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Were the Japanese meant to wear headbands and play giant drums? See p. 34 for the answer to that rhetorical question.

#402SEPTEMBER12 Fax: 02 6257 4361 Mail: PO Box 713 Civic Square, ACT 2608 Publisher Scott Layne Allan Sko General Manager Allan Sko

T: 6257 4360 E: advertising@bmamag.com

Advertising Manager Elisa Sko T: 6257 4360 E: sales@bmamag.com

Editor Ashley Thomson

T: 02 6257 4456 E: editorial@bmamag.com

Accounts Manager Yu Xie

T: 02 6247 4816 E: accounts@bmamag.com

Sub-Editor Greta Kite-Gilmour Graphic Design Marley Film Editor Melissa Wellham NEXT ISSUE 403 OUT SEPTEMBER 26 EDITORIAL DEADLINE SEPTEMBER 17 ADVERTISING DEADLINE SEPTEMBER 20 Published by Radar Media Pty Ltd ABN 76 097 301 730 BMA is independently owned and published. Opinions expressed in BMA are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or staff.

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Entering its 44th year, Stone Day is singing a brand new tune on Friday October 26 in and around Zierholz @ UC and over four stages. The Zierholz Stage will play host to San Cisco, Alison Wonderland, Skryptcha, The Griswolds, Super Best Friends, Tin Can Radio and many more. The Silent Party this year will set the battle ground for Strangeways DJs, Mum DJs, Celebrity Sex Tape, Architect DJs, Eddie Shaggz and more to fight it out. And what’s a carnival without freaks? The Bally promises the greatest circus stunts and there’s also a Car Park Carnival, featuring carnival rides, an outdoor bar and DJS. Sporting a ticket price of only $25 for UC students, 2012 is a new day. A new… Stone Day… For more information visit uclive.com.au or facebook.com/UCLive.

Int’l Short Film Festival Flickerfest 2013 Calls For Entries Celebrating its 22nd year, Flickerfest, Australia’s only Academy Award-accredited, BAFTA-recognised (and also its largest) short film competition is accepting entries from Australia and around the world for the 2013 festival. Flickerfest will screen for ten days under the summer stars at Bondi Beach in January 2013 with selected highlights heading off after the festival around Australia on a 40-venue national tour. The categories are International, Australian, Documentary, GreenFlicks (films with an environmental focus or theme from across the world) and Flickerup (national high school and primary school competition). Jump online at flickerfest.com.au. All films must be in by Friday October 5.

Corinbank [Take 2] Springs To Life It takes more than a once-in100-year inundation to stop the Corinbank Music and Arts Festival. Postponed in March after torrential rain,

Australia’s Largest Solar Farm To Be Constructed In Canberra A plot of land, 50 hectares near Royalla just off the Monaro Highway, has been earmarked for development by Spanish-based company Fotowatio Renewable Ventures (FRV). The land will be used to construct a 20 megawatt solar farm facility made up of 83,000 photovoltaic panels, producing enough renewable electricity to power 4,400 Canberra homes. Construction is due to begin next year and is expected to be finished in 2014, subject to environmental and planning approval. ACT Environment Minister Simon

Corbell says it is an exciting new step in Canberra becoming a sustainable city. ‘It’s about making the shift to renewables at a very cheap price, with a great saving in terms of greenhouse gas emissions and jobs and economic activity in our city,’ he stated. The ACT Government says the solar farm will have an approximate reduction of 560,000 tonnes of carbon emissions over the 20 year life of the project, aiming to make Canberra a carbon neutral city by 2060.

New Charity Vintage Store ‘Hipsley Lane’ To Open In Braddon The team at Lifeline Canberra have provided some insights into the latest addition to their suite of commercial enterprises, a vintage clothing store called Hipsley Lane. ‘Hipsley Lane will be specialising in vintage clothing, whilst also carrying a variety of vintage books selected by experienced volunteers at the Bookfair Warehouse in Mitchell,’ said Manager of Commercial Enterprises and 13-year operator of Cowboys & Angels, Karen Bustamante. Located in the newly developed Braddon retail precinct, everything at Hipsley Lane will be specially sourced and purchased by expert buyers. Hipsley Lane will also raise much needed funds for the telephone counselling service. 100% of the funds raised by Hipsley Lane will go directly to Lifeline Canberra. Located at Shop 2, 27 Lonsdale Street, Braddon, the first day of trade at Hipsley Lane will beThursday September 27 at 5:30pm. RSVPs can be emailed to hipsleylane@gmail.com..

This is what hippies see when they look into the eyes of their lovers and ejaculate with great force.

University Of Canberra’s Stone Day 2012 Line-Up Announced

tickets for Corinbank [Take 2] will be on sale Thursday September 13 from 9am. This time the event will run Friday November 30 to Saturday December 2 in the Brindabella Mountains. The festival has sprung from Corin Forest with a Pozible fundraising campaign, maintaining the festival’s impeccable environmental credentials. Numerous rewards for the fundraiser have poured in. (You could even get married at Corinbank.) General manager Amy Moon said Corinbank’s unique, inclusive nature had earned it an extraordinary following that few large music festivals enjoyed. ‘Corinbank [Take 2] will be no different, celebrating life, music, art and creativity, promoting Australian bands and artists and showcasing the picturesque Brindabellas.’ Tickets for Corinbank [Take 2] will be available from corinbank.com. The Pozible campaign will also launch, details available from the Corinbank website.


YOU PISSED ME OFF!

FROM THE BOSSMAN It was Father’s Day recently - my second ever - and the one thing I looked forward to the most, supplanting any notions of breakfast in bed or even the heart trembling embrace of one’s pink progeny, is the warm glow of new socks and underpants. We are to experience many Rites of Passage moments; first kiss, the loss of one’s virginity, the loss of one’s heart to Gladys, the frumpy window-cleaner. But there is one far more potent for a man, one that serves as a burning indicator that you have truly arrived... The Moment Socks and Underpants Go From Being The Worst Gift In The World To The Best. Peer back through the smog of memory, if you will, and remember those moments at Christmas when your ganglylegged self would nip emu-like from present to present, gingerly squeezing each one when you thought no-one was looking in an attempt to form a sharp mental picture of what lay beneath. Inevitably, you would come across a shudderingly soft present, one with the undeniable give of a pair of neatly folded socks. A quick glance at the label confirms your worst fears - ‘Dear Allan. Thought you might need these, much love Gran.’

Has someone yanked yer chain recently? Well send an email to  editorial@bmamag.com and have your sweet vengeance. And for the love of God, keep it brief! [All entries contain original spellings] Hey everybody dickriding Obama again, just STOP. To coffee grinds… I need you so badly in my daily life, and yet when I spill you and you scatter to the far ends of the fucking kitchen lodging yourself into every nook and cranny so that I have the spend the next fifteen fucking minutes wiping you up instead of chowing down on some desperately needed caffeine well that just GOD DAMN PISSES ME OFF GAAAH! JUST GIVE ME MY DAMN COFFEE NOW! FUCK! To the parents with DVD players in their cars. I’ve got an idea for you, why don’t you go and buy some duct tape and tape a DVD

‘Bollocks. Fucking socks,’ my foul-mouthed nine-year-old self would mutter. O well. I’ll be sure to fart in her thank you card.

player to your child’s head then you’ll never have to communicate

This attitude to undergarments continues unwavering through the teen years. But then, one day, something strange happens. For your birthday you find yourself uttering the impossible... ‘Oooo, socks and underpants would be great!’

in the car, you might learn something. And while I’m at it 4WD’s

with them at all. Piss the DVDs off and try talking to your kids have always pissed me off, how’s it going paying $2000 a week for petrol?

A strange phenomenon, yes, but there is a simple logic behind it. Years of presents from fart-caked elderly relatives has allowed a healthy supply of undergarments and - much like bills, food, and generally every other cost of running a household - their value has been shielded from us. When you finally move out of home at the trembling age of 28 and realise that a humble fivepack of undies will obliterate your wallet, you baulk. Socks and underpants fall into the same category as cars - we need them, but we hate spending money on them. When we put Old Bessie over the pits and the grizzled charlatan of a mechanic returns, no doubt rubbing oil off their hands with an impossibly dirty cloth like they do, to say it’ll be $1750 dollars for four new tires, a brake pad, and a new baffle-spiget, we don’t cheerily retort, ‘O well! Such is the inevitable wear and tear of daily life; I’m just happy I got five years before having to replace anything; what a bonus!’ Instead we normally bark, ‘Thief! Outrage! Rape! I will summon Zeus and fire lighting directly into your anus, you money grubbing spanner jockey! Do you take me for a simpleton? Good day sir!’ before driving off into a tree. So loathe are we to spend money in this vital area of modern civilisation that we will go countless months with frayed undies, holy socks, stressed elastic and items that look like they’ve taken a detour through the Kingdom of the Mighty Mothpeople. We can’t fathom paying for them after so long, so we try to figure out a way to avoid it. Stealing them could see you end up in jail as the bitch’s bitch in the prison pecking order, and starting a fashion mag for freebies is a shade more effort than required. And at that precise moment, we realise... We can get them as gifts, and so we enter into The Moment. It is an important time. A significant time. Just thinking about it is making my eyes swollen with tears <sob> So beauitful! Sunrise, sunset, the cat’s in the cradle with the silver spoon, yes, we have no bananas... ALLAN ‘OH GLADYS, WHERE ARE YOU NOW?’ SKO allan@bmamag.com

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WHO: LOCAL DJ COLLECTIVE WHAT: RHYTHM CONFIDENTIAL LAUNCH WHEN: FRI SEP 14 WHERE: LA DE DA

So the long solace of winter left you unenthused, content with a movie and blanket as your Friday night release, while cold winds swept through empty Canberra streets in the prime party hours – no one in sight. Well, it’s time to shake off the winter layers, folks, ‘cos spring has finally landed. The best part is that while most of us were tucked safely between doona and couch, a new night of pumping house music from Canberra’s finest DJs, good vibes and studentfriendly drink specials was in the making. Rhythm Confidential is now set to launch into action for a first taste of the summer to come. 9pm-2am. Free.

WHO: Fritz Kalkbrenner WHAT: Techno Luminary WHEN: Fri Sep 14 WHERE: Trinity Bar

I can almost hear the communal heartbeat of the local electronic music community reaching a frenetic bpm at the arrival of this prodigal soulboy. While his brother, Paul, is considered a techno luminary, his little bro is a creative genius in his own right. Fritz is one of few electronic artists whose talent is not limited to producing, nor his scope definable by a single genre. Fritz’s own voice is as finelyhoned as his production skills, featuring on a number of tracks on his 2010 debut album, Here Today Gone Tomorrow, while his upcoming mix-tape proves once again that hip hop, soul and house are not opposites, but ‘planets in the same galaxy’. 8pm-4am. Free pre-10pm.

WHO: NO HAUSFRAU WHAT: EP FUNDRAISER SHOW WHEN: SAT SEP 15 WHERE: THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Hurrah! No Hausfrau have whisked together an EP and are on the fundraising train to get it pressed. Experience their uplifting folk while bringing their widespread and eager supporters one step closer to owning their very own hardcopy of the stuff. I say ‘stuff’ for lack of a description that would do justice to their eclectic sound. I’ll leave it to frontwoman, Alice Cottee: ‘If you must have a mental comparison, we might suggest My Brightest Diamond & Susanne Vega meets Johnny Cash while eating sushi off Tia Carrere.’ Perfect. 7:30pm. Plastic money donation. And get semi-wood for their EP launch at the White Eagle Polish Club on Fri Oct 19.

WHO: NAKED WHAT: EAST COAST TOUR WHEN: MON SEP 17 WHERE: THE PHOENIX

Having already headlined some of Hobart’s eminent live venues (as well as living rooms, alleyways, backyards and rooftops) and supported the likes of Dick Diver, Pop Singles and The UV Race, Naked are set to bring their shambolic show to the mainland masses. They’ve hand-picked the best chunks from their digital albums and recently released Recorded At Sam’s Place for their live set. With a propensity for onstage arguing, sweet pop harmonies, actual nudity and debacles of various other kinds, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t catch Naked live and uncensored. Supported by Sex Noises, E A V E S and Kid Of Harith. 8pm. Free.

WHO: FREYJA’S RAIN WHAT: ALBUM LAUNCH WHEN: FRI SEP 21 WHERE: THE FRONT

Gotta love a band named after the Nordic goddess of love, beauty, fertility, war, death and wealth (but not irony, strangely...). If that’s not enough, she loves music, spring and flowers and rides on a carriage drawn by cats. She’s got my vote. As does Freyja’s Rain, who will be launching their fittingly entitled Outrageous EP this month, which combines contemporary folk, pop, blues, gospel and rock with soulful singing. Outrageous indeed. As this cause is close to the hearts of the grooving goddesses, you are encouraged to ‘dress in your best peace-loving hippy clothes’. Minimal effort all round then. Supported by AMAX and Xav Ier. 7pm. $10 w/EP.

WHO: AMBER NICHOLS WHAT: EP LAUNCH WHEN: SAT SEP 22 WHERE: THE ABBEY

Independent singer-songwriter Amber Nichols is stepping out solo. Her debut release showcases her trademark angelic voice, which simultaneously embodies an unassuming strength and power. Her luminous vocals combined with her delicate melodies are both uniquely haunting and soulfully uplifting. With influences ranging from Lamb to Etta James, her emotive tone and genuine love for creating beautiful music are why Amber is currently being touted as one of Australia’s great new rising talents. Any of that mean shit to you? No? Me either. Regardless, let her ‘mellow your soul’ at the launch of Oh My Lullaby. Doors at 6:30pm, main act at 9pm. $20 door. See theabbey.com.au.


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ben hermann The concept of the ‘album tour’ (a tour to play an album start to end – usually an acclaimed album from a band’s earlier years) has inspired an increasing amount of long-running and recently-reformed bands to return to the touring circuit and give their fans an experience previously only contemplated, preceded wistfully with, ‘wouldn’t it be amazing if...’ In 2009, The Pixies undertook an international tour of the institutional Doolittle and since then Australia has received, among others, Public Enemy’s Fear of a Black Planet. Locally, The Living End has announced a comprehensive retrospective tour and, perhaps less notably, last year Area-7 gave fans the complete Bitter & Twisted on a ferry as it sailed around Sydney Harbour. Now, on the eve of their 20th birthday, Brisbane’s most infamous keytar enthusiasts, REGURGITATOR, are embarking on a tour to play their two most beloved albums – 1996’s Tu-Plang and 1997’s Unit – back-to-back.

I look back at the solo record and I just piss myself listening to the lyrics I was writing

‘About eight songs we haven’t played for 10 years, and there’s probably a good reason for that,’ says the group’s boyishly recognisable frontman and founding member Quan Yeomans. ‘But I have to relearn all our songs every time we rehearse anyway because I have a brain like a sieve. We have had to work on them and we’re still in the process of working out how to do a few of them, backing track-wise.’ While the album tour is a means of giving fans a chance to relive a particular time and associated memories, as well as giving groups a (for now) fresh alternative to the standard touring setlist, it’s also an acknowledgement, in an era of iTunes playlists, Spotify and burgeoning singles downloads, that there is something unique and worthwhile in a full-length album; a nucleus of songs with some form of collegiate theme, tone, story and sound. But like all memories, past events may become romanticised in our minds and there’s the chance that the memory will be spoilt by reliving the treasured experience with fresh eyes. However, as Yeomans points out, there’s always a need to recognise, acknowledge and celebrate your past achievements, however you might view them now. ‘I have an appreciation for the distance in time [since the albums were written] and I realise it was a younger version of myself. I remember what made me write them and I still appreciate a lot of them,’ he says. ‘But at the time of writing them I was actually extremely critical and sensitive of how crap it was. With time, that becomes easier. After ten years I could listen to those albums and realise that they were appropriate for their time. And they still work, and they’re still fun to play. I still get a kick out of it. It’s kind of fun because it’s so surreal and so odd.’

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Yeomans doesn’t remember exactly why or how the group decided to tour the two albums. They performed Unit in its entirety at 2011’s Falls Festival and have since decided to couple that with Tu-Plang. ‘I don’t know what the motivation really was. You get to a point in your career and you realise it’s been 19 years and you think about digging out the old tracks. We’ve been thinking about it for a couple of years,’ Yeomans explains. He additionally agrees that the tour could be a form of cleansing and a means of allowing the group to move on creatively – no doubt a good thing. Although Tu-Plang and Unit remain unchallenged as the group’s great triumphs, 1999’s …Art and 2001’s Eduardo and Rodriguez Wage War on T-Wrecks still gained them relatively strong support. However, they hit something of a creative rip in the mid-naughties with the less-than-notable Mish Mash! and 2007’s Love and Paranoia, an album Yeomans told The Vine in 2010 he felt ‘slightly embarrassed’ about. Yeomans has since dabbled in some solo work but admits it’s not his forte. ‘I’m really not that great an entertainer on my own,’ he says. ‘I find it really daunting. I’d like to collaborate, but I don’t have enough time. I look back at the solo record, and I just piss myself listening to the lyrics I was writing.’ Nowadays, although Regurgitator is back touring and he is hoping the group begins writing again soon, he explains that he’s already burning the candle at both ends. ‘Lately my time’s been taken up with animating. I’ve been doing 15-hour days just animating, and Ben [Ely] has been doing a lot of gallery work. Recently, I’ve been commissioned to do a film clip for Bertie Blackman. It’s just so full-on, animating for even only a 3.5-minute scene. After I finish a project I always tell myself I’m never going to do it again!’ Yeomans is now also a Melbournian, having moved south only a few years ago. However, he denies that this has had any effect on his creative direction. ‘I’m not really one of these people who immerse themselves in the culture of a city so much.’ he says. ‘Melbourne is such a locked-down city that I’ve found myself able to work really well. Because it’s so cold, it’s conducive to staying indoors.’ Melbourne, solo projects, galleries. It might sound like the ‘Gurge’s quirky, computer nerd charm and purveyor of all things strange and different has faded. Yet their choice of supports for the Tu-Plang/Unit tour suggests otherwise. The group will be joined by Beijing’s Hedgehog and Indonesia’s Senyawa. In true Regurgitator style, they were chosen not to achieve any type of cohesive theme or to present similar musical styles for the tour, but merely because they were great groups who had caught the attention of Yeomans, Ely and drummer Peter Kostic. ‘I’ve never actually met them. I’ve seen them play and was just blown away that I felt we had to ask them. I’m excited and it’s going to be a great tour, regardless of how good our little nostalgia trip ends up being.’ Regurgitator plays at Zierholz @ UC on Thursday October 4, 8pm, supported by Senyawa and Hedgehog. Tickets are $39.80 from Oztix.


