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CANBERRA’S NO.1 ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE #39 4 M AY 0 9

anton newcombe of the brian jonestown massacre:

INSIDE4 national indigenous art triennial+ NEW JACK WHITE REVIEWED BELL SHAKESPEARE’S MACBETH+ www.bmamag.com


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“If ever there was one man to take over the world, that man would be Adam Hadley” - Nicholas Combe, 2011.

BMA = Best Mates Always

# 3 9 4 M A Y 0 9 Fax: 02 6257 4361 Mail: PO Box 713 Civic Square, ACT 2608 Publisher Scott Layne General Manager Allan Sko T: 6257 4360 E: advertising@bmamag.com Advertising Manager Elisa Sko T: 6257 4360 E: sales@bmamag.com

Editor Julia Winterflood T: 02 6257 4456 E: editorial@bmamag.com Accounts Manager Yu Xie T: 02 6247 4816 E: accounts@bmamag.com Super Sub-Editor Ashley Thomson Graphic Design Marley NEXT ISSUE 395 OUT MAY 23 EDITORIAL DEADLINE MAY 14 ADVERTISING DEADLINE MAY 17 Published by Radar Media Pty Ltd ABN 76 097 301 730 BMA is independently owned and published. Opinions expressed in BMA are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or staff.

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All good things must come to an end, and it is with this in mind we must say a heartfelt goodbye to Hadley. For although Canberra will suffer excruciating feelings of abandonment, rejection and betrayal, it is important to remind ourselves that the poet, slam champ, organisational wizard, Bootlegs MC, festival Führer, inaugural Miss Corinbank and all round wonderful, inspiring and completely mad human being has given more to Canberra’s arts world than any other, so we really should feel blessed and not bereft. Oh fuck it, who am I trying to fool. HADLEY! WE’RE GOING TO MISS YOU SO MUCH! SERIOUSLY. HAVE YOU ANY IDEA HOW MUCH WE’LL MOURN!? CANBERRA WILL GRIEVE FOR A HUNDRED YEARS! Righto, now that’s out of the way, on with the deets. Hadley’s having his farewell bash at The Phoenix, naturally (“Hadley is the human equivalent of The Phoenix” – Tom Stayner, 2012), and he’s roped in Trendoid and Alphabet (YouTube Intergalactic Glory Hole (feat. PissChrist MC) for a titillating taste), Fun Machine, Andrew “Bring a Brollie” Galan and probably

Australian Burlesque Festival 2012 The biggest celebration of tease in the Southern Hemisphere, The Australian Burlesque Festival, boasts four revered international performers touring alongside six local superstars with more performers to be announced for each city. The bursting popularity of the burlesque revival is in full swing around the globe with festivals and competitions in all major cities. Australian burlesque is internationally renowned for its unique flavour of theatrical, glamorous and avant-garde burlesque and outrageously talented performers. The Festival is sashaying its way into Canberra on Friday June 22

at the Erindale Theatre. www. australianburlesquefest.com .

Three Fantastic Gigs at The Front On three dates in May The Front will play host to three fantastic gigs. On Sunday May 13 exCanberran now-Melburnian Kate Grealy’s gorgeous voice and gorgeous songwriting, which is influenced by jazz, folk, hip hop and punk, will warm up your Sunday eve from 6pm. And then, if you’re in need of a midweek pick me up, blues hound Moondog J will be bringing his own brand of original Australian blues to the table on Wednesday May 16. Later in the month on Thursday May 24, Jasmine Beth will be entrancing audiences with her majestic story songs. Whether delivering gritty Tom Waits style blues or a poetic ballad, she draws her audience in with her enchanting sound, sharp, meaningful lyrics and warm, enticing vocal style. This one kicks off at 8pm. bronze statue of hadley doing a handstand in garema place we say

Hadley’s Farewell

a whole stack more he hasn’t had time to text message me about yet. It’s all going down on Thursday May 24. Get ready for a big one Canberra. We love you Hads. Julz x


FROM THE BOSSMAN

YOU PISSED ME OFF!

Last issue I promised a sloppy and fond dedication to my three departing BMA-ers and, being an inherently untrustworthy fellow, I shall instead proceed to cast aspersions on their character and bombard them with foul and amusing anecdotes.

Has someone yanked yer chain recently? Well send an email to  editorial@bmamag.com and have your sweet vengeance. And for the love of God, keep it brief! [All entries contain original spellings]

I have regaled tales of Graphic Designer and dear friend Cole Bennetts in this space before; the man inspires storytelling. The whirling ginger dervish has three major talents; he is one of the world’s most splendid photographers; he has a supremely keen eye for graphic design; and he also has an uncanny ability to fall on completely flat unmoving ground, often while brandishing a full cup of tea or other unfortunate item. Actually I tell a lie, Cole has many other talents. He can wear a flannel shirt, brown tie, skinny jeans and red shoes - a combination that would see most people raped up and down the east coast - and yet somehow he manages to pull it off. The noises that would rattle from his office had to be heard to be believed. “Is Cole in?” someone would ask, before a cough that belonged in a Dickensian poor house would shake the walls and remove all doubt. He’s also one of the most generous, funniest and dearest men you are likely to meet, bringing smiles and laughter to all. I am proud to call him my friend. Even if he did once spill an entire glass of orange juice all over my keyboard during a particularly tense deadline.

