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BLAHNKET+DOCTOR WEREWOLF LOCAL‘N’LIVE+DEF WISH CAST+VAN SHE &HEAPS MORE ONLINE! www.bmamag.com


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anca gallery seeking exhibition proposals This issue: more graffiti than there are images of Clive Palmer and Gina Rinehart bumping uglies in your nightmares. BOOM.

#397J U LY 0 4 Fax: 02 6257 4361 Mail: PO Box 713 Civic Square, ACT 2608 Publisher Scott Layne Allan Sko General Manager Allan Sko

T: (02) 6257 4360 E: advertising@bmamag.com

Advertising Manager Elisa Sko T: (02) 6257 4360 E: sales@bmamag.com

Editor Ashley Thomson

T: (02) 6257 4456 E: editorial@bmamag.com

Accounts Manager Yu Xie

T: (02) 6247 4816 E: accounts@bmamag.com

Super Sub-Editor Greta Kite-Gilmour Graphic Design Marley Film Editor Melissa Wellham NEXT ISSUE 398 OUT JULY 18 EDITORIAL DEADLINE JULY 9 ADVERTISING DEADLINE JULY 12 Published by Radar Media Pty Ltd ABN 76 097 301 730 BMA is independently owned and published. Opinions expressed in BMA are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or staff.

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ANCA Gallery is an ideal space to present solo or group exhibitions and is inviting applications from both artists and curators for the second half of 2013. Australian National Capital Artists Inc. (ANCA) is an artist-run-initiative located in Canberra. ANCA’s mission is to promote visual arts and cultural development through a dynamic sustainable organisation by providing access to affordable professional studio and exhibition space. The application form, hire conditions and floor plan are available for download from the ANCA website: www. anca.net.au. Proposals are due by Friday August 17. For further information contact Jan Falsone, ANCA Gallery Development Officer, on (02) 6247 8736 or via email at gallery@anca.net.au.

NEw hip hop label for the act DEFYNT Music Australia (DMA) is an independent hip hop label which was founded in late 2011 by Chris Abideen aka MC Defyntz (‘Defiance’), the end result of three established entities working collaboratively towards a common goal - to promote the balance between lyrically diverse, socially conscious hip hop and hip hop made to appeal to the masses. DMA the label will officially launch its permanent home (www.defyntmusicaustralia. com) in the latter part of 2012. Over the coming three years the team at DMA have planned seven releases under the DMA banner which will be distributed digitally via TuneCore. Defyntz and Moshated have already launched their first single, Dear Lord, available for free download from Soundcloud and Triple J unearthed. You can keep abreast of developments with the new label on Twitter (@DEFYNTmusicAus) or via their Facebook page.

For those who missed out first time round, Bone hit the ACT back in 2010 and teamed up with KP for a full house show and an after party we won’t forget. Krayzie and Wish loved the capital and they are coming back for round two: Friday September 21, 8pm. Bone Thugs N Harmony burst onto the hip hop scene in the ‘90s, signing on with the late Eazy E’s Ruthless Records. With the backing of Eazy, Bone came into the game at full throttle, using their signature sound to cement themselves as one of the most successful groups hip hop has ever seen. Bone will again be supported by Big Dave, Grantwho? and Kitty B performing songs from the upcoming Self Made LP for the first time. Tickets are available through Moshtix and Ticketek.

australian music prize frees entry process AfterThe Jezabels were announced as the winner of The 7th Amp, the team behind The Australian Music Prize have started work on The 8th Amp. Notably, for the first time, entry to The Amp is free of charge. Also for the first time The Amp has already started collecting albums for consideration. “We’re simplifying the process for artists and going digital,” says Scott B. Murphy, the Founder and Prize Director of The Australian Music Prize. “We now accept Australian artist album releases digitally and our judges can access the music online.” The Amp urges artists, labels, publishers or anyone who’s heard an Australian artist album release this year, of any

musical style or genre, to have it considered by the judges. For details and entry forms, visit www.australianmusic prize.com.au.

TEX PERKINS TO RETURN TO CANBERRA Well, Tex Perkins is bringing his stunningly successful show, The Man In Black: The Johnny Cash Story, back to Canberra Fri-Sun August 17-19. He imitates Johnny Cash, sings Cash’s songs in a thematically and chronologically coherent order and walks away with a wad of cash. Meanwhile at the Southern Cross Club, some other guy’s rinsing more punters doing the same things for another dead guy, Michael Jackson, on Thursday August 2, albeit a guy with more accusations of paedophilia hovering over his garishly overwrought grave. How this differs from remaking a classic movie beats me. And Walk The Line was pretty good, too, if you want a Cash trip. Anyway, tickets are available from Canberra Ticketing. There are your facts. Hence: news.

rick astley comes to canberra In 1987 Rick Astley was the biggest thing in pop music. It was a time of ceaseless copulation. In 1993 Rick felt it was time to retire. Many children were stillborn. The phenomenon of ‘Rickrolling’ saw his biggest ever single Never Gonna Give You Up reignite public interest. Many children were conceived and were strong. Rick will perform at Canberra Theatre on Wednesday November 21. Tix through Canberra Ticketing.

This work inspired by abstinence.

Bone thugs n harmony To return


FROM THE BOSSMAN

YOU PISSED ME OFF!

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”

Has someone yanked yer chain recently? Well send an email to  editorial@bmamag.com and have your sweet vengeance.

Some bearded bloke wrote that some time back (my writing is rarely bogged down by facts) and despite knowing folk wouldn’t lower their head for a nasal sample of something called a shitwafter, the point still rings true today in 2009.

Yet a-fuckin-gain, another place that touts itself as a VENUE but is nothing like one. Ooooo, nice trick, superficial dick… for months everyone in the music scene was excited by massive sign saying VENUE over your entrance. Soon we will become senile with cynicism, but, until then, a “venue” is expected to actually be a music venue. You know how venues usually have things like live music, a stage, sound attenuation, a sound desk, someone who knows how to use it and REAL DEDICATION TO MUSIC. Oh no, of course not, you must be from Canberra… the city so desperately in need of a venue any hospitality joint uses the word VENUE to become popular. L A M E. Shit advertising stunt – even if you’re an awesome bar, I already don’t care because you’re clearly more concerned with looking cool rather than being real. IMAGINE IF YOU REALLY WERE A VENUE… then Garema place could be cool. But, again, we’re stuck with bars. Please, for Canberra, prove me wrong.

Spelling, on the other hand, is a different matter. When people call me as ‘Alan’ instead of Allan I know it’s a harmless typo likely furiously bashed out in a hive of emailing activity, but it feels like they’re addressing someone else, some other Alan imposter who perhaps steals in and answers my emails when I’m at the pub. Coupled with this is a slight nagging feeling that this mage of misnomers cares so little about you, they can’t even be bothered to spell your moniker correctly and, by clear inference, thinks you’re ugly too. But there’s the rub (to continue the contrite application of Shakespeare-isms); with an anxiety-ridden over-thinking sot like me, an incorrect spelling of the name provides a concrete mental platform from which an admirable bulk of crazy can propel itself. I mean, how could this person spell my name wrong? I literally just signed off my name it would have taken - what? - all of three seconds to double check it... Heck, they simply could have copyand-pasted the name if they couldn’t be bothered keying in each letter lovingly arranged in the correct order to represent who I am. Am I worth that little? Do I hold such a wisp of value in this person’s eyes? Have we become so beset by work busyness in our lives that there’s no longer time for the simple courtesy of spelling someone’s name right? Can I... etc etc

Dear Pissed Off contributor to mag number 396, you must be one miserable wretch. Surely only a sad, sad life would inspire you to hurl such venom at those who suggest you look outside yourself out of a sense of love. You’re free to ignore it, but a lot of ordinary people get much meaning from thinking about something higher, instead of getting high. There’s more to life that trashy celebrity culture, the latest smart phone app or a bigger SUV. Or, in your case, sexo-religious fantasies and playing with yourself. I’ll say a prayer for you, which will probably piss you off even more.

It tends to chide the countenance a little more that it should. Maybe it’s because I exact meticulous, near paralysing pains in spelling names correctly. Whether you’re a Tom, Dick, or Ravishangpatagulong, before sending an email I will scrutinise your name-spelling, ticking off each letter, doubling back over previous correspondence to check and triple check. A Kirsty/ Kristy can see me hover over the Send button for a full ten minutes before I finally muster the confidence to proceed. This loopiness could be more deeply set, and I’ll leave you with this particular little comedy nugget to demonstrate. My last name - Sko - used to be spelled Schou, a proud Danish name that hails from my father’s side. Problem being - thanks in large part to people like Michael Schumacher - everyone assumed it was pronounced ‘shoe’. Growing up in England, where Taking the Piss is a national pastime and insults are like oxygen, this summoned no end of mirth and humiliation on my fragile facade. Throw my brother into the picture and the ‘pair of shoes’ line was wielded with the same fury and repetitiveness as a cobbler’s hammer. Finally, at the behest of my dear lady wife, I bit the bullet and officially changed the spelling. I mulled over the best phonetics for some time - Sco, Scou, the sleek and ultimately wanktastic Sc-Oh - and finally settled on Sko. After the rigour of changing my driver’s license, birth certificate, credit card, Marvel lifetime membership et al I sat back, exhausted, at which point an idle thought popped into my addled head... ‘I wonder if the Sko spelling means anything in native Denmark?’ So I jumped onto an online Danish dictionary and had a look. Shoe. Sko, in Danish, means shoe. I had changed my name from shoe to shoe, and now the proud country of Denmark has another thing to laugh about besides that Dinner For One film they show every New Year’s. A rose may smell the same, but having your name by any other spelling stinks like a shitwafter. ALAN “ALLAN SKO” SHOE - allan@bmamag.com

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WHO: Colombian Jungle WHAT: Thick beats WHEN: Sat Jul 7 WHERE: The Clubhouse

From the word ‘go’ Colombian Jungle have hit the ground running. Within months of bumping heads these two have got their debut EP coming out on Beatport through Shabang Records, have attracted attention from some of the best clubs and producers from around the country, and this has led to some fresh collaborations with some of Australia’s best electronic artists to be released within the year. Catch them on their Australian EP launch tour which will be hitting The Clubhouse with The Manething to promote Blow This, released Monday June 11 with remixes from Spenda C, Rubberteeth and Kraymer. 8pm. $15.

WHO: James Fahy WHAT: Last Chance To See WHEN: Sat Jul 7, Wed Jul 11, Sun Jul 22 WHERE: The Front Gallery and Café

James Fahy has played scores of gigs in this town in a bunch of incarnations: with Drew Walky, Pocket Fox, Cuddlefish, Beth & Ben, Dub Dub, even Peter Combe. He’s toured the country with Joe Oppenheimer, was at the first Fun Machine practice (and will get up with them at their single launch, Friday July 6), and is off to take his mesmeric post-folk Elliott Smith-meets-Jeff Buckley thing to North America. Luckily he’s going to make up for it by playing all these shows. So attend all of them; Saturday July 7, 4pm-6:30pm; Wednesday July 11 with Nick Saxon; and Sunday July 22 with Anna Smyrk. So long, Fahy. We’ll always have the storm water drain.

WHO: Canberra’s Finest WHAT: Sunday Best WHEN: Sun Jul 8, Sun Jul 15, Sun Jul 22 WHERE: A Bite To Eat Café

Sunday Best brings you lovers of live tunes free gigs from an everchanging pool of talent. The welcoming ambience of the café is more Melbournian than Canberran but that’s OK; revel in it anyway. Marvel at the mish mash of furniture and relive those carefree days of childhood when you encounter a glass or saucer just like the ones yer nanna had. Sit back, order some tapas and an Aussie beer on tap and enjoy free live music every Sunday. This month sees The Dreamlanders (folk/country), The Gossips (smooth jazz) and David Christoper (emotive originals/covers). See www.abitetoeat.net.au for details. Music/tapas from 5pm, Happy Hour 6pm-7pm. Free.

WHO: Tracy McNeil WHAT: Acclaimed Songstress WHEN: Fri Jul 13 WHERE: The Merry Muse

Hailing from the wilds of Ontario, Canada, Tracy McNeil is best known for her powerful voice, beautifully phrased songs and arresting stage presence. 2011 marked the release of her critically acclaimed sophomore album, Fire From Burning. After a sold out launch, East coast tour and international supports, McNeil and band are gaining speed as one of the finest acts on the Melbourne music scene. “Her songs ring with the kind of universal authority that lends them weight and gives the impression that McNeil is raiding some lost American troubadour songbook,” remarked Rhythms Magazine. Special guest Nigel Wearne. 8pm. $17 door.w

WHO: Ray Beadle Trio WHAT: blues guitarist WHEN: Fri Jul 13 WHERE: The Abbey

Ray’s music is rich with a deep history of the blues; rich from 20 years of experiences garnered performing nationally and internationally; and rich from a deep understanding of his instrument. Ray’s life as a musician started when he was just nine, and for the next 20 years he played with and learnt from the best. A three month residency with the house band in BB King’s Club in Memphis and Buddy Guy’s Blues Club in Chicago were defining moments during Ray’s US tours. His style evokes numerous blues legends while concocting a breathtaking style of his own. Bookings through www.theabbey.com.au. 6:30pm. $25/$65 with dinner.

WHO: FRENZAL RHOMB WHAT: PUNK STALWARTS WHEN: SAT JUL 21 WHERE: THE BASEMENT

After five years in the wilderness of the public conscience, the fearless foursome are back with album number eight, Smoko at the Pet Food Factory. It was recorded with infamous Black Flag stickman Bill Stevenson (Rise Against, NOFX) in the backwoods of Colorado, USA, and finds Frenzal flashing new skills amid old tricks. It’s been all systems go from there as Frenzal continue spreading their vitriol. With a stellar track record for causing pandemonium at any show they play – be it inciting huge circle pits, destroying piñatas of political leaders or drinking every other band’s beer – trust the brand you know. 8pm. $25 + bf through Moshtix.


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JAMES FAHY & KAYLA Martin If you live in Canberra, you’ve seen the work of ubiquitous artist ABYSS .607. Noble and imposing figures, richly coloured and slightly arcane, scribed in impressive detail on walls and billboards across the city. These are ‘Seers’, Abyss’ signature creations. You might have noted the sudden street-side characters over the summer and been as intrigued as I was. Large and small, Abyss’ works are mysteriously compelling and beautifully eldritch. My own borderline obsession with the personality behind them reached fever pitch during this latest creative explosion. Imagine my childlike joy when I heard that a feature on the enigmatic Abyss .607 was finally on the cards. A Merimbula native, Abyss moved to Canberra half a decade ago and has been working hard ever since. He began in the style of the Adbusters movement, obscuring the faces of advertisements with demonic red eyes, and quickly progressed to stickers and paste-ups starring the immensely detailed Seers you can now spot all over the city. Prophets who can read the past and see into the future, the Seers are often depicted carrying light, a symbol of the energy of imagination. For a little while, the Gus’/Essen Café strip even boasted a Seer holding a glowing cup of coffee: inspiration in a mug.

I’ve just always been drawing. I have to make something. It’s what I’ve got to do

That particular artwork lasted little more than a week. Abyss’ is an art-form defined by brevity, both in the lifetime of the works and in their execution. It takes a thick skin and an adventurous spirit, Abyss explained. “You’ve got to be aware… but sometimes I’ll just put my earphones on, play it loud, and if someone sees me they see me. It’s a release.” His works show up in some hairraising places, like the third-storey shopfront of an abandoned building on Lonsdale Street. “Leaning out isn’t scary at all – it’s getting up there. We scaled a pole, crept across a rotting roof full of holes, and this time we didn’t have a rope, so we had to use an extension cord.” Abyss has a bagful of adventure stories, including a particularly entertaining yarn about dashing down a Woden stormwater drain ahead of a flash flood. “The water built up slowly, and then suddenly this wall rushed through. It was out of nowhere!” As a lifelong skater, Abyss keeps an open eye as he traverses the city, recognising the hidden corners, unused walls and opportunities to work on something special, like the crimson dragon undulating along the Lonsdale Street Roasters laneway. There’s never a hint of grandstanding or fame. It’s who he is. “I’ve just always been drawing. I have to make something. It’s what I’ve

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got to do.” He described the evening streets as a playground. “It’s just good to be out there by yourself…No-one around, no cars. It’s one of the best feelings that I get out of it; the solitude. To be under the stars, just rolling.” New works turn up every week around the city, revealing this artist’s exceptional work ethic. While smaller work like stickers and tags can be improvised and thrown up in a moment, Abyss still plans out his approach. “If I’m going to smash out a heap of stickers, I have a spot in mind and pre-prepare… then I go and do that whole location in one shot.” Larger art takes a great deal more planning. When a likely location turns up, Abyss will photograph the location and take a tape measure to it to make sure he’s got a good area with which to work. He can spend weeks working on a single piece, often to see them disappear before he gets a chance to record them with a photo. He’s grateful when he sees a high-quality photo turn up online, as that’s the ultimate resting place of art that can be scraped down or rained away without warning. Recently Abyss has been making use of mixed media to add vivid colour and texture to his paste-ups. The increasing frequency and scale of the works allows him to exercise his turn towards abstraction. “I find I’m getting more abstract recently. More freeform,” he revealed. “I find it’s less containing. I’ve developed a lot as well and I can feel like I make good work, and what you can do with it is endless.” Tying the threads together is a belief in imagination and a holistic approach to form. “It’s all energy. That’s what life is, it’s what art is, it’s what music is.” This sense of freedom has allowed Abyss to ignore what might be seen by others as boundaries. His style is unmistakeable and revolves around a certain cast of distinctive characters, which could lead to repetition. Instead, Abyss has found opportunities at every turn. A work at the Ainslie shops, while a familiar character, is innovative in its detail – a shining, origami-paper style mixedmedia cloak – and in its placement, where a shadowing effect makes the Seer seem to lean away from the wall. Next month Abyss will be contributing to MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art Project, a roving exhibition exploring the history and evolution of the Australian street art movement. It will be well worth checking out; he’ll be the guy boasting a set of mysterious spectres sketched in bold lines that will occupy the room like unexpected guests. If you don’t make it out to Belconnen, don’t worry – you can probably see one from where you’re sitting. Abyss .607 will be an artist-in-residence at MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art Project running Friday July 6 – Saturday August 11 at Belconnen Arts Centre. The exhibition is free, Tue-Sat, 10am-5pm. In the meantime, enjoy Abyss .607’s artwork scattered throughout Canberra’s streets and city facades.

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ALL AGES Greetings friends! Blasting Hot Chocolate’s You Sexy Thing is definitely one way to assist your study for exams. (Hopefully your internal or external voice sang the start of the chorus.) Note: it assists almost disturbingly well. I highly recommend it. I think it’s easy to forget amongst the stress of exams that they actually mean the glorious school holidays are nigh. Miracle, right? Well I believe in them. You sexy thing… Anyways, my point is there is still a lot of all ages goodness going around for us young whippersnappers in these upcoming weeks and beyond. Do holidays make you feel like dancing away the oppression of school? Good. They should. Speaking of dancing, Kulture Break, a not-for-profit dance school are passionate about ‘influencing a culture and empowering a generation’ through dance. Help them celebrate a decade of community service Fri-Sat July 6-7 by coming to the Legacy Expo Festival 2012. Guest performers include Stan Walker, Paulini, Instant Bun, Pyro (US) and KG as well as 400 performers from various Canberra schools. It will be on at the Canberra Theatre Playhouse. Tickets can be booked by calling (02) 6257 2700 or online at www. canberratheatrecentre.com.au. Sometimes the festive cheer of holidays makes you feel like growing a mohawk and whipping it back and forth. If this statement is true for you, I might be correct in assuming you’d like to see The Bride, Wish For Wings, Trainwreck, Immersion and Here’s To Hoping live at the Woden Youth Centre.