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ALL AGES Hey folks! There’s plenty happening on the all ages front, so seize the day (/tomorrow) with this special procrastination themed col— Oh, sorry, didn’t finish that sentence. I was too busy alphabetizing my bookcase and procrasti-cleaning my imaginary cat. Along with a hundred other things that I didn’t need to do. I don’t recommend it. (Spoiler alert: future-you will hate you.) Something I do recommend you is to start practising with your band again, because the LIFT OFF competition and festival is coming up soon. LIFT OFF is a music competition and festival for people aged 12-25. Prizes include professional recording sessions, a band photo shoot and professional website design. There will be three heats to decide the winning band. The first two heats will be held on Friday November 2 and Saturday November 3 at the Woden Youth Centre and the finals and festival will be held on Saturday November 10 at Eddison Park in Woden. Registrations open on Monday September 24 and close on Friday October 12. For more information, updates and registration forms see their Facebook page: facebook.com/ liftofffestivalcanberra. If you’re not seizing the day today, then at least seize it on Tuesday October 2. Come see The Amity Affliction, The Ghost Inside (US), Architects (UK) and Buried In Verona at the UC Refectory. Tickets are $51.30 + bf and can be bought online or by calling either Ticketek or Oztix.

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If we learn anything from the Zombie Prom Musical, it’s that zombies have feelings too, and even if you are spontaneously turned into a zombie you still shouldn’t put off asking that girl you like to the prom. Zombie Prom Musical makes its way to the Yarralumla Woolshed on Saturday October 6 and Sunday October 7. Tickets start at $25 + bf and can be bought online at Moshtix. Hot Chelle Rae teaches us through their delightful pop song, Tonight Tonight, that we should indeed party tonight, and not put it off ‘til tomorrow night. They will be playing at the Royal Theatre on Sunday October 28, supported by Cher Lloyd. Tickets are $89.90 + bf and can be purchased via Ticketek. Touche Amore and Make Do And Mend are two passionate American hardcore punk bands. Both toured Australia separately in 2011 and now they are back and touring together. With reviews describing their music as ‘melodic as it is fierce’ and ‘refreshingly real’, it’s definitely worth seeing them – no matter how many bookcases need alphabetizing. They play at the Tuggeranong Youth Centre on Sunday November 4. The gig is from 6:30-10pm. Tickets are $35 and can be bought online at Moshtix. Here’s a joke. Q: Why did the sad Andie miss out on tickets to Mumford & Sons? A: Procrastination. Yep, the punch line still stings a bit. Don’t let that be you. Invest in tickets ASAP for Parkway Drive at the UC Refectory on Sunday December 16. They’re supported by I Killed The Prom Queen, Northlane and Survival. Tickets cost $45.90 + bf through Ticketek. So there, the next time you have the urge to procrastinate: just put it off. ANDIE EGAN allagescolumn@gmail.com


LOCALITY

Until recently I’d never heard of Mudd Music but they put on a show last week as solid as the cancerous knots in Lance Armstrong’s amputated nut. (Imagine it. Imagine the nut. Is it in a jar? Is a hobo rolling it in his cheek?) Anyway, they have another one on Thursday September 13 at Transit Bar with Renegade Peacock, The Khalasar and Critical Monkee from 8pm and it’s free. The same night, over at The Phoenix Bar, the guys behind the local Punktuation Podcast (punktuation.me) are holding an official launch to coincide with its tenth episode. Yoko Oh No, Revellers and The Euphorics will all be playing and proceedings get under way at 9pm. Also free.

The following night, Friday September 14, there’s more gimpy sorts on display at The Pot Belly Bar in Belconnen. They’re hosting The Feldons, Magic Rob Universe, Marji Curran and John Lollback from 8pm and it’s a feeble $5 on the door. Feeble like a baby trying not to swallow a fly that wandered into its mouth. The same day sees the Canberra Short Film Festival launch at Dendy Cinema. It runs over the weekend and wraps up on Sunday September 16. See page 41 (and dendy.com.au) for details. Also on that weekend, Saturday September 15 to be specific, will be No Hausfrau’s EP fundraiser at The Front Gallery and Café with Sebastian Field & Matt Lustri and Cromwell in support from 7:30pm. Monday September 17’s Bootleg Sessions at The Phoenix Bar is a sweaty, incestuous mess of local and interstaters. Local electronic wunderkind E A V E S is sandwiched in between headliners Naked (TAS) and Sex Noises and Kid of Harith. See page 14 for more info but it kicks off at 8pm and, as always, is free.

YOU MADE MY DAY!

Email editorial@bmamag.com to send a message of gratitude, warmth and generosity to the world at large. Aww.

To my dear old friend who sent me a postcard featuring a black and white photograph by Wolfgang Tillmans titled Alex & Lutz, looking at crotch to my current address which also happens to be my Dad’s place, you made my day! There’s nothing quite like your 64-year-old father passing you a picture of a couple of naked Germans standing in a field while one of them has a good old gucken at the other’s scheide. Particularly when the message on the back wraps up with “Sorry about the inappropriate posty. Hope you love it!” O yes, my dear old friend, I loved it just as you knew I would, even if it was my old man who retrieved it from the letterbox. Just be aware next time you’re living with your Dad I’m sending you crazy German porn so I can make your day too! To the old lady who changed my perception of geriatric drivers this morning. Here I was standing curbside, ready to weave my way between oncoming traffic rather than wait for the little green man to give me his condescending approval, when I almost took a step out in front of her speeding vehicle. I caught myself at the last second and retreated a step. Her reaction as she drove past? A warm, wrinkled, would-you-like-a-biscuit smile and a nod, as if to say, ‘You be careful, y’foolish little bugger.’ Made my day, y’fruity old bint.

Charlie Black in Manuka are hosting a legitimate, two month-long Hot Five Comedy Competition on selected Wednesdays. On Wednesday September 19 the headliner is John Campbell (VIC), things kick off at 7pm and tickets are $10 at comedyact.com.au or $15 at the door. The competition runs until Wednesday October 31 and some dosh goes to Legacy, so that’s supposed to be good. The weekend after that sees The Canberra Musicians’ Club’s Fourth Birthday Party at The White Eagle Polish Club from 7pm. I haven’t a clue what they have planned but feliz cumpleaños and wear a condom. Saturday September 22 will see Abstraktions 3, the next in a series of music nights, take shape at The Street Theatre from 8pm. hellosQuare are once again at the helm and they’ve brought Sydney jazz artist Adrian Lim-Klumpes, renowned electro improviser Ollie Bown and duo Cold House along for the night. See thestreet.org.au for info and tickets. And finally, Floriade’s Nightfest gimmick bullshit kicks off on Wednesday September 26. Instead of looking at a bunch of cosmetic, time-wasting retardation in daylight, you can look at it under glaring floodlights and get drunk because it’s socially acceptable. Bully for you. It runs 6:30pm-10pm for five nights. And that’s everything local I care about and Floriade. ASHLEY THOMSON - editorial@bmamag.com

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since the beginning of August.

LANE DOWN HER OWN TRACK mel cerato LANIE LANE, the jazz-rockabilly pin-up girl taking the world by storm, is as charming and polite as she is talented and in-demand. From entering a triple j Unearthed competition to releasing her impressive debut album to working with the international icon Jack White, Lanie has had a hectic couple of years. ‘I didn’t really know in what way to make being a musician a reality. I didn’t really make the final “this is it, this is how I want to do it” ‘til only four or five years ago,’ she says. ‘I was still not sure if it was for me, but I have always played music and I did know that I wanted to do something with that.’ Reaching number 12 on the ARIA charts, To The Horses mixes a whole host of music genres to create a smooth rock ‘n’ roll/blues/rockabilly sound incredibly different to your average Katy Perry or Ke$ha.‘I don’t really have anything to compare it to but it is overwhelming and amazing, I’m really stoked,’ Lanie says of the reception to her album. She is already working on the next album, and will start recording it after she finishes the On My Own Track tour she has been undertaking

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I didn’t really know in what way to make being a musician a reality

‘We’ve put aside a week to a couple of weeks to record another album in October. So if I want to do another week, well, it’s open to that,’ she explains happily. ‘I want to feel like I can basically go into a house with my band and we can just record and take our time.’ In the middle of her busy couple of years, it was last year that Lanie had the unbelievable invitation to work with Jack White, legendary musician of The White Stripes and The Saboteurs fame, in his own studio in Nashville.

‘He is very kind and generous and polite. He is just a gentleman. I mean, he hasn’t opened a door for me that I can remember, but I’m sure he would,’ Lanie laughs. ‘He is very inspiring. He really has got a great instinct with music.’ Will Lanie be making some more sweet music with Mr White anytime soon then? ‘When you build relationships with people and keep it then you never know, but there is nothing planned at the moment,’ she says with a knowing tone in her voice. Lanie has decided to take a break later this year, for a much-need period in which to reenergise and relax. ‘I’m going to have a break after [recording the next album]. It’s time,’ Lanie says with a sigh. ‘I think I’m just getting quite tired and need a bit of breather. I just want to be fresh again. This summer will kinda be like my season of resting for a while so that I can come back and bloom again.’ If you were lucky enough to nab tickets to Lanie’s sold-out show on Saturday September 15, you’ll no doubt be blown away by what’s set to be a stellar performance at The Street Theatre.


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PETE HUET A lone Englishman sings while staring at the neck of his electric guitar on an otherwise empty stage. The impact of the clip for BILLY BRAGG’s A New England came not from production values, but from lines such as ‘I saw two shooting stars last night/I wished on them but they were only satellites’ and the originality of what Bragg was doing at the time. In fact, it appears as if the lone-man-with-electric-guitar approach was designed for effect. ‘No, it was desperation more than anything, really.’ says Bragg. ‘I’d kind of run out of all the other options.’

I was afraid it was going to be beefeaters and bowler hats and Churchill and Spitfires and all of that shit

It was only when he started playing in front of an audience that the Barking (East London) born and bred singersongwriter realised how novel his setup was. ‘There were a lot of people knocking about with acoustic guitars singing, but nobody with an electric guitar. Nobody with that edge – that punk edge – to what they were doing. So it ended up being a great way to cut through what was going on.’ And there was a lot going on. The early ‘80s was a golden age of British music that had begun with the punk explosion of the previous decade. The likes of The Clash, The Specials, The Cure and The Smiths were creating music with a sense of urgency and Bragg was a singular force in the middle of it all; a man with an electric guitar, an ear for a tune and a sense of social justice – very much a result of Thatcher’s Britain. Tracks like It Says Here and his version of The World Turned Upside Down made Bragg essential listening for youth with a social conscience. The success of Bragg’s early releases was repeated when he took on a band to record Worker’s Playtime (1988). The rousing single, Waiting for the Great Leap Forwards, helped the Bard Of Barking take a loyal following into a new decade where, for a while, it appeared he would continue to be associated with the time in which he emerged. But an approach from the daughter of iconic American folk singer Woody Guthrie would change all of that and bring a new audience to a man who was proudly continuing the protest song tradition. Nora Guthrie asked Bragg if he would like to go through her father’s unrecorded lyrics, of which there were reportedly hundreds. The Englishman then took those lyrics into the studio with Wilco, the Chicago-based band that had just rolled into an extraordinary purple patch with the release of double album Being There (1996). Together, Billy Bragg and Wilco turned words into song and produced the classic Mermaid Avenue (1998), which was followed by Mermaid Avenue Vol. II (2000) and, more recently, Mermaid Avenue Vol. III (2012).

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Mermaid Avenue not only gave a boost to Wilco’s nascent stardom and expanded Bragg’s own sizable fan base (especially in the US), it had a profound effect on the posthumous life of the ‘Dust Bowl Troubadour’. ‘It made people reassess who [Woody Guthrie] was,’ says Bragg. ‘That was Nora’s intention. I think she felt that her father had been hijacked by academics… [who] were only seeing the tip of the iceberg of who he really was. And when she involved us she wanted us to sing songs like Ingrid Bergman – about him wanting to make love to a Swedish film star – rather than more songs like This Land is Our Land, which everybody knew.’ Like Guthrie, Bragg’s political anthems can draw attention away from songs like the timeless Greetings to the New Brunette with its working-class words of affection; ‘I’m celebrating my love for you with a pint of beer and a new tattoo.’ So in this ‘post-ideological time,’ as Bragg puts it, does the man once known as much for his socialism as his music still consider himself a socialist? ‘I do, yeah. I define myself as a socialist. But I think the socialism I’m talking about is different from the socialism of Leon Trotsky. For those of us who know a bit about socialism we’re aware that there are many different types of socialism. But our enemies will only accept there’s one type of socialism and that’s exemplified by the Soviet Union and its worst excesses during the years of Stalinism.’ Along with being a socialist, Bragg is a patriot. He says there are also many forms of patriotism, not just the kind espoused by his long-time adversary of the far right, the British National Party. He feels so strongly about the idea of a positive, inclusive love for one’s country he wrote a book about it – The Progressive Patriot (2006). As such, Bragg was happy to see the subject of British patriotism brought to the fore by the London Olympics. ‘I think there’s been a shift away from the Imperial idea of ‘Britishness’,’ he says, adding that he was particularly impressed with Danny Boyle’s opening ceremony. ‘I was afraid it was going to be beefeaters and bowler hats and Churchill and Spitfires and all of that sort of shit. But it wasn’t.’ Boyle’s decision to take 1948, the year of the last London Olympics, as year zero was especially significant. Bragg explains that this was the year that post-war immigration began, the year the welfare state was founded and the year British coinage appeared without the abbreviation ‘Ind. Imp.’, which had denoted British rule over India. Bragg’s return to these colonial shores coincides with the centenary of Woody Guthrie’s birth. He will perform a set of his own songs and a set of Woody’s. ‘People who know Woody Guthrie, I want them to leave with a different opinion of who he was,’ says Bragg. ‘And people who don’t know about him I want to leave intrigued.’ Billy Bragg will play at the Canberra Theatre Centre on Tuesday October 23 at 8pm. Tickets are $85.95 through canberratheatrecentre.com.au or by calling (02) 6275 2700.


BLESSED ARE THE MERCIFUL

chris navin

OH MERCY are an established indie four-piece from Melbourne who are evolving their focus from acoustic pop sensibilities into a groovebased and edgy sound. Their new full-length, Deep Heat, is a showcase of this new direction and an impressive display of songwriting and musicianship, which shows why they’ve earned themselves ARIA Award Nominations and an extensive tour of the US. Frontman Alexander Gow discussed the band’s progress. ‘We put the record out a week and a bit ago and people seem to be appreciating the slight change in direction for us. I feel like we’ve retained our loyal fans and picked up a few new ones too’.

I wanted to make rock with swagger, as opposed to rock for meatheads

The strong change in direction was a deliberate choice by the band. ‘I noticed people started getting comfortable with their ideas of who I was, so I consciously wrote this album as a bit of a curveball to shake people’s expectations up and to keep myself interested. I think it’s done just that.’ One of the key differences from the band’s earlier work is a change in songwriting to focus more on writing lyrics in the third person. ‘It was really liberating for me to write in the third person. It meant that I had a broader spectrum of concepts to choose from and it was also really fun to put on a bit of a mask and take on those characters.’ The inspiration to take on the challenge was in part inspired by Paul Kelly. ‘There’s a chapter in his memoirs, How To Make Gravy, and that was definitely the catalyst for me writing in the third person. I gave it a crack and found it particularly easy and really fun.’ Recorded at Family Farm Studios, just outside of Portland, the differences in the new material are not just lyrical; the band has opted for a much more groove-based ‘70s R&B inspired sound. ‘I’ve always loved groove-based music – namely ‘70s African American R&B and awesome late ‘70s glam and post-punk stuff. I wanted to make rock with swagger, as opposed to rock for meatheads.’ Another feature that stands out in the new album is the unique and engaging cover art which features a photo from renowned artist Rennie Ellis. ‘He’s one of my favourite photographers. I studied his work at art school and I chose that particular one because it represented the album we just made: bombastic, colourful and provocative – it ticked a lot of boxes for me.’ In between a slow march to crack the North American scene – ‘it’s just baby steps for us over there’ – but Oh Mercy will be touring Australia to bring their newfound groove and swagger to receptive audiences throughout the country. Oh Mercy will groove on into ANU Bar on Friday September 24 as part of their Deep Heat tour supported by Millions. Tickets are $20.10 from Ticketek.