To the every person who’s participated in any kind of political polling in the past month, you go fuck yourself. What the FUCK is going on when a man with NO SOLUTIONS is predicted to succeed in becoming PM? FUCK Peter Slipper for being a shitheel, FUCK Julia Gillard for being a bland twat and FUCK everyone in the Labor party for being unable to come up with a viable alternative to the most narrow-minded, backwardsarse buttfuck of a human being ever to run for office! And you know what? Fuck the liberal media for being harsher on a Labor government than they ever would on a Liberal government. Pollers, politicians, commentators and every fucking family man who’s worried about his job, you all piss me off you fucking survivalist buttasses. It’s SEXISM and you all fucking know it.

Advertising Manager Paul Foley - whilst only with us for a scant year - injected a lasting and indelible sense of joy into the office. He did this as much through his jolly work ethic as with his genuine wit (example: he’s Guy Sebastian’d this page as a parting gift). He also came equipped with an unfeasibly long list of Dad Jokes and an even longer showing of their close cousin The Daggy Comment, the favourite being when he bellowed, “Telegram from Mr Shit... I’m on my way!” whenever one of his children farted. The fact that this axiom was delivered by a manic wide-eyed goofy expression with a smile that would put a clown to shame, and accompanied by some Wiggles-grade finger pointing, pretty much ensured the sip of tea that was resting happily in my mouth only seconds earlier was sprayed liberally over the workstation. Ducks to water were impressed at how quickly he took to the role, and people’s sadness at his leaving is testament to how much the industry, and the area, will miss this most affable of gentlemen.

To the ANU—WHAT THE FUCK?!?! You PISS ME OFF. The ANU School of Music is one of the finest musical learning institutions in Australia and well done – you’ve GUTTED it. OH BUT WAIT! WE’RE OFFERING CREDIT TO STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN EXTRA-CURRICULAR MUSICAL ENDEAVOURS. Oh that’s great. Fucking perfect. I’ll just cover a Snickers bar in tin foil and record the noise it makes when I PUSH IT IN AND OUT OF MY DICK. Thanks for the CREATIVE LICENCE you fucking retards.

And Julia Winterflood. Dear Editor Julia Winterflood. A woman as awe-inspiring as her name suggests, with a heart as big as her collection of banging dresses. Never was there a person with more passion, care and enthusiasm for this town and the people in it, matched only by her talent, power and skill in delivering it. She poured her soul into these pages, throwing herself enthusiastically into debates, judging panels, concerts and the occasional pub with wit, aplomb and more than a snifter or two of ale. She weaved such magic, joy and laughter with her wonderful words both in print and in person, so I will instead summarise and honour her reign with numbers. Three wonderful years. 73 brilliant issues. One very grateful Bossman. One dear friend for ever. She leaves 73 twitching Deadline Dragons in her wake with only a speck of blood on her to show for it (which is fine, because she rocks the colour red). I shall miss Julia and her magazines as much as I shall miss torturing her with an endless parade of drum ‘n’ bass compilations. Much like my love for the woman, they will never end. My heart aches, and yet I am warmed to have known them, and to call each of them a lifelong friend. Darn it; turns out this was sloppy and fond after all. I told you I was inherently untrustworthy. ALLAN SKO - allan@bmamag.com

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WHO: hellosQuare and Spartak WHAT: Cue Funktion – pupup venue WHEN: Thurs May 10 – Sun May 20 WHERE: CCAS, Gorman House

Local DIY indie label hellosQuare is creating a pop up venue at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, Gorman House. From Thursday May 10 to Sunday May 20, Cue Funktion will be a melting pot of multifaceted artforms that inhabit the same creative landscape, one born out of a DIY spirit and unique interpretation. Cue Funktion will feature new works by Luke Penders, Elena Papanikolakis, Dylan Martorell, Helani Laisk, Robbie Karmel and Kate Ahmad while each Friday and Saturday eve from 8.30pm, Cue Funktion hosts Spartak in residency with different guests each night; May 11 is Ollie Brown, May 12 is Shopgirl, May 18 is Deafcat and May 19 is Merewomen. $5.

WHO: The Falls and Evan & The Brave WHAT: Folk Club WHEN: Fri May 11 WHERE: The Front

Folk Club is a little known Sydney gem that’s been steadily growing into a community of musicians, industry and fans alike, and provides a platform for new bands in the Sydney folk/alt-country scene. Both The Falls and Evan & the Brave have been part of Folk Club since its inception, so it seemed fitting that they join forces to take Folk Club on the road. Evan & The Brave started 2012 with a bang, with the all-singing/all-playing quintet’s first single Lil Monster being played on triple j and FBi. Touring partners in crime The Falls are nu-folk/altcountry/melodramatic pop at its broken hearted best. 8pm, $10.

WHO: REV WHAT: Come As You Are – ‘90s tribute night WHEN: Fri May 18 WHERE: Bar 32

Get ready for another instalment of REV’s ‘90s tribute night Come As You Are. On the decks will be the REV crew plus guest DJs who will take you on a journey through the decade that brought us the likes of grunge, gangsta rap, Brit bop, boy bands, US college rock, pop punk and a bucket load of trashy one hit wonders. This is the perfect excuse to dress up in your ‘90’s gear including all your favourite flannel, stripy shirts, sequins, crushed velvet and fluro numbers. Remember to get in early to avoid the line up and for cheaper entry before midnight, plus make sure to dance like it’s still 1999.