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They play on Sunday July 8 at 8pm and tickets can be purchased at the door. Warning: this is definitely the kind of music that gives you the mohawk cravings. If you’re still keen as a hardcore bean, Harm’s Way (US) and Phantoms are coming to the Tuggeranong Youth Centre on Tuesday July 31. Those who have seen Harm’s Way perform before have described it as a “rewarding journey through the hardest of sonic assaults.” So evidently this is not a show you’ll want to miss. Tickets are $19.40 and can be bought online at Oztix. Holidays are also for chilling out to acoustic vibes. LIVE@BAC can help you with that at the Belconnen Arts Centre foyer on Friday July 13 (and every second Friday of the month). Support the local musicians who play, view works from local visual artists while you’re at it, and enjoy the view of the lake. It goes from 5.30pm-7.00pm and entry is $5 at the door. Details on performers are put up each month on their website: www.belconnenartscentre.com.au. There is still time to enter the triple j Unearthed High competition. Upload an original song to their website by Monday July 23 for your chance to win a lunchtime concert for your school with Bliss n Eso, and record a song in the triple j studios. More information on how to enter and terms and conditions can be found at www.triplejunearthed.com/unearthedhigh. Treat you and your mohawk cravings once more for Antagonist A.D. (NZ), Lionheart (US) and Shinto Katana. They play at the Tuggeranong Youth Centre on Wednesday August 15. These bands have toured previously with the likes of Parkway Drive, Have Heart and Earth Crisis. Tickets can be purchased through Moshtix. Cheers, ANDIE EGAN allagescolumn@gmail.com


LOCALITY

This week The Front Gallery and Café is displaying an exhibition designed to encapsulate its standing as a newly seven-year-old venue. As part of its ongoing birthday celebrations, The Front asked anyone who cares to to submit a work of any shape or size with one proviso: that it speak to their love of the venue. Visit now to find out what kaleidoscopic mongoloid love-ejaculate that resulted in.

Locals Fun Machine have had more than their fair share of text in this magazine already, as has the venue they’ve chosen to host their single launch: the White Eagle Polish Club. Get down there on Friday July 6, 7:30pm, to catch them with Mustered Courage, Trendoid & Alphabet and Vulpes Vulpes. The sound system in the Polish Club has tended in the past to rough the fine edges off live acts like a fart off polite conversation. Here’s hoping something’s happened to close the gap between how it should sound and how it does. This is a good week for hip hop at Transit Bar. Friday July 6, 8pm, sees Transit’s Soul Be In It night hosting what their PR goons call ‘Canberra’s only night dedicated to soul, funk and hip hop’. The Buick crew are holding the reins on this one and it’s free. And on Saturday July 7, 8pm, the bar hosts original four elements Australian hip hop act Def Wish Cast. They’re not for everyone but if true hip hop means anything to you then Australia doesn’t have a truer hip hop act. Read: they’re old, they wear clothes made for black people, they have criminal histories. See our feature on page 29 for details. Wednesday July 11, 8pm, sees interstaters Per Purpose hook up with locals The Fighting League and Danger Beach to scorch every last remnant of stoner-picked foam from the less-than-curbsidestandard couches in The Phoenix. The Fighting League should still be perfecting the fundamentals of their debut, Tropical Paradise. Catching them before that material skulks off their set list is wise. Transit Bar has quietly sprung a new indie/electro series, Nite Society, and they’ll be pulling down Unearthed up-and-comers Millions on Saturday July 14. These guys look about as compelling as a merkin but the buzz around them is firm; run your fingers through it and get back to me with an authenticity reading. Ex/semi-locals Agency Dub Collective (page 24) are coming back to Canberra with their latest EP, Dubby Riddim, on Thursday July 19, 8pm, with Sub Detonator. Word is they’ve mellowed out since their early days. Coax these stooges back from the edge with a bottle of gin and a slap in the teeth. In a recent twist, Smiths Alternative Bookshop has announced it’s for sale only six months after mounting a concerted effort to turn from a comfortable book hole into an intimate, licensed venue. With waxed armpits and a vanilla-scented gooch, this biddy is courting. Part of her second wind are the Paperback Sessions and the next installation on Friday July 20, 8pm, sees Abby Dobson appearing. Turn to page 22 for more details. And that’s everything local I care about. ASHLEY THOMSON - editorial@bmamag.com

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GRETA Kite-Gilmour Many of you may have experienced BLAHNKET through any number of its diverse musical manifestations; whether at intimate nights of laid-back beats at the ANU Food Co-op or the highenergy, foot-stomping seizure that was Machinedrum at Trinity. However, few may be familiar with what lies at the humble heart of this steadily-growing, forward-thinking group venture. Canberra subunit and co-founder of Blahnket, Patrick Morgan, joined by friend and collaborator Ric Lavers (Blahnket/Treehouse), shed some light on his enigmatic brainchild. Having long viewed it as an events-based organisation, I was surprised (and slightly abashed) when Pat informed me that Blahnket began, and continues to be, an online music-sharing blog. “In 2010 I started the blog with my best friend in Sydney, Fence Tomkins, to promote electronic music that I thought wasn’t really getting enough attention then. We were producing some too, so it was to give our influences some credit and was also an avenue to publicise our own music. If people were going to go look at it for the music I was promoting, they might have a look at what we were making ourselves.” Not only was a blog the most practical medium for this concept, it also provided planning flexibility. “I knew if I started a blog it would be something I could take in different directions… I just let it grow from that into something that still isn’t particular yet. I guess in terms of what we’re currently doing it’s mostly event management and promotions for now.”

I’m trying to keep – without being a wanker about it – a standard, but I’m making it inclusive

Evidently mindful of what this label often connotes, Pat clarified what ‘promoting’ means for him. “I hate how you have to make [Facebook] events and spam people about it. I try to keep it to a minimum but at the end of the day you’ve got to do it somehow. Ideally, I’m trying to promote less and less and get a following, a thing of trust. I want Canberra to trust what we’re doing and just come along and give it a go.” If Blahnket’s consistently satiating shows – including Ras G, Machinedrum and Hudson Mohawke – are any guide, Canberrans have every reason to embrace their future events without reserve. So how did these headliner shows evolve from a humble blog? “It pretty much all started from Ric and Treehouse helping us out.” Ric, the man behind events group Treehouse, explained characteristically casually, “Jerry [head honcho of Melbourne touring agency, The Operatives] was looking for a Canberra leg of their FlyLo/Gaslamp Killer tour in 2011. I guess we did a good enough show with that to get some other ones from there.” For Pat, Canberra’s receptive music community was enough in itself to spark his active involvement in events management. In fact, it wasn’t until he moved here from Sydney that the thought of doing so even appealed to him. “I didn’t really want to be involved in the

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Sydney scene and become a promoter there… There’s so much mess there, it’s kind of hard to get through to people.” Pausing, he added, “In Canberra it seems like you can do something really unique. The crowd is always receptive to new things and it’s easier to get involved with other people doing creative things too. It’s a much smaller city; I think that’s beneficial.” Involvement and interaction with other creatively-minded, inspired individuals is fundamental to Blahnket’s whole ethos. The name itself was chosen to describe the group’s nondiscriminant nature – “I wanted it to be something that could include everything” – a quality which is reflected through not only the music featured on the blog, but the artists and individuals that compose Blahnket: “Anybody can be involved as much as they want to be. At the moment it’s DJs like 2fuddha, Aeon, Beat Smugglerz, Digby and Cream Crops from Canberra, Elliot from the Blue Mountains, Onetalk in Sydney… those guys are the fucking best! I mean, I’m trying to keep – without being a wanker about it – a standard, but I’m making it inclusive instead of exclusive.” The beauty of having a web-based music-sharing community means that this ‘inclusivity’ can reach as far, for example, as Nashville, Tennessee: “One of the closest artists involved is Bornagen Baldwin, a duo who play hazy hip hop… I’ve never spoken to them but they’re actually in the process of trying to work out passports so they can get over here!” While remaining open to all kinds of electronic music, Pat says that over the years he’s narrowed his focus to ‘the beat side of things’, essentially comprising the music you’ll find on the blog. “It’s one of those things I want to expand on, include more genres. I’m on the hip hop tip right now so that’s what I’m focusing on.” While Pat remains passionate and committed to introducing people to underground music via the blog, he clearly recognises the complementary value in physically bringing Canberrans the music he endorses. “Hopefully people look at the blog and listen to the music and get a bit of a feel for it so that when we do play it live they can appreciate it a bit more.” So which upcoming events will showcase Blahnket’s freshly-picked sounds? As well as their monthly shows at the ANU Food Co-op, Blahnket’s next big event will be MONO/POLY (LA/Brainfeeder) at Hippo on Thursday August 9, as part of their monthly Method-B nights. In November, Pat’s looking forward to bringing electronic hip hop producer and visual artists Teebs (LA): “I would probably say he’s my favourite producer over the past three years.” As for next year, “I really want to bring Young Montana [UK] out. That guy is just…bullshit. Like, in a really good way.” Well, if that’s the case, then I implore you to check out Blahnket’s upcoming events. They’re bound to be bullshit – in a really good way. Catch beatmaster MONO/POLY on Thursday August 9, 8pm, at Hippo Bar. First release tickets are $25 + bf through Moshtix. Come early to support your uber-talented locals, Deaf Cat, 2fuddha, Aeon and more. Until then, check out where it all began at http://blahnket.blogspot.com.au.


Between hotels and airports it’s not as glamourous as people think

and Ladyhawke. “There are clubbers who like our remixes who have never heard of Van She (the band), and band followers who have not heard of the offshoot Van She Tech. It’s like two separate worlds.” So what influences their choice of remix material? “When we find some interesting song we take the vocal and make a totally new sound underneath it. Harmonically, you can go anywhere.”

HI-TECH HAPPINESS RORY McCartney I spoke to Mikey de Francesco, keys and synth player in Sydney five-piece electro-poppers VAN SHE, as the band was rehearsing in advance of their forthcoming tour. With a consistent line-up since 2005 after getting together at dance club Bang Gang, they are set to release their second album Idea Of Happiness.

Van She has toured in impressive company, including the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, New Young Pony Club and Daft Punk. However, their favourite touring partners are closer to home. “We really liked the tour with The Presets and Architecture In Helsinki. Our last time in Canberra as a full band was at the AIS with The Presets.” Mikey admits they are not big on partying. “We usually go back to hotels after gigs. Between hotels and airports it’s not as glamorous as people think.” Idea Of Happiness hits the streets on Friday July 6 and Van She plays Zierholz @ UC on Saturday July 7 at 8pm, supported by RüFüS. Tickets are $24.20 + bf through Moshtix.

“Our new album is a lot more unified in terms of mood and direction than our first release, V, which contained more variations in style. The new title is deliberately upbeat to send out a good message.” When asked about the decision to release Jamaica as the second single, Mikey confessed, “We didn’t have a real feel for what should be next. We rely on the record company for that choice as they are not as close to the music as we are.” Van She has been described as displaying strong ‘80s vibes. “Kids are influenced by their parents’ tastes and what they play in the car. It was a memorable decade of big sounds, big budgets and excess in the pop world. The instruments used then have withstood the test of time.” Was the album stirred by sun-baked travels as has been described? “These themes represented our wish to escape the underground recording studio in Kings Cross that we’d built ourselves to avoid budget and time pressures.” The time between Van She’s releases has seen a huge rise in the influence of social networking mechanisms such as SoundCloud and YouTube. “The beauty of them is that anyone can make and post songs. It helps in the band’s exposure, especially overseas, and is a more cost effective means of promotion.” Mikey, with singer Nicky Routledge, form Van She Technologic, which uses material from such artists as Dragonette

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OH, MR. SHEFFIELD…

THE SKY’S NO LIMIT

justin hook

CHRIS DOWNTON

When RICHARD HAWLEY last visited Australia he was the English tourist straight out of central casting. “As soon as I got off the plane I made a beeline to Bondi and passed out. I was rushed to hospital with a blister the size of a fucking football on my back.” In the intermediary years, the Sheffield-based singer and one-time Pulp guitarist morphed into a soulful, melancholic crooner with an old school rockabilly, roots and leather jacket vibe.

Since their earliest beginnings as the result of jamming sessions in a Sydney share house back in 1997 inspired by the likes of Flying Saucer Attack and MBV, space rock/shoegaze duo THE LONGEST DAY have gone on to outlive many other similar bands. While cofounders Jay Annabel and Brad Stafford now live in two different cities (Annabel in Canberra while Stafford resides in Sydney), they’ve continued to build up a steady body of work with their latest release Beyond Your Skies offering up their fourth album in total.

That’s all been thrown out the window on his new album Standing At The Sky’s Edge. Loud, roiling riffs replace the textured jazzy chords. There’s a smattering of The Stooges and layers of distortion. It’s a bold stylistic gamble and feels like Hawley is making up for a decade of playing it low-key. Critics are calling it his psychedelic masterpiece – a term that rankles Hawley: “I don’t like that word. It implies flowers and rainbows and San Francisco bullshit. Aldous Huxley talked about psychedelics in the ‘40s and he wore a three-piece suit and glasses.”

I don’t like that word [psychedelic]. It implies flowers and rainbows and San Francisco bullshit

With this new direction Hawley expected backlash, but happily it’s been his most commercially successful venture; both a pleasant surprise and relief. “I thought this is the one where I get totally slagged off, the one everybody would hate. I’ve always had positive support from the press and people in general in the UK. There’s been a lot of goodwill, which is obviously greatly appreciated, but I thought this time it might not happen. Then the opposite happened: there was more goodwill. It was mind-blowing. It was beautiful and – dare I say it – emotional. I’m a 45-year-old guy for fuck’s sake! We live in shallow times and there’s not much tangible or real. What I do that’s successful has had a powerful effect on me. You slightly re-evaluate what you think about things…only slightly though.” Hawley’s connection to his hometown is well documented and Sheffield references litter his catalogue, and when asked to describe Sheffield, Hawley is quick and succinct: “Fucking brilliant!” As Hawley explains in a thick home-grown accent, “It’s a good feeling to know where you’ve been, where you’re coming from, where you’re at. It helps you figure out where you’re going. I walk the streets that hundreds of people I am related to have walked. Those things are very important. It probably doesn’t matter a rat-shit to anyone else – but it matters to me. It helps give meaning and depth to the music.” Hawley suggests he’ll be making a belated return to Australia before the year’s end and like any return tourist has learnt from his mistakes. “I won’t be going to Bondi again – let me tell you that!” Standing At The Sky’s Edge is out now on Mute/EMI.

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We never really ask what each other’s lyrics are about…the thread is the music

One of my first impressions upon listening to the new album was just how much larger the duo’s sonic palette sounds, with an increased scope and depth present on all of the tracks that’s a discernible jump from their early, more laptop-centred work. During my phone chat with Jay, I venture that the new album struck me as a big leap forward for the band. “I’d tend to agree with you,” he admits modestly. “It definitely sounds a lot more complete to me. We have the huge tracks and the droney tracks… you get a lot more out of this album if you listen to it in order rather than shuffle. It was definitely designed that way.” I also suggest that there’s more of a focus on lyrics this time, with the duo’s vocals sitting more prominently in the mix on many tracks. “It wasn’t a conscious thing, but I agree that’s what happened,” replies Jay. “We didn’t discuss it, it just turned out that way. It’s interesting because this is the first album where I’m singing on three songs, mainly because I had lyrics that were worth singing. I’ve never asked Brad what he’s getting at [in his lyrics]. We never really ask what each other’s lyrics are about. The thread is more the music than the lyrics. Having said that, there are two really vague songs about climate change issues, but they’re not overt and most people wouldn’t notice.” Jay notes a number of other stylistic changes. “We recorded the majority of the album at Brad’s music room. We’re getting better at mixing and also restraint. We used to throw heaps of stuff in there, heaps of effects, but now we’re getting better at holding back.” As well as appearances from Fourplay’s Peter and Tim Hollo, Beyond Your Skies also features long-time ‘third’ member and Boston resident Christy Romanick on guitar and vocals, who is also responsible for the album’s striking sleeve photography. “I don’t know how she does what she does. She’s done all the art since the second album. She doesn’t treat anything, it’s all unfiltered. It was really hard to get a visual palette on the last album that suited the music, but this time we really got it right.” Beyond Your Skies is available now through Feral Media.


THE END IS NIGH ben hermann When the AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER ORCHESTRA goes on tour this July to perform Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time and Schubert’s Trout Quintet, it will take on the blessing and burden that inevitably accompany the performance of classical favourites. “They’re two very well-known and popular pieces of music, and deservingly so,” says Helena Rathbone, the principal second violin of the ACO and Director and Leader of ACO’s second ensemble, ACO2, which sources musicians from the Emerging Artists Program. “It makes it a treat to perform such well-known pieces. But at the same time, it’s also difficult. Everyone knows what they sound like, and they all have their favourite recordings, so they all have preconceptions of what they hope or think it will sound like.”

You have so much adrenalin running through your body that you need to wind down somehow

Joining Rathbone and three other ACO Principals will be Artistic Director of the Australian National Academy of Music and clarinetist Paul Dean, as well as Palestinian-Israeli pianist Saleem Ashkar. Although relatively young, Ashkar is revered globally in the classical music community. He first began playing piano in Nazareth at the age of six when his father traded the family’s car for an old piano because it ‘looked nice’. Although no one in his family could play, a visit from his uncle gave him the appetite for piano that would lead to him study abroad in Europe and eventually to make his debut at Carnegie Hall at the age of just 22. Askhar regularly speaks of the mesmerising effect that music had on him as a child, and this is an experience that Rathbone regularly enjoys through her work with ACO2 and the Australian Youth Orchestra. “Working with the ACO and people like Paul Dean and Saleem Ashkar, while also working with the younger, emerging orchestras absolutely gives me the best of both worlds,” she says. “Working with young people is just so refreshing and energising. You see their enthusiasm and their need and desire to lean and absorb as much as possible. Trout is actually only the second Schubert I’ve played so it’s new to me. It was the same experience that younger musicians have; playing something for the first time with a fresh, wide-eyed approach. It brings you down to earth and reminds you why you began playing.” Despite how younger generations may perceive classical music musicians and aficionados, Rathbone insists that life on the road for all musicians is fairly similar at the end of the day. “Musicians are always pretty good partiers,” she explains. “You don’t get off stage until ten or so and you have so much adrenalin running through your body that you need to wind down somehow.” The Australian Chamber Orchestra presents Schubert’s Trout Quintet and Messaien’s Quartet for the End of Time at Llewellyn Hall, ANU, on Saturday July 21, 8pm. $42-89 through Ticketek.

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We get to wear froufrou dresses and get sloshed and sing!

NINJA TURTLE’S FRENCH EX-WIFE

LAUREN STRICKLAND

My interview with singer-songwriter ABBY DOBSON starts with a long detour through that potentially awkward territory: talking about the weather. This is rarely a good start to an interview – shouldn’t we be talking about music or something? – but with Abby this usually dead-air-filler conversation piece is surprisingly

revealing. “Today’s been extraordinarily sunny and beautiful in Sydney after a lot of rain, so it’s quite a mood enhancer; all of a sudden the world doesn’t seem so grim – all feels possible and exciting again,” she tells me in her comfortingly husky voice. Her distinctive vocals will be familiar to anyone who encountered Abby in her previous life as lead singer for Leonardo’s Bride, famous for their 1997 hit Even When I’m Sleeping. Although she should be promoting her current solo tour – shows combining songs from her old album (2007’s Rise Up) and as-yet unrecorded tracks –Abby finds that she is easily distracted by so-called side projects. Speaking about her latest distraction – a collection of French songs performed with her friend Lara Goodridge – transforms her husky voice almost into squeals. “It’s called Baby Et Lulu,” she says proudly. “It’s a beautiful project, I absolutely adore it. [Lara and I] both love all things French; we also love to drink red wine and sing in harmony.” Abby and Lara put together a six-piece band and recorded an album set to premiere in August. “We get to wear froufrou dresses and get sloshed and sing! It’s our little side project that’s been taking over the whole frame.”