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DANCE THE DROP

You are guilty. As guilty as me. We are all Canberra-bashers. We may not wear the gloves nor work inside the octagon, but we take more daily swings than a UFC champion. ‘It’s too cold’…BAM! ‘It’s boring’… BIFF! ‘It’s not as good as Sydney’...JOOF! Before your coffee, the nation’s capital is sprawled out on the mat, blood pouring out of its nostrils like a big, useless water fountain. The moral of the story is you have to learn to love where you live, and I’ve sensed a pride that’s been echoed through the success of our local dance music exports. The Aston Shuffle have just released their long-awaited new single, Can’t Stop Now, The Only are ripping up the airwaves with their smash hit, Drag Me Down, Peking Duk have just returned from their second international tour and Karton are chomping at the bit to drop their latest bass-heavy EP in the coming weeks. The best thing about this city is the people in it, so always remember to support your local artists. Canberra, you’re alright. Pang! Proprietor Hugh Foster celebrated a milestone birthday at the end of August, but it is us who will be receiving the presents. Two massive internationals will be gracing the Trinity Bar floorboards in September; German legend Fritz Kalkbrenner brings his bag of upfront house, progressive and techno to the club on Friday September 14 and UK bumpy house misfits Zombie Disco Squad completely write off your Saturday with their first ever Canberra appearance on Friday September 21. It has taken me a while to warm to current incarnations of dubstep and D&B, but it is artists like Perth’s ShockOne who make it easier to absorb. You can catch the master of disaster at The Clubhouse on Friday September 21, presented by the ever present True Jungle Souljahs (TJS) crew. If you like it crazy, ShockOne’s the man! The ‘Drop Top 5 is taking a bit of a segue this week with my man System Segue providing a chocolate-covered slice of fresh techhouse for your salivating palate. System Segue – Can’t Stop (Original Mix) [Miami Techno Chrome] – From my Together EP, on sale now via Beatport. A deep bassinfused tech-house club tune. UMEK – Unclear Mechanics (Original Mix) [Toolroom] – Really loving this track. Bouncy tech-house with elements of techno. RESET! – Don’t Let The System (System Segue Remix) [Bootleg] – A bootleg remix I produced with a smooth bassline and cool sax stabs. Check it out on soundcloud.com/system-segue. Da Fresh – Right On Time (Original Mix) [Wasabi] - Groovy bassline and vocal stabs that keep you moving. Been diggin’ this for a while. Adele vs. Tube – Free Tribes Set Fire To The Rain (DjLYLT Mashup) – A mashup I did under my DJ alias that is always a crowd pleaser. Free download at soundcloud.com/djlylt. TIM GALVIN tim.galvin@live.com.au

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The only main difference [in the future] will be that Apple make a ton more money

CEREBRAL HUNGER mel cerato Contrary to the belief that the name ZOMBIE DISCO SQUAD is the direct result of a drunken night out, it actually came from a member of the press. ‘Yeah, it was actually coined by a journalist about a party we did years ago,’ says Nat Self, aka Zombie Disco Squad. ‘They said it was like a squad of disco zombies. And it stuck.’ Nat and his friend Lucas Hunter started ZDS in 2006 as DJs, partying around their hometown of London. Known for their ‘Get Rude’ parties and residencies at some of the hottest London clubs, the boys soon released a single, Straight Boy, online for free and received over 10,000 hits, sparking the band to take to the road. ‘It was the first track we ever did and it came out on record. We had no idea what to do with digital distribution it so we just gave it away,’ Nat explains. ‘I started playing about seven years ago and it was just a hobby. I never thought it would come this far. I feel blessed’.

Now, seven years later, Nat is by himself at the helm of ZDS. ‘It’s not as fun as travelling with someone else; it is the only real change I guess,’ he says about losing his bandmate. But while the road is lonelier, the booth creativity has not been impeded. Nat released a debut album, Brains, earlier this year. Brains was released on UK house music label Made to Play, whose policy is to release only one album a year to maintain quality.

Having the 2012 spot for the album is an accomplishment not lost on Nat. ‘I was very very happy. The feedback was amazing,’ he says. ‘It was a bit intense, writing it. I buckled down, drank a lot of coffee and had a lot of late nights.’ The album mixes many dance genres, including house, ghetto tech and disco, as well as hip hop and soul. ‘I grew up on drum and bass and a lot of ninja tune stuff. Right now I’m pretty obsessed with Motown and soul – as well as house, which I’m always into.’ Touching on the topic of whether digital music will wipe out existing physical forms, Nat is unconvinced. ‘I think vinyl will last a while yet. It’s a nice format and is a nice thing to own. I feel like CDs are on their way out fast,’ he hypothesises. ‘I feel like the only main difference [in the future] will be that Apple make a ton more money.’ Zombie Disco Squad’s Australian tour is going to be a quick one, with five shows booked in four cities over two weekends. Sounds like a riddle, really. Nat is excited about checking out the land down under. ‘I’ve never been; I’m excited to come to Oz’s capital.’ Zombie Disco Squad will appear at Trinity Bar on Friday September 21 with Offtapia, Shaolin, Stylez & Hyde and more. Free before 10pm.

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THE REALNESS I’ve recently been listening to some hip hop albums released over the last two years or so, one of which was the much-hyped Bad Meets Evil collaboration/reunion album between Detroit legends Eminem and Royce Da 5’9. We all know Em has produced some horrible music over the last few years, but his recent Recovery effort wasn’t so bad, saved by more mature content and better beat selection. Royce has been ever-reliable and his recent excursions with his Slaughterhouse colleagues have been fresh and exciting. Needless to say, my expectations were high for Bad Meets Evil. What I heard, however, (save for a few tunes) was a steaming-hot pile of offensive turds. Em had mostly returned to his shouty ‘fart-n-burp’ rap style and Royce (though keeping his trademark slippery flow) seemed to dumb down his lyrical content to match. The beats were bland as a plate of chokos, the Bruno Mars featured tune unforgiveable and even the usually reliable Mr Porter turned out a few stinky productions. What happened? Rap music in 2012 has proven that you don’t need to dumb down to sell records and gain mainstream attention, so this record left me more than a little baffled. Sure, Royce was still rapping his ass off, but that spark was missing. His return this month with his Slaughterhouse cronies for their brand new Welcome To Our House record has me crossing my fingers for the return of the artist I know and love. With production from T-Minus, Boi-1da, Hit-Boy, AraabMuzik, J.U.S.T.I.C.E League and No I.D., surely my faith will be restored? Now signed to Shady Records, however, I hold little hope that Eminem’s ‘executive producer’ fingers will be kept at bay. Time will tell. Rant over. Now, to other news. Blu & Exile return this month with Give Me Flowers While I Can Still Smell Them. Crappy title, but their last collaboration produced great results, so expectations are high for this one. Mello Music Group has been on a roll lately, releasing a nice catalogue of records (including the incredible Trophies from Apollo Brown & O.C.). Their next release is from veteran Substantial. Home Is Where The Art Is features production from M-Phazes, Oddisee, Eric Lau and more. It’s out at month’s end. Hieroglyphics have kept busy, with releases already seeing the light of day from Pep Love and Del. Casual has teamed up with boom-bap expert J. Rawls for the Respect Game Or Expect Flames album on Nature Sounds. It features the aforementioned Pep Love and Del, along with Kurious, Copywrite and most of the Hiero crew. Giles Peterson’s Brownswood imprint is shifting gears for the third instalment of the much loved Brownswood Electric series. Released on Monday September 24, this time around the label has compiled tunes from the likes of Krampfhart, DJRum, MonoLithium, Dub Phizix, Kidkanevil, Hrdvision and many more. Expect plenty of warm bass and stuttering riddims. Finally, one of my fave electronic producers Ital Tek returns to Planet Mu this October with his third full-length album Nebula Dance, exploring 160bpm tempos influenced by Chicago juke music, African rhythms and lashings of sci-fi fantasies. To hear music from all these releases (except Bad Meets Evil) and more, tune to The Antidote on 2XX 98.3FM every Tuesday night from 9:30pm. ROSHAMBO AKA CED NADA - roshambizzle@yahoo.com.au

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COLLATERAL DAMAJA allan sko On the eve of his first trip to Canberra (or ‘Can-bear-ra’, as Americans charmingly pronounce it) I caught up with 20-years-in-the game hip hop champion JERU THE DAMAJA to discuss what every hardcore rapper wants to talk about: feelings. ‘Getting older, I’m more open to opening up, so you’ll get more of my soul [on album six],’ he says. ‘I’ve always spoken my mind, I’ve never been afraid of that, but I’ve been protective of my deeper feelings, d’youknowwhatImean? So I’m going to open up more.’ This is not to suggest that Jeru – a man who rolls with the mighty Gangstarr, has penned six albums and lent his considerable vocal talents to diverse projects with Groove Armada, Rae & Christian, Dillinja and Poland’s Slums Attack – is going soft now he’s 40. Instead, he layers his voracious style with pearls of wisdom. ‘As you get older sometimes you have to know when to shut the fuck up,’ he says about diss lyrics. ‘Every time I’ve done that it’s been in the heat of the moment. It’s been the decision of a youthful soldier, d’youknowwhatImean? It’s not always thought out, it’s not always the best thing to do, but it’s how I felt at the time, but as you get older... know when to shut the fuck up. To put it, you know... loosely.’

As you get older, sometimes you have to know when to shut the fuck up

Having worked through the occasional beef with The Fugees and even fellow melody maker Premier, Jeru has this to say of up-andcomers: ‘These guys are not as tough as we were. You might get into something with somebody and get into a fistfight and then you’re friends, y’know? But these guys are pretty soft so I think it’s gonna turn out to be disaster for one of them.’ And don’t get him started on social media stoushes. ‘I mean, it’s ree-dic-you-lus; don’t get in that, gangster. Somebody’s gonna see that, man. Leave it alone. You guys are making millions of bucks... Have fun, y’know.’ On his much-publicised row with Prem, Jeru reveals it wasn’t nearly the acrimonious split the media made out. ‘When you’re brothers you go through things. People in their houses with their family go through a bunch of shit, but our relationship is public. There’s never been any malice... We’ve always talked over the years. It was never a big thing, it was simply guys being like, “I wanna do this [instead]”.’ With an unnamed sixth album about to drop and Prem back on the same side of the mixing desk, Jeru is predicting great things. ‘We’ve been in talks, we haven’t had the chance to hit the studio yet but things are gonna get going. This year and next are gonna be great years for hip hop. I’m really looking forward to coming to Can-bearra; I’ve never been there before. I hope everybody comes out... We’re gonna rock!’ Jeru The Damaja plays at Transit Bar on Monday September 17 with Words Eye View in support. Tix are $25 + bf from Moshtix and are in limited supply.


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When we perform we do it like we’re still hungry – that’s one thing I promise and we pride ourselves on

THUG HARMONIES alistair erskine 20 ago, when Easy E discovered BONE THUGS-N-HARMONY and shot them to international fame, there was little to no singing in hip hop. Now from Aussie knapsack rap to ultra-tuned commercial rap there is singing by all manner of rappers. I ask Krayzie Bone how he sees the rise in singing, harmonising and adding some soul to hip hop. ‘It took a while for people and other artists to embrace it, to realise that this not a gimmick. So it’s funny nowadays that the record executives won’t sign anyone unless they can sing. I mean, rap had died, but not really – this is how rap is staying alive. If rap hadn’t embraced singing... With the singing, it has made rap more acceptable to the average person. I mean, man! We had some vulgar, violent lyrics that were probably too hard for many people to take but then we put in the harmonies and made the songs more soothing, so people didn’t necessarily pick up on the words when they heard our songs.’ Were Bone Thugs-N-Harmony being cheeky – trying to subvert the system with their violent lyrics being shrouded by palatable

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harmonics? Krayzie laughs, ‘No, it wasn’t intentional, we were just making music. We had been together for so long, and the subjects we talked about were things we did, experienced or saw – we were just rapping about our everyday life. We didn’t think it was being dishonest or anything, we just saw how the harmonies just captivated the audiences and we really loved performing them.’

20 years on, the Bones are grown men with families, children and an older perspective. I ask Krayzie what the growing up process has meant for the group’s music. ‘We have changed a whole lot, but the one thing we have never changed is that we like to keep it real with our songs and themes; if you weren’t doing it, you shouldn’t say you were there. Now these days we have families, we don’t have to stand on the corner and steal and deal. But with our lyrics we can go back and visit those days and we can still talk about what we see, put ourselves in someone else’s shoes, but we aren’t going to talk about being on the block – it would be dumb on our part because it would show the world that we learned nothing in the last 20 years.’ So what can Canberran audiences expect when the group returns to the nations capital? Krayzie enthuses, ‘I want to tell them if they are after a real show, if they came to the last one they would know the energy; we will play the hits and some new stuff and when we perform we do it like we’re still hungry – that’s one thing I promise and we pride ourselves on.’ On Friday September 21, Krayzie and Wish will be performing at the University of Canberra Refectory. Supporting acts include DJ Frags, Eitha, Collossuss, Pug D, Dlinkwnt, N2W, Big Dave and Kitty B. Tickets are $47 + bf through Moshtix.


METALISE So Sunn got cancelled. Heathen Skulls and the band have been having a bit of a public back-and-forth over it. Heathen Skulls were classy about it; the Sunn team cited a lack of professionalism. The bottom line: neither Sunn nor Pelican are coming now, so boo. As an aside, I still read and hear people call the band ‘Sunno’ due to this symbol on the end of their name: ‘o)))’. That’s the symbol for the Sunn amp brand that they use. I digress. This hasn’t stopped Heathen Skulls taking Earth around this week with a show at Hi Fi in Sydney Thursday September 13 and bringing Russian Circles and Eagle Twin to ANU Bar on Thursday October 4 with locals I Exist in tow. Also announced by the promoter is the welcome first visit to this country by New Orleans sludge gods Eyehategod in late November, with a headline performance at Cherryrock Festival in Melbourne and sideshows in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne. More details on that one as they arise. Also coming up are the delights of the High On Fire show at Manning Bar in Sydney on Saturday September 29. De Vermis Mysteriis is way up there on my metal albums of the year and this is the first time the band has had time to do their own tour so it should be an absolute ripper. Blood Duster are hitting the interwebs with the first single from their forthcoming full-length KVlt in the next week or so, with the album due out on Monday October 1. I spoke to Jason P.C. last week and after that conversation I think it will be a delicious proper grindcore record, in that it will really piss off a lot of people – just the way a grindcore record should. Speaking of Melbourne grindcore, we finally get the opportunity to see one of Melbourne’s newer grind bands (well newer in relation to Blood Duster at any rate). The Mung first came to my attention at Goatsound studios when recording there a couple of years back. I was treated to the most insane grind vocals I have heard, which do not use anything other than a human being to change the sound. Their two EPs, The Splatter Sessions and Showering In Shit, are depraved technical grindcore and I mean that in the best possible way. They’re playing a stacked bill at The Basement on Friday September 21 with local death metal gore-lords Tortured in the headline spot, Whoretopsy (Melb) and local death metallers Infested Entrails. A mere $10 for a whole lot of good, unclean fun. Alestorm seem to have buried a whole bunch of booty on their previous tours and we’re going to be on the receiving end of another Australian tour in early January next year. It will include a show shooting footage for a live DVD on Tuesday January 18 at Hi Fi in Melbourne. The Sydney show is on Wednesday January 19. Cannibal Corpse are touring with Psycroptic in October and hit The Metro in Sydney on Saturday October 6, so don’t forget that one either. Unkle K’s Band Of The Week: Ice Dragon: Boston doomsters channelling Sabbath through Game of Thrones: icedragon.bandcamp.com. JOSH NIXON doomtildeath@hotmail.com

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E X H I B I T I O N I S T

100 YEARS, 365 DAYS melissa wellham Next year Canberra turns 100, and boy, are there some big events and projects planned for the year-long birthday bash celebrating the CENTENARY OF CANBERRA. While one might expect that the majority of events would be stuffy tributes to Canberra’s role as the seat of democracy in the nation – and, sure, there are one or two of those – the majority of the events are galas of awesome. There are vaudeville performances inside glittering, mirrored tents; ballet performances influenced by Canberra’s iconic landscape (read: roundabouts); numerous film festivals to suit any attention span; and such a plethora of performances from a diverse range of local, independent bands, that it’s likely you won’t even have seen them all before. And that’s saying something. It would be impossible to outline all of the events happening in Canberra throughout the year – indeed, there will be an event on literally every single week of the year – but there are some highlights that are too good not to mention. Throughout 2013 local Canberra band The Cashews and other musicians will be resuming their series of ‘guerrilla gigs’ throughout the city, in locations not typically used for musical performances. From Fri-Sun March 8-12, when the Big Birthday Weekend takes place – which will be the centrepiece of the Centenary celebrations – local indie bands will provide musical entertainment, showcasing just how much town-grown talent we have. Collected Works: Australia will be the Canberra Theatre Centre’s subscription season and will bring works from every State and Territory to Canberra – including the Sydney Theatre Company’s The Secret River and big hART’s Yijala Yala – to encourage national participation and a greater awareness of the arts scene within the nation’s capital. One of the events I am most looking forward to is the arrival in Canberra of The Famous Spiegeltent, from Wednesday February 27 to Sunday March 24, a hand-hewn pavilion used as a travelling dance hall, bar and entertainment salon. The most beautiful of the last remaining Belgian Spiegeltents, The Famous Spiegeltent is built of leaded glass, mirrors, wood and canvas and decorated in velvet and brocade. You can expect to be overwhelmed – in a good way – by over-the-top and outrageous cabaret and vaudeville performances. The tent is actually run by former Canberrans David Bates and Michele d’Arbela.

