NOVEMBER 23

Exhibition - Elements: wood The dynamic conclusion to the Elements series. ‘Til Dec 17.

monday NOVEMBER 21

After the Fall (USA)

The creative risks necessitated by an artist’s obsession to interrogate their work. ‘Til Dec 4.

CRAFT ACT

From 5pm.

Live

TRANSIT BAR

Every Tuesday, from 9pm. Free entry.

Blends modernist photography with the craft of the loom. ‘Til Dec 17.

Exhibition - Phase

THE GEORGE HARCOURT INN

Karaoke Love

The must-see new country act, with Jack Colwell and James Fahy. A terrific trio indeed. 8.30pm. $5.

Melodic hardcore in the vein of Bad Religion, Paint It Black, NOFX, Propaghandi and Kill Your Idols. BAR 32

Victoriana Gaye and Jeff Raglus Sometimes whimsical, sometimes romantic and sometimes rockin’. 8pm, $10. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Battle of the Bands Final #1 8.45pm – late.

P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Super Best Friends Karma Karma Single Launch

As part of Phoenix 18th birthday week. Sweet Teeth, Reckless Vagina. Free. THE PHOENIX PUB

Something Different CIT Momentum 2011

11 creative disciplines, 300 participating students, 3 big days and nights. OLD BUS DEPOT MARKETS

Fame Trivia @ Transit

Every Wednesday, from 7:30pm TRANSIT BAR

M16 ARTSPACE

Blends modernist photography with the craft of the loom. ‘Til Dec 17. CRAFT ACT

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

La Mauvaise Réputation

Live Cardboard Charlie Presents The Bootleg Sessio As part of Phoenix 18th birthday week. Julia Rose Band, Reichelt, Monka. THE PHOENIX PUB

Melbourne-based French swing trio launching their new album Tours Eiffel en plastique. 8pm, $10. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Something Different CIT Momentum 2011

Trivia @ King O’s

11 creative disciplines, 300 participating students, 3 big days and nights.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Phoenix Birthday Week Trivia Night

Something Different Every Monday night. 7pm, free entry, $100 bar tab first prize.

OLD BUS DEPOT MARKETS

All questions Phoenix Pub history/booze related. 7.30pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

OUT NOV23

SUMMER RHYTHM FESTIVAL SALMONELLA DUB GURRUMUL SPICKS AND SPECKS CAT CAT ...AND MORE!

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FIRST CONTACT

SIDE A: BMA BAND profile

Fox and Fowl Where did your band name come from? For a while we had more band names than gigs. We realised this wasn’t working and went with one name, more gigs. We settled on Fox & Fowl late one night whilst watching a documentary on the Red Fox. Group members: Lachlan Smart (vocals, keys, guitar), Mitchell Gardoll (vocals, guitar), Tim Dyer (vocals, bass), Elliot Goard (guitar) and Matthew Smail (percussion). Describe your sound: It sounds like putting 15 sour Warheads in your mouth at once. Who are your influences, musical or otherwise? Though there are five in the band we have pretty similar tastes in music, some just a little more refined than others… haha. Jinja Safari, Whitley, Eagle and The Worm, The Local Natives, Oasis, Mum’s lasagne and weather conditions. What’s the weirdest experience you’ve had whilst performing? An audience. What’s your biggest achievement/proudest moment so far? As a band, getting through to the Foreshore Sound Search finals is a biggie. We can thank our splendid friends and family for that. What are your plans for the future? Four of the five are headed to the states early next year for six months to travel and study. Returning home we hope to head into the studio. What makes you laugh? Jokes. Smail. What pisses you off? That water that comes out of the bottom of the fridge. What’s your opinion of the local scene? To be honest we are pretty green on the local scene. At times it can appear like not a whole lot goes on, but all you have to do is scratch the surface and you’ll find it. And it’s good! What are your upcoming gigs? Phoenix Pub – Monday November 14, fingers crossed for Foreshore at the Sound Search Finals on Saturday November 26, Transit Bar – Thursday December 1. Contact info: contact@foxandfowl.com, 0430 371 795 – Lachlan, foxandfowl.com