Her new album may be a little while off yet. “I just keep getting distracted! People keep asking me things and I just go, ‘Oh, yeah, I could do that’, and I just put my album on the back burner all the time.” Despite the temptation to continue discussing collaborative projects, Abby considers her Canberra show as a chance to reconnect with her audience. “I’m doing this show on my own because of the intimacy thing, which I do really like. I like playing in venues that are nice to be in. Sometimes you end up in a room and there’s no art involved whatsoever and there’s nothing on the walls, and it’s just cold and grey.” She explains why she was drawn to the idea of a gig in a bookstore, a small enough venue that means she leaves her backing band behind for a night. “I like the idea of playing in different sorts of places where people can get cosy and everybody can get close. They’re often the most challenging because of the intimacy level, but at the same time they can be some of your favourite shows because of that same thing.” Hear Abby’s melodies and watch Baby Et Lulu’s album release at Paperback Sessions, Smith’s Alternative Bookshop, Friday July 20, 8pm. $20 door or online at www.paperbacksessions.com.au.

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The chickens like to dance and it keeps them laying

HOW FUNKY IS YOUR CHICKEN? RORY MCCartney I spoke with Sean, aka Funkelstinskin Chickenstrut, of as he was taking a break, as it happens, from feeding the chooks. You may be wondering where the name comes from. Sean explained, “Funk sounds sort of sticky and juicy. ZooPaGoo sounds like superglue and we want the funk to stick to everyone.” That goes for listeners and every one of the eight band members, who began their collaboration “through contacts amongst ACT musos. The five core people auditioned for extra members. Plus, we can pick up horn players from exSchool of Music types.”

The song dances the group promotes include The Bump ‘n’ Touch, Popcorn and The Funky Sixteen Corners. “These are borrowed from the funk masters who have come before us (YouTube is good for some background research). ZooPaGoo is bringing the funk back in a big way, with a nasty vibe. The funk essence is in everyone and Chickenstrut will bring it out. There will be a mix of original material and classic ‘70s music from the greats.” They appear at Digress Cocktail Lounge as part of the venue’s third Big Bang event. Digress is working commendably hard to establish itself as a live music venue with a difference, with monthly shows and regular Friday solo/duo sets. There’s even a new cocktail blended for each Big Bang. ZooPaGoo have a dance competition with prizes at every gig so it should be a hoot! Or is that a squawk? Get your funk on with ZooPaGoo on Saturday July 7, 8pm at Digress Cocktail Lounge. Supports on the night include The Rocksteady Soundsystem and DJ Timber.

What inspired these newcomers to the ACT funk scene? “We just love that ‘70s funk of artists including James Brown and Sly and the Family Stone. There have been past Canberra funkers like Changeable Dan, but there’s not enough funk around now and we aim to be a good-time party band. When the girls go to the dance floor, the boys will follow.” ZooPaGoo has already proven it can inspire a dancefloor. “We had a very successful ladies’ night at The Front. People were dancing inside, outside, even behind the bar. Then at The Phoenix we had people on the tables and chairs. It was so crowded everyone was forced to stand and dance.” The band has been joined on stage by go-go dancers, clowns and even chickens. “Yeh, the chickens like to dance and it keeps them laying. Then we have our petting zoo with dogs, cats and even mice. We need to expand, though, before we can get the elephant.” The show is sponsored by April’s Caravan, vintage clothing specialists. “Mr Chickenstrut likes the funky clothes and April’s Caravan has the cool threads. I made them an offer to wear their gear and it was a perfect match.”

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sound as much as we can. It was a bit of a two year saga, but we also did consciously take time off this time. We wanted to take a break from constant gigs, to make sure that the album is really killer. We used several studios this time and it was definitely the longest process for a record we’ve had.”

Lotek understands the music and what we’re trying to do

BEGGARS COLLECTIVE

chris downton

While AGENCY DUB COLLECTIVE relocated to Melbourne back in 2003, they’ve always had a sizeable part of their heart in Canberra, playing their first show at the long-departed Finnigan’s in Dickson in November 1999 and returning here steadily in the intervening years. It’s a connection strengthened recently with the return of drummer Dan Sommariva from Japan, meaning that half the band now lives in Canberra. While it’s been a good four years since ADC’s last album; 2008’s SOS, the now four-piece band have spent the time continuing to hone their live sound in the studio, the first fruit being the new Dubby Riddim EP, a taster for the band’s seventh album, Beggars Belief, out this November. When I catch up with ADC bassist and founder member Elrond Veness, I mention that I found Dubby Riddim a lot more chilled out and roots-oriented than their previous work, with a real emphasis on capturing a tight live sound this time. “We’re definitely more chilled out since SOS, which was a more heavy political record,” he responds. “We’re going for a real live band

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Responsible for mixing duties on Beggars Belief is ex-pat UK producer and Big Dada affiliate Wayne Lotek, certainly one of the most reputable dub/hip hop mixers currently operating in this country. “Lotek understands the music and what we’re trying to do,” explains Elrond. “We were thinking we might have to go to New Zealand because dub is practically mainstream there,” he adds laughing, before going on to mention that ADC are looking at touring there in the future. “We actually started recording the rhythm tracks back in August 2010 at Barry Stockley’s Fat Sound Studio in Melbourne, down on analogue tape. He really knows how to capture a good live sound, and he’s got heaps of great old gear like a vintage Rhodes [keyboard] and reverb plates. We then went and did overdubs in our various home studios and edited tracks together. “From here to November, we’ll be busy getting the vocals done. I’m really happy with the sound. It’s funny because our first album was recorded on a four-track with just four crappy mikes, and we’ve gone from that to something quite polished but still natural,” he adds. “We’ve had horn sections in the past, but we’re really happy with the stripped down sound.” Agency Dub Collective launch their Dubby Riddim EP at Transit Bar, Thursday July 19, supported by Sub Detonator. 8pm $10/$15 with EP.


UTAH KING TO ME? ALLAN SKO For an admirable 15 years Luke Wilson has entranced denizens of drum ‘n’ bass with his soul-tinged liquid funk UTAH JAZZ project. He has rarely deviated from his beloved style in this time, and in a world drunk on the raging yin of warbling, smashing dubstep, Luke’s smooth liquid funk yang is like salve to sore ears. “Soulful vibes is where I began 15 years ago and it would feel weird to jump ship purely for commercial gain,” the affable Luke reveals. “Especially as that rarely exists these days anyway. I grew up on the atmospheric jungle days of the mid ‘90s and was absolutely obsessed. The hardcore stuff of earlier years didn’t do it for me - I shared a bedroom with my older brother who listened to pirate stations non-stop - but when I first heard the early Good Looking/ Moving Shadow/ Headz/Basement/ Vibez/Timeless releases, I was totally hooked. So now it feels like a cardinal sin to move too far away from that!” Latest album Groove Therapy is a worthy extension of Luke’s last two projects; 2008’s It’s A Jazz Thing and 2010’s Vintage. “I was maybe trying out too many different styles with Vintage, which could be a good thing, whereas Groove is me wholeheartedly going back to my ‘liquid funk’ roots.”

My record sales struggle to even cover my phone bills these days, let alone pay my mortgage

With the financial bottom falling out of the music industry, Luke is very much in it for the love. His time in the industry allows him a considered perspective. “I’d be lying if I said I didn’t feel sorry that I missed out on the good old days selling thousands of vinyls per month, but I feel fucking lucky to still be doing this and that’s largely down to internet exposure,” he says. “Things are definitely tougher - the ‘old guard’ probably didn’t realise how good they had it - but that’s just the way life is. My record sales struggle to even cover my phone bills these days let alone pay my mortgage. I try to resist saying that as it sounds like I’m complaining but so many people think I must be some kind of millionaire! That said, I’m fortunate enough to be busy on the DJ circuit which keeps the wolf from the door,” he adds with a cheeky wink. In a further bid to keep the financial lupine jaws from snapping, Luke will form part of The Clubhouse’s excellent electronic roster this July, and it seems us headz have a spirited rollick down memory lane to look forward to. “I’m playing a range of tracks - 1994 tunes to present day - from Alex Reece, Wax Doctor, Bukem, Aquasky, Neil Trix, PFM, Digital, Adam F, 4 Hero, R-Type, Fresh, Calibre, Marcus Intalex, Phace, Noisia, Sub Focus, High Contrast, Netsky, Furney, Matrix, BCee, Sigma, Hazard, TC, Die, Interface and so many more.” Utah Jazz Presents Groove Therapy is out Monday July 16 on digital, vinyl & CD, so go find it somewhere people. (“I hear the Russian torrent sites are doing a roaring trade!” says Luke.) Utah Jazz plays at The Clubhouse, Friday July 13 with supports Karton, Tidy, Deluxx, MGO, Venom, Fourthstate and VJ Hale. $15/free before 11pm.

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MANHOOD IN THE GRASS

THIS TIME IT’S [CANIS] LUPUS

zoya patel

JADE FOSBERRY

It’s been a while since we last heard from him, but MUSCLES is back in action in a big way. Having just released his second album, Manhood, Muscles is off on an Australian tour and then heading to Splendour In The Grass in July to rock amongst the greats. Although a long time coming, Manhood is an intricate album, with a blend of electronic pop, dance and a whole bunch of other influences, all with a deeper story woven throughout. “[Manhood] is not a huge dramatic change but it’s definitely an evolution of the old Muscles sound compared to the new Muscles sound,” the man himself explains.

Picture that chick from The Exorcist. Upside down, neck spinning, seriously going nuts. Now replace that outdated nightdress with a fresh tee, that mop of sweaty hair with – actually leave that, just give her an undercut – and set that scene with a musical backdrop. What would it be? The sweet sounds of DOCTOR WEREWOLF. You could classify their music as dubstep, drum ‘n’ bass, drum-step, rave or a sweet mish-mash of all of the above. But in simple terms, the boys know what sounds get your feet moving, heart pumping and neck spinning. (I hope you’re thinking of our possessed friend still rocking out on the staircase.)

I’ll have to try not to stalk [Lana Del Rey and Jack White]

Following on neatly from his debut album, Guns Babes Lemonade, Manhood deals with Muscles’ experiences as a young man, with each song forming a broader story arc that takes the listener on a journey through the whole record. “I like to think of it as though each song is a really small part of a much larger story. And the more songs that I write, the more the mythology of Muscles and the Muscles universe I’ve created gets bigger.” With the album now released and making waves, there’s no time to rest for Muscles. After this album tour, he’s hitting Splendour In The Grass, heading overseas and even recording another album, which he describes as the “extra deluxe version,” which will feature acoustic tracks from both of his records so far. Will it be hard to strip back such energetic dance music to a bare acoustic version? “I always try to write most of the songs on the piano at the beginning, so all the songs I’ve ever written can be reinterpreted in different ways,” Muscles says. “I’m really looking forward to just playing the tracks on piano. For me personally it’s a completely different experience from just shouting and getting crazy!” Just because it’s acoustic though, doesn’t mean his shows won’t be a party. “There have been times in the past when I’ve played acoustic, and things still get pretty wild. My fan base are completely awesome and always up for partying!” As for Splendour In The Grass, this will be Muscles’ second time playing the festival, which is an anomaly for him. “It’s the first time I’ve ever played a festival for two years in a row. I always said I’d never do that!” Despite the repetition though, he’s keen to have a great time, and will be partying for the whole three days of the festival. He’s particularly keen to see Jack White and Lana Del Rey while he’s there. “I think I’m staying at the same hotel as them so I’ll have to try not to stalk them,” he says. “Better not wait in the lobby till they come out and try and get a photo or something…” Muscles won’t be flashing his junk in Canberra but Manhood is out now on Modular Records.

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I had a chat with Adam Zae, one half of Doctor Werewolf, about who they are, what they’ve been up to lately and what we can expect. The Sydney boys met in high school. According to Adam, “Andrew traded porn for my friendship. It wasn’t till much later that we started making tracks.” It’s a good thing that trade happened because years later they’ve taken Australia by storm. Although they both hold down full-time jobs, these weekend warriors are tearing up clubs, topping charts and solidifying their place in rave/dub/ party. The boys are inspired by everything from trip hop to ambient and heavy metal, with elements of each in their production.

There were girls dancing on the decks with no underwear on

Although their music is a myriad of genres, the duo aren’t fans of classifying themselves as any one in particular. However, they were recently classed as a very different genre, opening up the door to a whole new musical world. Their track Trololo managed to top the DJ download lounge charts. So how do they feel about conquering a completely new genre? “We’re not slightly lounge; there is nothing chilled about what we do. But it got put in there and topped the charts; not everyone in the bass music game can say that.” The pair consequently created a completely new genre they dubbed ‘lounge-step’. “It doesn’t share any chilled properties with its lounge counterparts. It’s a party on the lounge.” With the outrageous mood of their shows, I was sure the boys would have some crazy stories to share. What I wasn’t prepared for was that the craziest took place in our humble little capital at The Clubhouse. “That room was heaving. There were girls dancing on the decks with no underwear on and people were just losing their minds in there. Don’t discount good old Canberra.” So what’s next on the agenda? “Definitely continual shows and a remix for Krafty Kuts. It’s not quite lounge-step but has some elements. And we’re back in Canberra for a show.” What can we expect from this show? “Lots of loud bass and I’d imagine some poor behaviour.” And hopefully girls on the decks with no underwear on. You can catch Doctor Werewolf at The Clubhouse,Saturday July 7, with Autoclawz, Ben Penfold, Logic, MRNP, Riske and Transforma. 9pm. $15/free before 11pm.


THE REALNESS First up, a quick correction: last issue I said the new Oh No album Ohnomite was being released by Stones Throw. This is not the case. While Oh No obviously still holds close ties with the label, his new record dropped on the Five Day Weekend imprint. My bad. Anyway, onwards and upwards. The mighty Def Wish Cast have returned with the release of their 20th anniversary record Evolution Machine. If you know Def Wish, you know what you are getting; future b-boy funk and unparalleled representation of the purest hip hop elements. True veterans and pioneers of hip hop culture in Australia, Def Wish have delivered a modern opus which looks to the future whilst paying homage to the past. Production comes from Plutonic Lab, Resin Dogs, M-Phazes, DJ Sing, DJ JS1, Vame, Dizz1, DJ Murda1, JP & Brass and Katalyst. A huge line-up for a huge record. An absolute must. Another hip hop legend, Large Professor, has just lifted the veil on his latest record, Professor @ Large, which sees the Extra P collaborating with a host of talented artists. The album features Busta Rhymes, Cormega, Tragedy Khadifi, M.O.P., Mic Germino (wow, haven’t seen that name in a while), Action Bronson, Roc Marciano and Saigon. Judging from the guest line-up, this should be a hard-hitting record and I’m looking forward to checking it out.  Detroit DJ/producer legend House Shoes (he’s that dude you always hear all the Detroit MCs rapping/talking about) is set to claim the spotlight with his debut record Let It Go on Tres. Although it’s his official ‘debut’ he’s been kicking about the scene for years and the guest list speaks volumes for his standing in the Detroit hip hop community. Let It Go features Shafiq Husayn, Oh No, Alchemist, Black Milk and Guilty Simpson to name a few. The album also comes with a second disc of instrumentals. Bargain mate! I’ve been banging on to anyone who will listen about how good I think Harry Fraud is. The talented producer has been making waves of late with beats for Rick Ross’ Maybach Music camp, French Montana and Action Bronson and he’s just served up a full album of productions for the underrated Smoke DZA. Entitled Rugby Thompson, this is pure paranoid stoner rap through and through (it’s on High Times, after all). A few live tidbits to mention now. Rhyme Intervention is returning to Zierholz @ UC on Saturday September 8 for its fifth instalment. Launched almost ten years ago in 2003, the festival was first conceived as an opportunity to raise money for the Cancer Council ACT. This year, it returns with Def Wish Cast, Reason & Briggs, Dazastah & Layla, Ciecmate & Newsense and many more. There will also be a Rhyme Intervention 5 documentary made covering the history of the event, with the aim to sell it to help raise further awareness for the Cancer Council ACT.  UC is also hosting the Hip Hop Big Block with Thundamentals, Mantra, Dialectrix, Sietta and D’Opus & Roshambo. Tickets are on sale through Moshtix. Should be a big night for hip hop in Canberra. To hear music from all the above artists and more, tune to The Antidote on 2XX 98.3FM every Tuesday night from 9:30pm or stream at www.2xxfm.org.au. ROSHAMBO AKA CED NADA - roshambizzle@yahoo.com.au

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Baz Ruddick An often overlooked part of the Australian musical landscape, Indigenous musicians have been pigeonholed into a couple of categories in the past: rock bands and singer songwriters. The last couple of years have seen the reshaping of the Indigenous music scene, with more funk and hip hop artists making waves, selling hard socio-political messages about the welfare of first Australians and the inherent racism in mainstream society. Newcastle-based WHITEHOUSE and Melbourne-based YUNG WARRIORS are two such groups, showing the country there are talented indigenous musicians who want to be heard. I spoke to Grant from political funk band Whitehouse, and Tjimba, MC and one half of Melbourne-based duo Yung Warriors. Down-to-earth family man Grant is loud and outspoken when it comes to Aboriginal welfare issues. Standing staunchly opposed to the Federal Government’s intervention into Northern Territory Aboriginal communities, which he describes as “legislation based on racism,” Whitehouse’s songs are littered with sound bites taken from Australian political history and references to Aboriginal political history. Their current tour is a call for all Australia to think about what’s happening around them and form opinions regarding Federal Government legislation. “We call it the Funky Intervention tour. It’s a parody on the intervention. It’s like a good satire. You get the audience laughing and then later they think about what they’re laughing about. We’re hoping to move audiences in a funky way. Get them up dancing, which we’re really good at. Hopefully we can inspire people to go and read more and join petitions and movements.

A lot of people in this country are in denial...but there’s still overt racism

“I am really centred on the fact that a lot of people in this country are in denial and find it hard to accept these truths. But there is still overt racism with the Federal Government’s extension of the intervention into the Northern Territory under this new title, ‘Stronger Futures’.” Despite such deep-seated, hard-hitting political messages, Whitehouse’s music is as important as their message. Reminiscent of old school funk bands, Whitehouse uses an infectious rhythm section laced with an ‘80s electronic snare to create a contagious dancey sound that gets the audience moving. Consisting of cousins Grant and Allan Morris, along with Sri Lankan rhythm duo Dinesh and Chaminda, the ‘koori curry’ originally started life as more of a Rage Against the Machineinspired wall of sound. “I loved RTAM at their height in the mid-nineties. They inspired me a lot. We started out with the

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same high-level distorted guitars and heavy rock sort of groove.” However after working with producer Shaun Carey and ‘song doctor’ Matt O’Connor, they were inspired to re-invent themselves. “What they advised was to go back to a really stripped-back sort of sound and let the lyrics have that power in a more spoken word sort of way. Like Gil Scott-Heron. Do it in a more poetic way. It lost that sort of Zac De La Rocha angry edge but still has the substance.” This reinvention of their sound has made the message more accessible, less confrontational. Sharing a similar politically-based sentiment, Melbourne hip hop duo Yung Warriors have been spitting rhymes since 2007. Proudly Indigenous, Tjimba is the grandson of world-renowned painter and artist Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri. While his grandfather’s work is a clear inspiration for him, he uses his Aboriginal heritage along with the modern hip hop culture to channel creativity. Along with his grandfather’s art, his musician father, Selwyn Burns of Coloured Stone, created a ripe environment for young Tjimba’s musical development. “I used to wake up in the middle of the night and see Yothu Yindi sitting on my couch. People like Midnight Oil were always hanging about when I was a kid. It was pretty normal. I just always had that music scene and a musically orientated upbringing. So my dad taught me a lot about music. My whole family are musicians.” Having worked with the likes of Joelistics from TZU and Momo from Diafrix, the boys have quickly become a favourite amongst crowds in the Aussie hip hop scene. Successful artists in their own right, cousins Tjimba and Danny Ramzan (D-Boy) are not just rapping about change but are helping do their part for the future of Indigenous musicians. Along with Essendon Football Club player Nathan Lovett-Murray, the boys have established an Indigenous record label, Payback Records. “We actually went to school together and we are family. He approached me one day and said, ‘I reckon we should start an Indigenous label’, and we ended up doing it. We had a lot of ideas about how we wanted it to be. First we ended up with some MCs from Melbourne but then a lot of interest came from interstate. It’s been crazy. After three years we started working with a lot of international acts. It also gives you a big pool of talent to draw from when you’re recording your own stuff.” While Whitehouse and the Yung Warriors differ substantially in sound, what makes them similar is their desire to make a difference. In the words of Grant from Whitehouse, “This is not just about yourself and getting the most out of life. It’s about setting up a good future for your kids and their kids and doing something positive.” Whitehouse and Yung Warriors will be appearing together at The Front Gallery and Café on Thursday July 12, supported by DJ Moto. 8pm. $15.