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Even better, the Centenary of Canberra program highlights all of the amazing stuff that already happens in Canberra anyway. If you’re sick of your friends complaining that there’s never anything to do in this sexy-librarian-of-a-city of ours, but can never remember exactly the events that you know are happening, then the program pulls together all the festivities into one convenient handbook. The Canberra International Film Festival is going to be bigger and better than ever before – and other film events will include the Canberra Short Film Festival, Lights! Canberra! Action!, Optus Flix in the Stix at the Senate Rose Gardens and Sunset Cinema Canberra held at the Royal Botanic Gardens. Multi-arts festival You Are Here returns in 2013 for ten days, once more infiltrating our alleyways and hidden nooks and crannies throughout the CBD to showcase emerging and alternative arts communities. There will be debates and forums, poetry and gigs, spoken word performed on the street and installation art in unexpected locations around the city. There are huge sporting events planned (I have been led to believe that the Prime Minister’s XI between Australia and the West Indies is a big deal?), indigenous art projects and shows, science symposiums and conventions (including Questacon’s – my favourite underrated Canberra institution’s – 25th birthday) and more. Canberra cops a lot of flak – from interstate and local critics alike – because there’s ‘nothing to do.’ To those people, I say: only the boring get bored. Zing! But seriously, if there is one thing that the Centenary of Canberra should accomplish, it is reminding cynical and sceptical locals (and hopefully a few interstate visitors) that Canberra does indeed have a soul. This is not a city comprised solely of politicians and middleaged public servants – but of dedicated artists, communicators, playwrights, musicians, dancers and choreographers. A city of young people (who just want to try and sneak booze during the National Multicultural Festival) and retired workers (who want to travel the country in minivans and bring seashells back to Canberra for their grandkids) alike. And, you know, middle-aged public servants who are mostly not robots, but human beings who are interested in bringing foreign films back to Canberra since Dendy went insipidly mainstream, or really enjoy seeing local bands live, or think that the frequent events at the Canberra Contemporary Art Space are awesome. Canberra is a lively, multi-faceted city – and for a 100-yearold broad, she’s got a lot going on, the saucy minx. The full Centenary program was released on Tuesday September 4. You can find out more by visiting canberra100.com.au and subscribing to the newsletter. You can also find more information on Facebook at facebook. com/CentenaryofCanberra or Twitter (@CentenaryofCanb).


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thought it would involve engineers spending days looking through hundreds of hours of tapes. But it was all sourced though YouTube in a short time.’ Even so, it wasn’t so easy to cut down the initial shortlist. ‘I’d like to bring it all back and have a raft of new material to use too. So this idea is not likely to be a one-off but the first of a series of shows. I really enjoyed investigating the material and there’s much more that’s not recorded.’

MCDERMOTT HOLLERS rory mccartney Ever wondered what lies behind the irreverent exterior of TV funnyman PAUL MCDERMOTT? Paul’s illustrious career has included filmmaking, writing kids’ books, the Doug Anthony All Stars (DAAS) and appearing in comedy festivals and a raft of TV shows. His quick wit is at its best in TV comedy debates. Paul has also written many songs, some of which he will resurrect in Paul Sings, together with stories from his career. A Canberra lad, he first appeared onstage here as a boy wearing a coconut-bra in the musical South Pacific. Paul explained how the new show came about. ‘Ted Robinson [from Good News Week] and I talked about an idea for it about two years ago. Then, just before this year’s Melbourne Comedy Festival, we decided to select the songs for the show.’ With a shortlist of about 40 songs, it took surprisingly little time to cut it down to 20. ‘I

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With such an expansive backlog of songs, material for the show was drawn from a whole range of periods in his musical history. ‘There’s the song Bottle, which I first wrote for DAAS. It’s the oldest in the set. Then there’s one from the days of GUD, the band, a few from The Sideshow and Good News Week Night Lite.’ Despite having previously covered some classics, including Heard it on the Grapevine with DAAS, Paul maintains that his show will not contain any such thing. ‘No, it’s all original and I’ve done some new material for the show too. Some songs were written under difficult conditions, under tight timelines for TV shows. I don’t know much about music but I’m learning the guitar so I know my way around some chords.’ This can only be further complemented by a somewhat formidable all-star backing band. ‘Stu Hunter put them together. He backs Katie Noonan and has his own solo career. I’m blown away by his talent. Then there is Evan Mansell, Patch Brown (ex-Superjesus) and David Symes, who supports Sarah Blasko.’ Renowned for both his aggressive and entirely contrasting ‘Dalai Lama’ personas, Paul advised what was to be expected in his upcoming show. ‘Probably a mixture. I once got hit by the cast on a guy’s arm at Canberra Theatre. If anyone pisses me off I may rise to the bait.’ Paul sings live at the Canberra Theatre Centre on Sunday September 16 at 6pm. Tickets are $40/$45 through the venue at canberratheatrecentre.com. au or on (02) 6275 2700.


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TAIK’ING OZ BY STORM JULIA WINTERFLOOD ‘When you see a taiko performance, the sound is overwhelming – it’s very big and very loud. But it’s a warm sound, and the physical movement is mesmerising,’ says Graham Hilgendorf, member of premiere Australian ‘taiko’ (Japanese for ‘drum’) ensemble TAIKOZ. For the first time in their 15-year history they’ll be joining global taiko kings, KODO, on the expansive Canberra Theatre stage later this month for a performance in which,‘the extremes will be more extreme than they’ve ever been.’ A perfectly synchronised team of magnificently muscular men and women striking elephantine drums with machine-like precision is extreme in the world of instruments. But, contrary to what this image conjures, the taiko and ‘wadaiko’ (Japanese for the traditional style of Japanese drumming) are not about extreme volume but extreme contrasts. Gushes Graham, ‘this, to me, is the great thing about the taiko: it can be played so beautifully and soft, but when the full group’s going for it, it’s incredible.’ And they really do go for it, with every muscle, bone and sinew of their beautifully athletic bodies. No getting smashed on tour for these guys. ‘We’re quite elastic, so when we make a stroke we’re not just lifting our arm up and hitting the taiko, we’re actually lifting our whole body up. We’re stretching our body like it’s a piece of elastic that’s tied to the ground and then letting it go. That’s how we can produce such a big sound. ‘Because it is so physical, because the whole body is used to produce the sound, breath is very important. A whole group will breathe together. That breathing element becomes very meditative.’ The sound of the taiko is so meditative it’s been known to send screaming squiglets to sleep. ‘The drums played beautifully can lull a baby to sleep because it’s like being back in the womb and hearing all those sounds of the mother’s body. Taiko performances are not just about your ears and your eyes; your whole body is being taken on a journey.’ So what can one expect from a journey when TaikOz and KODO combine? ‘Having KODO come out to Australia is a really special thing in its own right. They’re the best taiko group in the world. They’ve been around the longest, they’re well studied and they understand the art form so well. They are constantly pushing boundaries and creating new things. For this particular concert TaikOz will contrast with KODO by adding a few other elements, such as a marimba [that instrument in Somebody That I Used to Know] to one of the pieces, as well as a drum kit. Towards the end of the performance we start to put our collaborative piece together. There’ll be 17 of us on stage. It’s going to be pretty massive.’

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KODO and TaikOz play the Canberra Theatre Centre on Saturday September 22 at 7.30pm. Tickets range from $39 to $70 and can be bought from canberratheatrecentre.com.au.


I want happiness – but only enough for me. I do not want to share it with anyone. I can’t afford to. It is mine, after all, and I got started on it late in life. Find your own. I am saving my happiness for later. If I get a good thought, the urge to giggle or smile, I immediately stifle it and stuff it deep down in my body. The way I like to think of it is that I currently place much of my happiness into a high interest account, growing, away from others who might spoil it. I do not withdraw it, share it or waste it on little coffees or puppies. I am being responsible and saving all of my happiness for when I retire. And, when I do retire and have all the happiness I need, I will distribute it in measured amounts amongst servants in Bali. Here, my happiness will go much further, relatively speaking, and I will be able to afford protection from those who might ruin it. I have given up laughter. Incidentally, playing, whistling and humming have also been shelved. I’ve surrendered hobbies too. I have 14 people randomly tickling me throughout the day. Nothing. I save it all. There is an argument that happiness can be found more economically in prostitutes and illicit street drugs. I am investigating these possibilities. I have found several ways to grow my happiness. If I were to share with you the best wells upon which I draw, you might try to go there yourself and deplete the rich source and purity of happiness. I will, however, share with you a few examples from further down the list: 1. Monkey research: Monkey-based research in the field of scientific inquiry is where a great deal of happiness can be found. ‘Twelve macaque monkeys were caged, tickled and destroyed to see if the happy centres in their brain had grown.’ By focusing my attention on monkeys, monkey brains, and monkey happiness, my own happiness grows. I count every dead monkey as a little happy trophy. Try it. 2. Shake it from children: Sometimes, around a child who is naturally happy, I steal and bottle it (the happiness, not the child). This happiness is wasted on the child. Shaking the joy from the happy child, I take a jar and clasp wildly at the air, hoping to grab some molecule, some vibe, something invisible to the eye but present in the ether. Then I open the jar and imagine myself drinking this elixir. 3. Repeat the above process with a wild squirrel: Squirrels are naturally happy. One can be held in each hand to double the return on your investment. Contrary to popular belief, their tails do have muscle, allowing them to double-back on you and bite. For this reason, only one squirrel per hand, and grasp it firmly around the waist when shaking. 4. Consider using your thumbs more often: Thumb elaborately around people. Point at things with your thumb, or insist on picking up pieces of paper with your thumbs. Repeat the process but try painting your thumbs like little people. If you find this successful, try tattoos. I tattooed figurines onto my thumbs years ago and it has provided untold happiness. My fingers are next. I look forward to when my hands dance, tangle and wrestle with one another. Happy bank; get ready to expand. I, for one, plan to make quite the deposit with this little scheme. matt Bulman - Matt Bulman is a surrealist comedian and humourist who lives and performs in Canberra. He regularly performs stand-up comedy at The Potbelly, Civic Pub, The Front, Ainslie Football Club and The Italo Club. You can contact him at matthew_bulman@yahoo.com and view more of his work on thebulmanblog.blogspot.com.au.

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HEAVY LIES THE SHADOW CHLOE MANDRYK THE WEIGHT OF SHADOWS offers a view from the top end. I spoke to Alexander Boynes before his solo-show opened at the ANU Photospace Gallery. The multimedia works echo Boynes’ experience of the contemporary and bygone mystique he felt on a recent trip to the Tanami desert. Which is fitting when you consider that his practice is set in motion in a similar way. Boynes explained, ‘I don’t have a set formula as such. Every work is unique and requires a different approach; it’s mostly the work that tells me what it needs.’ Formerly a student of gold and silversmithing, the artist encourages alchemy between representing life as it is, as it is felt and ways that we can reproduce it. However there is a constant in his work: the importance of the figure. Boynes’ pieces aim to pull the audience in to reflect on how we see ourselves and our perception of this country’s shared past. This intent became clear after he visited Paruku, an Indigenous Protected Area (also known as Lake Gregory), and Mulan, a small community. ‘While I was there I wanted to contribute something to the community, so I participated in a culture session at the school and some afterschool activities with the local kids, who happily joined me in the making of my new works.’ In Mulan he also helped to put together a shadow dancing night. This was the perfect setting to be inspired by the shapes a figure can cut – especially at a party with R&B on blast and a smoke machine. The faceless figures that move with a very individual spirit in Mulan Shadows are inspired by the ‘present-day human condition and imagination, and attempt to address contemporary youth culture and its fears and challenges. I hope that people come out of it feeling optimistic about the positive future ahead of Australia,’ Boynes said. The technique used in these works has developed over many years and continues to adjust. Boynes starts by taking photographs and digitally manipulating them, then, depending on the type of work he is making, etches and scratches into sheets of acrylic – an approach used in earlier light-based projects. Boynes then paints and pours pigments onto sheets of aluminium, which are then printed onto. Without doubt it is a complex and thoughtful process, and yet, he said, ‘the challenge of trying to make a better work than the previous one is enticing; it pushes me to experiment with new techniques and materials.’ Add The Weight of Shadows to your list of things to do before it closes. As Boynes said, ‘artists don’t have to be European and dead to warrant a trip out of the house, do they?’ The Weight of Shadows is on at ANU Photospace Gallery until Sunday September 16. Open Mon-Sat, 10:30am-5pm. Free.

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cash flows, people emerge from poverty, etc. But there is nothing like a homemade object, be it a danish baked fresh in the room where you eat it, a blazer fit to your size, or, indeed, a bicycle.

UNINHIBITED I recently devoured the new Dave Eggers novel, A Hologram for the King. It’s excellent. Very much a ‘book for our times’. It’s about many things; what we make of our lives, the intersection between Western and Middle-Eastern culture, surgery, sexual despondency and bikes. The last bit hooked me. I’m a bike nerd and have been since my first BMX (my sixth birthday). Since then, I’ve dabbled in most cycling variations: road, mountain, cycle-cross, fixie and gentlemen’s commuting. I subscribe wholly to the cycling evangelical: it’s about freedom; it’s the best way to see a city; it’s good for the soul. Suck it, motorists. Take your Alan Jonesapproved hate and sup on it ‘til you gag. I care not. In AHFTK, Eggers gives us a protagonist who oversaw the expansion of the Shwinn bicycle company from an American-owned and manufactured item to a mass-produced steed made in the Far East. The protag (partly responsible for the shift) is left on the scrapheap – a common and timely tale. An economist is far better qualified than I to opine on this ongoing discussion re. offshore vs. local production. To tar the process with a simpleton’s brush does no good for anyone, and manufacturing in the developing world isn’t anywhere near all bad; jobs are created,

The lads at Acton’s Moçan and Green Grout are applying the final touches to their very own track bike; the Goodspeed, an elegant but tough-looking piece of work. They’re sourcing the steel, striking deals with local component makers and will start selling these beasts in the coming months through their lovely corner café. Say what you will about track bikes and hipsters, this column doth not judge. To misquote cycling’s greatest stoner, Lance Armstrong: ‘It is about the bike.’ Whatever you’re riding is cool by me, so long as you’re riding. And while my mass-produced big-brand steed does the trick, this Canberra bike excites me. The investment is not only in an object, but a process. I’ve spent a lot of time discussing the process with Miles and David at Moçan. They’re passionate dudes. It rubs off. And in my mind’s eye, when imagining future spins on my own Goodspeed, I’m piloting a message as much as a bike. One that speaks to beautifully applied craft, a personal touch and a good sense of local pride. A product like this can be the greatest billboard for a place. And your cash is supporting much more than a slick spin. It keeps local folk making. It feels good. In Eggers’ book, relinquishing contact with the people for whom a company is making precipitates a decline. Avoid it. Buy a Canberra bike and ride it wherever you go. GLEN MARTIN glenpetermartin@gmail.com

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ONE IN A ONE chloe mandryk JOEL GAILER has covered the ground of a small exhibition room with neat rows of Art Monthly Australia at CCAS Gorman House. Each magazine is left open at the same pages printed with a white ‘1/1’ graphic set against a black background. The title of the work, Unique State, refers to the idea that each work in each magazine is an original, one of one. The title is tongue in cheek as there are 200 copies at our feet that are offset prints, a red flag of mass production. A print is a transfer made from a plate, block or object to a surface, with the ability to be repeated over and over. In an offset print the image you end up with has been moved only once from its initial plate and all the other copies stem from the secondary surface, the print. This is a technique used commercially for ads and magazines.Before the 15th century, images and text were created by hand, every mark an original that would escape replication. Now, most images we see are reproductions, machine-made, living in perpetuity online, as a saved file, a printing plate or rubber stamp. Overlooking the magazines is a plinth with a stamp that reads ‘The Truth is a Copy’. You are invited to stamp a piece of paper to take away. The stamp is personalised but has been formed by technology that depersonalises the maker’s mark – laser engraving. Gailer suggests that in our industrialised world the origin of consumer luxury items branded with makes, models and editions is a classification system borrowed from the print. And drawing this idea to the surface is a concept relevant to a medium that has lived so many lives over six centuries. The artist explained, ‘Printmakers either love me or hate me… A lot of printmakers that are only engaged with traditional art think my work is the end of printmaking.’ Over time prints have empowered people to disseminate knowledge, such as religious or scientific texts, as well as turn our trust and understanding of the medium on its head – Warhol, anyone? Prints can be thrown away or not even noticed. A print is almost inextricable from the modern world – think of receipts, branding on every which, what, billboards, tickets, label and this issue of BMA. But is it art? ‘Art, to me, is about existing in the present and being as relevant to now as I possibly can,’ said Gailer in conversation with Dark Horse Experiment, a research and commercial space in Melbourne (extended interview on Vimeo). There are many questions this room brings up, which is what makes it good. By challenging the relationship between the art from the object, he does something strange. A mass-produced work of art is denied the ability to be a part of mass consumption. Printed material is everywhere but Gailer draws our attention to something not as common – art and ideas.