WHO: Capital Dub Style WHAT: Sub Detonator (live) and Iron Gate Sound WHEN: Thurs May 17 WHERE: Transit Bar

Capital Dub Style, Canberra’s reggae crew, return to Transit to showcase the best of the new bass heavy sounds and beats operating in and around the ACT. Sub Detonator are an explosive new live dub trio comprising the three founding members of Agency Dub Collective, playing classic modern dub: bass-heavy, hard driving rhythms, layered with strange and wondrous sonic explorations. Sub Detonator sound spacious yet ridiculously heavy, while Iron Gate Sound blend classic and modern roots reggae from up and coming artists as well as bags of big tunes from Jamaican artists past and present. 8pm, $10. Free mix CD for the first 50.

WHO: Adam Cook WHAT: World premiere of Larry Sitsky’s sonata No. 2, in three movements WHEN: Wed May 16, 12pm WHERE: Larry Sitsky Recital Room, ANU School of Music

Pianist Adam Cook will perform the world premiere of Sitsky’s Sonata No. 2, in three movements, which will be an opportunity to hear intriguing and challenging music. Larry Sitsky is an icon of Australian art music. He is the country’s most commissioned composer. His knowledge of the piano has resulted in the development of a unique language which explores the instrument to its full capacity. In Adam’s words: “ANU Vice-Chancellor Ian Young and his cronies’ recent chainsaw massacre upon the School of Music is certain to put a definitive stop to events like this, so get in while you can.” Enquiries adam-cook@hotmail.com .

WHO: City Kid Music WHAT: DJ Psar (Belgium) and Mike Hyper (Syd) WHEN: Fri May 18 WHERE: The Clubhouse

City Kid Music is back and bringing its first international to The Clubhouse, DJ Psar from Belgium. DJ Psar’s career has been marked by incredible achievements across the globe – from entertaining thousands at the hottest venues in Europe to leading exclusive parties for today’s biggest EDM artists. His unique energy and sound has been created through countless radio shows, interviews, and tours around the world; there’s no denying that Psar is more than a triple threat when it comes to his combination of skills, personality and experience. With local support from Riske, Logic, MRNP and 2Fuddha, it’s gonna be big.


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ON GUN CULTURE, NEW ORDER AND WHY GERMANS HAVE MORE CIVIL LIBERTIES. chris downton It’s fair to say that there aren’t many bands to have emerged over the past two decades whose work spans so many styles and genres as THE BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE. Since emerging at the start of the nineties as an outfit informed by the then-current UK shoe-gazing scene, TBJM’s stylistic tendrils have extended out to take in everything from Satanic Majestyesque psychedelica, country-rock and folk through to blues, experimental sound collages and even electronic elements on recent work. To a certain extent this dextrous magpie-like aesthetic is down to the guidance of bandleader Anton Newcombe, the one constant presence among TBJM for the last two decades; a period that’s seen a veritable army of members pass through the ever-shifting line-up, some of them going on to form their own high-profile acts such as Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and The Dilettantes. While TBJM have attracted high-profile fans and fairly consistent critical acclaim, in recent years it’s often been the circus surrounding the band that the popular media have been preoccupied with, something not helped by the fact that many people might only be aware of Newcombe through his less-than-flattering depiction in Ondi Timoner’s arguably biased documentary, Dig!, which cast him and TBJM as nemesis to the then-rising Dandy Warhols. In anyone’s book though, the size and consistency of TBJM’s sprawling back-catalogue is difficult to argue with, and this May sees Newcombe and the latest incarnation of TBJM touring Australia on the back of the band’s 15th studio album, Aufheben, an achievement most bands only dream of making it to with a maintained sense of integrity and quality.

It’s all just really a cage I’m building for the beast that is the body of work

After grappling with the publicity company’s slightly convoluted system of international dialling PIN numbers, I’m not even sure which country I’m about to reach Newcombe in. As it turns out, he’s firmly ensconced at home in Berlin, his base of operations for the past several years, where he’s been living with his wife. He soon proves to be one of the most engaging and chatty interview subjects I’ve had for a long time, something evidenced by the fact that our conversation, originally scheduled to 20 minutes, ends up running for an hour and a half. “I really had to get out of the US because it wasn’t good for me health-wise,” he offers when I enquire about the reasons behind the move. “Living in Europe, for a lot of reasons, is a much better lifestyle for me. One of the biggest cultural differences is that

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here in Europe people don’t intrude as much into your life and personal business as they do in the US.” At this point I mention that several of my friends have left the US in the wake of things like the Bush administration and the erosion of individual privacy, and ask Newcombe whether that’s also been a factor in his relocation. “I don’t know if you’ve ever spent much time in California but there’s just some really disgusting things about it, like gun culture,” he replies. “A lot of it is very facile, and a lot of people are completely led by the mass media. And in regard to the whole police state thing, here in Germany they can’t really do that whole fascist police thing because they’ve already been there 70 years ago. I mean, obviously they still do things like monitoring terrorists but they just can’t go too far down that path of cutting off civil liberties because they’ve already been there and the world knows it. “That’s also one of the reasons why I chose the title Aufheben [for the new album], because it has several meanings, including ‘abolish’, ‘destroy’ or ‘deserve’, and in this case I’m referring directly to the cultural rebuilding of Germany post-war,” he elaborates. “Also, Marx and Hegel referred to the term in their work... but I’m not a Commie,” he laughs. “Carl Sagan actually attached the term to the plate that was carried by the Voyager spacecraft, which also contained pictures of what humans look like and our relative position in the solar system. That’s pretty dark if you think about it, that Sagan was pretty much saying that humanity needed to be destroyed for any race that found the plate.” Given that the aforementioned Voyager plate actually provides the sleeve art for Aufheben, I’m curious to find out whether Newcombe’s aiming for any deliberate apocalyptic conceptual themes, given the myriad esoteric theories surrounding 2012. “I did want to do something that ties into all of that and there are a couple of songs on the album that do mention those sorts of themes. I also kinda like the idea that if some alien race does actually find the Voyager plate and travel to Earth, they’ll find my album and go, ‘Hey, this is the guy who sent that thing into space!’” he jokingly adds. “I’ve always been interested in the arcane and esoteric and that makes its way into the lyrics of The Brian Jonestown Massacre. I’ve always been that way, since being a child and watching things like [1970s paranormal TV program] The Mysterious World.” At this point, I’m curious to find out whether TBJM is the sort of band that approaches a new album with a definite conceptual direction from the start, or whether the process slowly reveals itself during the construction. I also mention that I’ve always noticed a mantra-like, flowing and free-associative quality to a lot of TBJM’s music. “Exactly,” Newcombe responds. “It’s like that mantra-like thing you mention. I like to think of that as almost like that speaking in tongues thing. I like to visualise myself as giving that. It’s a shamanistic state, but not pushy. I don’t have a plan, I just look for inspiration. It’s all just really a cage I’m building