The whole industry basically needs a smack in the face

“And sometimes you do and sometimes you don’t, but at the end of the day the only people we are doing this for are the fans, the ones that push themselves to the front and will dance up a sweat even if no-one else is – you can always see them by the end,” Sereck grins.

KNIGHTS OF THE EVOLUTION

“The Evolution Machine is just the beginning. A kind of warm-up record of a bunch of ideas that we have been kicking around with lately, to get us out there, get us fit, get the cogs moving. Because we will be back soon enough with a new record that will be way harder. Way harder.”

ALISTAIR ERSKINE

This direction seems to be at odds with the trend of hip hop in Australia – I ask if this is a response to that. “In some ways it is, yeah. We have always done our own thing but we are really looking forward to sticking it to everyone in the future.”

“The whole industry basically needs a smack in the face... so you just want to smash ‘em with bass.” I’m talking with legendary MC, painter, dancer and producer Sereck from Australian hip hop pioneers DEF WISH CAST who have just released Evolution Machine, their first LP since bursting back onto the scene in back in 2006.

Def Wish Cast hit Transit Bar Saturday July 7, supported by Celsius, Killawatz and Old School Al. 8pm. $20 presale through Moshtix.

Sereck and the Def Wish Cast have been in Australian hip hop from the beginning, releasing their debut LP Knights Of The Underground Table back in 1993. Back then the only Aussie rap that we really had were some breakdowns in pop songs by Kulcha, little dancey jams by Sound Unlimited Posse and the occasional ocker comedy single. But out in Sydney’s western suburbs, there was a crew that weren’t just about providing cute rhymes over pop beats. They were about painting the walls, about popping, locking and break-dancing, about collecting, sampling and looping records. And when they rapped, they did so with a frenetic style, referencing their environment, their hometown, their culture, their lifestyle. And that’s how in 2012 they came to be the national support for KRS-One. “No-one would ever want to play after us; we would lift the energy and the creativity so much in the room, people wouldn’t want to step into a void they couldn’t fill, so we have never been that interested in support slots. But KRS-One was a great thing to be part of; we got to play a full show and tour around with a legend. The biggest thing you notice that is different is that back at the start, there wouldn’t be anyone who would be at a show that wouldn’t be a diehard fan. So sometimes these days you are playing shows to rooms that aren’t always 100% on your side, that might need a bit to win over.

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METALISE Delving into another fortnight of international show announcements, fans of ‘80s glamour-pusses Steel Panther were pleased to gain a second opportunity to see the band in Sydney with an additional show announced on Saturday October 6 at The Big Top, Luna Park. All their shows have sold out or have required venue upgrades as enthusiasm for the band has hit fever pitch. Over 18s only – but with their lyrical content, that kinda goes without saying. Good times. Nasum shows are selling fast so make sure you jump on tickets for that tour, presented by Heathen Skulls in Sydney at The Hi-Fi with Psycroptic, Dyscarnate (UK) and Captain Cleanoff. Speaking of the Captain, it will be the band’s first tour with a new bass player following the departure of Blood Duster four-stringer, Jason PC. While Heathen Skulls are not bringing Nasum to town, they are bringing back Chicago’s Russian Circles again along with Salt Lake City’s Eagle Twin. I Exist have the support for the show at the Thursday October 4 show at the ANU Bar. Burning Love from Canada (featuring ex-Cursed vocalist Chris Colohan) are also making a trip to town on Saturday August 18 with supports to be announced soon. Former Alchemist front man Adam Agius has joined forces with Mark Palfreyman and Scott Young from Alarum to form The Levitation Hex. The band has elements of both former bands but with a definite character all of its own. You

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will be able to find this out for yourself should you join the mailing list through levitationhex.net and receive a track to preview in return. You should also check out their show at The Hellenic Club on Saturday August 25. The band is also hitting Europe with Alarum including a slot at the prestigious Prog Power Festival. After filling in for Sevendust on the recent Avenge Sevenfold ‘Welcome To The Family’ tour, Melbourne band Dream On Dreamer are touring nationally through September and play with Like Moths To Flames, Hand Of Mercy and In Hearts Wake on Tuesday September 4 at The Basement in Belconnen. Geoff from the excellent Let’s Mosh! Radio show on 2XX has posted a slew of reviews from his recent trip to the States for the annual Maryland Death Festival on the blog (www.mendicantmusic.com) and it’s well worth a review (and in some cases a jealous groan or two) at the wonderful time that bastard had over there. I’m not bitter one bit because he bought me a shirt (thank you, Geoffy). Tune into the show Thursday nights at 10.30pm; those guys destroy the Racket in terms of killer metal playlists. If you haven’t given the new Turbonegro a go yet, you should. It’s not the same, but it’s a darned sight better than Hank Von Helvete’s new band Doctor Midnight & The Mercy Cult. Actually, it’s really quite awesome. Hopefully rumours of a tour early next year come to fruition. Unkle K’s Band of the Week: Windhand http://windhandva.bandcamp.com/ Sabbathfied doom metal with lashings of Reverend Bizarre. JOSH NIXON doomtildeath@hotmail.com


CARRIE GIBSON ASSIDIAN has reached a status of distinction in just 12 short yet deliciously satisfying months, following a change in name and, more significantly, a concurrent structural reconfiguration. As of April 2010, Assidian (formerly Assidian Records) expanded its services from simple music and promo support for local metal bands to the provision of full-scale, high quality booking, touring and events management. Two years on, we find them reveling in the company’s most recent successful endeavors, including the Sybreed Australian tour, Elysian album launch, @moshphere and the fifth chapter of Chaos ACT to tag just a few. These accomplishments in the industry have in turn enhanced its national standing with the Australian bands waving its banner, and the many that have supported them. Assidian can claim the throne for dedication, commitment and passion to Australian heavy metal.

Canberra is our home away from home and we love playing there

Don’t put away the fanfare or trumpets just yet though. The time has now come to celebrate Assidian reaching its sophomore year in none other than its hometown of operations: Canberra. Assidian will be your valiant hosts of a night that will feature the majority of their infantry, including Anno Domini, Elysian, Mytile Vey Lorth, The Seer, Hours In Exile and Seker Pare, performing a highly distinguished and polished burlesque set at The Basement on Friday July 7. Assidian will be taking the crowds to the home of metal in Canberra and, come dead of winter, aficionados to this rapidly growing monster will paint the town black and revel in all its debaucherous glory. Featured on this superb line-up are the Assidian elite, determined to celebrate this auspicious occasion with the utmost of ferocity. Definite crowd favourite Anno Domini are a band notably recognised for their ever-evolving sound with an amalgamation of styles. According to drummer Amir Bukan, “Assidian have truly been great to us. The business consists of people that get the job done and really take care of their bands through the headache that is touring.” Whilst under Assidian’s wing Anno Domini have received several support slots for international touring bands and are currently preparing for their stint with America’s blackened death metal band Goatwhore when they grace the shores of Sydney on Friday July 6. Canberra has everlastingly held a predilection with bands reaching up and down the east coast and the Assidian bands are amped to support and celebrate the Assidian name in its home town. “Canberra is our home away from home and we love playing there,”

Amir explained. “We are actually planning on doing something that we have never done before.” Melbourne-based progressive rockers Elysian have also reaped the benefits of teaming up with Assidian over the past 24 months. “Two and a half years and countless shows later, here we are… It was obvious Assidian were very much in it for the music. Every show we play we bring a tightly honed set with one of the most epic, aggressive and energetic performances you will ever see. This show is no different.” Elysian are a band assertive both in business and performance, and standing tall on the release of their latest album Wires Of Creation the hordes at Assidian come July will be in sheer elation. Assidian’s respect and admiration has extended to all bands that have been fortunate enough to be associated with this dominant enterprise and carry the name proudly, including Mytile Vey Lorth. “We have all known Assidian’s director Ben ‘Fogs’ Fogarty for many years now,” said guitarist Chris Hoogesteger. “A well-known figure in the Canberra metal community, Ben has been dedicated to promoting and organising shows in Canberra for years. It was only a matter of time before our paths crossed.” Mytile Vey Lorth joined the ranks of Assidian two years ago and they’ve not regretted it. “We feel privileged to be a part of the Assidian team. With their support over the years they have organised many shows for Mytile Vey Lorth with a variety of great bands. With Assidian’s ongoing support, we feel that it has helped Mytile Vey Lorth move to the next level and are confident that it will continue into the future.” They say talk is cheap, however the value that Assidian holds, not only with the enlisted bands of the agency but with the metal community as a whole, simply confirms that Assidian’s direct involvement in this industry has earned stripes and a firm and honest reputation as Canberra’s most successful, noble and esteemed agencies. “From both the directors Ben Fogarty and Rochelle Thorne, and the entire Assidian infantry we’d like to thank everyone who’s worked alongside us and supported what we’ve been trying to achieve within live music in Australia, and it wouldn’t be possible without the support of the fellow promoters, bands, sound technicians, publications and generally great people doing their part to support live music and keeping it strong for the future.” The Assidian birthday bloodbath is soon approaching; a night in which to commend the efforts of the Assidian team and show some general support for the agencies like Assidian that continue to bring you Australia’s heaviest metal. Help welcome the crew to the terrible twos at Assidian’s 2nd Birthday Show at The Basement, Belconnen on Saturday July 7, 8pm. The line-up features Elysian, Anno Domini, Mytile Vey Lorth, The Seer, Hours In Exile and more.

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ROMANI ITE DOMUM sinead o’cONNELL What you’re about to read seems only a microcosm of the ground-breaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and international graffiti artists. Vibrant, dramatic and confronting, the May Lane work spans a range of street art styles, from New York style graffiti, spray paint and paste ups to stencils and sculpture. MAY’S: THE MAY LANE STREET ART PROJECT is a Bathurst Regional Art Gallery touring exhibition in partnership with May Lane Arts Association Inc. and is supported by Visions of Australia. Tugi Balog, Director of the May Lane Arts Association Inc, has been documenting The May Lane Project since 2005 when he changed the face of street art history by turning the walls of his business in May Lane, St. Peter’s in Sydney, into an outdoor gallery space. “When I moved to this location – this factory – the lane was pretty trashed and wild and I found these guys who claimed the lane as their turf, painting everywhere. I knew they could probably come up with something more interesting or better. So I started to ask neighbours to give us the walls so people could paint freely.” The exhibition is an exploration and an experience of the history and evolution of the Australian street art revolution. Held at the Belconnen Arts Centre, this exhibit pays particular homage to the May Lane Project itself. It forges a pathway between the movement and venues in order to create a dialogue surrounding street artists, street art and its position in contemporary culture. As well as the exhibition, we can all look forward to workshops and events held through a public program including an amazing Jam Session at Belconnen Skate Park on Saturday July 14. [Ed: see p. 40.] For those of us not yet learned in the history of contemporary graffiti and street art, it dates back to the ‘60s, fashioned with the intention of depicting images of cultural importance to people of a particular region – the inner city – and their rituals and lifestyles. The works of famed street artists who left a legacy in this vain – Jean-Michel Basquiat and Kenny Scharf, plus Keith Haring – are celebrated throughout the exhibition, ultimately exposing that the fathers and sons of street art are valued independently for their visions. With influences varying from surrealism to pop art, photorealism to manga comics and cartoons, the street art faction, like most influential artistic movements, has consequently become a global phenomenon. If you’ve travelled, even to Newtown in Sydney, you’ll know that street art exists everywhere. It’s leaked from the subway on W 47th in New York to the tube in London and the Metro in Paris.

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Not to mention the liquored lanes of Tijuana and Sao Pãulo and then back onto one of Europe’s most prized facades, the Berlin Wall. Hence, the exhibition hosts works from Japan (Kenji Nakayama), Indonesia (Taring Padi Collective), USA (Chor Boogie) and Mexico (Peque). However, despite my transnational tangent, let’s not forget that an important element in this exhibition is its showcasing of works by Australian artists too. But wait – there’s more! I was lucky enough to grab a chat with the lady behind the Belconnen Arts Centre since its inception in 2009: director Hannah Semler. She mentioned that it is in fact the whole collection from the May Lane Project that’s making its way to Belconnen. “We’re going to try our best to showcase all of them. It’ll be a huge contrast to our current exhibition of Aboriginal artworks.” As an ex-Sydney girl, Hannah is familiar with the inner west and the demographics that make their way onto the walls like Mr Balog’s. “It gives us an opportunity to get in contact with the young and the old to inspire them to realise, and take seriously, work that is good work and give them the opportunity to discern it. The exhibition in its own right is this primary objective. As it runs for five-and-a-half weeks, we are also giving the opportunity for local street artists to have a go and showcase their own things.” The word graffiti comes from the Italian, ‘to inscribe’. I can’t help but notice that this sentiment is all too profound when reflecting on the nature of street artists’ intentions. Of course that’s what this is: an inscription – a dedication, impression, message. Like a sign that points you in a certain direction, that’s what street art is really about; pointing out a particular culture’s perfections and imperfections. Unfortunately, in contemporary society the word graffiti is often negatively stigmatised. However as we actively build on the history of graffiti, the practice itself becomes so much more than what we know it as. It’s clearly an art. Art that can take years for one to be versed in. It also reflects multitudes of attitudes that pass us by in everyday disciplines; greed, ambition, politics, power and love. And, of course, the odd cartoon makes us laugh. There are many reasons I feel privileged to live in the nation’s capital, especially its “constantly astounding, incredibly prolific arts community,” as former BMA editor Julia Winterflood put it. This exhibition is yet another opportunity to learn more, understand more and see more in Canberra. MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art Project runs Friday July 6 – Saturday August 11 at Belconnen Arts Centre. Talented local artists will be artistsin-residence alongside a survey of the artworks created at May Lane in St Peters, Sydney. The exhibition is open Tues-Sat, 10am-5pm, Entry is free.


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merchants Fun Machine as “big chamber-pop glory… that lives up to the band’s name” and singling out Canberra as a town full of great local talent. Not to mention campaign contributor Owen Campbell making it on Australia’s Got Talent – and being brought back by popular demand.

Sam King has huge plans for 2XX’s LOCAL ‘N’ LIVE: “In its heyday, 2XX was the internet in Canberra!” If the nation’s capital wanted to know where to go, to do what and with whom to do it, radio was the place to find out.

“People are looking for culture in Canberra, people are complaining about [the perceived lack of] it,” opines Taylor, “Local ‘n’ Live can give people a place where they can go to find it.” Recent reports suggest that there are as many as 150 bands in Tuggeranong alone, the majority of which aren’t on the radar for most Canberrans.

With Fun Machine/Hashemoto powerhouse Bec Taylor on board – “because she’s a force to be reckoned with” – the local music show is getting ready to re-launch as a platform for people to hear and see the culture of Canberra.

The LnL team think they can bring the unappreciated magic out into the light. Says King, “If word gets out that there’s a radio show that wants to play Canberra music, and it’s really easy to contact them, it’ll create opportunity.

They’re going to be kicking it off with a huge gig at the Polish Club on Friday July 13, starting a five-week online Pozible campaign where interested persons donate money to the launch and choose from a menu of creative rewards. “The rewards are all donated by different Canberra bands,” says Taylor, “and they’re pitching in some pretty outrageous stuff!”

“I canvassed a whole lot of people and said ‘What can I do with Local ‘n’ Live to make it awesome?’ 90 per cent just said ‘Put on events’.” It looks like King’s not going to disappoint. LnL have teamed up with the Canberra Musicians Club to present shows at the Polish Club every Friday night for the rest of 2012.

The list of donation-earned options makes for enticing reading: local label Dream Damage are offering a Who’s Who of signed albums; Pocket Fox are offering knitted ‘Fox Pockets’ full of homemade art and baked goodies; Mr. Fibby will fly outrageous front-man Adam Hadley in from Brisbane to ‘ruin’ an event of your choice; and Matty Ellis of The Ellis Collective could treat you to a ‘Coat Of Arms Barbecue’. “He’ll be cooking emu and kangaroo on the barbecue, in the bush, with his shirt off,” says Taylor. If you’ve ever wanted to sit in on a recording session, or have international star Mikelangelo read you a personal message on YouTube, or just get a whole bunch of great music stuff in the mail, it’s time to get excited. King and Taylor are clear about the purpose of Local ‘n’ Live: “We don’t want to do anything people are already doing, but we see a gap to fill: video.” It’s been decades since video killed the radio star, and now it’s come full circle. “The most engaging format on the internet is video,” says Taylor, “and Canberra bands don’t have videos.” King interjects, “Because editing video is a pain in the ass. Actually being able to pay people to do it means LnL won’t just be a bunch of volunteers that are really keen, and then we milk them dry.” Raising money through the campaign will take LnL above the level of the radio show – it’ll be a multimedia platform for Canberra’s music that will sustain itself and grow. The plan has perfect timing. Canberra, as a scene, has started to make a national splash. The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age just ran an article by triple j’s Assistant Director, Dave Ruby Howe, namechecking a handful of bands on the LnL roster, describing tinfoil-pop

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A BMA exclusive sneak-peek at the LnL blueprints revealed shows in the fantastic new ANU Food Co-op and Smith’s Alternative Bookshop, as well as new episodes of the sell-out Sad Sessions of yore. And for those who love the music but can’t make it to the shows, Taylor has the answer: “People in the community who don’t like to get to gigs, or don’t feel like they want to, should still be able access Canberra music, because Canberra music is great! We’ll have a place where they can find it online, on demand.” For a population that has turned its back on televised content in favour of the immediate smorgasbord of the internet, the plan sounds like a godsend. And of course, at the heart of it all is radio. The content produced by LnL will benefit the radio show, which has already seen a recent surge of listenership. King attributes this popularity to new blood behind the microphones. “The hosts who have come to the show recently have come in from all sorts of different backgrounds,” he says. He sounds extremely pleased with their performance, particularly their range: a bright group of young hosts who each bring their own specialties to 2XX every afternoon from 4-6pm. Enter Tom and Tom’s environmental talkback, Chris’ focus on the city’s heavy scene, and Adam Salter’s take on the strong local folk contingent. The online campaign looks like it’s going to be huge fun, and the Polish Club has ordered extra crates of Zywiec for the kick-off gig in mid-July. Is it possible that someone’s found a way to stop the ridiculous complaints of a ‘soulless’ city? Local ‘n’ Live could be a window to our capital’s soul. Tune into Local ‘n’ Live weekdays from 4-6pm on 2XX 98.3fm. For more info including check out their website at: www.localnlive.2xxfm.org.au. Their re-launch party will be a melting pot of talent and hilarity on Friday July 13, 7:30pm at the White Eagle Polish Club.