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1/1 is on show at CCAS Gorman House until Saturday September 29. See ccas.com.au for more info. Entry is free.


IN REVIEW

Australia Day The Playhouse Wednesday August 29 – Saturday September 1 The smell of a sausage sizzle and the dulcet tones of Men At Work’s Land Down Under hung in the air as we were shown to our seats by ushers in Australian flag aprons for the mid-run performance of Australia Day. Directed by Jonathan Biggins, the combined Sydney Theatre Company and Melbourne Theatre Company production featured a cavalcade of Australian stars. As the curtain went up a number of people in the audience could be seen whispering to their theatre companions; presumably saying, ‘That’s the guy from…’ The aforementioned cavalcade of Australian stars in Australia Day included the eccentric commanding officer from Changi (Geoff Morrell), the drunken lawyer from Crownies (Peter Kowitz), the Minister’s Department representative from Hollowmen (David Janes), the line producer from Frontline (Alison Whyte) and the ex-con from East of Everything (Valerie Bader). Newcomer Kaeng Chan (best known for his musical theatre appearances) rounded out the cast. Based on the director’s experiences as an Australia Day Ambassador, the production centred on the bungling grassroots politics of planning Australia Day celebrations in the fictional town of Coriole. On the planning committee were the Liberal Mayor, the CWA representative, the Mayor in waiting, a bigoted builder, the Greens Councillor and an Australian-born Vietnamese school teacher. Obviously, each of these people had differing views about how Australia Day should be celebrated and hilarity was meant to ensue. For me, however, it didn’t so much. I appreciate that it was a tongue-in-cheek look at rural Australia. I appreciate that the racist comments were made in jest and were meant to highlight some of the views that are still held within Australia – I get it. I really do. But the racist jokes and comments made me feel uncomfortable rather than amused. Maybe it’s because I’m too young? Maybe I’m not the target demographic? A quick glance around the theatre suggested that the average age was 45-55. Maybe I’m overly sensitive, having never lived in an environment in which such jokes and comments are customary? The majority of the audience laughed heartily, so perhaps it was just me... That aside, the cast were superb and there were some extremely clever lines. The suggestion that diversity is a wholemeal roll at a sausage sizzle and questions about the carbon-neutrality of the mafia went over well. It also weaved its way through a myriad of themes, such as disability, acceptance, the role of carers, death, cultural appropriateness, generation gaps, the meaning of being Australian, communication, politics and morality. The production was professional with quick scene changes, minimal but effective backdrops and pre-recorded montages to set the scene at the start and after interval. clare butterfield

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ARTISTPROFILE: Marje Seymour

What do you do? Visual Art Practice in Studio 6 at M16 ArtSpace (in the main, oil, collage and mixed medium on canvas). When, how and why did you get into it? I began painting/drawing in ‘80s in the Southern Highlands of NSW and found it to be a rewarding way of communicating beyond words to express my emotional and psychological response to the world around me. Creative expression is essential to the human condition and the making and studying of art reaches into literature, psychology of the mind, philosophy and lifestyle and enriches my life and how I live it. Who or what influences you as an artist? Many artists have influenced my art from many eras, as well as modern artists. I am as much influenced by Ruebens, Van Gogh, Picasso and Pollock as I am by modernists and postmodernists. My art practice has long since reflected my interest in change and what influences and/or directs the choices we make or don’t make that create significant change.

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Of what are you proudest so far? In art? Maintaining my commitment to the development of my personal journey in my arts practice. And the privilege of personal involvement, over many years, in achieving the fantastic refurbished M16 Artspace at Griffith through the ACT Government and their continued support. This allows many hundreds of people to have a creative life – from professional artists in nearly 30 studios, to the full social/age spectrum in our workgroup studios. In life? My children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. And my family. We are a big mob, which might make us ‘colossal’. What are your plans for the future? To continue to look for the money tree I haven’t yet located to support my art into the future. I am just at the end of a three-year body of work and I am already anticipating the next theme which will power the energy I will need over the next three years. What makes you laugh? Most things in life, particularly the silly nonsensical little moments and a quirky bit of black humour thrown in – particularly in the aging process denial in which I live. What pisses you off? Without pointing, can I say ex-partners? And I don’t mean mine. And technology. And politics of the negative sort. And... What about the local scene would you change? The degrading level of reported politics and the deplorable negativity of the Liberal Party. In particular, I would change their leadership to one that is. Upcoming exhibitions? The outside opening of insideCONSCIOUSNESS will be held on Thursday September 13 at M16 Artspace in Griffith. This exhibition is subtitled 2003 Canberra Fire 10th Anniversary Exhibition, which will be opened by the Minister for Arts, Culture and Emergency Services, Joy Burch. The theme explores the impacts of media and marketing/advertising on our conscious and unconscious mind. It begins with black paintings and merges into the white-onwhite of the spirit and celebration of re-emergence and survival. Contact Info: Facebook: Marje Seymour; website: m16artspace.com; Email: seymour.m@ optusnet.com.au.

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bit PARTS Canberra Short Film Festival WHAT: Homegrown short films WHEN: Fri Sep 14 – Sun Sep 16 WHERE: Dendy Cinema Come and see the Canberra filmmakers who are thinking big and filming short. This year’s 17th Canberra Short Film Festival is set to be bigger than ever before, representing the finest films from Canberra, Australia and around the world through a variety of categories, genres, styles and lengths up to 20 minutes. Commencing on Friday morning and spanning throughout the weekend, the categories included are Open National, Documentary, Schools, International and Canberra Local. The best of the best will be shown at the Sunday night Finals, followed by an awards ceremony at which $5000 worth of prize money, a regional tour and three intensive workshops will be awarded. And what better way to celebrate with winners and talented participants alike than by kickin’ on at the Honkytonks after party? Cinephile or not, come support your local filmmakers and enjoy some one-off quality viewing. Check dendy.com.au for session times/prices. Book there or by calling (02) 6221 8900.

Brawlers, Bawlers And Bastards WHAT: Thomas Farrell exhibition WHEN: Mon Sep 10 – Fri Sep 28 WHERE: Gallery @ Belconnen Community Centre Every year, gallery@bcs contributes a three-week exhibition, including print and design of promotional material and exhibition opening catering, to the ANU School of Art’s Emerging Artist Support Scheme. This year the prize goes to 2011 painting department graduate, Thomas Farrell, whose thoughtful exploration of everyday human mannerism brings light and life to his dark interior settings. Drawing on influences from the likes of Edward Hopper, Lucien Freud and Alex Katz, Thomas uses light and interior space as compositional tools to explore the concept of subconscious physical expression and the human condition. Official opening Thu Sep 13, 6pm. Mon-Fri, 9am-4:30pm. Free.

Flashes Of My Past In The Future WHAT: Mixed media exhibition WHEN: Thu Sep 13 – Sun Sep 30 WHERE: M16 Artspace, Gallery 3 Jocelyn Rosen and Kate Ward capture personal everyday scenes through photography, embroidery, ceramics and lino prints. A common theme is explored using techniques unique to the artists, resulting in a diverse, original collection of works. Enamoured by the romance of living in a historic dwelling built during the mid-1800’s, Ward’s sketches of her domestic scenes have been translated into delicate embroidered objects, while Rosen’s photographic work is taken from her life over the last six months, featuring portraits of friends, family and travel. Official opening on Thu Sep 13, 6pm. Open Wed-Sun, 12-5pm. Free.

Green Savvy Sunday WHAT: Environmental market day WHEN: Sun Sep 16 WHERE: Old Bus Depot Markets

YOUTH DECIDE: THE ENERGY ELECTION WHAT: National youth energy poll WHEN: Mon Sep 10 – Mon Sep 17 WHERE: Nationwide Spurred by the Government’s review of the Renewable Energy Target and their recent backdown on a promise to close our dirtiest coal power stations, Youth Decide: The Energy Election, a project of the Australian Youth Climate Coalition, will see 50,000 young people around Australia vote on what they think the Government should do about Australia’s future energy challenges. ‘We think [Energy Minister] Martin Ferguson shouldn’t listen to the big polluters – but rather listen to the young people, who will be the ones most affected by energy decisions that are made today,’ said Ellen Sandell, National Director of the AYCC. Results of the vote will be presented to the Government in Canberra in October and unveiled on a billboard outside Martin Ferguson’s office in Melbourne. To find out more or vote online, visit youthdecide.aycc.org.au.

Now in its third year, this environmentally-focused market day will demonstrate how easy it is to be green in our everyday lives. An additional 30 stalls will be showcasing and selling a range of green homewares made with recycled materials, chemical-free organic skin care products and, of course, a variety of delicious organic food. There will also be demonstrations of the latest in green technology for the home and information on innovative energysaving initiatives. Also attending will be WWOOF (Willing Workers on Organic Farms), a worldwide movement linking volunteers with organic farmers and growers. 10am-4pm. Free.

AFF12 WHAT: African Film Festival WHEN: Tue Sep 18 – Sun Sep 23 WHERE: Tuggeranong Arts Centre Tuggeranong Arts Centre in association with the African Diplomatic Women’s Group presents the first African Film Festival (AFF12) in Canberra. The festival aims to share the cultural richness of Africa with Canberra’s audience, as well as provide support for the growing presence of the African film industry in Australia. The film selected to open AFF12 is the Kenyan production The First Grader. Mr. Stephen K. Tarus, High Commissioner for Kenya, will officially open the ceremony at the Tuggeranong Arts Centre’s Café Space, Tue Sep 18, 6.30pm. Tickets $5 voluntary donation. Bookings on (02) 6293 1443. See tuggeranongarts.com for more info.

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human woman human woman [HFN Music]

Just as the resurrection of ‘80s electro-pop was beginning to emanate the same fetid fumes of stagnant monotony spawned by its fathering decade, out of the synth-loaded, disco-cheese miasma flows a breath of fresh air. In their self-titled debut album, Icelandic duo Human Woman offer respite through a kaleidoscopic world of addictive musical obscurity in a way that only the daring and eccentric Nordic know how. To be perfectly honest, when I first heard the falsetto male crooning of repetitious ‘ah-ahhhs’ overlaying the kitschy synth on opening track Einn Eftir, my heart sank. Another wannabe-indie attempt to resuscitate a genre, which, unless executed with inexplicable precision, is better left writhing in its black leather disco pants in the era whence it arose. Then I heard Delusional. A simple, buoyant bassline layered with uplifting keyboard climbs steadily toward a crescendo, in which the suspension of instrumentation heralds a hymn-like harmony that

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can only be described as euphoric. I was positively converted – and that was after a single track among many others set to produce comparable elation. Nothing is off-limits; from ambient house to minimal tech, a brief flirtation with dubstep – even tranquilising sitar-infused Indian chillout in the aptlytitled Sleepy. While Human Woman doesn’t entirely escape the cringeworthy melodrama and excessive intensity of the ‘80s electropop realm (*cough* Love Games...), it’s not without a sense of playful irony. Fundamental to the duo’s charm is their bold experimentation in a vast range of genres, sounds, textures and tempos. This opens up an unbounded soundscape in which there exists the potential for limitless sonic diversity, far exceeding that which would be permissible within the margins of the generic ‘80s electro-pop blueprint. Human Woman utilise this field of possibilities like children in a playground, inviting an adventurous melange of elements to mingle in their imaginative auditory world. GRETA KITE-GILMOUR

cold specks i predict a graceful expulsion [Broken Hertz/EMI]

slugabed mountains come out of the sky [Ninja Tune/Inertia]

Cold Specks is the moniker for Canadian artist Al Spx and her band. A proponent of Gothgospel, this dark angel’s voice projects shades of Janis Joplin’s earthy tones, but Al’s voice has a deeper complexity, akin to the grain of fine timber. It’s folk with a strong dose of Gospel influences, which used to go by the generic name of Negro Spiritual. While most tracks are dominated by her powerful gravelly tones, a key feature of this album is the hypnotic quality of the simple but clever melodic patterns underpinning her voice. The opener, The Mark, is a shining triptych comprising spell-casting vocals, guitar and cello. Heavy Hands beckons the interplay between the heavy passion in her voice and the teasing accompaniment of acoustic guitar combined with flourishes of percussion. Lyrics are like incantation, cut down with a keen blade to the bone of base human emotions of hopes, fears and passions.

After spending the last few years tantalising the UK bass music scene with a series of EPs, Brighton-based electronic producer Greg Feldwick (aka Slugabed) finally dropped his debut album, Time Team, to considerable critical acclaim. A scant few months on, this six-track EP offers up a more than worthy companion piece, collecting together a brace of consistently excellent reworkings of the title track, plus one new unreleased composition. In its original form, Mountains Come Out Of The Sky easily represents one of Time Team’s standout highlights, merging a jittery, footwork-indebted rhythmic backbone with dreamy layers of smeared-out synths and that unmistakeable Yes sample to spine-chillingly gorgeous effect. By contrast, Lapalux ventures out into gauzier post-chill-wave atmospheres with his reworking, dubbing out the samples into washes of reverb against spidery, broken 808 clicks, before Arp 101’s remix brings the dark bass synths back to the forefront as undercurrents of soul flit like ghosts against the chunky head-nod. Previously unreleased track I Dreamt I Could Skateboard Really Well is just as rewarding, ushering in slightly jazzy footwork drum patterns alongside glittering phased synths and dizzying layers of reverb in an offering that could easily be further out than any of the tracks that made it onto Time Team. Gorgeous stuff that sees Ninja Tune back in top form.

The brilliant songwriting of Spx projects an underlying darkness with phrases such as, ‘We’re as thick as thieves in sinking graves,’ and ‘He was a funeral hymn composed of fleeting fire.’ The choir backing builds a powerful momentum, like a wave of unstoppable righteousness in both Winter Solstice and the melancholy melody of Send Your Youth. Taken individually, the songs are hypnotic. However, as a collection, there is a lack of variety due to their consistent similarity in style. rory mccartney

chris downton


the lucky wonders lay down my arms [Independent]

crocodiles endless flowers [Frenchkiss/Shock]

purity ring shrines [4AD]

vulpes vulpes vol-pez vol-pez [The A&R Department]

The Lucky Wonders recently battled through rainstorms for four-and-a-half hours (dodging road accidents) to play at The Merry Muse to promote Lay Down My Arms.

Since forming in 2008 after the breakup of Brandon Welchez and Charles Roswell’s bands Some Girls and The Plot To Blow Up The Eiffel Tower, San Diego noise-pop band Crocodiles have expanded into a much louder five-piece incarnation. This significantly hyped third album Endless Flowers sees Crocodiles maintaining their established Anglophile tastes, whilst welding their pop hooks to the sorts of gauzy distortion you’d associate with the likes of A Place To Bury Strangers.

Megan James and Corin Roddick do not reach for a conventional progression of sound with Shrines. Rather, the Canadian duo’s debut album presents a single, fertile idea that blooms in varied hues throughout the life of the album. The result is an effort that, while not groundbreaking by any means, is catchy, gripping and instantly immersive. Opening track Crawlersout smacks you in the gut with its immense shifting sound, synth strings providing an addictive confection as they chime brightly over a shifting sea of bass. Fireshrine, Ungirthed and Amenamy follow suit, completely enveloping the listener in their rolling honey trap of pulsing beats. Vocalist Megan James injects each track with a strange, visceral intimacy, and as she sweetly implores you to ‘cut open my sternum and pull my little ribs around you’, her earnestness is both endearing and utterly convincing. Shrines takes a stumble or two at its midpoint. R&B-styled guest vocals punctuate the deep, rolling beats of Grandloves, pockmarking the slow warmth of the track with an uneasy and unwelcome soullessness. Following track Cartographist is barely there, providing a resting point in the album that feels stark and oddly uneventful.

Vulpes Vulpes scored an early spot in last year’s Foreshore Festival. It was so early that probably only a few close relations and some punters who got lost looking for LMFAO caught their act. However, that shouldn’t detract from their achievement in appearing on the bill for a major festival. The gritty vibe of their debut EP is a million miles from the sun kissed freshness of the NSW south coast, from where the band hails.