for the beast that is the body of work. I make records for people I don’t know rather than for the friends that I do. I’m aiming more for the person far away overseas somewhere who I might never meet, who picks up the record and thinks, ‘What is this?’ I’ve gotten a lot of shit from people in the past saying things like, ‘He just wishes that he was living in the sixties’,” Newcombe says, sounding exasperated. I contend that half the time the aforementioned comment is possibly a thinly-veiled comment on the fact that TBJM follow a path that’s far closer to the sixties/ seventies ideal of creating albums designed to be listened to all the way through, and also mention that I found some of the more familiar TBJM songs on this year’s singles collection felt out of context when divorced from their original track listings. How does he feel about things like iTunes culture and the increased emphasis on individual tracks? “Splitting up tracks is really like making mixtapes always was and that’s great and empowering. It’s just part of today’s culture,” Newcombe responds. “But I was sort of talked into the singles collection by the guy at my label. Personally, I was against it. I mean, usually when a singles collection comes out for a band it means that they’ve gone bad or aren’t good anymore. I mean, we didn’t have t-shirts for ten years that The Brian Jonestown Massacre was going for, so why would we have a singles collection?”

In the entertainment and arts world most people have an agenda, and I don’t have an agenda

It’s exactly at this point that Newcombe brings up the two obvious subjects that I wasn’t going to be the one to mention first. “In many senses the singles collection is more a reaction to things like the Dig! movie. Have you seen it?” I reply that I have seen Dig! and didn’t really rate it as a quality piece of music doco even before the ensuing controversy. “With Dig! using TBJM music on the soundtrack they went and made a commodity, a product of this thing that we created out of all the years of our hard work. And then because of Dig! people then had a certain idea of what the band was about. In many senses the singles collection is a reaction to things like Dig!, a chance to take back the songbook and the media focus on the band. In many senses, though, Dig! backfired just as much on The Dandys as it did us, because it kind of revealed just how commercial their whole model was,” he adds. “In the entertainment and arts world most people have an agenda, and I don’t have an agenda at this point,” emphasises Newcombe. “At this point, I could say the most upsetting and shocking thing in the middle of this interview and it wouldn’t affect how thousands

of people already feel about me in any way. I played music because I wanted to play music. When I was younger and I saw punk bands play I thought, ‘These guys are idiots’, but it was empowering because it made me realise that I could do it too. We live in such a strange time. It’s easy to think that it’s a pessimistic time but I feel optimistic. If I can be the model then I will. I think there needs to be an example, to show people that you can do this by persevering over setbacks and obstacles... and I just don’t get that from people like [Lady] Gaga,” he continues. At this point I enquire whether Newcombe’s looking forward to TBJM’s impending Australian shows, and whether he’s commenced touring behind Aufheben yet. “I’m really looking forward to being in Australia, and I’m also looking forward to checking out Canberra because we haven’t played there before,” he replies. “Before we go to Australia we’re off to California to get together and jam for ten days, real workmanlike. We just spend time jamming and make it really tight; it’s a democratic process. We do lots of different things. We listen to tapes, everyone gets involved and everyone has input. [With the live shows] a lot of stuff doesn’t ever get played, but you can’t please everyone. People want lots of different things from live shows. Some people want to hear certain songs, some people want to hear all new material, some people just want a great show. I just want us to be happy and play well. “Can I just jump in and say at this point that I’d love to do a film soundtrack, although that won’t happen in the US,” Newcombe continues. “I’d love do a soundtrack and get all of my friends in to contribute parts. It’s interesting, though; I don’t really go to the cinema much anymore because there’s nothing really there that’s for me.” Curiously enough, just as I’m getting ready to conclude the interview and thank Newcombe for his time, it’s a chance passing mention of New Order that results in one of the more unexpected and interesting conversational tangents. “It’s interesting, because you know how [New Order frontman] Bernard Sumner formed that band Bad Lieutenant?” he asks. “Well, they stole a BJM guitar riff for their first single [Sink Or Swim]. They thought they could get away with it!” Unfortunately the slow deterioration of the connection quality over the preceding 90 minutes renders the title of the pilfered BJM track inaudible. “So that’s exactly why I titled one of the tracks on the new album Blue Order New Monday. It’s my revenge on them via Google. Because of the way the whole Google search algorithm works, if anyone searches for either of those terms from now on, they’re forever tied to The Brian Jonestown Massacre, and therefore me.” Anton Newcombe will be leading The Brian Jonestown Massacre into town on Friday May 18 for a show at ANU Bar supported by The Raveonettes. It’s kicking off at 7.30pm and tickets are $75.55 + bf through Ticketek.