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ENCOUNTERS OF THE ABSURD KIND CHLOE MANDRYK WORD OF MOUTH: ENCOUNTERS WITH ABSTRACT ART is an exhibition of 19 emerging and established artists, working in glass, painting, sculpture and paper, with ties to Canberra through the Australian National University’s School of Art. As abstract art has always been fundamentally about reality, it makes perfect sense that as our reality changes so does the art form itself. Mark Bayly, curator, highlights the artists’ appreciation of our ever-evolving understanding of science, technology and emerging complexities in communication. “I’ve been struck by the fact that so many artists continue to work with abstraction as a visual ‘language’ across a range of media. This isn’t a local phenomenon. There is a considerable amount of work being produced internationally that continues to engage with abstraction and this continues to stimulate and provoke audiences. Some of the work is quiet and possesses a sober elegance, while there is also work that is exuberant and lively in appearance. There is a diversity of artistic voices engaged in the dialogue that is Word Of Mouth.” Abstraction is and was a movement in art that has been fraught with debate on how to distil the style to a unique voice. In contemporary culture we might continue this discussion by word of mouth, in the classrooms, cafés, literature or through social media. The exhibition proposes that abstraction’s nuances are a consequence of this accrued knowledge and engagement about how to define it, but also encourages us to see that the ways we communicate embed new colour, materials and concepts into the next wave of abstract art. Vibrancy and gestural marks belie the thought and considered approach to the composition and shape of a number of works. Gregory Hodge’s Magazine Mystics is made up of sixty sheets criss-crossed with blasts of excited colour. There is no direct representation in these works; instead the actors are the shapes and the contrasting cool and hot pigments which together create a rhythm across the large installation. It is like looking up into a kinetic sculpture, humming and reverberating against a wall. Emma Beer’s I Ain’t Gonna Lose My Skin has a similar energy and draws strength from an unusual use of line and inverted colour; visual cues hint at urban landscape rather than depict it directly. Despite working with different mediums – wood and glass – Richard Blackwell and Mel Douglas are united by their appreciation of the natural world through geometry. Like others, however, they could also be seen to communicate the ‘physics of the ineffable’. This idea

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also applies to Nadège Desgenétez’s petal-shaped balloons of glass fixed as though floating across the gallery wall. The pastel coloured pieces have a metallic finish, which might prompt us to see them as a product of a simultaneously friendly yet fiercely efficient world – and gives us pause for thought when you learn that the works, titled Here and Now, are inspired by the Canberra landscape. Liz Coats’ Organica paintings are impressive: each work measures about one metre in diameter and look like a cross between a brilliant crystal and a giant petri dish. Liz has created an unusual effect with acrylic paint. The undulating surface of these works was achieved by allowing small daubs of wet pigment to dry, building up a surface of hundreds of specks of unexpected colour, from lavenders to electric dashes of lime. The collection of small lines and markings could be seen as symbolic of the gestation of ideas; tidbits of information that eventually come together to give weight to a way of thinking or personal ethos. Julie Brooke creates fragmented images informed by her biochemistry background that could be seen as molecular structures or even grand plans for an architectural feat. Liz and Julie are not alone in this vision of the world. Mark explains, “When I saw artists’ work exhibited elsewhere or in their studios over the last couple of years, the common application of these types of forms really struck me as a pattern. Occasionally, these have the appearance of cellular structure or crystalline formations. The closer I examined the various artists’ practices, these ideas became more apparent. The overlapping of these visual influences resulted in the crystallisation of the key theme underpinning the exhibition.” There is a wealth of ingenuity in this show and many of the artists take to bold experimentation with their medium. Other works, with a more pared back approach are also standouts. For example Jonathan Webster’s sequence of drawings of concentric but imperfect circles that bleed over the boundaries of the paper show a considered restraint. A meditation on mortality and the subtext of abstraction is explored in the sweeping monochromatic surface of Peter Maloney’s work The Tuesday Years. These works are a well of introspection for the artist and, importantly, the audience. This is an extraordinary show that proves – if ever in question – that there are some great talents nurtured by the Canberra art scene. Mark says, “From a personal perspective, I’ve really enjoyed the privilege of speaking closely with the artists about the ideas underpinning the exhibition and it’s been inspiring to find how many times we were ‘speaking the same language’.” Word Of Mouth: Encounters With Abstract Art is currently showing at the Canberra Museum and Art Gallery, Civic Square. The exhibition runs until Sunday August 19, open weekdays 10am-5pm & weekends 10am-4pm. Free.


in wobbling ‘60s detail and fastidiously preserved by a music obsessive; archivists arguing over original dates; far too much long hair, far too unwashed; torn jeans and an asphyxiating nostalgia. At first I commented to my partner in tones of affront that bubbled up from some vestigial, tragic, pop-culture lobe of my brain, “None of these are for actual gigs!” Then the piece right in front of me, a modern thing that was all geometry and muted colours, resolved itself into a poster for an Eastern European festival of classical music. I finally opened my eyes and realised where I was – a gallery of design. Of course it was unlike any music-inspired exhibition I’d ever seen.

THE THEORY OF INTELLIGENT DESIGN james fahy I was rewarded with a singular feeling at a recent art opening, the AGDA POSTER ANNUAL: INSPIRED BY MUSIC. It was the feeling of my expectations swerving to avoid a collision, and I was subjected to this internal realignment more than once. That is itself a comment on the unexpected size of the Gallery Of Australian Design (GAD). The depth of the gallery was the first surprise, and the regularly spaced posters added dimension to the scene. Despite the clinical whiteness of the space, it felt like being beckoned into a Bedouin tent and realising that there were rooms and rooms to explore. The next surprise was the lack of grime. My internal picture of an exhibition of music posters ran thus: Jethro Tull et al. inscribed

Once I had come to realise what I was looking at, I quickly recognised the opportunities presented by the exhibition. The sense of creativity intersected with what I had expected but at an odd angle. The love of music was obvious in every work. Some of the works were blatant reference, particularly a pair of spectacles labelled Imagine and a sheet that just contained the God Save The Queen album artwork minus the text. The posters that made the exhibition were those that used a modern visual vernacular more recognisable from the infographics of The Guardian and data obsessed lifetrackers. Some highlights: brightly-coloured representations of musical vectors, lyrics parsed down into their emotional content and played off against one another, and a slab of monologue from rapper MF Doom’s seminal The Mouse and the Mask printed with the careful kerning that screams ‘design fanatic’. Visitors to GAD’s area-under-a-curve will find some of the magic that drew the original poster-masters like Mucha and Lautrec; somewhere between the message of the artist, and the message inherent in this medium, is a whole much greater than its parts. The AGDA Poster Annual: Inspired By Music is showing at the Gallery of Australian Design until Saturday July 28. Visit www.gad.org.au for details.

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Tomas begins his performances as he walks to the microphone, loudly reciting his works in staccato Spanish, or sometimes in a language of his own.

UNINHIBITED ‘This looks like Toastmasters for fuck-ups’, I thought, ‘… and I like it’. Around me were poets in fingerless gloves, poets heckling their friends, poets for whom a microphone was entirely unnecessary, poets not entirely successfully leaning on the bar and poets who were endearingly reserved. This was my first time at a Traverse Poetry Slam at The Front. Our city’s performance poets aren’t really fuck-ups of course (well not all of them) but there is definitely something beautiful about the unusual diversity of Canberra’s poetry slam community. Among the regulars who come to mind are the bookish (even for a poet) Julian Fleetwood, the wonderfully direct Miranda Lello, the sincere CJ Bowerbird, the strategic over-sharer Bernadette, the ever-joyful Flying V and the unpredictable Andrew Galan. Then there’s crowd favourite Jacinta (aka the now-Brisbanite Adam Hadley) who, like the bastard son of Tom Waits and Estragon, would constantly remind us that this is performance poetry. Two other notables are Josh Inman and Tomas. Josh’s pieces are Trojan Horses filled with foul rotting innards. He will take you on a romantic road trip into the outback with his girlfriend, before pulling out an axe and striking her repeatedly. And that’s the least offensive thing ever to happen in one of his poems. The enigmatic Chilean

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The year before last I headed to Sydney for the national slam finals, where I was disappointed to find the diversity of styles and subjects I was used to in Canberra lacking. There were so many earnest lefty pieces that the afternoon almost felt as monothematic as a Christian rock festival. In fact, the finals reminded me of an usher shift I once worked at the Canberra Theatre for a Year Six dance competition. At least four of the schools performing chose the theme of Tiddalik The Frog. In isolation they all were fine performances, and perhaps one outstanding, but together they were painful. Each successive oversized cardboard amphibian wheeled onto stage killed me a little. But something beautiful happened that day. A class of children immaculately dressed as 18th Century French nobility, filed onto stage and began a waltz. A waltz that was disrupted by a jarring jolt of rock, as the scene turned into a reenactment of the storming of the Bastille – to the tune of Twisted Sister’s We’re Not Gonna Take It. I wanted to find the teacher responsible and hug her. Repeatedly. And so I wished Josh Inman had made the national finals that year. To play the role those juvenile insurgents had played at the theatre. To show that poetry could be something different. To be the performance poetry equivalent of Twisted Sister at the Bastille. But alas Josh wasn’t there. And I wished I was back among the colour and the movement of a Canberra slam. Pete Huet petehuet@yahoo.com


ARTISTPROFILE: Tom Farrell

What do you do? I’m a painter and a student, I suppose. I’m half way through my final year at art school, which is an Honours degree in painting. When did you get into it? I feel as though I have always drawn but I’m pretty sure Mumsy got me into it. Who or what influences you as an artist? Well, my work is all about subconscious gesture; the way a person carries themselves, their stance, their mannerisms and gaze. So I guess any time I witness a really original person. What’s your biggest achievement/proudest moment so far? I feel as though I should say finishing third year at art school because I think I really grew a lot as a person over those three years. But maybe just knowing and being content that I want to paint for the rest of my life. What are your plans for the future? Finish Honours. I’ve got my first solo show in September and basically the dream for me is to do residencies around the world and get in adventures. I want to try to do one in Europe next year. What makes you laugh? When I first entered my studio at school someone had written in massive letters, ‘So you wanna be a Pokémon master?’ with a drawing of Ash from Pokémon. At first it seemed like a joke but now it’s all too real. What pisses you off? Sooo many things, but as I get older I find I don’t invest much time into things that piss me off and I guess I just sit back and realise that sometimes people just do things. What’s your opinion of the local scene? It’s awesome. I’ve met a lot of very talented people here and there really is a lot more happening in Canberra these days. Upcoming exhibitions? I’m having my first solo show on Thursday September 13 at the Belconnen Community Centre. It’s called Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards. I will be in the grad show at the end of the year too. Contact Info: thomasjamesfarrell@hotmail.com and tomfarrellpaintings.blogspot.com.

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bit PARTS WHO: The Four Elements Of Hip Hop WHAT: Hip Hop Jam Sessions WHEN: Sat Jul 14 WHERE: Belco Skate Park In a series of workshops between 11am and 3pm, the Hip Hop Jam @ Belco Skate Park will bring together the talents of MC Fenella Edwards, street artist Byrd (aka Dan Maginnity) and Melba Beatz. A lunchtime showcase will feature demos by a hip hop dance crew and skate board and BMX riders. Fenella will lead workshops in freestyle rap and rap writing. Participants will be able to perform their work to sounds laid down by Melba Beatz. Budding DJS can try out scratching, beatmatching and other turntablist manoeuvres. At two sites in the skate park, permanent artworks will be created as an ongoing reminder of the Hip Hop Jam. Emerging artists George and Abyss .607 has been commissioned to complete the works, demonstrating both aerosol and brush work. Meanwhile Byrd will be teaching stencilling and painting techniques. Those wishing to try their hand can leave their mark on large panels situated near the lake overlooking the wetlands site construction. To find out more, visit the Belconnen Arts Centre or go to the website: www.belconnenartscentre.com.au.

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WHO: Brooke Ellen Louttit WHAT: Art In The Mountains WHEN: Tue-Tue July 10-24 WHERE: JK Gallery & Mountain Shop, Thredbo If you’re heading to the mountains in the coming weeks, swing by the JK Gallery. Brooke Ellen Louttit is presenting her first solo painting exhibition in Thredbo, Cold Skies and Skeleton Trees – A Snowy Mountains Palate. Her paintings can best be described as a mass of layered colour and texture used to create an illusion of light. Influenced by artists William Turner, Brett Whitley and James Gleeson as well as masters Van Gough and Monet, Brooke’s work varies greatly in style and subject. “As a child, my family and I would travel to Thredbo annually. I wanted to create paintings that captured its atmosphere. It’s my hope that my audience experiences the landscape viscerally; that they can feel the cold, smell the trees and hear the quiet.” Call (02) 6457 6990 for details. Free. WHO: Skilled Community Members WHAT: SustainAbility Winter Workshops WHEN: Wed Jul 11 – Sat Sep 29 WHERE: Canberra Environment Centre Canberra Environment Centre is proud to announce the SustainAbility Workshops Winter series! Interested in learning practical, fun new skills that will help you reduce your carbon footprint? Following on from the popular Autumn SustainAbility Series, this is a great opportunity to learn new things, meet new people and make winter warmer. The series engages local presenters with a passion to share their skills and knowledge. It boasts a range of topics as diverse as gardening, bike maintenance, retro-fitting, eco screen-printing, homemade jam & Japanese pickling! There really is something for everyone. For details on the workshops, visit www.ecoaction.com.au. Bookings essential. Contact projects@ecoaction.com.au or phone (02) 6248 0885. WHO: International Arab Filmmakers WHAT: Arab Film Festival WHEN: Thu-Sun July 12-15 WHERE: National Film and Sound Archive The Arab Film Festival aims to showcase stories from Arabicspeaking peoples to Australian audiences, reflecting the complexity and diversity of Arab experiences. A primary aim is to address the (mis)representations of Arab peoples and cultures by providing spaces to present alternative representations of Arab subjects, cultures and narratives. A key objective is to engage Australian audiences in a more complex understanding of the diversity of Arab cultures, histories and stories. The Festival will encompass eight screenings in Canberra. For times, costs and film information, visit www.arabfilmfestival.com.au or www.nfsa.gov.au.

WHO: Canberran Environmentalists WHAT: Japanese Tanabata Fundraising Dinner WHEN: Fri Jul 6 WHERE: Canberra Environment & Sustainability Resource Centre Tanabata is a traditional Japanese festival, held to celebrate the day of the year when two stars, said to be lovers, meet. It is a day when people write wishes for the future and tie them to bamboo in hopes they’ll be fulfilled. This Tanabata, you’re invited to the inaugural Tanabata fundraising dinner celebration. Traditional Japanese food, music and wine will be provided, made with local and organic ingredients where possible. You’ll be able to write your own wishes for a more sustainable future, and they’ll do their best to make them come true! Formal Dress. Call (02) 6248 0885, email info@ ecoaction.com.au or visit www.ecoaction.com.au to make a booking. 6:30pm. $45.

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WHO: Textilian Troubadours WHAT: Creative Fibre Textile Market WHEN: Sun Jul 15 WHERE: Old Bus Depot Markets The Old Bus Depot Markets is getting ready for one of its most colourful events. Creative Fibre brings together artists who create amazing textile wares – from knitted garments and embroidery, to hand dyed fabrics and yarns – all to the highest standards. These highly skilled artists spin, dye and felt wool, creating everything by hand. It’s a great opportunity to stock up on striking accessories and clothing, one-of-a-kind screen prints, and handcrafted home wares. Creative Fibre will feature around 30 extra stallholders, including some of the region’s best textile artists. Visitors will have the opportunity to meet the people behind the products. For more information visit www.obdm.com.au. 10am-4pm. Free.


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the word

on albums

album of the issue

r.a.p. mUSIC KILLER MIKE [williams street records]

“The closest I’ve ever come to seeing or feeling God is listening to rap music. Rap music is my religion.” Those are the opening words of the title/final track on R.A.P. Music. By the time you hear them, Killer Mike’s earned the right to preach. Two phrases that appear more and more in great hip hop are ‘countryfied’ and ‘country shit’. Big K.R.I.T. is at the tip of this, whiling away hazy porch tracks with grandfather wisdom and a twanging, Deep South flow. But K.R.I.T. seems alone, content to chew a cheroot and watch the big smoke from a rocking chair. The big smoke, of course, is Atlanta, a southern Mecca still touched with the lingering memory of Outkast. A few years ago that memory galvanised into Big Boi’s solo debut, Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son Of Chico Dusty, an ultimately disappointing release. It smacked of cleverness and marketability but lacked authenticity and soul. Though Killer Mike spat the guts into numerous Outkast tracks in the past, as a solo artist he stayed indie in his ethics

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and production. However, R.A.P. Music (Rebellious African People) sees producer extraordinaire El-P step in. Just last issue we touted El-P’s Cancer 4 Cure, an album with production so intense and paranoid it puts its own verses on the back foot. Here El-P has scaled things back and put Mike in the spotlight, let his genuineness guide things. Killer Mike is exactly what Deep South rap needs. He’s an antithesis to K.R.I.T.’s dusty wisdom and a rapper without Big Boi’s crossover pop feel. The cover art reads, ‘Readers of the books, Leaders of the crooks’, and Mike toes the line between eloquence, intelligence and raw realness with godly confidence. The standouts (Southern Fried, Ghetto Gospel and Reagan) set out, respectively, to own Atlanta’s rap game, lament the violence ‘getting by’ and unveil Ronald Reagan as the devil. The key to each are pulsing El-P hooks grounded by Mike’s croon and fiery verses. But between all these are tracks banging the way only real hip hop can (see opener Big Beast and Mike’s ode to NYC, Anywhere But Here). This is a 2012 best. ASHLEY THOMSON

damon albarn dr. dee [parlophone/emi]

RUFus wainwright out of the game [polydor]

Damon Albarn must easily be one of the biggest workaholics to emerge from the UK music scene. If he wasn’t already well occupied with his new Rocketjuice & The Moon band project, this latest solo album Dr. Dee offers up his musical score to the opera of the same name, written in collaboration with theatre director Rufus Norris and performed at last year’s Manchester International Festival. In this case, the Dr. Dee in question is John Dee; 17th century astrologer, occultist and advisor to Queen Elizabeth I, a man who rose to the highest ranks of influence in the British courts before being undone by his less talented rivals and dying penniless in obscurity.

Self-negging has never been a step on the road to success. Winners yell ‘YYEERRSSS! I’M THE CHEERRRMPION’ and are echoed by screaming fans they know will be there as they sprint onto a field already layered with laurels. Calling your album Out Of The Game is not gold medal behaviour. Neither is recording a kitschy set of California pop songs when California pop died with The O.C. soundtrack, and you live in New York. Authenticity? I loved you, Rufus. I made a fool of myself singing your songs at a college talent quest while an exchange student played the piano. As for Out Of The Game – too right. I’m glad I kept the receipt. [Ed: he took a copy from our office.] Classic self-negging points go to a set of arch, patronising interviews wherein Rufus explained that he was ready again, after forays into Shakespearian adaptation and touring in drag as Judy Garland, to write mind-numbing pop that The People could dance to. Actual quote from producer Mark Ronson: “We were just doing guitar overdubs, and Rufus gets a call and says, ‘Does anyone want to go to the duchess of Austria’s yacht for a little party?’”