Those braving the icy Canberra evening to attend were repaid with captivating folk melodies and honeyed voices. If their debut album, Thirteen O’clock, was cinnamon, Lay Down My Arms is nutmeg; imbued with the same spice of life, but a little less sweet. The vocals of Jessie Vintila possess an ephemeral fragility that strikes deep. Songs co-written with Emma Royle project a powerful emotional mixture including pain, compassion and homecomings. Opener Let Me Forget is a highlight, with a toe-tapping tune and chiming guitars. Another winner, Turn On In, was written for Jessie’s dad during a difficult period in his life. Its choppy guitars add power in the chorus; drummer Anastassijah Scales underscores the lyrics with blows from her mallets. The cheery Anyway, written by Emma, bounces along with good advice about life. Their happiness at coming home to Byron Bay after their first album launch comes through clearly in Thing About Leaving, with Ben Franz providing a country twang with his lap steel guitar. This release retains the successful recipe of alluring melodies, lyrics from the heart and warm harmonies that made Thirteen O’clock so special, but raises the bar with its complex arrangements. rory mccartney

Perhaps the most noticeable comparison here is Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, another US bunch who certainly haven’t been shy about their love of the UK and reconstructed power-pop. If there’s a hint of Julian Casablancas’ practiced detachment in the opening title track, the organ-laced Sunday (Psychedelic Conversation #9) sees the fuzz-laden psycherock influences shift to the front, the entire effect not dissimilar to a happier version of The Horrors at points. No Black Clouds For Dee Dee wanders out into Spectoresque retro teen pop territory as Welchez’s reverb-heavy vocal rings out against shuffling skiffle drums and synthetic strings. Hung Up On A Flower wanders into soaring ambience, anchored mostly by vocal harmonies in what’s easily one of their most intriguing moments. Given the reference points and Crocodiles’ profile, Endless Flowers will probably expand the band’s fanbase, but I couldn’t help feel something was still missing here. chris downton

These relatively small missteps, however, do little to stem the album’s otherwise constant flow. Shrines finishes strongly, regaining the lushly pleasing blend of sounds that Purity Ring has lovingly bred and unquestionably claimed. david smith

Opener The Man With Dirty Shoes lays down the overall album vibe of fast-paced, interlocking guitars, encasing the gravelly vocals of Timothy Allen. Call it Fine honours the tradition of Brit-rock with a texture that evokes a menacing, late night cityscape. Its tomtom drumming leads into a dark bassline as an entrée to the song’s main course of a maze of speedy guitar licks. The band’s single release, Mirrorvine, starts with the unblinking suspense of a western gunfight, leading into a complex musical landscape that echoes and shudders. The lyrics in Complacency are delivered in a semi-spoken word style, projecting a film noir-like visage over a canvass of razorsharp sounds. Both it and The Struggle of the Pieces deliver some of Jack Talbert’s most impressive guitar work, with the latter track flinging a slashed tattoo of sound over the blurry lyrics. Produced by Dave Hammer (The Jezebels), this is a full-blooded debut, projecting a muscular musical dexterity. rory mccartney

43


the word

on films

WITH MELISSA WELLHAM

Is there anything as great as a Wes Anderson film? If there were such a thing as sour-candy ice-cream, and sour-candy ice-cream actually tasted good, then maybe there would be. But as there isn’t, Wes Anderson represents for this humble reviewer (who likes to inflict upon you her subjective taste) the epitome of great. Given that I’ve just been talking about sour-candy ice-cream, you might assume that my taste is questionable. In this instance, I promise I’m not misleading you. Show me someone who doesn’t enjoy Moonrise Kingdom and I’ll show you someone without a heart.

quote of the issue ‘I love you, but you don’t know what you’re talking about.’ - Sam (Jared Gilman), Moonrise Kingdom

hope springs

bernie

moonrise kingdom

How can a film feature Meryl Streep (babe) and Tommy Lee Jones (badass) and Steve Carrell (brilliant), yet be so simultaneously dull and depressing?

This idiosyncratic faux-doco style film (based on a true story) won’t sit right with some – perhaps due to the dark humour, the slow start, or the general style.

Kay (Meryl Streep) and Arnold (Tommy Lee Jones) have been together since the dawn of time (not literally), but decades of marriage have removed the fire from their relationship.

Based on a true story, this wry film follows Bernie (Jack Black), a likeable Assistant Funeral Director and an all-round inoffensive, God-fearing dogooder (so inoffensive, in fact, that it’s actually offensive).

[WARNING: This review was written by an extreme Wes Anderson fangirl. Opinions expressed within may or may not be clouded by utmost admiration for, unmanageable obsession with and unbridled attraction towards the director.]

Let’s be honest; it appears to have removed even the vaguest semblance of love from their relationship. Kay books herself and a reluctant Arnold in for a weeklong course in couples counseling with the specialist Doctor Feld (Steve Carrell) – and the games begin. And by ‘games’ I mean ‘the opposite of games.’ Like, ‘a really boring activity that is most definitely not a game.’ This is being marketed as a relatable chick-flick for the golden oldies, but it is probably too one-dimensional to appeal to anyone who has actually experienced a relationship that lasted decades. I also didn’t really care about whether or not their spark was reignited because, as far as I could tell, there was no reason for them to stay together anyway (aside from habit and routine). The three stars all turn in solid performances – and the film would have been no better than a Lifetime reject without them – but even they can’t save this self-indulgent, dull and depressing analysis of a failing middle-class marriage. melissa wellham

He befriends elderly widow Mrs Nugent (Shirley MacLaine), who is basically a horrible old cow with tons of cash. When things turn sour, a rash action on Bernie’s part propels the film into its more interesting second half. The acting is fantastic and the film is peppered with little ‘interviews’ with townsfolk from Bernie’s small town. Black brings real heart to the film and, while there are plenty of laughs, there is a bittersweet quality that enriches the otherwise farcical goings on. Some of Bernie’s motives are never quite clear and there are a few unanswered questions, but for me that worked more favourably for the film than not. Matthew McConaughey actually adds to the cast in a great role as the truly Texan DA Danny Buck – and keeps his shirt on to boot. Bernie is entertaining, although one wonders how the real Bernie and those involved feel about the film. I found it a little odd, but a nice addition to Jack Black’s more serious filmography. megan mckeough

Set on a small island off the coast of New England in 1965, Moonrise Kingdom tells the simple story of two 12-year-olds in love. Sam (Jared Gilman) and Suzy (Kara Hayward) make a secret pact to run away into the wilderness together, though they are thwarted at every turn by a Khaki Scout troop leader (Edward Norton), a local sheriff (Bruce Willis) and Suzy’s parents (Bill Murray and Frances McDormand). Moonrise Kingdom displays all the Wes-isms we have come to expect: warmth, whimsy and unexpected poignancy. Immaculately framed shots, beautifully acted scenes and impeccable art direction. It would almost all be so saccharine it hurts, except that it is balanced (like all Anderson films) by wry humour and (in this case) unexpected violence. The film presents a childlike view of the world – demonstrated in the way serious themes such as depression and adultery are touched upon, and then dismissed with innocent incomprehension – and makes for interesting viewing. It’s by no means Wes’ best, but it is a gloriously sweet, sun-drenched example of ‘60s nostalgia. It’s probably the most Andersonesque film Wes Anderson has ever made – so if you’re already a fan(girl), you’ll adore it. MELISSA WELLHAM

44


the word on dvds

battleship [universal/sony] Going in, you have every reason to assume Battleship would be a disaster. It’s a movie based on a board game, it runs for over two hours, it counts pop starlet Rihanna as one of its lead actors – whose sole purpose, it seems, is to dish out streetwise sass – and looks exactly like a Michael Bay film. These aren’t solid beginnings. But Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights) has crafted an enormous and expensive film that isn’t all bad and, in parts, is actually pretty damn fun. The thing that most resembles the plot revolves around a multinational naval exercise off the Hawaiian coast, a cocky upstart with authority issues (who somehow rises high enough up the ranks to captain a destroyer in an emergency) and aliens. The aliens pick up an intergalactic message and naturally enough want to colonize earth. Or destroy infrastructure and peoples’ lives. Actually it’s never established what the aliens are doing on earth. To steal our natural resources? To start a slave planet? Giggles? Don’t bother with specifics, just put them in the Pacific Ocean and let them to blow shit up. Which they do spectacularly well. And that’s a problem with contemporary alien disaster films. The odds are so stacked in their favour that when hell is unleashed it’s inconceivable we earth people stand a chance. Our guns are puny. But Battleship overcomes this by making the aliens selective – they sort fair and unfair kills somehow for some reason. Again, don’t ask why.

boardwalk empire the complete second Season [Warner Home Video] Boardwalk Empire isn’t the best show on TV. It doesn’t have to be. But the conversation about cable drama is more interested in endlessly debating apogees than it is about simply taking a step back and soaking up the riches on offer. If critical mass deems a show to be less than The Wire/Mad Men/ Breaking Bad then it’s a mere afterthought. This logic has inflicted the most damage on shows like Boardwalk Empire. It’s a sumptuous, prohibitionera political drama set in Atlantic City that mixes fact (real life gangsters stroll in and out of frame) and fiction (Steve Buscemi’s Nucky Thompson had a different surname in real life and probably didn’t murder people in cold blood). Helmed by Terence Winter (The Sopranos), it makes no bones about taking things slowly. This deliberate pacing and occasionally staid dialogue has not endeared the show to the tastemakers.

Yet despite these plot contrivances and holes, Battleship is glorious, fast-paced, stupid fun. And with Taylor Kitsch and Jesse Plemons being directed by Peter Berg again you could almost believe it was Friday Night Lights: The Navy Edition. No bad thing.

Kingmaker Nucky is out of favour with the political elite who plot to send him away to prison for a long stretch so as to capture the bootlegging trade. For the most part, Nucky is sidelined, struggling to mount a defence against federal charges. Nature’s well-known abhorrence of vacuums means his one-time protege, Jimmy Darmody, assumes control of the vice trade. His inability to cope with the demands of leadership guides this season; it’s a brutal lesson in reach exceeding grasp and power being thrust upon a person rather than sought. There are dozens of critical characters and plot arcs weaving through Boardwalk Empire to get lost in, the scope and production design is dazzling and reportedly very expensive. It may never be a buzz show, but that makes it all the more enticing. Respect trumps obsession.

justin hook

justin hook

Bored to death - the complete third season [Warner Home Video] The third season of Bored to Death turned out to be its last. That seems about right. There’s only so far three dysfunctional, pot-smoking, relationship-fearing friends can push the same chaotic barrow through the streets of Brooklyn, serpentine style. That’s not to say it turned into a bad show, indeed some of episodes were up there with the best. But it did feel like the charm and goodwill the show traded on was waning. In a somewhat ironic twist, the final season dealt almost exclusively with identity; just as the show made an attempt to define its characters beyond easy gags the pin was pulled. Early on, Jonathan, the self-style private investigator and author, finds out he was fathered through a sperm donation. Taking the news incredibly well, he makes it his task to uncover the identity of his real father. His infantile sidekick Ray (Zach Galifianakis) has identify issues of his own when he starts dating women twice his age and, in the final part of the unholy trio, George’s (Ted Danson) identity is challenged when his young daughter gets engaged to Bernard (David Rasche), a 60-year-old, lycra-clad, bike-riding good influence. Of course there are addled hi-jinks in the interim – the Dick Cavett Show set piece being a perfect example of the balance of high farce and well-scripted lunacy Bored to Death was capable of striking. It was a good sign the show had plenty of life in it and every actor looked like they were having the time of their life on screen. But it wasn’t to be and the finale turned out to be an embrace between Jonathon and his sperm bank sister (Isla Fisher) whom he had already bedded. An odd, challenging and hanging coda to a normally breezy and light show. justin hook

45


the word

BLACKBOX

on games

Spotify Platform: OS X, Windows, iOS, Android, Linux (experimental) Developer: Spotify Length: N/A Verdict: Get involved, you slag! Deviating away from games this issue, I’ve decided to check out the increasingly popular Spotify. First released in 2006, Spotify made its way to Australia late May. If you were like me and managed to ignore the barrage of Facebook notifications, I encourage you to give this service a look, as it may change your listening habits. Spotify addresses the age old issues of piracy and digital vs. hardcopy by turning to the (oh-so-popular) subscription model. For 12 bucks a month, you get unlimited access to over 15 million songs featuring many of the latest releases. As usual, there are some notable absentees (including The Beatles and Tool), however you can make up for this by supplementing your playlist with your own music, including your iTunes collection. Unlike some of the other services out there, Spotify lets you download tracks, allowing you to listen to your tunes sans net. Of course, if your subscription lapses the music quickly buggers off, however, at roughly $150/year, it’s far cheaper than other options. The service has even seen a drop in piracy in the US, a rather ironic fact given that the father of piracy, Napster inventor Sean Parker (the guy played by Justin Timberlake in The Social Network), is also a Spotify board member. Like with any good idea, Spotify has competition, the foremost of which is probably Rdio. With each being similarly priced, picking the two apart is difficult. Spotify has a larger music collection and is better supported across all the major platforms, while Rdio has a web-based player and a nicer interface. Both apps have a strong social component, while also allowing you listen to your music without broadcasting your tastes to the world (meaning I can still listen to Robbie Williams without the shame). Notably, while Spotify once had the limitation of requiring a Facebook login (with all the subsequent spam that entails), they have since relaxed this signup requirement. All in all, there’s not much between the two, with Spotify winning out based on the size of the collection. Another feature that helps Spotify win this battle is its support for applications, which includes the likes of a triple j app. With there being such a wealth of music on offer, it starts to feel wrong listening to the same thing twice. Features likes the apps and the song radios (which works much like the iTunes Genius feature) help to sift through this collection, making it easier to put together a playlist and discover new music. As ultimate testament to this service, I since found myself unsyncing my iTunes music collection from my phone. Having listened to the same albums dozens of times whilst writing my thesis, I do wish I had gotten onto this service earlier. torben sko

46

The worst-kept secret in Australian television is finally out – the Chaser crew haven’t completely ditched auntie for the cold hard cash. The Hamster Wheel (ABC1, Wed Sep 26, 9:05pm) is back. They haven’t completely taken the pauper route, though – half the crew will make a name for themselves on the network that sued them (Prime) later this year with the Australian version of The Unbelievable Truth. One of the greatest things about being Australian is the two taxpayer-supported free-to-air channels. Not only do they bring us great local fodder such as Rake (ABC1, Thu, 8:30pm) and Rockwiz (SBS, Sat, 8:30pm) and a plethora of docos, they also ensure (sometimes belated) access to cable shows like Boardwalk Empire (SBS1, Sat Sep 29, 9:30pm). And they’re not afraid of the ratings monster. ABC’s Dr Who (ABC1, Sat, 7:30pm) debut on iView immediately after its UK premiere broke records. Docos to check out include Artscape: Subtopia (SBS, Tue, 10pm), which looks at Blender co-op founder, artist, activist and academic Adrian Doyle, who put street art on Melbourne’s map, Empire (Prime, Thu Sep 13, 7:30pm), which looks at the NY icon, Sunday Best: Jig (ABC2, Sun Sep 23, 8:30pm) which follows the intrigue of Irish dancing world champs, Tyson (SBS1, Sun Sep 16, 9:30pm), Sunday Best: Surviving Progress (ABC2, Sun Sep 16, 8:30pm), Terry Pratchett: Choosing to Die (SBS1, Sun Sep 23, 9:30pm), JK Rowling (ABC1, Thu Sep 27, 8pm), her only Australian interview – with Jennifer Byrne – and Prohibition (SBS1, Sat Sep 29, 8:30pm), which cleverly precedes Boardwalk Empire. Masterchef may be well and truly over but there’s no shortage of foodie fodder to indulge your palate, including a new season of The Great Food Truck Race (ABC2, Fri Sep 14, 7:30pm), Poh’s Kitchen Lends a Hand (ABC1, Tue, 8pm), Yes Chef (SCTEN, Sat Sep 15, 3pm), A Taste of Travel (SCTEN, Sat Sep 15, 3:30pm), with aforementioned Masterchef contestants travelling the country and globe to find the best food, Love to Share (SCTEN, Sat Sep 15, 4pm), with more Masterchefers, and Rick Stein’s Spain (ABC1, Tue Sep 25 8:30pm). Best. News. Ever. Rik Mayall and Adrian Edmondson are reprising their Bottom roles in Hooligans Island – set to air in 2013. (Second best news ever: The Shire has been axed.) There are more new shows in the US Autumn schedule to look out for in coming months including Copper, a BBC America production about an Irish-born police officer in 1860s New York, and Go On, a new Matthew Perrydriven comedy. Vegas, set in ‘60s Las Vegas when The Strip was just getting started, starts in the US on Tue Sep 25. Of course, the next most anticipated return (when it gets its (hopefully) free-to-air start) will be season two of Homeland (TBC). Sadly, a new season of Game of Thrones is a long way off – they’re still casting – and The Wire’s Dominic West turned them down. McNulty would have made a perfect King beyond the wall. The Emmys (Fox8, Mon Sep 24, 9am) don’t seem to have a free-toair home. And on award shows, this year’s ARIAs will be on Go with public voting categories. And the biggest football comp of the year is here: UEFA Champions League (SBS1, Wed Sep 19, 4:30am). Don’t miss the third instalment of Celebrating 25 Years of rage – 199598. Here at Chez Blackbox there’ll be plenty of (ANU) bar flashbacks in store... And if that’s not enough, an avid fan has put together a site of all rage eps from 1998- 2012: rageagain.com. TRACY HEFFERNAN tracyherrernan@bigpond.com @ChezBlackbox


the word

on gigs

Pop Singles, Catcat, Biscuits, TV Colors The Phoenix Saturday August 18 The Phoenix is a fine place to be on a cold Saturday night in Canberra. On Saturday August 18, Melbourne indie kids Pop Singles, Canberra exports Cat Cat and the enigmatic Biscuits were set to take the stage with a late-night set by the always colourful TV Colours. A steady flow of regulars and the expected uni art student cohort made for a packed night, with a long line to gain entry to the temple of indie and garage the night was to become. Ex-Canberrans Cat Cat opened the night in solid form. Their sound was essentially a garage band set on half-speed, with lengthy periods without vocals and structures that focused around sustained, simple beats and chord patterns that slowly washed over the audience in a way that was calming and hypnotic. The wafting chords and pleasantly delivered vocal musings, enjoyed while warming up with a pint, were a pleasant experience and the crowd responded positively to a set laden with songs somewhat reminiscent of the lighter moments of Interpol. The crowd were won over early in the night. Biscuits carried the torch of slacker garage-indie with pride. Despite being dispersed over a few different states, they drew upon their experiences in bands such as Ah! Pandita, Teddy Trouble and Graveyards to bring the night’s most energetic set. The songs were simple, well-written and the unusual inclusion of a 12-string guitar added an intriguing and creative feeling to their highly esoteric sound. The vocals were perhaps a touch too atonal and deliberately lazy, which may have worked for those more deeply involved in the genre, but were a bit grating for others. However, the band left a good impression with a mix of engaging melodies and interesting song structures. Melbourne favourites Pop Singles were startlingly young, which perhaps worked in their favour as they delivered some moody, bare bones, three-piece garage sounds. The frontman played a stylish Rickenbacker guitar and delivered his material with a strangely humble, calm and soft-spoken attitude, which gave them an interesting, almost ethereal stage presence. The ‘oh-so-cute’ female drummer was a nice touch to their overall impression and no doubt stole a few hearts throughout the night with her simple but effective rock feel. Their songs were often short and unaspiring, content to purr along, locked into a vaguely psychedelic wavelength that went down well with the art scene crowd. To cap off an already worthy night, local solo act TV Colours put in a late performance after a long break between bands that made the set feel less like a part of the line-up and more like an after-party DJ. The set was a unique mix of ultra-modern and heavily retro elements, using an over-driven drum machine, peaked guitars and rampaging energetic vocals not unlike recent visitors Bomb The Music Industry. It for made a hyperactive mix of extremes, venturing into punk, garage and experimental territory. The set was short and sweet with the crowd left revved, exhilarated and, for some, as though they were witnessing something truly unique and ahead of its time as the outrageous noise was blasted their way.