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Aaron Peacey Aaron 0410 381 306 Activate Jetpack activatejetpack@ hotmail.com Adam Hole Adam 0421 023 226 Afternoon Shift Adam 0402 055 314 After Close Scotty 0412 742 682, afterclose@hotmail.com Alcove Mark 0410 112 522 Alice 0423 100 792 Allies ACT (Oxfam Group) alliesact@hotmail.com/ myspace.com/alliesact Amphibian Sound PA Clare 0410 308 288 Amplif5’d Classic rock covers band Joy 0407 200 428, joybarac-heath@hotmail.com Annie & the Armadillos Annie 6161 1078/0422 076 313 The Ashburys Dan Craddock 0419 626 903 Aria Stone, sax & flute, singer/ songwriter (guitar) Aria 0411 803 343 Australian Songwriters Association (Keiran Roberts) 6231 0433 Arythmia: Ben 0423 408 767/ arythmiamusic@gmail.com Backbeat Drivers Steve 0422 733 974, www.backbeatdrivers.com Big Boss Groove Andrew 0404 455 834, www.bigbossgroove.com.au Birds Love Fighting Gangbusters/DIY shows - bookings@birdslovefighting.com Black Label Photography Kingsley 0438 351 007 Blister Bug Stu 0408 617 791 Bridge Between, The Rachel 0412 598 138, thebridgebetween.com.au Bruce Stage mgr/consultant 6254 9857 Caution Horses Nigel 0417 211 580 Chris Harland Blues Band 0418 490 640 chrisharlandbluesband@yahoo.com.au Clear Vision Films rehearsals/film clips/stunts - 0438 647 281 wcoulton.clearvisionfilms.com Cole Bennetts Photography 0415 982 662 /colebennetts.com Cris Clucas Cris 6262 5652 Crooked Dave 0421 508 467 Danny V Danny 6238 1673/0413 502 428 Dawn Theory Nathan 0402 845 132 D’Opus & Roshambo hifidelitystyles@yahoo.com DJs Madrid and Gordon 0417 433 971 DJ Latino Rogelio 0401 274 208 DJ Moises (RnB/Latin) 0402 497 835 or moises_lopez@hotmail DNA Vic 0408 477 020 Drumassault Kate 0414 236 323 Easy Mode Daz 0404 156 482, easymodeband@gmail.com Entity Chris 0412 027 894 Epic Flagon band@epicflagon.com Fighting Mongooses, The Adam 0402 055 314 Final Warning Brendan 0422 809 552 Fire on the Hill Aaron 0410 381 306/ Lachlan 0400 038 388 4dead Peter 0401 006 551 Freeloaders, The Steve 0412 653 597 Friend or Enemy 6238 0083, www.myspace.com/friendorenemy Funk Shui Dave 0407 974 476 Gareth Hailey DJ & Electronica 0414 215 885 GiLF Kelly 0410 588 747, gilf.mail@gmail.com Groovalicious Corporate/Weddings/ Private functions 0448 995 158 groovalicious@y7mail.com Guy The Sound Guy live & studio sound engineer, 0400 585 369, guy@ guythesoundguy.com HalfPast Chris 0412 115 594 Hancock Basement Tom 6257 5375, hancockbasement@hotmail.com Happy Hour Wendy 0406 375 096 Haunted Attics band@hauntedatticsmusic.com Hitherto Paul 0408 425 636 In The Flesh Scott 0410 475 703 Inside the Exterior Nathan 0401 072 650

Itchy Triggers Andrew 0401 588 884 Jacqui Seczawa 0428 428 722 JDY Clothing 0405 648 288/ www.jdyclothing.com Jenn Pacor singer/songwriter avail. for originals & covers, 0405 618 630 Jim Boots 0417 211 580 Johnny Roadkill Paulie 0408 287 672, paulie_mcmillan@live.com.au Karismakatz DJ Gosper 0411 065 189/ dj@karismakatz.com Kayo Marbilus myspace.com/kayomarbilus Kurt’s Metalworx (PA) 0417 025 792 Little Smoke Sam 0411 112 075 Los Chavos Andy 0401 572 150 los.chavos@yahoo.com.au Manilla Green Herms 0404 848 462, contactus@manillagreen.com, Mario Brujo Gordon world/latin/ reggae/percussionist and DJ. 0405 820 895 Martin Bailey Audio Engineer 0423 566 093 Words for You: writer/publicity/events Megan ph 6154 0927, megan@wordsforyou.com.au Mercury Switch Lab Studios mercuryswitch@internode.on.net Missing Zero Hadrian Brand 0424 721 907 hadrian.brand@live.com.au Moots aspwinch@grapevine.com.au Huck 0419 630 721 MuShu Jack 0414 292 567, mushu_band@hotmail.com MyOnus myonusmusic@hotmail.com/ www.myspace.com/myonus No Retreat Simon 0411 155 680 Ocean Moses Nigel 0417 211 580 OneWayFare Chris 0418 496 448 Painted Hearts, The Peter 6248 6027 Phathom Chris 0422 888 700 The Pigs The Colonel 0422 412 752 Polka Pigs Ian 6231 5974 Premier Audio Simon 0412 331 876, premier_audio@hotmail.com Rafe Morris 0416 322 763 Redletter Ben 0421 414 472 Redsun Rehearsal Studio Ralph 0404 178 996/6162 1527 Rhythm Party, The Ross 0416 010 680 Rob Mac Project, The Melinda 0400 405 537 Rug, The Jol 0417 273 041 Samsara Samahdi 0431 083 776 Sansutra J-Ma 0403 476 350 Simone Penkethman (Simone & The Soothsayers, Singing Teacher) 6230 4828 Soundcity Rehearsal Studio Andrew 0401 588 884 Solid Gold Peter 0421 131 887/ solid.gold@live.com.au Super Best Friends Matt 0438 228 748 Surrender Jordan 0439 907 853 Switch 3 Mick 0410 698 479 System Addict Jamie 0418 398 556 The Morning After (covers band) Anthony 0402 500 843/ myspace.com/themorningaftercovers Tiger Bones & The Ferabul-Zers Danny feralbul@aapt.net.au Tim James Lucia 6282 3740, LUCIAMURDOCH@hotmail.com Top Shelf Colin 0408 631 514 Transmission Nowhere Emilie 0421 953 519/myspace.com/ transmissionnowhere Udo 0412 086 158 Undersided, The Baz 0408 468 041 Using Three Words Dan 0416 123 020, usingthreewords@hotmail.com Voodoo Doll Mark 0428 650 549 William Blakely Will 0414 910 014 Zero Degrees and Falling Louis 0423 918 793 Zwish 0411 022 907


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BMA Mag 383 NOV 9 2011  

Canberra’s FREE Entertainment and Gig Guide