It’s a typical English tale that continues some of the themes explored by Albarn on The Good, The Bad & The Queen, and this is a far more immediately accessible collection than first portents might suggest. While there are the expected massed librettos and theatrical segues scattered throughout the eighteen tracks here, it’s Albarn’s own vocals that emerge as the centrepiece to much of the story, backed up by string and woodwind instrumentation. While regular Albarn associates Simon Tong and Tony Allen make subtle appearances here, the latter’s presence is only apparent on instrumental segue Preparation, the one concession to beats here. It’s haunting and intriguing, but without having seen the accompanying opera there’s a sense of lost context. chris downton

On the other hand, everything Rufus touches turns to gold in a campy kind of way, and the last-gasp play-your-best-hand tribute-to-Mum ballad Candles will blow you away. You’ll cry in the first line, if you swing that way: “I tried to do all that I can/ but the churches have run out of candles.” Sob. james fahy


bobby womack the bravest man in the universe [xl recordings]

the wedding present valentina [scorpitona]

One of the finest albums of 2010 was the first Gil ScottHeron had released in 16 years: I’m New Here. It turned out to be his last; he died in May 2011, aged 62. The album came about as a result of a push by XL Recordings-owner Richard Russell, who reportedly hassled Scott-Heron to complete it. It featured sparse electro hooks and eclectic drum breaks, over which Scott-Heron’s metal-filing croon was brought to the fore. It was brutally confessional and brilliant. With Bobby Womack’s The Bravest Man, Russell and cohort Damon Albarn repeat the process. And the raw material’s good; Womack (now 68) is a man whose life has been a technicolour smorgasbord of fucked. He married Sam Cooke’s widow three months after Cooke died, later narrowly surviving her attempt to shoot him when she discovered he was sleeping with her daughter. His wire-worn voice has been shredded by booze and cocaine; when brought to the fore it conjures a wealth of soul to supplement the clicking beats and sparse instrumentation Albarn and Russell have provided. However, The Bravest Man is ultimately inferior. There are half-baked anomalies, both in arrangement and lyricism: “Our love’s like lollipops/ Lollipops running through the rain.” Despite missteps this is an incisive cut into a deep well of talent. This modern, expositional take on what most regard as a generation whose best work is long past has resulted in a virile, valid record.

We’ve all experienced the emotional yuck of a relationship break-up and some of that has to do with accompanying feelings of self doubt – as in, ‘Could it be that I am not as desirable as I thought I was?’ The Wedding Present’s David Gedge seems to spend much time asking himself questions like this and others along the lines of, ‘This girl is so beautiful; why would she want to be seen with the likes of me?’ Gedge wonders about this on Mystery Date, a not atypical track on Valentina. This thought is sustained by a fluid melody and rhythm which makes the point without getting too carried away. In earlier days The Wedding Present had mastered the quiet-to-loud dynamic where the music would increase in intensity to match raw feelings in the vocals. The band had been doing this to good effect since the late 1980s and outlived the short rein of emotion-drenched grunge guitar in the earlier half of the 1990s. The idea was to keep the arrangements simple and the guitars alternating between gentle and forceful to keep listeners focused on the rollercoaster ride that shapes the precarious state of mutual attraction. Gedge has mellowed a bit these days and although his turbulent narratives have remained pretty much intact, the music sets an unhurried pace where a contemplative atmosphere punctuated by properly edgy riffs and accessible insight creates a space for consideration of universal themes.

ASHLEY THOMSON

dan bigna

metric synthetica [metric music international] Synthetica is the new record from New York indie outfit Metric. It follows their hit debut Fantasies, involvement in various film scores and a performance for the Queen. Synthetica has a somewhat darker tone than Fantasies, both instrumentally and lyrically (see the environmentallycharged Speed The Collapse). Emily Haine’s voice is emotive and genuine but its pop-punk sheen – disguised by mic distortion on Lost Kitten – reminds me of, well, Twilight. There’s a definite The Cure/ Smiths influence on the record but Metric’s creative abilities fall short. The band has experimented with different synth sounds which are omnipresent in Dreams So Real. Scott-Key (drums) brings sharp, uncomplicated beats that give their sound a hipster feel. The sweet guitar melodies, innocent xylophone-esque synths, and predictable interludes and song structures make this record less than impressive. Even the attitude on Synthetica – a kind of rebellious anthem against homogenisation of the pop culture world – seems safe. On the good side, softer tracks like Clone and Nothing But Time, with Haines’ whispery tones and mellow instrumentals, aren’t unpleasan. No doubt added energy at their live shows would bring the songs to life, especially in a hip New York club. Nothing But Time exhibits building intensity, layered electronic sounds and sees the band break their usual song structure, finishing the album in a nice, ethereal, haunting space. sophia mcdonald

the walkmen heaven [bella union/fat possum] The advance word on this, the seventh LP from the Brooklynvia-Philadelphia five-piece, had an unfamiliar tone. Instead of hyperbolic details of struggle or personal excess (still the key ingredients in rock mythology), the talk suggested that Heaven was comfortable: the sound of a band at peace after 11 years of graft. Not the stuff of rock legend. Heaven does sound comfortable, but this is not a bad thing. The Walkmen have long been modern rock’s underdogs; never as famous or acclaimed as The Strokes, The White Stripes, The National and the rest of their Class Of 2000 kin, and unable to follow through on the promise of vast singles like The Rat. And yet, unlike The Strokes or Stripes, they remain alive and alert. Hamilton Leithauser remains one of the greatest voices in modern rock and the shimmering guitar and piano interplay is as it ever was, with the urgency of Angela Rock City or In The New Year replaced with the embrace of rollicking easy rockers like Heartbreaker or the ‘50s swagger of The Witch. It’s a record about getting older and being okay with that. The album might have been trimmed a little but when songs slip by as easily and enjoyably as these, it seems unkind to quibble. Bands rarely age this well. The Walkmen are to be celebrated for taking the least rock-friendly circumstances and making an essential rock record from them. Heaven is exactly that. glen martin

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the word

on films

WITH MELISSA WELLHAM

It’s unfortunate that the films I try not to review in this fine rag are often some of the best films I get to see. However, often they’re one-off screenings, or the film will have stopped showing by the time the mag goes to print. One such fabulous film, that I urge you all to see if you ever get a chance, is the screening of the National Theatre’s live performance of Frankenstein, directed by Danny Boyle and starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller. It’s a stunning production. That is all!

quote of the issue Julie Keller: “When do you think it’ll be OK to get naked with someone?” Jason Fryman: “Let me see.” [Julie takes off her towel and Jason looks at her body.] Jason Fryman: I think we’re three weeks out. Julie Keller: Thanks. -- Friends with Kids

friends with kids

prometheus

Friends With Kids has been mis-marketed as a hilarious rom-com romp, in the vein of Bridesmaids (and the presence of Bridesmaids’ Jon Hamm and Kristen Wiig has been somewhat over-emphasised). The film is hilarious, yes. But more often it is very human: upsetting, messy, lovely and complicated.

For fans of Alien and Blade Runner – those engaging, tense Ridley Scott sci-fi classics that taught us how to fear heartburn (because it might actually be an alien spawn) amongst other things – I’m going to do you a big favour. Prometheus is not one of those classics.

Written and directed by Jennifer Westfeldt – who also acts the female lead, Julie – the film follows a group of close-knit friends as they begin navigating the problem of adding children into the equation of their lives. Best friends Julie and Jason (Adam Scott), who observe that having children often kills a happy marriage, decide that they should have a kid together – but date other people. To say that Friends With Kids entirely escapes from the conventions of the ‘baby rom com’ genre would be a lie – after all, there is a scene of a man changing a nappy, while covered in baby poop – but it mostly avoids clichés, and packages its uplifting life lessons with witty banter and genuine warmth. The ensemble cast turn in great performances, particularly Jon Hamm and Kristen Wiig as a struggling couple who are on the rocks; while Maya Rudolph and Chris O’Dowd show the more pleasant alternative. Humour, romance, social relevance – the equation of Friends With Kids works. P.S. Megan Fox is also in this film. But don’t let that put you off. MELissa wellham

In this slick thriller, Scott has traded atmosphere for pretty lights and big actors, and the baffling plot (with more holes than a cheese grater) only makes it all the more apparent what this film isn’t. It isn’t as good as Alien, it isn’t even good sci-fi – in fact, it’s annoying. And stupid. And horrifying in parts, but not in the good way. In short, a group of scientists (with varying degrees of balls) head into space on a mission, and in the end everyone starts questioning human existence and toying around with penisshaped aliens, or trying to kill each other or screw each other over. And Fassbender plays a robot. This is a straight-up blockbuster, so don’t expect any more, but feel free to expect less – you might even end up enjoying this film for what it does manage to offer, which is decent acting and some scares. At the end of Prometheus, I was left with many questions. How could I get a refund? Why would anyone think a sequel was a good idea? [Ed: ahem, prequel.] What was the last film that disappointed me this much? MEGAN McKEOUGH

snow white and the huntsman Based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale, Snow White And The Huntsman is grim in more ways than one. It’s dark and edgy to be sure; but it’s also disappointing. I received a text message from a friend before I saw Snow White, which read nothing but “snow white = fail.” (I’m glad I was given this warning prior to watching the film, as I’d had high expectations.) It’s not a complete ‘fail’, but unfortunately, while this take on Snow White is darker and more complex than the original performance, it is undermined by bipolar performances from its stars, a poor script and problematic pacing. The film has no internal consistency and seems to be a pastiche of other stories that it’s trying to imitate: the love triangle from Twilight; the sweeping landscapes from Lord Of The Rings; the uncomfortable undertones of incest from Game Of Thrones (yep); and the modern musings, but ultimately underdeveloped themes that deal with vanity, a-la the earlier Snow White production this year, Mirror Mirror. However, the set design, costumes, and cinematography all are ravishing. As is Chris Hemsworth, while I’m noting admiration of aesthetically pleasing things (and, er, objectifying the male form). There are enough glorious visuals to keep you looking at the screen, but not enough of the cerebral stuff to make this worth watching more than once. MELISSA WELLHAM

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the word on dvds

entourage - the complete eighth season [warner home video]

the girl with the dragon tattoo [universal/sony]

Even in its heyday Entourage was pure fluff. It wanted to lampoon the entertainment industry – the hollowness of celebrity system, the arrogance and aloofness of actors, the desperateness of the hangerson, the bottom-feeders, the glad-handlers, the agents, the waiters – but ended up applauding them. Insider-y fun, yes. Penetrating satire, no. And true to form that’s exactly how this eighth and final season plays it, agreeable low stake chuckles. Over the years there has been some attempt to bring Vincent Chase (Adrian Greiner) down a peg or two and this season’s freshly rehabbed version is more sombre than ever. Not only is Chase dealing with sobriety, he’s also on hand for a suicide and finds out his charm isn’t universal when he petulantly attempts to woo a disinterested journalist. Will he be forced to grow up and accept he isn’t the centre of the universe? Will proximity to death make him a better person? Of course not. In this world, no one ponders reality or fails; you only don’t succeed as well as the next one up the ladder. ‘Success’ is an endless roundabout of money, fame, drugs and hi-gloss debauchery. Besides, failure is just another opportunity for a cleverly-worded press release. Whichever way you slice it, Entourage ends on hastily constructed high notes that negate any semblance of growth or redemption. Everyone’s a winner – that’s the way it works in Hollywood. But haven’t we just spent the last eight years finding out how the system is a bullyboy that eats souls, destroys ambition and fractures relationships? What we get instead is vacuous wish fulfilment and grinning hi-fives. It’s fitting that the series’ ambiguous coda focuses on Ari Gold (Jeremy Piven), because without this alpha-male scream machine, Entourage would have struggled to make it to eight.

It’s no secret that film studios are running out of ideas. After all, Tonka Truck: The Movie is in the works. So it’s hardly surprising that little time was wasted to green-light a US remake of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy. And it’s really no surprise it went to David Fincher – the guy who makes art-house films for the multiplex blockbuster crowd or vice-versa – was the man to fill the role. Sadism, revenge, terror and pain litter his catalogue: Seven, Fight Club, Zodiac and Panic Room. Safe hands, you’d assume. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo novel is the sort of Nazi-in-the-familytree pulpy trash that finds a natural home in airport book stores and the palms of millions of public transport monkeys, looking to switch off after a long day enabling and disabling macros. Its popularity is in direct proportion to its unerring mediocrity and proves that old maxim, ‘smart people read shit books all the time’. Having said that, a good director can salvage almost anything and that’s exactly what Fincher has done here. In his hands, a bogstandard multi-generational serial killer plot gurgles to life with sharp pacing, minimal shock reveals and a well mannered, almost European sensibility. Filming in Sweden no doubt helped on that score. Daniel Craig as the investigative journalist Michael Blomkvist is a scholar in quiet reserve and there’s no Bond-esque pouting or garish ab-touting. The breakout star is Rooney Mara as Elisabeth Salander; thylacine thin, angry, agile and one step ahead of everyone else. In many ways she’s the weakest link of the story – a by-the-books damaged but talented loner – but Mara rescues the character from oversimplification and propels the movie far beyond its capacities. This is one of those rare remakes: a successful one.

justin hook

justin hook

chinatown [paramount] “Forget it Jake, it’s Chinatown” – five simple words perfectly encapsulating the deceit, corruption, and destruction wrought by the abuse of power. And five simple words that also capture the 130-odd minutes of arcane noir-ish plotting that preceded it. It’s an iconic parting gesture from an equally, and deservedly, iconic film. The Jake in question is Jake Gettes (Jack Nicholson) who has been hired to investigate a bigwig in the Los Angeles water and power bureaucracy on the premise of adultery. But soon enough he’s entangled in a byzantine plot to corruptly purchase land in the Californian desert and redirect water through a massive aqueduct to LA against the wishes of local residents. Then he stumbles across incest and other various skeletons in various closets. Somewhat against type, Nicholson’s Gettes is not the sneering, confident huckster we have come to expect from Jack or cinema detective gumshoes – he’s fallible, confused and occasionally wrong. Based loosely on the Californian Water Wars at the end of the 19th century, Chinatown was Roman Polanski’s first film in the US after the murder of his wife and unborn child by the Manson Family in 1969. Little wonder then that the film reeks of pessimism, threats of violence and injustice. Nicholson sports a bandage for most of the film, covering a knife wound perpetrated by a small time hood played by, you guessed it, Polanski. It’s a reminder that, try as you might, it’s impossible to hide the impact of greed and violence. In the end, the little guys (farmers, the poor, immigrants) are scorched by the evils of capitalism, left figuratively and literally out to dry. Previous transfers of this 1974 film have been left wanting so it’s a relief this rerelease is the definitive version of a true classic. justin hook

45


the word

on games

Tiny & Big: Grandpa’s Leftovers Platform: Windows/Mac Developer: Black Pants Game Studio Length: 8hrs+ Verdict: Play it at a mate’s Tiny & Big: Grandpa’s Leftovers is a 3D platformer from newcomer indie studio Black Pants Game Studio, which has been receiving some big praise from a variety of game festivals. The game is centred around the protagonist, Tiny, who has mislaid some pants, but they’ve been stolen and are unexpectedly magical. He must use his (selectively) awesome ray gun, grappling hook and infinite supply of ridiculously powerful rockets in order to wreak absolute havoc in some Aztec temple. It’s quite confusing. The strongest part of the game is the art style which is obviously done by someone with a strong vision of how the game should look, and then executed with great care and attention to detail. It’s almost as if Tim Schafer turned up for the art teams meetings and bestowed upon them some Grim Fandango crossed with Psychonauts level of art direction. Unfortunately, if Tim was present for the art meetings, he obviously had prior commitments at the same time as the gameplay meetings. Being given the capability to cut the rocky world up is an interesting method of solving puzzles but your character has the constitution and fortitude of a sheet of tracing paper, which is a bit incompatible with the masses of falling and flying rock you create. The developers probably considered the need to be constantly sprinting away from the rock avalanche you created with your laser gun a bit annoying, but then just put a fast respawn system in place. This fast death rate would be forgivable if I was dying whilst piloting a rocket powered hunk of newly sliced rock as I sent it hurtling through the air, but none of the puzzles are particularly exciting; all of them seem to boil down to: cut a little bit off the rock, jump on the remainder. Rinse and repeat. My final gripe is around the ray gun’s selective ability to cut the world around you. It’s always slightly jarring when you get into an open world with the apparent ability to go anywhere and do anything, only to find that there are in fact artificial restrictions in place precisely to prevent you from going everywhere. If I hear that the world is completely destructible, I want to be able to pull out my super-cutting ray gun and cut the fucking mountain in half, then watch it slide apart. Not being able to shortcut through an area using my destructive abilities because it would ruin the developers nicely made puzzle area is anathema to the idea that you’re free to do as you wish. It’s generally considered to be a cardinal sin to criticise an indie developed game, but I genuinely had hoped for more than some eye candy and a one-trick 3D platformer. Pete Huet

46

BLACKBOX Oh, to be witty, likeable and know the right people. While it’s true everybody loves celebrity, it’s usually the off-camera antics of the Paris Hiltons of the world that draw most followers. If you really want a long-term audience, the key is to be a slightly funnier yet still inherently daggy version of the rest of us. Think Myf Warhurst, Adam Hills, Hamish Blake or Andy Lee. Sure, Andy may have dated a top model and Myf may have met more celebrities than Canberra has roundabouts but they still ask the stupid questions we’d ask and get starstruck. And everything they touch turns to gold. What’s that, Hamish and Andy? You want to spend a year hanging out in NY? Sure. Now you want to do it again in Europe? No problem – we’ll call it Hamish and Andy’s Euro Gap Year (WIN, Thu, 8pm). So, Myf, you want to journey back to ‘80s pop culture? That’s nice. We can call it Myf Warhurst’s Nice (ABC1, Wed, 8pm). And the king of everymen has Stephen Fry’s 100 Greatest Gadgets (ABC1, Thu, 9:30pm). Alas, even roller derby and a pet a llama wouldn’t save Blackbox’s Canberra Gap Year from a 10am Saturday timeslot on SBS. Other new shows this fortnight include Audrey’s Kitchen (ABC1, Sat Jul 14, 6:25pm) the latest Working Dog creation where celebrity chefs get the Frontline treatment, Episodes (WIN, Tue, 9.30pm), a new comedy starring Tamsin Greig and Greg Mannigan as UK TV producers remaking their show for a US audience, and new seasons of Rockwiz (SBS1, Sat Jul 7, 8:30pm), Futurama (11, Wed Jul 11, 8pm) and Wilfred (11, Tue Jul 10, 9pm). John Clarke is never far from anything Olympics-related. The satirist looks at why we take sport so seriously on Sporting Nation (ABC1, Sun, 7:30pm). Stories about travel and food sell almost as well as sex, and there’s plenty of them: Joanna Lumley’s Greek Odyssey (ABC1, Tue, 8:30pm), Gordon’s Great Escape (ABC1, Tue, 9:25pm), which takes Gordon Ramsay on a culinary journey through south-east Asia, A South American Journey with Jonathan Dimbleby (SBS1, Fri Jul 6, 7:30pm), and the ultimate US road trip with Billy Connolly’s Route 66 (Prime, Sun, 7:30pm). Docos to seek out include Forest Designs (SCTEN, Sat Jul 7, 2:30pm), which looks at Tasmanian artisans using native timbers, Sunday Best: Kumare (ABC2, Sun, 8:30pm), in which filmmaker Vikram Gandhi poses as a guru as a social experiment, and Compass: Nigeria’s Millionaire Preachers (ABC1, Sun Jul 15, 6.30pm). No free-to-air appearance of True Blood in sight but Season Five has just started here on Showcase. Those in search of other HBO shows can catch Bored To Death (ABC2, Mon, 9:30pm) or repeats of Deadwood (ABC2, Mon, 12:20am), and something equally compelling in AMC’s Breaking Bad (ABC2, Mon, 11:55pm). The much-anticipated Aaron Sorkin drama Newsroom has just kicked off in the States and it looks worth the effort. (How can you not eagerly anticipate a Sorkin show?) Emmy nominations are announced Thursday July 19. Send tips. Movies to check out include Woody Allen’s Play It Again, Sam (ABC2, Sat Jul 14, 8:30pm), The African Queen (1951) (ABC2, Sat Jul 14, 9:50pm), so-bad-it’s-good Dr Jekyll and Sister Hyde (WIN, Sun Jul 8, 2:40am), Shaun of the Dead (7Mate, Sun Jul 8, 9:45pm), X Files: I Want To Believe (11, Tue Jul 11, 9:30pm). The best (pre-Voyager) Star Trek villains get the human touch in Star Trek Next Generation: I Borg (11, Thu Jul 5, 9:30pm). You can now watch all your fave Aunty goodness on the move (as long as you have an iPhone). The free iView app is available on iTunes. News is that iView is about to overtake piracy. Now if they’d only get Game of Thrones… TRACY HEFFERNAN tracyherrernan@bigpond.com (@ChezBlackbox)


the word

BMA Presents The Bootlegs Sessions The Phoenix Bar Monday June 11

on gigs

It feels like only yesterday that the unanimously revered poetryslamming Bootlegs MC and all-round creative genius Adam Hadley tipped his illustrious hat to the citizens of Canberra in favour of the sunnier (if curiously unbefitting) city of Brisbane. Yet it was almost a month later that I found myself reacquainted with that all-too-familiar emotional bipolarity evoked by the flight of another talented Canberran. Friends, musicians, and even the ordinarily indifferent barfly mélange gathered within the warm and homely surrounds of The Phoenix den to simultaneously mourn, sing, drink and dance their farewells to our enviably sagacious yet profoundly affable and widely adored former BMA editor: Ms Julia Winterflood. It must be gratifying to have some of Canberra’s most talented, esteemed musicians feel as chuffed to perform as you are to enjoy them. As local luminary James Fahy strummed the opening chord of the night, I made a mental note to befriend every busker/music school student/person carrying an instrument I encountered. James’ performance was as electric as the hue of Joe Oppenheimer’s fetching cerulean coat that night, and perhaps even more warming. James is one of few artists whose technical skill and performance style seems to evolve exponentially from one show to the next. Each lyric, belted out with soulful passion or woefully crooned, was driven by an unconstrained honesty and raw emotion that seemed to flow through every vein, fuelling an emotive performance as absorbing to watch as it was to listen. I’ve always felt slightly cheated that I didn’t make it into the Gen-X cohort, purely for having missed out on witnessing rock history’s finest. Each time I experience local musicians like James, I feel a little less bitter about it. Raising the mood level to an altogether otherworldly plain was the cobalt-clad chorister himself. Anyone who has experienced the magic of Joe Oppenheimer’s characteristically uplifting performances will testify that it is actually physically impossible to harbour even a vestige of negativity the instant he illuminates the ‘stage’. (I use that term very broadly – hand the man a guitar in the middle of the street and you’ll soon be wishing you’d brought along a tambourine.) As per custom, the entire concept of the stage/ audience barrier was repudiated by light-hearted conversational interplay between audience and musician – words from which were frequently converted into spontaneous minute-long reprises by the master of musical improvisation. Also included was the everamusing sing-along experiment, which never fails to unite the crowd through both dubious pitch-matching and fond memories of our Peter Combe days. Also showcased was more unfamiliar material: a touchingly ironic collection of essentially mournful laments veiled by the paradoxically cheery tenor for which he is renowned.