PHOTOS BY PAMELA MILLER

Overall, a sense of unassuming and raw musical creativity was the order of the night. The bands were laidback and blasé about their material in a deliberate, genre-norm sort of way, the songs were mostly warm-hearted and enjoyable and there were enough ideas executed with enough style that the night was a highly enjoyable success for the young bands on show. CHRIS NAVIN

47


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Sept 12 - Sept 14 Wednesday September 12 Art Exhibition - The Weight of Shadows

See www.alexanderboynes.com for more. 9am-4pm. ANU SCHOOL OF ART

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - afterLandscape

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Julia Stone

Call (02) 62302905 or visit www. theabbey.com.au for bookings. Tickets on sale June 15. 6:30pm. THE ABBEY

Six60

Tickets through Ticketek. 8pm. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Sing For Your Supper

Singers, poets, musicians! Feeling hungry? Book your slot for a free meal! (02) 6230 2484. 6:30pm. THE GEORGE HARCOURT INN

On The Town Latino Wednesdays

$8 cocktails. 9pm. Free. MONKEYBAR

Trivia Transit Trivia

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential! 2 for $20 pizzas. 7:30pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Thursday September 13

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Art

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat).

CRAFT ACT

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Earth Works

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - In Residence 2011 Works by Megalo’s 2011 Artists in Residence. Open 9:30am-5pm. Free. MEGALO PRINT STUDIO + GALLERY

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm. ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat). CRAFT ACT

Comedy Hot Five Comedy Competition

Local & interstate comedians compete for $1000! Entry/tickets at www. comedyact.com.au. 7pm. CHARLIE BLACK

Karaoke Karaoke

From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

Live Music The Red Paintings Details TBC.

THE BASEMENT

Andy Sorenson

Underwater Breathing tour. 7:30pm. Tix $20 online at http://www.trybooking. com/BSUI or on the door. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase

CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - The Weight of Shadows

See www.alexanderboynes.com for more. 9am-4pm. ANU SCHOOL OF ART

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Exhibition - In Residence 2011 Works by Megalo’s 2011 Artists in Residence. Open 9:30am-5pm. Free. MEGALO PRINT STUDIO + GALLERY

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm. ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Comedy The Best of Green Faces The best of the best. www. canberraticketing.com.au or (02) 62752700. CANBERRA IRISH CLUB

Dance Terrain

Bangarra Dance Theatre. The spiritual resonance of Lake Eyre. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Film Local Feats: Cthulhu (2000)

Canberra feature films w/ director’s talk. 6pm + 9pm. Tix/info: http://newacton. com.au/localfeats KENDALL LANE THEATRE

Karaoke ‘Tuggies Idol’ Karaoke Competition

$5 before Fri Aug 31 to win $1000 JB HIFI gift card. 8pm. See facebook.com/ events/512928288733928/ P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Karaoke Night!

1st place wins cash prize! Plenty of bar vouchers to be won too. 8pm. P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Live Music Mudd Music Presents…

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase

Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat). CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - The Weight of Shadows

See www.alexanderboynes.com for more. 9am-4pm. ANU SCHOOL OF ART

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey 10am-5pm.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition – Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards Atmospheric, detailed, human scenes by Tom Farrell. 9am-4:30pm. (Opens Thu Sep 13, 6pm.) BELCONNEN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - Unconscious Mind An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 11am-5pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Thursdays At The Bar

Exhibition - afterLandscape

TRANSIT BAR

With uniVibes. Beers, bands and DJs jamming in the afternoon sun. Free. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Punktuation Podcast Launch With Yoko Oh No, Revellers and The Euphorics. 9pm.

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Charles and Dave

THE PHOENIX BAR

CRAFT ACT

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - In Residence 2011 Open 9:30am-5pm. Free.

MEGALO PRINT STUDIO + GALLERY

Exhibition – Earth Works

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

9:30pm.

10am-5pm. Free.

Ashley Feraude

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground

CRAFT ACT

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Exhibition Opening Unconscious Mind

Local Bands 8pm. Free.

An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 6pm. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - afterLandscape

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Earth Works

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

TRANSIT BAR

On The Town 4Some Thursday

Awesome 4Some Drink Specials. 9pm. Free entry. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Thursday Ladies Night

Free champagne for ladies til 11pm + iconic tunes by ladies all night from female DJ Pumpin DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Theatre Neil Simon’s Lost In Yonkers

A comedy about duty, devotion, trust and love. See canberrarep.org.au for tix. 8pm. CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

48

Art

A night of rock ‘n’ roll with Renegade Peacock, The Khalasar, and Critical Monkee. 8pm. Free.

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Friday September 14

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

12pm-5pm.

ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Dance Terrain

Bangarra Dance Theatre. The spiritual resonance of Lake Eyre. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Film Canberra Short Film Festival

All sorts of short films from the best local talent with $6000 up for grabs. See www.csff.com.au. DENDY CINEMA

Live Music Ungus Ungus Ungus

Progressive funk rock gypsy pop psychedelia. Yep. 7pm. $8. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE


49


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Sept 14 - Sept 18 Wednesday September 12 Art Exhibition - The Weight of Shadows

See www.alexanderboynes.com for more. 9am-4pm. ANU SCHOOL OF ART

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - afterLandscape

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Julia Stone

Call (02) 62302905 or visit www. theabbey.com.au for bookings. Tickets on sale June 15. 6:30pm. THE ABBEY

Six60

Tickets through Ticketek. 8pm. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Sing For Your Supper

Singers, poets, musicians! Feeling hungry? Book your slot for a free meal! (02) 6230 2484. 6:30pm. THE GEORGE HARCOURT INN

On The Town Latino Wednesdays

$8 cocktails. 9pm. Free. MONKEYBAR

Trivia Transit Trivia

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential! 2 for $20 pizzas. 7:30pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Thursday September 13

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Art

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat).

CRAFT ACT

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Earth Works

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - In Residence 2011 Works by Megalo’s 2011 Artists in Residence. Open 9:30am-5pm. Free. MEGALO PRINT STUDIO + GALLERY

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm. ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat). CRAFT ACT

Comedy Hot Five Comedy Competition

Local & interstate comedians compete for $1000! Entry/tickets at www. comedyact.com.au. 7pm. CHARLIE BLACK

Karaoke Karaoke

From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

Live Music The Red Paintings Details TBC.

THE BASEMENT

Andy Sorenson

Underwater Breathing tour. 7:30pm. Tix $20 online at http://www.trybooking. com/BSUI or on the door. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase

CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - The Weight of Shadows

See www.alexanderboynes.com for more. 9am-4pm. ANU SCHOOL OF ART

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Exhibition - In Residence 2011 Works by Megalo’s 2011 Artists in Residence. Open 9:30am-5pm. Free. MEGALO PRINT STUDIO + GALLERY

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm. ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Comedy The Best of Green Faces The best of the best. www. canberraticketing.com.au or (02) 62752700. CANBERRA IRISH CLUB

Dance Terrain

Bangarra Dance Theatre. The spiritual resonance of Lake Eyre. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Film Local Feats: Cthulhu (2000)

Canberra feature films w/ director’s talk. 6pm + 9pm. Tix/info: http://newacton. com.au/localfeats KENDALL LANE THEATRE

Karaoke ‘Tuggies Idol’ Karaoke Competition

$5 before Fri Aug 31 to win $1000 JB HIFI gift card. 8pm. See facebook.com/ events/512928288733928/ P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Karaoke Night!

1st place wins cash prize! Plenty of bar vouchers to be won too. 8pm. P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Live Music Mudd Music Presents…

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase

Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat). CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - The Weight of Shadows

See www.alexanderboynes.com for more. 9am-4pm. ANU SCHOOL OF ART

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey 10am-5pm.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition – Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards Atmospheric, detailed, human scenes by Tom Farrell. 9am-4:30pm. (Opens Thu Sep 13, 6pm.) BELCONNEN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - Unconscious Mind An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 11am-5pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Thursdays At The Bar

Exhibition - afterLandscape

TRANSIT BAR

With uniVibes. Beers, bands and DJs jamming in the afternoon sun. Free. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Punktuation Podcast Launch With Yoko Oh No, Revellers and The Euphorics. 9pm.

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Charles and Dave

THE PHOENIX BAR

CRAFT ACT

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - In Residence 2011 Open 9:30am-5pm. Free.

MEGALO PRINT STUDIO + GALLERY

Exhibition – Earth Works

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

9:30pm.

10am-5pm. Free.

Ashley Feraude

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground

CRAFT ACT

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Exhibition Opening Unconscious Mind

Local Bands 8pm. Free.

An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 6pm. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - afterLandscape

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Earth Works

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

TRANSIT BAR

On The Town 4Some Thursday

Awesome 4Some Drink Specials. 9pm. Free entry. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Thursday Ladies Night

Free champagne for ladies til 11pm + iconic tunes by ladies all night from female DJ Pumpin DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Theatre Neil Simon’s Lost In Yonkers

A comedy about duty, devotion, trust and love. See canberrarep.org.au for tix. 8pm. CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

50

Art

A night of rock ‘n’ roll with Renegade Peacock, The Khalasar, and Critical Monkee. 8pm. Free.

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Friday September 14

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

12pm-5pm.

ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Dance Terrain

Bangarra Dance Theatre. The spiritual resonance of Lake Eyre. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Film Canberra Short Film Festival

All sorts of short films from the best local talent with $6000 up for grabs. See www.csff.com.au. DENDY CINEMA

Live Music Ungus Ungus Ungus

Progressive funk rock gypsy pop psychedelia. Yep. 7pm. $8. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Sept 18 - Sept 20 Academy Fridays

TRANSIT BAR

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Theatre

With Hook N Sling. 9pm.

Stephen Cummings

Australian rock singer/songwriter. Two full sets from his 36-year back catalogue. $25 door/web. 7pm.

Neil Simon’s Lost In Yonkers

3rd Exit

CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE BOOKSHOP

A comedy about duty, devotion, trust and love. See canberrarep.org.au for tix. 8pm.

From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

Princi

Saturday September 15

9pm.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Mexican Independence Day

$5 Coronas & tequila + DJs Trent Richardson & DJ Spink. 9pm. MONKEYBAR

Jemist

HIPPO BAR

Retro Experience

Featuring The Feldons, Magic Rob Universe, Marji Curran and John Lollback. 8pm. $5. POT BELLY BAR

Smokin’ Salmon Trio Live music.

CASINO CANBERRA

Moment of Truth

From 7pm-9pm, followed by resident DJ Craig with dancefloor classics/hits. P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Fritz Kalkbrenner

With Biggie vs. Anjay, Girl Shaped Love Drug, Kazuki and Radar. Free before 10pm. TRINITY BAR

Special K 4pm.

Art Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm. ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Dance Terrain

Bangarra Dance Theatre. The spiritual resonance of Lake Eyre. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Film

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Canberra Short Film Festival

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase

DENDY CINEMA

CRAFT ACT

All sorts of short films from the best local talent with $6000 up for grabs. See www.csff.com.au.

Live@BAC

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

Clairy Browne & The Bangin’ Rackettes With special guest Kira Puru & The Bruise. 8pm. Presale from Oztix. TRANSIT BAR

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm.

Love Saturdays

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

On My Own Track solo tour. 8pm.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

CRAFT ACT

An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 11am-5pm.

Exhibition - In Residence 2011 Works by Megalo’s 2011 Artists in Residence. Open 9:30am-5pm. Free. MEGALO PRINT STUDIO + GALLERY

Exhibition - afterLandscape

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm)

Three-Way Dance-Off At The Polo

CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Earth Works

The CMC presents nozl, Zoopagoo, Beth ‘n’ Ben. 7.30pm. $15/10/8.

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free.

Dose

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Featuring Kasimir (Richter of Karton), Peekz, Marky, and Phil Jones. 8pm. Free.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

On The Town Old Skool Saturdays

Mix of Old Skool R‘n’B, 80s & 90s. Free entry. $5 vodka original & flavours 10-11pm. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Sunday September 16

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground

Over Lake Ginninderra: live music, cruise the gallery, drink, catch up. With nibbles! 5:30-7pm. $5.

THE WHITE EAGLE POLISH CLUB

10:30pm.

OLD CANBERRA INN

With Runamark. 9pm. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Lanie Lane

THE STREET THEATRE

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Oscar

Old school classic rock bangers. Free.

THE ABBEY

Funk/live 6-8pm (Happy Hr 5-7pm). Resident DJ + more play allsorts 9:30pm on. $8 J/bombs 10-11pm.

HIPPO BAR

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Pseudo Echo

Digress Dual Friday

Celebrity Sex Tape

CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - Unconscious Mind

THE CLUBHOUSE

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Art

Groundwerk Invites Biggie 10pm.

EP Fundraiser with Sebastian Field (Cracked Actor) & Matt Lustri, and Cromwell. 7:30pm.

Renaissance

9pm.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

No Hausfrau

Live Music

Goji Berry Jam

Heuristic

MONKEYBAR

Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat).

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Urban Playground Presents. 10pm.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am-

A five-piece funk band to ease in your afternoon. 2pm. MOCAN & GREEN GROUT

12pm-5pm.

ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - Unconscious Mind An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 11am-5pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition – Earth Works

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Bar menu available. Doors 6:30pm. Main act 9pm. $40.

Film

DJ Chad Sexington

All sorts of short films from the best local talent with $6000 up for grabs. See www.csff.com.au.

From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

music, coffee

Bass, violin, looped vocals or something similar. 10am-11am. MOCAN & GREEN GROUT

DJ Soup 9pm.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Kooky Fandango Live music.

CASINO CANBERRA

Billy Goat and the Mongrels With The Burley Griffin. 9:30pm. THE PHOENIX BAR

DJs Karma/Jswiss/Hypnotic/ Slim/MC Tee

Canberra Short Film Festival

DENDY CINEMA

Live Music Mia Dyson

Dinner and show available for $105. Show only $35. Doors 6:30pm. Main act 9pm. THE ABBEY

Canberra Blues Society’s Monthly Blues Jam

A great afternoon of blues hosted by Canberra’s leading blues bands. $5/$3 members. 1pm-4.30pm. STATESMAN HOTEL

Sunday Best: Ruth O’Brien

51


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Sept 20 - Sept 23 Jazzy, bluesy, cabaret-style pop. Tapas from 5pm, happy hour from 6pm. Free. A BITE TO EAT CAFE

Irish Jam Session

Traditional Irish music. 5pm. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Paul McDermott

Paul Sings: Songs from The Sideshow, DAAS, Mosh, Gud + more. 6pm. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

monday September 17 Art Exhibition – Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards

Atmospheric, detailed, human scenes by Tom Farrell. 9am-4:30pm. (Opens Thu Sep 13, 6pm.) BELCONNEN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Live Music Jeru The Damaja (USA)

The Brooklyn legend brings the wrath, supported by Words Eye View and more. Tix thru Moshtix. 8pm. TRANSIT BAR

Georgia Mooney + Hannah Crofts

Thoughtful storytelling and delicate folk songs. 7:30pm. $10. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

The Bootleg Sessions

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground

$8 cocktails. 9pm. Free.

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

Something Different

CRAFT ACT

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards Atmospheric, detailed, human scenes by Tom Farrell. 9am-4:30pm. (Opens Thu Sep 13, 6pm.) BELCONNEN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - afterLandscape

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Earth Works 10am-5pm. Free.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

hellosQuare Recordings presents Naked (Tas), Sex Noises, E A V E S and Kid of Harith. 8pm.

Dance

Biscuits

Dance where no one’s watching. 7:30pm-9pm. $5.

THE PHOENIX BAR

Post-weekend sounds from Ryz, Peekz, Kimosabi, Steve On Weekends! Free pool, 2-4-1 pizza, 9pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

On The Town 2-4-1 Steak and Schnitzel Night Exactly what it says. THE DURHAM

Mojito Monday

$10 Mojito’s, $7 Nojitos. The best latin DJ’s & Music in Canberra. $7 entry w. free drink. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Theatre Rolling Home

A fantastical musical tale about finding the best place in the world. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Ctr. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Trivia King O’s Trivia

Free entry and bar prizes. 6:30pm. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

tuesday September 18 Art Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

No Lights No Lycra

Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm.