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ALL AGES Since coming aboard the good ship BMA I’ve noticed that I have been thinking in a pirate voice and telling really bad pirate pick-up lines and jokes to anyone who will listen. So, ahoy there mateys! Thank you for having me aboard. My name is Andie, I’m 17 years old and I’m so excited for this new endeavour. I feel like a pirate with 100 bottles of metaphorical rum. I have been searching for all age gigs/shows like doubloons and this is what I have found. The chilled out Groovin The Moo festival is coming to Canberra on Sunday May 13 at The Meadows, University of Canberra. It will cost $99.90 + bf and those tickets can be bought online at Moshtix. Some of the big names include City and Colour, Public Enemy, Kimbra, Hilltop Hoods and Matt Corby. It is all ages but rated M16+ so it’s recommended that anybody younger than 16 is accompanied by a responsible adult. triple j’s Unearthed High competition gives you and your schoolYARRd chums (I high-fived myself for that awesome coincidence) the chance to win a lunchtime concert for your school with Bliss N Eso and to record a song in triple j’s studios. All you need to do is upload an original song to their website by Monday July 23. More information on how to enter/terms and conditions can be found at www.triplejunearthed.com.au/unearthedhigh .

If you love punk rock or pop punk you are in luck, with Nine Sons of Dan coming to Woden Youth Centre on Saturday May 12. Other bands in the line-up include Sounds and Seasons from Sydney and Canberra’s own Love & Satellites, DanSweeto and Little Saturn. Tickets are $10 and you can buy them at the door or online at Oztix for a small extra booking fee. If you still have nothing to do on Saturday May 12 because you aren’t really into the punk rock scene do not worry. Just casually skate on down to the Southern Cross Stadium, Tuggeranong to watch the Surly Griffins vs. Black ‘n’ Blue Belles in the awesome game of Roller Derby. Tickets can be bought online at Oztix for $11.75 + bf. A little bird told me that pirates are fans of dancing, which means you should be too. QL2 Dance Inc. is putting on a show titled Me Right Now at the Canberra Playhouse from Wed-Sat May 9-12. It showcases a young Australian ensemble of dancers exploring the idea of staying ‘forever young’ through contemporary dance. Tickets can be bought online at www.canberratheatrecentre.com.au or by calling (02) 6275 2700. And finally, for all the theatre lovers out there, I Love You, Bro, a play based on fact that delves into a modern teenager’s world of loneliness and the quest to remedy this loneliness through online chat rooms. It plays at The Street Theatre from Tue-Sat May 15-26. Tickets start from $25 and can be bought online at www. thestreet.org.au or by calling (02) 6247 1223. (Warning: this play is recommended for 16+ as it contains some mature themes.) So that is all for now and I’d like to finish with a nice pirate joke that’s so bad it’s almost good: What kind of grades did the pirate get in school? HIGH SEAS. Heh, writing this column is going to be fun. (And we’re stoked to have you aboard Andie! Let the good times roll! - Ed.) ANDIE EGAN - allagescolumn@gmail.com

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LOCALITY

This is my last column, dear readers. After three years and 73 issues it’s time for me to rediscover weekends, sleep ins and public holidays. I’ve cobbled together 73 issues of Canberra’s streetpress; it’s something I’ll cherish, be thankful for and mighty proud of for the rest of my days.

On my desk sits every issue I’ve put my name to, the oldest ones yellowed by the sun. Whenever I gaze at their spines I imagine them nestled in various bookshelves in various houses throughout my life. I’ll dip in to my BMA library every now and then, flick through a few, show a family member or friend. For each one is a two week time capsule containing not only a fortnight of music and arts in Canberra, but also a fortnight of what went on behind the scenes, what occurred during the production of each and every magazine. Each issue triggers memories and rouses reminiscing as they remind us here at BMA of what was going on in our lives at that particular time. Every article and every ad contains much more than ink on a page. There’re stories behind the features, exasperating and amusing anecdotes behind the ads. It’s one of the things that makes the job so immensely satisfying; every fortnight we have something we can hold, something tangible, of which we can be chuffed with. They’ve been a joyous three years alright, and for that I have my BMA family to thank: Publisher Scott Layne, Graphic Designer Cole Bennetts, previous Ad Man Paul Foley, previous Exhibitionist Editors Naomi Milthorpe and Yolande Norris, Sub-Ed Josh Brown, previous Sales Gal Danika Nayna, Contributor, Cool Word Man and Music Encyclopaedia Justin Hook, Contributor and Guru Scott Adams, Dance Columnist and No. 1 Go To Guy Tim Galvin, previous Editors Ben Hermann and Peter Krbavac, previous Film Editor Mark Russell and current Film Editor Melissa Wellham, photographers Andrew Mayo and Martin Ollman, and Bossman Allan Sko. Allan, you’ve made me laugh more than anyone I’ve ever known; I’ve shed countless tears of laughter because of you. Eternal thanks for bringing me on board, for the millions of inappropriate gags, for the unforgettable good times, and for smashing all those fucking annoying blowflies. Finally I want to thank my wonderful team of writers. One issue especially will forever be an extremely evocative memory trigger. Issue 379 I put together at my father’s bedside in Royal Adelaide Hospital. When I needed them most my writers were there; they helped to make the most traumatic experience of my life also the most empowering. They all do this gig for free you know, and I honestly can’t express how grateful I am for their generosity and prodigious writing ability. I leave you in the more than capable hands of the erudite, charming and genuinely lovely Ashley Thomson. He’s a rad dude and I know you’re gonna dig him and the direction he takes the mag in. I can’t wait to see where our little street rag goes. BMA has a lifetime reader and friend in me. JULIA WINTERFLOOD - julia.winterflood@gmail.com