PHOTOS BY ADAM THOMAS

I’ve found that my favourite Bootlegs have come to feature the same bunch of musos, not just for their performances as individuals or set bands, but because of the exchange of roles between them. Not only does it keep their sets fresh, it’s also a beautiful thing to watch: the friendship shared between James, Joe and the whole Fun Machine crew is saliently reflected through their grinning faces and on-stage energy, which radiates onto the ever-appreciative audience. Tonight we were treated to a particularly special Yes/No set in which, along with the usual crowd-pleasers, featured selected tracks from their latest album. Unfortunately, the star vocalist of my favourite track, tactfully titled The Lady Who Interrupted Us And Didn’t See The Microphone, was unable to make it on the night. And so it was that another Bootlegs Session played host to an Irishstyle farewell: it was not a night to mourn, but to celebrate good times had with an irreplaceable Canberra gem: We’ll miss you, Julz. GRETA KITE-GILMOUR

47


the word

Missy Higgins, Butterfly Boucher The Playhouse Thursday June 14

on gigs

Butterfly Boucher opened, bouncing on stage like a pony. It was a shock, despite her leather boots and fashionably short hair, when Butterfly stomped on a pedal and the entire sold-out Playhouse shook with an overproduced backing beat. Similarly wrong-footed was the sound-fellow, who took that song and most of the second to get vocals and guitar in line with the electro-ruckus – just in time for her band to join her, and win over Missy’s curiously teen-free audience with music that would have suited the Espy more than a seated Globe-wannabe. She got by on heart, and some excellent song-writing; Warning Bell left the audience in a stunned hush before it gathered wits to applaud. Upbeat and dressed-down Missy Higgins joined Boucher for an adorable double-act, four hands together on one synth, and it looked like they were genuinely enjoying each other’s company. Backstage smooches were the vibe. They co-produced Missy’s droughtbreaking The Ol’ Razzle Dazzle in Nashville, where Boucher has been silently sweeping together a great big success story. It started with Grey’s Anatomy OS and so far has peaked, unarguably, at a duet recording of Changes – with Bowie, no less. The teamwork made for a tight show. It’s easy to forget, loving local music and steeped in neophilia, that an enduring strength of radiofriendly pop is the professionalism. Halfway through a set with its fair share of tech irritations and variations from the set-list, it was unavoidably apparent that Missy and her band rarely hit a wrong note. This kind of expertise in the field of the four-chord pop song can seem excessive (or risk avoidant), and yet… The fourth estate in her performance was her humility. She was so real that sometimes the overwhelmingly feeling was not energy or wonder but fondness. Countless times Missy brought us back from the edge of saccharine polish with a moment of humour or an unscripted comment. It didn’t sound like backtracking or playbook banter when she derided the “tens of thousands of interviews you will have read,” and when her assemblage of glowing-talent musos laughed at her for starting the wrong song, you could sense the fun and kinship they shared. The six-piece group invoked atmospheres that added tremendous depth to the songs. It’s a surreal experience to hear resonant, powerful performances of seemingly paper-thin teenage Top 20s like Scar or Steer. Clever instrumentation like bowed xylophone and a cellist with a shaker kept the music nerds happy, and the leading lady’s rich, controlled vocal tone was always pitched to the light and shadow of the arrangements. Missy’s theme between songs was the song-writing process: running from writing block through American house-sits, the disconnect between words and music, and experiments with unusual approaches. Set Me On Fire began as a 12-verse rap before it was tamed to the piano. Collaboration with Boucher was all over some of the new songs, particularly first single Unashamed Desire (which is infinitely better live – the Missy Gaga version on YouTube almost turned me off the concert). Not to say it isn’t Missy herself in the driving seat; she was out for something new in a sparkling short-cut evening gown, and she threw herself into the new tracks with a definite joie de vivre.

PHOTOS BY DAVID BURKE

All up it was a concert of surprises. I have to recommend that you catch Missy if you ever get a chance. Regardless of where you’re coming from, I can guarantee she’ll surprise you, at least in this incarnation. JAMES FAHY

48


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE July 4 - July 7 WEdnesday July 04 Arts Exhibition – In Light of Shadows

By Tanja Taglietti, Enrico Taglietti, Brett Lowe, Erika Gaggia, Gianmatteo Romegialli BILK GALLERY

The Venetian Twins

Play by Nick Enright/Terrence Clark. (02) 62571950 for info/bookings or visit www.canberrarep.org.au THEATRE 3

Exhibition - Alphabet

Curated by Mel George. Exhibition of glass works. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free. CRAFT ACT

Exhibition - unDisclosed

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Dance

Exhibition - Alphabet

Exhibition - Alphabet

Three Exhibitions

CRAFT ACT

CRAFT ACT

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Curated by Mel George. Exhibition of glass works. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Curated by Mel George. Exhibition of glass works. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

Exhibition - unDisclosed

Exhibition - unDisclosed

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Comedy Heath Franklin’s Chopper

Part of Greenfaces. www. canberraticketing.com.au or (02) 62752700. Seen on Ronnie John’s Half Hour. CANBERRA IRISH CLUB

Dance Trash Thursday

$3 drinks 10pm-midnight! ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Thursday Ladies Night

Free champagne for ladies til 11pm + iconic tunes by ladies all night from female DJ Pumpin

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

Live Digress Dual Friday

Funk/live 6-8pm (Happy Hr 5-7pm). Resident DJ + more play allsorts 9:30pm on. $8 J/bombs 10-11pm. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Kerser

With DJ Rush and Daz. 8pm. $15. TRINITY BAR

Fun Machine

Ready For The Fight launch tour. With Mustered Courage, Trendoid & Alphabet, Vulpes Vulpes. 7:30pm. THE WHITE EAGLE POLISH CLUB

Necrotic Reign

Avascular Necrosis, Reign Of Terror, Boundless and Immersion. 8pm. THE BASEMENT

One Love Trance Mission Tour

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

The Old Dark House (G) 4:30pm.

ARC CINEMA

Exhibition – Fragments

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

The Venetian Twins

Play by Nick Enright/Terrence Clark. (02) 62571950 for info/bookings or visit www.canberrarep.org.au THEATRE 3

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

The Bride of Frankenstein (G) 7:30pm.

ARC CINEMA

With Marlo. 9pm.

Dance

Ninth Pillar (Syd)

Old Skool Saturdays

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Latino Wednesdays

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

MONKEY BAR

Live

Karaoke

Elliot The Bull

POT BELLY BAR

Sabor Mid-Year Ball

THE PHOENIX PUB

ITALO AUSTRALIAN CLUB

$4 wine. 9pm. Free.

With Kyle Horsley (Syd), The Glaciers (Canb) and Critical Monkee. 8pm.

Colombian Jungle

Wednesday Karaoke

With Beth n Ben, The Masquarades. 9pm.

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Ced Nada

Eargasm Presents. The Blow This EP tour with special guests The Mane Thing.

Live

The Front Birthday Bash

Soiree

Sing your ugly heart out.

Make Them Suffer

Perth boys release debut. Supported by Resist The Thought. 6:30pm. $12 Moshtix/$15 door. TUGGERANONG YOUTH CENTRE

Something Different

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

THE DURHAM

King O’s Best Beard Competition

Two $500 prizes to the best beard and best King O’Malley costume on show. And hot mulled wine!

CASINO CANBERRA

Live

The Front Birthday Bash

The Arachnids

Day 5: Twin singer-songwriters Alanna & Alicia blend folk/jazz/roots. Supported by Rafe Morris. $10.

Van She

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

With The Streetlight Parade and Chasing Rabbits. 8pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

friday July 06 Arts Exhibition – Fragments

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free.

Transit Trivia TRANSIT BAR

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm.

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential! 7:30pm. Free.

thursday July 05 Arts Exhibition Opening – Fragments

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 6pm. Free.

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Exhibition – In Light of Shadows

By Tanja Taglietti, Enrico Taglietti, Brett Lowe, Erika Gaggia, Gianmatteo Romegialli

Three Exhibitions

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

Exhibition – In Light of Shadows

The Venetian Twins

BILK GALLERY

The Venetian Twins

Play by Nick Enright/Terrence Clark. (02) 62571950 for info/bookings or visit www.canberrarep.org.au THEATRE 3

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Soul Be In It

Canberra’s only night dedicated to soul, funk, and hip hop from Buick and crew. 8pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Xmas in July

Havana Nights Presents. 9pm. MONKEY BAR

Jemist

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Idea Of Happiness tour with special guests Rufus. Tix through Moshtix. ZIERHOLZ @ UC

Mornings

With Making. 9:30pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Rufus

Official Van She afterparty. 10pm. $10 with Van She gig stamp/$15. TRINITY BAR

Timber

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Ninth Pillar (Syd)

Something Different

P J O’REILLY’S (TUGGERANONG)

Make A Wish Australia Trivia Night

Canberra Make-A-Wish will be holding trivia to raise valuable funds. Register up to ten. 7–10pm. $35 ITALO AUSTRALIAN CLUB

saturday July 07

BILK GALLERY

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

By Tanja Taglietti, Enrico Taglietti, Brett Lowe, Erika Gaggia, Gianmatteo Romegialli

Amazing performances. Beginner Salsa at 7pm. Dancing at 8pm. 7pm–late. Prepaid $30/$55 door.

Day 5: Hashemoto, Jason Reclina. 7.30pm. $10/$5.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Live music.

Karaoke

From 10pm.

THE CLUBHOUSE

Mix of Old Skool R‘n’B, 80s & 90s. Free entry. $5 vodka original & flavours 10-11pm.

Arts Exhibition - Alphabet

Curated by Mel George. Exhibition of glass works. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Free.

With Kyle Horsley (Syd), The Glaciers (Canb) and Critical Monkee. 8pm.

The Front Birthday Bash

Day 7: The Burley Griffin + more. 8pm. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Assidian 2nd Birthday Show

Elysian, Anno Domini, Mytile Vey Lorth, The Seer, Hours In Exile, more 8pm. THE BASEMENT

ZooPaGoo

Digress Big Bang Saturday! Supported by Rocksteady Sound System and DJ Timber. 8pm. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Doctor Werewolf SubSquad Presents THE CLUBHOUSE

Def Wish Cast

Play by Nick Enright/Terrence Clark. (02) 62571950 for info/bookings or visit www.canberrarep.org.au

CRAFT ACT

THEATRE 3

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

As Famous as the Moon

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

CASINO CANBERRA

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - unDisclosed

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Supported by Celsius, Killawatz, Old School Al. 8pm. Presale from Moshtix. TRANSIT BAR

Live music.

Love Saturdays With Pred. 9pm.

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

49


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE July 7 - July 13 DJs Karma, Jswiss, Hypnotic Urban Playground Presents. 10pm. MONKEY BAR

Something Different Fash ‘n’ Treasure

A smorgasboard of kitsch old stuff! O, the smells! 10am-3pm. $3. EXHIBITION PARK IN CANBERRA

sunday July 08

Mojito Monday

$10 Mojito’s, $7 Nojitos. The best latin DJ’s & Music in Canberra. $7 entry w. free drink. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Something Different Trivia at King O’Malley’s

Monday night trivia. Be in it to win a $100 bar tab. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

tuesday July 10

Arts Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - unDisclosed

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Irish Jam Session

Traditional Irish music.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Sunday Best at A Bite To Eat

The Dreamlanders - A soulful genre blend. Tapas from 5pm. Happy Hr pre6pm. 5pm-7pm. Free. A BITE TO EAT CAFE

Tom Dickins

The Front B’day Day 8: Evening of requests, never-heard-before material and classics. 7:30pm. $10.

Exhibition - unDisclosed

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Three Exhibitions

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE - GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Fragments

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Karaoke Karaoke Love

Croon and wail your heart out on the Transit stage. 9pm. Free.

Live

Habibi + The Pillars

Exhibition - unDisclosed

ARC CINEMA

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Comedy

Three Exhibitions

Felicity Ward

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE - GORMAN HOUSE

CANBERRA IRISH CLUB

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Dance

Karaoke

Live

Wednesday Karaoke

Nathan Kleyn

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

We Dont Give A F**K

Live

THE CLUBHOUSE

Sing your ugly heart out.

Nick Saxon & The Elusive Few 8pm.

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Per Purpose

With The Fighting League, Danger Beach. 8pm. Free. THE PHOENIX PUB

Something Different

THE DUXTON

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential! 7:30pm. Free.

Traditional Irish music.

Transit Trivia

Bearded Gypsy Band

TRANSIT BAR

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Fame Trivia

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

From 7.30pm. THE DURHAM

Trivia Tuesday

$100 cocktail party as first prize. 7:30pm. Free. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

The Phoenix Quiz

Every week a special Phoenix brand trivia. 7:30pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

WEdnesday July 11

Live

Arts

Biscuits

Exhibition – Fragments

Post-weekend sounds from Ryz, Peekz, Kimosabi, Steve On Weekends! Free pool, 2-4-1 pizza, 9pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

The Bootleg Sessions

The Fuelers, Jack Biilman, Dylan Hekimian. 8pm. Free. THE PHOENIX PUB

50

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Wednesdays at the Wall

Sacha Jeffery: T’s and Works on Paper. HONKYTONKS

Thursday Ladies Night

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Irish Jam Session

Something Different

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

MONKEY BAR

From 10pm.

Arts

$3 drinks 10pm-midnight!

$4 wine. 9pm. Free.

Karaoke

7:30pm. $12.

Trash Thursday

Free champagne for ladies til 11pm + iconic tunes by ladies all night from female DJ Pumpin

Latino Wednesdays

Sunday Sessions at The Duxton

Exhibition - unDisclosed

Part of the Arab Film Festival. Info/ tickets through nfsa.gov.au/www. arabfilmfestival.com.au. 7pm.

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

THE DURHAM

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm.

Dance

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Something Different

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm.

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm.

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm.

TRANSIT BAR

monday July 09

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Part of Greenfaces. www.canberraticketing.com.au or (02) 62752700. Seen on Good News Week.

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Live music from 3pm. Free.

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

Exhibition – Fragments

Live

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Exhibition - unDisclosed

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12-4pm. Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free.

The world’s biggest ten-minute play festival. Details at www.shortandsweet. org. 6-9pm.

Arts

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Short + Sweet Theatre Acting Workshop

thursday July 12 Arts Exhibition – Fragments

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Short + Sweet Theatre Directing Workshop The world’s biggest ten-minute play festival. Details at www.shortandsweet. org. 6-9pm.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

They care enough to self-censor. 9pm.

Yung Warriors

Standing Strong national tour from underground hip hop outfit. Supported by Whitehouse. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Skeptical

Feel The Noize Presents THE CLUBHOUSE

The King Hits

With Little Mac and the Monster Men. 9pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

friday July 13 Arts Exhibition - Rings

A selection of contemporary makers. Makers of what? Forget about it. BILK GALLERY

Three Exhibitions

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE - GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Exhibition - unDisclosed

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Three Exhibitions

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE - GORMAN HOUSE

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

No More Fear + Fly Over Egypt Part of the Arab Film Festival. Info/tickets through nfsa.gov.au/ arabfilmfestival.com.au. 8:30pm. ARC CINEMA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE July 13 - July 16 Asmaa

Part of the Arab Film Festival. Info/tickets through nfsa.gov.au/ arabfilmfestival.com.au. 6:15pm. ARC CINEMA

Exhibition – Fragments

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free.

DJ Trent Richardson

Havana Nights Presents. 9pm. MONKEY BAR

Ray Beadle Trio

Call (02) 62302905 or visit www. theabbey.com.au for bookings. $25/$65 w. dinner. THE ABBEY

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

saturday July 14

Live

Arts

Digress Dual Friday

Exhibition - Rings

Funk/live 6-8pm (Happy Hr 5-7pm). Resident DJ + more play allsorts 9:30pm on. $8 J/bombs 10-11pm. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Faux Real

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Glasshouse Presents

Ra Bazaar (Syd), Neon Bombs, Radar, Mitcharelli and Glasshouse DJs. 8pm. Free.

BILK GALLERY

Cairo 678 + Yasmine And The Revolution Part of the Arab Film Festival. Info/tickets through nfsa.gov.au/ arabfilmfestival.com.au. 7:30pm.

Glamour Goes Global

Picture the world covered in glitter. It’s like that. 9pm. THE CLUBHOUSE

Love Saturdays

With Jared de Veer. 9pm. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Nite Society pres. Millions With Step Panther. TRANSIT BAR

Hip Hop Jam

Rap, freestyle, graffiti, cutting, BMX, skating and a free lunch. BE THERE. 11am-3pm. BELCONNEN SKATE PARK

With BELCO Turbojugend. 9:30pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

THE CLUBHOUSE

Mixed Bag

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

The Rif Lover + Fighting For Air

DJs Karma, Jswiss, Hypnotic

That glamourous siren of gutshot rock. Tickets through Ticketek. ROYAL THEATRE

Part of the Arab Film Festival. Info/tickets through nfsa.gov.au/ arabfilmfestival.com.au. 4:30pm.

Urban Playground Presents. 10pm.

The life and music of Stevie Wright and the Easybeats. Tickets at (02) 6275 2700.

Exhibition - unDisclosed

CASINO CANBERRA

Barrel of Monkeys

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

HELLENIC CLUB (CIVIC)

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Arts

Three Exhibitions

Tayeb, Khalas, Yalla

Live music. 8pm.