Karaoke Love

Croon your way to the grand final prize (first Tuesday of October), inc. a Sony LED TV and PS3. 9pm. TRANSIT BAR

Live Music The Bearded Gypsy Band

A frenetic brand of gypsy-inspired music. 7:30pm. $12. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Theatre Rolling Home

A fantastical musical tale about finding the best place in the world. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Ctr. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Trivia

Poetry slam. 9pm.

CRAFT ACT

Theatre

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase

Rolling Home

Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat). CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

PJ’s Trivia Tuesday

Exhibition - Wednesdays at the Wall

Yam: Fish Magnet. Street art + live art. HONKYTONKS

Exhibition – Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards Atmospheric, detailed, human scenes by Tom Farrell. 9am-4:30pm. (Opens Thu Sep 13, 6pm.) BELCONNEN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Exhibition - Unconscious Mind An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 11am-5pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - afterLandscape

Art

52

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat). CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Exhibition – Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Comedy Hot Five Comedy Competition

CHARLIE BLACK

Karaoke

From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

From 7:30pm.

Exhibition – Urban Forest

ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Exhibition – Earth Works

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Fame Trivia

wednesday September 19

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground

Tue-Fri 10am-5pm. Free.

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase

CRAFT ACT

thursday September 20

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm.

Singers, poets, musicians! Feeling hungry? Book your slot for a free meal! (02) 6230 2484. 6:30pm.

Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat).

TRANSIT BAR

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

CRAFT ACT

1st place cash prize with Bar and Kitchen vouchers to be won! 7pm.

THE DURHAM

Table bookings essential! 2 for $20 pizzas. 7:30pm. Free.

Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Transit Trivia

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm)

Live Music

P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Trivia

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Karaoke

THE PHOENIX BAR

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm.

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Every week a special Phoenix brand trivia. 7:30pm.

A fantastical musical tale about finding the best place in the world. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Ctr.

Art

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm.

Trivia Tuesday

The Phoenix Quiz

THE PHOENIX BAR

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

Local & interstate comedians compete for $1000! Entry/tickets at www. comedyact.com.au. 7pm.

$100 cocktail party as first prize. 7:30pm. Free.

Bad!Slam!No!Biscuit!

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

CORROBOREE PARK HALL

Karaoke

MONKEYBAR

Sing For Your Supper

THE GEORGE HARCOURT INN

On The Town Latino Wednesdays

CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

9am-4:30pm.

BELCONNEN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Exhibition - Unconscious Mind An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 11am-5pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - afterLandscape 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition – Earth Works

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Karaoke ‘Tuggies Idol’ Karaoke Competition

$5 before Fri Aug 31 to win $1000 JB HIFI gift card. 8pm. See facebook.com/ events/512928288733928/ P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Sept 23 - Sept 27 SPACE - GORMAN HOUSE

Karaoke Night!

1st place wins cash prize! Plenty of bar vouchers to be won too. 8pm. P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Live Music Nathan Kleyn 9pm.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Laneway

With a stunning new release and The Fingers Malone Ensemble. 8pm. $10. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Hey Geronimo!

Presale from Moshtix. 8pm. TRANSIT BAR

Roger Shah

Supported by Peekz, Callum Fox, Jared Kong, Junior and Chief. 9pm. TRINITY BAR

Jemist 9pm.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Thursdays At The Bar

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

A fantastical musical tale about finding the best place in the world. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Ctr.

CRAFT ACT

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition – Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards Atmospheric, detailed, human scenes by Tom Farrell. 9am-4:30pm. (Opens Thu Sep 13, 6pm.) BELCONNEN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Exhibition - Unconscious Mind An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 11am-5pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

The Ottomans

Exhibition - afterLandscape

THE PHOENIX BAR

MIC Night feat. CIT Student Bands

CRAFT ACT

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm) CRAFT ACT

Music students play all sorts. 7:30pm. Free.

Live Music

Kleyn

RAW FM Live

CIT MUSIC INDUSTRY CENTRE KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

With Chris Fraser. 9pm.

On The Town

Cheese/Retro

Thursday Ladies Night

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Cheesy cheesy retro badness. 8pm. Free.

Free champagne for ladies til 11pm + iconic tunes by ladies all night from female DJ Pumpin

TRANSIT BAR

4Some Thursday

Soiree

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Awesome 4Some Drink Specials. 9pm. Free entry. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Theatre Rolling Home

A fantastical musical tale about finding the best place in the world. Tix thru Canberra Theatre Ctr. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

friday September 21 Art

Mitch and Heuristic From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

Live music.

CASINO CANBERRA

Freyja’s Rain EP Launch With Xav Ier and AMAX. 7pm.

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Ced Nada

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat). CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART

Goji Berry Jam

A five-piece funk band to ease in your afternoon. 2pm.

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

MOCAN & GREEN GROUT

saturday September 22

Saskwatch

Launching their LP ‘Leave It All Behind’, supported by Zoopagoo. Presale from Moshtix. 8pm.

Art

TRANSIT BAR

Exhibition – Earth Works

Exploring landforms in Canberra and around the world. 10am-5pm. Free.

RPG Radio

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

With Drew Walky. 8:30pm. Entry by donation.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Love Saturdays

Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm.

With Matt Nukewood. 9pm. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Exhibition – Urban Forest

Textile works by Dianne Firth evoking Canberra’s urban forest. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Abstraktions 3

CRAFT ACT

hellosQuare presents Lim-Klumpes/ Bown, Cold House, Fedorovitch/Ingall/ Keanan-Brown/Kim. 8pm. $10.

Exhibition - void/Walking Blank/Unique State

THE STREET THEATRE

Annie and the Armadillos

Art by E. Hutch, H. Michaelsen and M. Oren/R. Lemoh/J. Gailer. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Free.

Live music.

CASINO CANBERRA

Faux Real

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

HIPPO BAR

Exhibition – Canberra Potters’ Society Award

From 10pm.

Something Like This THE DURHAM

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

music, coffee

Exhibition - Crucible Showcase

MOCAN & GREEN GROUT

CRAFT ACT

Bass, violin, looped vocals or something similar. 10am-11am.

Canberra Potters’ Society Award Exhibition of Moraig McKenna. 11am5pm (12-4pm Sat).

Mike Champion

Exhibition – Ginninderra Journey

MONKEYBAR

CRAFT ACT

Urban Playground Presents. Supported by DJs Karma/Jswiss/Hypnotic/Slim/MC Tee. 10pm.

The Skronks

With Peking Sheers and The Chuffs. 9:30pm.

Group show. A visual tracking of the artist’s journeys through their local surroundings. 10am-5pm.

THE PHOENIX BAR

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Heuristic

Exhibition – Landscapes and Place

9pm.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

MONKEYBAR

Exhibition - Unconscious Mind

THE ABBEY

With DJ Donbear (Chile). 9pm.

Moment of Truth

From 7pm-9pm, followed by resident DJ Craig with dancefloor classics/hits. P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Shockone (WA)

Bone Thugs N Harmony

ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Chilean Independence Day

Exhibition - The Loaded Ground Paintings by Michael Nelson Jagamara & Imants Tillers. 12pm-5pm.

9pm.

Amber Nichols

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

10am-5pm. Free.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Princi

Rolling Home

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Chaos Theory tour. With Buick, Benjammin’, Faux Real, Logic and more. 10pm.

Exhibition – Earth Works

Live Music

Theatre

With uniVibes. Beers, bands and DJs jamming in the afternoon sun. Free. With Crash the Curb. 9pm.

CRAFT ACT

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Moraig McKenna showcase exhibition. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

An international exchange project with the Tree Museum, Canada. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

10:30pm.

CRAFT ACT

EP Launch. With Emmy Bryce & Matt Amery (Tin Sparrow). Doors 6:30pm, main act 9pm. $20.

An exhibition by Josie Cosgrove. 11am-5pm.

Newfangled

Exhibition - afterLandscape

On The Town

10pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

THE CLUBHOUSE

Four Canadian and two Australian artists with art two years after a collaboration. 11am-5pm (12-4pm)

Old Skool Saturdays

Mix of Old Skool R‘n’B, 80s & 90s.

THE CLUBHOUSE

With Big Dave, Grantwho?, Kitty B and more. Tickets through Moshtix. UC REFECTORY

Tit For Tat HIPPO BAR

Digress Dual Friday

Funk/live 6-8pm (Happy Hr 5-7pm). Resident DJ + more play allsorts 9:30pm on. $8 J/bombs 10-11pm. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Mitch 10pm.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

The CMC’s Fourth Birthday Party

7pm. $10 (members free).

OUT

sep26

sebastien tellier the aston shuffle canberra short film festival richard clapton ...and more!

THE WHITE EAGLE POLISH CLUB

Killing The Sound

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FIRST CONTACT

SIDE A: BMA band profile

The Longest Day Where did your band name come from? It’s a reference to the summer solstice, and definitely not to the film of the same name, which we found out about after. Group members? Brad and Jay. Between us we play all instruments. This is usually guitars, bass, keys and drums. There’s a notional third member, Christy, who supplies us with guitar drones. Describe your sound: Post-rock, shoegaze, atmospheric. There are also elements of minimalist drone and indie pop. Who are your influences, musical or otherwise? Bands and musicians: Flying Saucer Attack, Bailterspace, Galaxie 500, Steve Reich, Philip Glass. Visual artists: Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Iain Baxter. Filmmakers: Woody Allen and the Coen Brothers. Photographers: Christy Romanick. What’s the most memorable experience you’ve had whilst performing? We played at the Peats Ridge festival a few years back on the morning of New Years Eve. Some guy burst into the tent halfway through the set and was really into the song we were playing. At the end of the song, he said, ‘Man, you guys sounded so awesome I just ran from the other end of the field to watch.’ Two minutes later he’d buggered off. Of what are you proudest so far? Our new record, Beyond Your Skies, which we wrote, recorded, mixed and mastered ourselves, as well as arranging the cover art. What are your plans for the future? We’d love to get into film scores. If there are any filmmakers out there who like our stuff, please get in touch with us. What makes you laugh? Woody Allen is a very funny guy. So are Larry David, Ricky Gervais, Steve Coogan and our very own Mr John Clarke. What pisses you off? The dismissal of the Whitlam government in 1975 – maintain your rage (and enthusiasm). What about the local scene would you change? It would be good if more international bands played in Canberra. Sonic Youth played here at least twice in recent memory; if they can do it, so can everyone else. Also, is there a reason why nobody ever uses the Albert Hall? What are your upcoming gigs? We’re planning to play at least once in Canberra and Sydney – and hopefully also Melbourne – before the end of the year. Contact info: thelongestday.com.au, feralmedia.com.au/ artists/the-longest-day, feralmedia.bandcamp.com/ album/beyond-your-skies.

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Aaron Peacey 0410 381 306 Activate Jetpack activatejetpack@hotmail.com Adam Hole 0421 023 226 Afternoon Shift 0402 055 314 After Close Scotty 0412 742 682, afterclose@hotmail.com Alcove Mark 0410 112 522 Alice 0423 100 792 Allies ACT (Oxfam Group) alliesact@hotmail.com/ myspace.com/alliesact Amphibian Sound PA Clare 0410 308 288 Amplif5’d Classic rock covers band Joy 0407 200 428, joybarac-heath@hotmail.com Annie & the Armadillos Annie 6161 1078/0422 076 313 The Ashburys Dan Craddock 0419 626 903 Aria Stone, sax & flute, singer/ songwriter (guitar) Aria 0411 803 343 Australian Songwriters Association (Keiran Roberts) 6231 0433 Arythmia: Ben 0423 408 767/ arythmiamusic@gmail.com Backbeat Drivers Steve 0422 733 974, www.backbeatdrivers.com Big Boss Groove Andrew 0404 455 834, www.bigbossgroove.com.au Birds Love Fighting Gangbusters/DIY shows - bookings@birdslovefighting.com Black Label Photography Kingsley 0438 351 007 Blister Bug Stu 0408 617 791 Bridge Between, The Rachel 0412 598 138, thebridgebetween.com.au Bruce Stage mgr/consultant 6254 9857 Capital Dub Style - Reggae/Dub Events + DJs facebook.com/CapitalDubStyle Rafa 0406 647 296 Caution Horses Nigel 0417 211 580 Chris Harland Blues Band 0418 490 640 chrisharlandbluesband@yahoo.com.au Clear Vision Films rehearsals/film clips/stunts - 0438 647 281 wcoulton.clearvisionfilms.com Cole Bennetts Photography 0415 982 662 /colebennetts.com Cris Clucas Cris 6262 5652 Crooked Dave 0421 508 467 Danny V Danny 6238 1673/0413 502 428 Dawn Theory Nathan 0402 845 132 D’Opus & Roshambo hifidelitystyles@yahoo.com DJs Madrid and Gordon 0417 433 971 DJ Latino Rogelio 0401 274 208 DJ Moises (RnB/Latin) 0402 497 835 or moises_lopez@hotmail DNA Vic 0408 477 020 Drumassault Kate 0414 236 323 Easy Mode Daz 0404 156 482, easymodeband@gmail.com Entity Chris 0412 027 894 Epic Flagon band@epicflagon.com Fighting Mongooses, The Adam 0402 055 314 Final Warning Brendan 0422 809 552 Fire on the Hill Aaron 0410 381 306/ Lachlan 0400 038 388 4dead Peter 0401 006 551 Freeloaders, The Steve 0412 653 597 Friend or Enemy 6238 0083, www.myspace.com/friendorenemy Gareth Hailey DJ & Electronica 0414 215 885 GiLF Kelly 0410 588 747, gilf.mail@gmail.com Groovalicious Corporate/Weddings/ Private functions 0448 995 158 groovalicious@y7mail.com Guy The Sound Guy live & studio sound engineer, 0400 585 369, guy@guythesoundguy.com HalfPast Chris 0412 115 594 Hancock Basement Tom 6257 5375, hancockbasement@hotmail.com Happy Hour Wendy 0406 375 096 Haunted Attics band@hauntedatticsmusic.com Hitherto Paul 0408 425 636 In The Flesh Scott 0410 475 703

Inside the Exterior Nathan 0401 072 650 Itchy Triggers Andrew 0401 588 884 Jacqui Seczawa 0428 428 722 JDY Clothing 0405 648 288/ www.jdyclothing.com Jenn Pacor singer/songwriter avail. for originals & covers, 0405 618 630 Jim Boots 0417 211 580 Johnny Roadkill Paulie 0408 287 672, paulie_mcmillan@live.com.au Karismakatz DJ Gosper 0411 065 189/ dj@karismakatz.com Kayo Marbilus myspace.com/kayomarbilus Kurt’s Metalworx (PA) 0417 025 792 Little Smoke Sam 0411 112 075 Los Chavos Latin-Ska-Reggae facebook.com/loschavosmusic Rafa 0406 647 296 Andy 0401 572 150 Manilla Green Herms 0404 848 462, contactus@manillagreen.com, Mario Brujo Gordon world/latin/ reggae/percussionist and DJ. 0405 820 895 Martin Bailey Audio Engineer 0423 566 093 Words for You: writer/publicity/events Megan ph 6154 0927, Mercury Switch Lab Studios mercuryswitch@internode.on.net Missing Zero Hadrian Brand 0424 721 907 hadrian.brand@live.com.au Moots aspwinch@grapevine.com.au Huck 0419 630 721 MuShu Jack 0414 292 567, mushu_band@hotmail.com MyOnus myonusmusic@hotmail.com/ www.myspace.com/myonus No Retreat Simon 0411 155 680 Ocean Moses Nigel 0417 211 580 OneWayFare Chris 0418 496 448 Painted Hearts, The Peter 6248 6027 Phathom Chris 0422 888 700 The Pigs The Colonel 0422 412 752 Polka Pigs Ian 6231 5974 Premier Audio Simon 0412 331 876, premier_audio@hotmail.com Rafe Morris 0416 322 763 Redletter Ben 0421 414 472 Redsun Rehearsal Studio Ralph 0404 178 996/6162 1527 Rhythm Party, The Ross 0416 010 680 Rob Mac Project, The Melinda 0400 405 537 Rug, The Jol 0417 273 041 Samsara Samahdi 0431 083 776 Sansutra J-Ma 0403 476 350 Simone Penkethman (Simone & The Soothsayers, Singing Teacher) 6230 4828 Soundcity Rehearsal Studio Andrew 0401 588 884 Solid Gold Peter 0421 131 887/ solid.gold@live.com.au STonKA Jamie 0422 764 482/ stonka2615@gmail.com Super Best Friends Matt 0438 228 748 Surrender Jordan 0439 907 853 Switch 3 Mick 0410 698 479 System Addict Jamie 0418 398 556 The Morning After (covers band) Anthony 0402 500 843/ myspace.com/themorningaftercovers Tiger Bones & The Ferabul-Zers Danny feralbul@aapt.net.au Tim James Lucia 6282 3740, LUCIAMURDOCH@hotmail.com Top Shelf Colin 0408 631 514 Transmission Nowhere Emilie 0421 953 519/myspace.com/ transmissionnowhere Udo 0412 086 158 Undersided, The Baz 0408 468 041 Using Three Words Dan 0416 123 020, usingthreewords@hotmail.com Voodoo Doll Mark 0428 650 549 William Blakely Will 0414 910 014 Zero Degrees and Falling Louis 0423 918 793 Zwish 0411 022 907


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BMA Magazine 402 September 12 2012