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DANCE THE DROP

People tend to get very protective of their chosen genre of dance music. Just look at DJ Sneak’s recent rabid tweet about Swedish House Mafia being “DJ Actors” who “do not play house music” and you get an idea of what the industry can be like. The artists that I respect the most are multifarious and don’t align themselves with one genre; unpredictable diversity begets longevity. Remember that one, kids! Our Sound is back with one of my favourite heterogeneous newcomers Trumpdisco (Melbourne) on Saturday May 12 at Trinity Bar. The atomic duo have already served up hot remixes for artists like Greenskeepers, Yolanda Be Cool and Haezer and promise to put on something special when appearing within touching distance. Academy sprinkle a bit of ex-Canberra flavour into the club stew in May with two of its most famous escapees revisiting their old stomping ground for consecutive headline slots. Chris “the beard with legs” Fraser hand-delivers the Raw FM 2012 Tour to us on Friday May 25 while almost exactly 24 hours later Jeff “the legs with a beard” Drake spreads the love all over your dance sandwich on Saturday May 26. The Alliance team have also announced that they will be presenting a huge trance event on Friday June 1 under the luscious Armada label banner. The evening will include dual headliners TyDi and Myon & Shane 54 so put on your best ‘reach for the lasers’ outfit and get amongst it! Brand spanking new production team Sub Squad introduce themselves to bass fans at The Clubhouse on Saturday May 12 with international dubstep artist Ajapai of Rottun Records (Japan) headlining their inaugural event. Well-established outfit City Kid Music are back the very next weekend with a real two-pack (not a dodgy hologram) in DJ Psar (Belgium) and Mike Hyper (Sydney) on Saturday May 18. I’ve been on a real progressive tip over the last few months and I have to share with you the following list of amazing records (old and new) which I have come across (both inside the throbbing womb of clubland and in the online mega-verse) during my quest. First cab off the rank is one I picked up while trainspotting a Jerome Isma-Ae set at the Chinese Laundry in Sydney last month; Jochen Miller’s Brace Yourself completely blew me away when it dropped and still gives me ‘special tingles’ when I hear it today. It’s definitely a must have for any prog/trance fan. Maceo Plex’s Stay High Baby is one of those cool-as-fuck minimal groove tunes that grows on you with every listen. Mystery man Khainz dealt one the most impressive EDM album releases I have ever heard with the stellar Modul8 long player. Every single track is amazing! Dirty Harris finally provide us with a good quality bootleg of one of my favourite records, Rui Da Silva’s Touch Me, and last but not least Cosmic Gate have delivered a real big room progressive hammer blow with their latest single Flying Blind. TIM GALVIN tim.galvin@live.com.au

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Nici Cumpston, Barkindji people, Campsite V, Nookamka Lake 2008

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unDISCLOSED CHLOE MANDRYK The second NATIONAL INDIGENOUS ART TRIENNIAL is about to open at the National Gallery of Australia and welcomes a host of 20 visual artists from across Australia until Sunday July 22. Carly Lane, an independent Indigenous curator, has shaped the show. In the fury of installation of UNDISCLOSED (some art works reach 3m high by almost 8m wide) I spoke with Senior Curator of Indigenous Art at the NGA, Franchesca Cubillo about what we can expect this time around. She explained that the installation saw works from Naata Nungurrayi, Bob Burruwal, Lena Yarinkura and Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori hung. “It’s very exciting to see the artwork in the gallery. The works vary across media – synthetic polymer paint on canvas, fibreglass oversized masks, bark paintings, video installations, works on paper and illuminated fluorescent lighting.” One of the preconceptions about Indigenous visual art is that the canvases are primed and sculptures woven with personal histories, lore and knowledge about the land. That is an excellent starting point but only represents a fraction of the inspiration in contemporary Indigenous art. In 2012 unDisclosed explores broader themes and loops in and out of Indigenous and universal concerns. The works in the show have been created independent of one another but collectively consider rival ideas such as fact and fictions, self and country, success and failure and living the history versus remembering it. As Carly Lane has explained, “layers of public and restricted information may co-exist in a single work. unDisclosed is an attempt to bring elements of the known and unknown equally to the fore.” Jonathan Jone’s installation Lean To uses MDF wood, tarpaulin and fluorescent lights to create a glowing structure made up of two chunky panels propped up by one another. Jonathan uses everyday materials but refers to lofty ideas; the piece could be linked to minimalism, a canon of art history. It also may debate colonial and current attempts at the homogenisation or assimilation of Indigenous peoples, particularly in reference to housing or shelter. You can’t approach this space to live or sign a lease. But of his ideas more generally Jonathan has said, “throughout our history there have been moments between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians, meetings based on great insight, humility and understanding. These encounters often challenge the stereotypical relations… People like William Barak, Vincent Lingiari and Charles Perkins became pillars of support – a position and form re-created in Lean To.” The outer shell of the panels sees fluorescent tubes placed in sequential lines. This look could find a modern counterpart in white-hot highway markings, the luminescence of an overpopulated city or the swinging sign of a tattoo parlour, but actually refers to Kamilaroi and Wiradjuri cultural line work.