P J O’REILLY’S (CIVIC)

Stevie

THE PLAYHOUSE

With Escape Syndrome + Septimus Prime + Variodivers. 8pm. $15.

Tremor Beats Farewell

True Jungle Souljahs Presents. Featuring Utah Jazz (Hospital, UK). 9pm. THE CLUBHOUSE

Basement Massacre

Rise and Shadows In Ruin. More bands TBA. 8pm. $10 door. THE BASEMENT

Ben Kemp 8pm.

THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Tracy McNeil & Band

$12 Monaro Folk Society Members/$14 Conc/$17 Adult THE MERRY MUSE

Utah Jazz

True Jungle Souljahs Present THE CLUBHOUSE

Jordan F

With Fro and Mo, Deepcuts and more. Free before 10pm. TRINITY BAR

ARC CINEMA

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition – Fragments

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Dance Old Skool Saturdays

Mix of Old Skool R‘n’B, 80s & 90s. Free entry. $5 vodka original & flavours 10-11pm. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Live

Frequently Asked Questions

Nite Society: Millions

CASINO CANBERRA

TRANSIT BAR

Live music.

8pm. $15/$10 on guestlist.

Sunday Best at A Bite To Eat

The Gossips - smooth and satisfying jazz. Tapas from 5pm. Happy Hr pre6pm. 5pm-7pm. Free. A BITE TO EAT CAFE

Canberra Blues Society’s Monthly Blues Jam

A great afternoon of blues hosted by Canberra’s leading blues bands. $5/$3 members. 1pm-4.30pm.

Something Different

The Vee Bees

Timomatic Matt Dent

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

ROYAL THEATRE

ARC CINEMA

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Traditional Irish music.

STATESMAN HOTEL, CURTIN

Tix through Ticketek.

Melissa Etheridge

Alliance @ Academy Presents. 9pm.

Irish Jam Session

Melissa Etheridge

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm.

TRANSIT BAR

Live

Sunday Sessions at The Duxton Live music from 3pm. Free. THE DUXTON

monday July 16 Arts Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Live music.

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm.

Jemist

Exhibition - unDisclosed

MONKEY BAR

Annie and the Armadillos

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

sunday July 15

Part of the Arab Film Festival. Info/tickets through nfsa.gov.au/ arabfilmfestival.com.au. 4:30pm. ARC CINEMA

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Live Biscuits

Post-weekend sounds from Ryz, Peekz, Kimosabi, Steve On Weekends! Free pool, 2-4-1 pizza, 9pm. Free.

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm.

TRANSIT BAR

Exhibition - unDisclosed

THE PHOENIX PUB

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

$10 Mojito’s, $7 Nojitos. The best latin DJ’s & Music in Canberra. $7 entry w. free drink.

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Something Different

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm.

Exhibition – Fragments

Elaine Camlin, Martin James, Alex Lewis, Jake Silvestro and Rebecca Stapledon, 11am-5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

The Bootleg Sessions

Bears With Guns, The Rude Heads, Matt Hall Band. 8pm. Free.

Mojito Monday

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Trivia at King O’Malley’s

Monday night trivia. Be in it to win a $100 bar tab. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

51


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE July 17 - July 20 tuesday July 17

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

GOD + pool (no water)

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Arts

Exhibition of street art by Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm.

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Exhibition - unDisclosed

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Three Exhibitions

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - unDisclosed

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Exhibition Opening - Smoke and Mirrors Kate Barker, Alexander Boynes, Daniel Edwards and Annika Harding. 6pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Two comedies, one by Woody Allen, the other by Mark Ravenhill. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre.

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - unDisclosed

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Stray Cat Rock: Sex Hunters (R18+) Nikkatsu classic. 7pm. ARC CINEMA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm.

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Dance

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Latino Wednesdays

Karaoke

MONKEY BAR

Exhibition Opening - Tracking Patterns

Karaoke

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Wednesday Karaoke

Exhibition - Smoke and Mirrors

Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12-4pm.

Karaoke Love

Croon and wail your heart out on the Transit stage. 9pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Live Carla Lippis & The Martial Hearts

With comparisons to Patty Griffin, Ryan Adams & Martha Wainright, she captivates. 7:30pm. $10. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Irish Jam Session

Traditional Irish music.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Something Different Trivia Tuesday

$100 cocktail party as first prize. 7:30pm. Free. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

The Phoenix Quiz

Every week a special Phoenix brand trivia. 7:30pm.

$4 wine. 9pm. Free.

Sing your ugly heart out. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

WEdnesday July 18 Arts

Jacklyn Peters. 6pm. Free.

Kate Barker, Alexander Boynes, Daniel Edwards and Annika Harding. 11am5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Live Bad!Slam!No!Biscuit! Poetry slam. 9pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Kym Campbell

A cross between Colbie Caillat and Jack Johnson. 7:30pm. $5. THE FRONT GALLERY AND CAFE

Something Different Karaoke

From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

Transit Trivia

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential! 7:30pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

THE PHOENIX PUB

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

thursday July 19 Arts Cairo 678

Exhibition - Rings

A selection of contemporary makers. Makers of what? Forget about it. BILK GALLERY

Agency Dub Collective 8pm. $10/$15 with EP. TRANSIT BAR

The Toot Toot Toots

Onomatopoeic live music. 9pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

friday July 20 Arts Three Exhibitions

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

GOD + pool (no water)

Two comedies, one by Woody Allen, the other by Mark Ravenhill. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - unDisclosed

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details. NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

A Colt Is My Passport/Branded To Kill (R18+)

Comedy

Nikkatsu classic. 7pm.

Steady Eddy

Exhibition - Tracking Patterns

Part of Greenfaces. www. canberraticketing.com.au or (02) 62752700. Seen on NRL Footy Show. CANBERRA IRISH CLUB

Dance Trash Thursday

$3 drinks 10pm-midnight! ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Thursday Ladies Night

Free champagne for ladies til 11pm + iconic tunes by ladies all night from female DJ Pumpin

ARC CINEMA

Jacklyn Peters. 11am-5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - Smoke and Mirrors Kate Barker, Alexander Boynes, Daniel Edwards and Annika Harding. 11am5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - Rings

A selection of contemporary makers. Makers of what? Forget about it. BILK GALLERY

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Live Digress Dual Friday

Arab Film Festival. Info/tickets: nfsa.gov. au/arabfilmfestival.com.au. 2pm.

Live

Exhibition - Rings.

Three Exhibitions

Three Exhibitions

All genres welcome. 9pm.

Funk/live 6-8pm (Happy Hr 5-7pm). Resident DJ + more play allsorts 9:30pm on. $8 J/bombs 10-11pm.

Timber

Abby Dobson

BILK GALLERY

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

52

ARC CINEMA

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Open Decks

THE CLUBHOUSE

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

8pm. $20 in store or www. paperbacksessions.com.au.

SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE BOOKSHOP


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE July 20 - July 24 Ashley Feraude

Tower Of London (G)

Exhibition - unDisclosed

Cheese/Retro

ARC CINEMA

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Dance

Kate Barker, Alexander Boynes, Daniel Edwards and Annika Harding. 11am5pm. Free.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Cheesy cheesy cheesy retro badness. 8pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Ministry Of Sound Sessions Nine Tour With Timmy Trumpet. 9pm. ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Alex Smoke

4:30pm.

Old Skool Saturdays

Mix of Old Skool R‘n’B, 80s & 90s. Free entry. $5 vodka original & flavours 10-11pm. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

Exhibition - Smoke and Mirrors

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm.

Soma|Hum&Haw, UK. 9pm.

Live

Ladyhawke

Leading Edge

Live

CASINO CANBERRA

Irish Jam Session

THE CLUBHOUSE

Rising star Ladyhawke burns into ANU for one night. Tix $46.05 + bf through Ticketek. 8pm. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Wayne Ryder Trio Live music.

CASINO CANBERRA

saturday July 21

CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Live music.

Princi

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Frenzal Rhomb

Guests TBA. Tix $25 (+bf) through Moshtix. THE BASEMENT

Bare, Big Choc & Swiss Dub Subsquad Presents. 9pm.

Arts

THE CLUBHOUSE

Three Exhibitions

40 DJs, four stages, secret venue revealed 24 hrs before take-off. 9pm6am. $25 + bf thru Moshtix.

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

The Underground Project

SECRET LOCATION

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Smitty and B. Goode

GOD + pool (no water)

THE PHOENIX PUB

Two comedies, one by Woody Allen, the other by Mark Ravenhill. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

With Tom Woodward. 9:30pm.

Bare + Big Chocolate

With Swiss Dub, Logic, Transforma, Nay Nay. 9pm. THE CLUBHOUSE

Computer & Electronics Fair

Exhibition - Tracking Patterns

OLD BUS DEPOT MARKETS

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Bargains and rock bottom prices. $3/ kids free.

Jacklyn Peters. 11am-5pm. Free.

sunday July 22

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Arts

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA

Two comedies, one by Woody Allen, the other by Mark Ravenhill. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre.

2nd national Indigenous art triennial. Visit www.nga.gov.au for details.

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Exhibition - Smoke and Mirrors Kate Barker, Alexander Boynes, Daniel Edwards and Annika Harding. 11am5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition - Rings

A selection of contemporary makers. Makers of what? Forget about it. BILK GALLERY

GOD + pool (no water)

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Exhibition - Tracking Patterns Jacklyn Peters. 11am-5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE - MANUKA

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

TRANSIT BAR

The Bootleg Sessions

Zoopagoo, The Bus Vipers, Lavers, David Knight. 8pm. Free. THE PHOENIX PUB

Something Different Trivia at King O’Malley’s

Monday night trivia. Be in it to win a $100 bar tab. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

tuesdayw July 24

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Sunday Best at A Bite To Eat

David Christopher - interstate guitarist. Tapas from 5pm. Happy Hr pre-6pm. 5pm-7pm. Free. A BITE TO EAT CAFE

Matt Dent

Live music. 1pm.

THE GEORGE HARCOURT INN

Renee Geyer

The most soulful of white women returns to Canberra. $125 with dinner. Doors at 6pm. 62302905. THE ABBEY

Something Different Sunday Sessions at The Duxton Live music from 3pm. Free. THE DUXTON

monday July 23 Arts GOD + pool (no water)

Two comedies, one by Woody Allen, the other by Mark Ravenhill. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Exhibition - unDisclosed

Post-weekend sounds from Ryz, Peekz, Kimosabi, Steve On Weekends! Free pool, 2-4-1 pizza, 9pm. Free.

Traditional Irish music.

Something Different

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm.

Biscuits

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Live Mojito Monday

$10 Mojito’s, $7 Nojitos. The best latin DJ’s & Music in Canberra. $7 entry w. free drink. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Arts GOD + pool (no water)

Two comedies, one by Woody Allen, the other by Mark Ravenhill. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Exhibition – MAY’S: The May Lane Street Art

Groundbreaking exhibition of street art by leading Australian and int’l graffiti artists. 10am-5pm. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Three Exhibitions

Flutter - Alex Davies, Holding Light - Belinda Toll, Advertising Emotion Natalie Thomas. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Word of Mouth

Encounters with abstract art. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm. CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

Karaoke Karaoke Love

Croon and wail your heart out on the Transit stage. 9pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Live Irish Jam Session

Traditional Irish music.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Something Different Trivia Tuesday

$100 cocktail party as first prize. 7:30pm. Free. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

The Phoenix Quiz

Every week a special Phoenix brand trivia. 7:30pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

53


FIRST CONTACT

SIDE A: BMA band profile

The Burley Griffin Where did your band name come from? My great great grandfather once owned a farm that now lies buried beneath Lake Burley Griffin. I started using the band name while I was touring solo in the US and it made for a great story about my hometown when people would ask me to explain the meaning. Group members? Evan Buckley (vocals, acoustic guitar), Henry King (banjo, vocals), Kyle Mitchell (drums, vocals) and we’ve recently been working with Michael de Hoog on keys. Describe your sound: Raw yet melodic folk-rock with a touch of alt-country. Both passionate and fun. Who are your influences, musical or otherwise? The first album I ever bought was by Ricky Martin, so I guess that’s where I learned to shake my bon bons. As a songwriter, I’d say some of my major influences would be Paul Simon, Rufus Wainwright, The Avett Brothers and a strange, smelly, genius I once toured with named Brandon Reid. What’s the weirdest experience you’ve had whilst performing? Specifically while performing, probably the time I was hit in the head by a flying sausage, mid stride. What’s your biggest achievement/proudest moment? Recording an album was a huge milestone. That happened while staying in Michigan with Mike Mains & the Branches. What are your plans for the future? We’re keen to start touring more throughout Australia. There’s still so much of this country we’re yet to see! What makes you laugh? Bad harmonica solos. Groin fat. Rap metal. Parks and Rec. What pisses you off? Pay parking. 6:20am. Monsanto. (Losing at) competitive sports. What’s your opinion of the local scene? It’s like a warm blanket. It’s hard to get out but it’s so cosy and familiar, why would you want to? What are your upcoming gigs? Friday July 7 at The Front with a ton of other artists for The Front’s birthday celebrations, and Friday July 20 at the White Eagle Polish Club with The Bon Scotts. Contact info: theburleygriffin@gmail.com or www.facebook.com/theburleygriffin .

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Aaron Peacey 0410 381 306 Activate Jetpack activatejetpack@hotmail.com Adam Hole 0421 023 226 Afternoon Shift 0402 055 314 After Close Scotty 0412 742 682, afterclose@hotmail.com Alcove Mark 0410 112 522 Alice 0423 100 792 Allies ACT (Oxfam Group) alliesact@hotmail.com/ myspace.com/alliesact Amphibian Sound PA Clare 0410 308 288 Amplif5’d Classic rock covers band Joy 0407 200 428, joybarac-heath@hotmail.com Annie & the Armadillos Annie 6161 1078/0422 076 313 The Ashburys Dan Craddock 0419 626 903 Aria Stone, sax & flute, singer/ songwriter (guitar) Aria 0411 803 343 Australian Songwriters Association (Keiran Roberts) 6231 0433 Arythmia: Ben 0423 408 767/ arythmiamusic@gmail.com Backbeat Drivers Steve 0422 733 974, www.backbeatdrivers.com Big Boss Groove Andrew 0404 455 834, www.bigbossgroove.com.au Birds Love Fighting Gangbusters/DIY shows - bookings@birdslovefighting.com Black Label Photography Kingsley 0438 351 007 Blister Bug Stu 0408 617 791 Bridge Between, The Rachel 0412 598 138, thebridgebetween.com.au Bruce Stage mgr/consultant 6254 9857 Capital Dub Style - Reggae/Dub Events + DJs facebook.com/CapitalDubStyle Rafa 0406 647 296 Caution Horses Nigel 0417 211 580 Chris Harland Blues Band 0418 490 640 chrisharlandbluesband@yahoo.com.au Clear Vision Films rehearsals/film clips/stunts - 0438 647 281 wcoulton.clearvisionfilms.com Cole Bennetts Photography 0415 982 662 /colebennetts.com Cris Clucas Cris 6262 5652 Crooked Dave 0421 508 467 Danny V Danny 6238 1673/0413 502 428 Dawn Theory Nathan 0402 845 132 D’Opus & Roshambo hifidelitystyles@yahoo.com DJs Madrid and Gordon 0417 433 971 DJ Latino Rogelio 0401 274 208 DJ Moises (RnB/Latin) 0402 497 835 or moises_lopez@hotmail DNA Vic 0408 477 020 Drumassault Kate 0414 236 323 Easy Mode Daz 0404 156 482, easymodeband@gmail.com Entity Chris 0412 027 894 Epic Flagon band@epicflagon.com Fighting Mongooses, The Adam 0402 055 314 Final Warning Brendan 0422 809 552 Fire on the Hill Aaron 0410 381 306/ Lachlan 0400 038 388 4dead Peter 0401 006 551 Freeloaders, The Steve 0412 653 597 Friend or Enemy 6238 0083, www.myspace.com/friendorenemy Gareth Hailey DJ & Electronica 0414 215 885 GiLF Kelly 0410 588 747, gilf.mail@gmail.com Groovalicious Corporate/Weddings/ Private functions 0448 995 158 groovalicious@y7mail.com Guy The Sound Guy live & studio sound engineer, 0400 585 369, guy@guythesoundguy.com HalfPast Chris 0412 115 594 Hancock Basement Tom 6257 5375, hancockbasement@hotmail.com Happy Hour Wendy 0406 375 096 Haunted Attics band@hauntedatticsmusic.com Hitherto Paul 0408 425 636 In The Flesh Scott 0410 475 703

Inside the Exterior Nathan 0401 072 650 Itchy Triggers Andrew 0401 588 884 Jacqui Seczawa 0428 428 722 JDY Clothing 0405 648 288/ www.jdyclothing.com Jenn Pacor singer/songwriter avail. for originals & covers, 0405 618 630 Jim Boots 0417 211 580 Johnny Roadkill Paulie 0408 287 672, paulie_mcmillan@live.com.au Karismakatz DJ Gosper 0411 065 189/ dj@karismakatz.com Kayo Marbilus myspace.com/kayomarbilus Kurt’s Metalworx (PA) 0417 025 792 Little Smoke Sam 0411 112 075 Los Chavos Latin-Ska-Reggae facebook.com/loschavosmusic Rafa 0406 647 296 Andy 0401 572 150 Manilla Green Herms 0404 848 462, contactus@manillagreen.com, Mario Brujo Gordon world/latin/ reggae/percussionist and DJ. 0405 820 895 Martin Bailey Audio Engineer 0423 566 093 Words for You: writer/publicity/events Megan ph 6154 0927, Mercury Switch Lab Studios mercuryswitch@internode.on.net Missing Zero Hadrian Brand 0424 721 907 hadrian.brand@live.com.au Moots aspwinch@grapevine.com.au Huck 0419 630 721 MuShu Jack 0414 292 567, mushu_band@hotmail.com MyOnus myonusmusic@hotmail.com/ www.myspace.com/myonus No Retreat Simon 0411 155 680 Ocean Moses Nigel 0417 211 580 OneWayFare Chris 0418 496 448 Painted Hearts, The Peter 6248 6027 Phathom Chris 0422 888 700 The Pigs The Colonel 0422 412 752 Polka Pigs Ian 6231 5974 Premier Audio Simon 0412 331 876, premier_audio@hotmail.com Rafe Morris 0416 322 763 Redletter Ben 0421 414 472 Redsun Rehearsal Studio Ralph 0404 178 996/6162 1527 Rhythm Party, The Ross 0416 010 680 Rob Mac Project, The Melinda 0400 405 537 Rug, The Jol 0417 273 041 Samsara Samahdi 0431 083 776 Sansutra J-Ma 0403 476 350 Simone Penkethman (Simone & The Soothsayers, Singing Teacher) 6230 4828 Soundcity Rehearsal Studio Andrew 0401 588 884 Solid Gold Peter 0421 131 887/ solid.gold@live.com.au Super Best Friends Matt 0438 228 748 Surrender Jordan 0439 907 853 Switch 3 Mick 0410 698 479 System Addict Jamie 0418 398 556 The Morning After (covers band) Anthony 0402 500 843/ myspace.com/themorningaftercovers Tiger Bones & The Ferabul-Zers Danny feralbul@aapt.net.au Tim James Lucia 6282 3740, LUCIAMURDOCH@hotmail.com Top Shelf Colin 0408 631 514 Transmission Nowhere Emilie 0421 953 519/myspace.com/ transmissionnowhere Udo 0412 086 158 Undersided, The Baz 0408 468 041 Using Three Words Dan 0416 123 020, usingthreewords@hotmail.com Voodoo Doll Mark 0428 650 549 William Blakely Will 0414 910 014 Zero Degrees and Falling Louis 0423 918 793 Zwish 0411 022 907


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BMA Magazine 397 July 4 2012  

Canberra’s Free Entertainment and Gig Guide

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