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I asked if the works in this exhibition had surprised Franchesca, as they largely deal with ideas of what goes undisclosed. “I am continually surprised by the changing face of contemporary Indigenous art. New artists, new work in various media and new concepts emerge on a regular basis. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art history of Australia is currently unfolding before us and it is the role of curators to present the changing face of this exciting new art practice.” Fiona Foley presents a series of 34 photographs within a mixed media work made up of three opium pipes, a sketch book, a stool and 34 brass poppy sculptures titled Let a hundred flowers bloom. This work, created in 2010, was pre-empted by Fiona’s position as an Adjunct Professor with the Queensland College of Art at Griffith University. Fiona’s presentation of a beautiful field of flowers with a very sinister undercurrent is pitch perfect. Fiona learned that in Queensland, opium was provided for and used by Indigenous and Chinese workers. It is a little known part of the state’s history that affected the health and lives of many. The event in itself was compounded by the introduction of a ‘protection act’ which removed and dispersed Aboriginal people. Missions such as Palm Island and Yarrabah were set up, and “this history is not taught in schools,” said Fiona. Christian Thompson is back again for the Triennial (a coup for other artists such as Tony Albert Vernon Ah Kee, Julie Gough and Lorraine Connelly-Northey) with a majestic video titled Heat. Running for 5.52 minutes it depicts three bare-chested but not exposed young women from the Queensland outback. The women (Charles Perkins’ granddaughters) are still as their hair is whipped up by hot air you can only imagine. Set against a soft rust background the film conveys heat moving slow and with their steely gaze you feel they are tied to the land but also possess the insight of teenagers. The artist has said, “I love the mysticism and the seductive cruelty of the desert, my home, and how it can be so elusive and alluring and potentially life threatening.” Christian’s work is similar to the themes of Jonathan and Fiona because it brings up binary ideas of performance and reality and the irony of communicating earth, wind and fire in a near empty room indoors. unDisclosed will be a sight for sore eyes because aside from the NGA’s new exhibition space, our exposure to contemporary Indigenous art in Canberra is not as far reaching as other cities, Franchesca added. “I do think that Indigenous art is well represented in Canberra, however it would be great to see more local contemporary art by young Indigenous artists in the community.” The National Indigenous Art Triennial, unDisclosed, opens at the National Gallery of Australia Friday May 11 and runs to Sunday July 22. The exhibition is open 10am-5pm every day. Free.


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THOSE THREE LITTLE WORDS (AND ‘BRO’) BEN HERMANN In 2007 a 14-year-old boy from Manchester was charged with inciting his own murder after convincing another boy of 16 to attempt to kill him with a six-inch knife. Over the course of nine months the boy known as ‘Johnny’ posed as six different online characters to ensnare and manipulate the older boy ‘Mark’, eventually convincing him that Johnny was a Government spy who needed killing. Melbourne’s Adam Cass was so enthralled by the mysterious tale of love, lies and deception that he turned the story into the awardwinning one-man play I LOVE YOU, BRO. The play premiered at the 2007 Melbourne Fringe Festival and went on to receive extensive acclaim throughout the UK including at the 2008 Edinburgh Fringe Festival. “The whole script is extremely complex. It’s 30 pages of words with around 15 different characters and voices,” says Brisbane’s Leon Cain, the actor tasked with playing Johnny, Mark and Johnny’s various characters in director David Berthold’s production of the play. “But probably the most difficult thing for me first time around was just the pressure of what it means to do a one-man play; to keep an audience enthralled for a whole hour and ten minutes.” Johnny’s tale and the circumstances of his meticulously planned ‘suicide’ have both bewildered and captivated onlookers since they were made public in 2007. His manipulation of Mark, albeit cruel, is often overshadowed by the public interest in the mind of a boy who appeared so lost, lonely and powerless that he turned to the internet as a means of creating his own reality. “I have more sympathy than frustration for Johnny because in a weird, twisted way, Johnny’s intentions are still meant in a good way, or at least he sincerely sees it that way in his own mind,” says Cain. “I think audiences as well are drawn to Johnny because of his desire for intimacy. He has a big heart and loves completely. But as an outsider you can see he is still young and doesn’t really know what love is.” The current production opened in 2010 with La Boite Theatre Company in Brisbane. The initial season was extended due to popular demand and its success resulted in the decision to take it on a 24-show tour in 2012. Cain says that he undertook a lot of research when preparing for the role of Johnny. Berthold would let him try his own approach initially and then ‘mould’ his performance to bring out the complexity of Johnny and his enigmatic psyche. “The strongest emotion that Johnny draws from you is sheer bewilderment in the way his mind works and what he actually does, especially considering his age.” I Love You, Bro plays at The Street Theatre from Tue-Sat May 15-26. Tickets are $25-$35, available through The Street’s website (www.thestreet.org. au) or by calling 62471223.

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my mind are amazing tools for crafting community and empowering young people. I work in a school as a chaplain and I hang out at the Bimberi Youth Justice Centre often; I’m all too familiar with the jarring statistics that have been grafted onto this generation of young people. A quarter of young Australians aged 16-24 suffer from a common mental health illness. There are young people in schools cutting their arms, abusing drugs and alcohol, finding themselves homeless, committing crimes, taking their lives…

SAY YOU, CARE TO SLAM? Will Small Everyone has a different voice. Everyone has different stories. Everyone has different ways of using their different voices to tell their different stories. And everyone’s voices and stories and different ways of telling them matter. It all starts to jumble together doesn’t it? These are the statements I’ve been thinking and breathing and speaking for the last few months. I believe each of them. And over the last year with the help of some very supportive friends and poets I’ve been able to be a part of something new that we’re starting called ANU VOICE POETRY SLAMS. We aren’t trying to reinvent the wheel. We are trying to make more wheels start spinning in more places. In particular, schools. I believe that creativity and rhythm and poetry and hip hop music and this whole collection of things that have jumbled into one big mass in

When you don’t listen to people’s voices, they find other ways to shout. When you give people their voices, they sing. I’ve seen girls with marked arms sing out beautiful, sweet melodies. I’ve heard a refugee speak out with rhythmic courage about the horrible things he’s witnessed. I have heard the voiceless find their voice. I have seen the unseen stand tall. I believe that ink on the page needs to replace blood on the arms. I believe that the voices of individuals are more powerful than numbers on websites. I believe that everyone is a poet. And that poetry really can change the world. We are extending the invitation to everyone that poetry is not exclusive or elusive. We are creating opportunities for High School/ College students in the ACT to speak out and take pride in their unique voice. We are yelling at a mountain, hoping to start an avalanche. At Kippax Library on Thursday April 12 we kicked these events off for the year. On Wednesday May 16 at Erindale Library we’ll take things up a notch. Then it’s Gungahlin on the Wednesday July 25 and finally on Wednesday August 22 at Theatre 3 we are going to pull all the strings together, let all the snow fall and yell, bleed, laugh and listen to the young people in Canberra. Consider yourself formally invited. The next ANU Voice Poetry Slam will be a ‘mini-slam’ at Erindale Library on Wednesday May 16, 6pm-8pm. Admission is free. Visit www.drss.anu.edu. au/student_equity/voice_poetry_slam.php for more details.

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“I’ve tried to approach the art making process in a traditional way,” he says of his preference for digital methods. “If you have a canvas you can just slap on the paint – and there’s a point when you can go further or you can stop. With digital media you can keep working on it, you can add bits; undo, if you make a mistake. I still do those things – I use the digital medium to my advantage – but I try and look at it like it’s a painting.”

SKY AQUARIUM AND THE WORLD OF TOMORROW Lauren StrickLand My interview with digital painter PAUL SUMMERFIELD took place while he was in the middle of hanging his new exhibition. He was having difficulty squeezing the 18 intricately detailed works that constitute Sky Aquarium into The Front’s small cafe/gallery space. “It’s a really good space,” he tells me, taking a few minutes away from the assembly process. “It’s a bit more grungy than some other spaces. It’s kind of like someone’s lounge room.” Paul has shown his work in dozens of cafes across Australia and enjoys the experience of working in a busy cafe atmosphere. But Paul’s paintings are sometimes too big to fit into cosy coffeescented nooks. He was one of five artists selected to be part of Enlighten’s Architectural Projections; Paul saw his piece The Moad scrolling across the sides of Old Parliament House, blown up to nearly 600 metres in size. The finely lined and richly detailed nature of his work made him a natural fit for the large-scale project.

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A previous exhibition was the product of a year spent living in Japan, but Sky Aquarium is not bound by such an earthly setting. “Sometimes I make up stories to go along [with the artworks]. There’s no real geographical counterpart but some of the works... [form] a series. The same kind of colours or buildings. I guess I’m building my own little locations; my own little imaginary worlds.” His imaginary creations are full of the kind of hidden details you’d expect from actual places. Some of the paintings are crammed with activity; others are more subtly complicated. A particularly mesmerising piece from Sky Aquarium seems initially to be a simple arrangement of bright blue water and luminous pink flowers; closer inspection reveals fish painted so that each scale is visible. Allowing me a glimpse into the half-hung exhibition, Paul tells a story of how he once hid a picture of his own face in a painting. “No one noticed it for years,” he laughs. “Then once they realised it was there, it was all they could see.” Sky Aquarium is a bright, curious collection of work full to the brim with half-concealed, fascinating detail. Undoubtedly the more time you spend with his work, the more beauty you will find lurking there. Sky aquarium is open now and continues until Monday May 21 at The Front Café and Gallery, Lyneham. Entry is free.


CANBERRA LENS ITSELF TO ART chloe mandryk IN MY EYES is an exhibition of photography on show now at the Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre. Six entrants are from the Canberra School of Art, helping make up a group of 25 drawn from the Australian National University across the disciplines of Science, Humanities, Asian and Pacific studies and Business. It’s a collection of images that explores how ephemera and familiar sites consolidate our connection to this city. The exhibition was conceived as a community project to bring international students of ANU and domestic students into conversation and if nothing else you might find that individuals from a diverse background share a sentimental journey. Ruo Yan presents a 360-degree panoramic landscape taken at dusk from Black Mountain Tower because, “the first time that I fell in love with Canberra was when I saw the city from afar, with an outsider’s perspective. I’m from Sydney and when I first came here by myself to study I felt I should still be in Sydney. But now I feel a sense of belonging. Canberra’s my home.” Joseph Ting’s photograph is of the ubiquitous ducks of the ANU campus, which he hopes will transmit a sense of happiness and nostalgia. Joseph explains, “I find it especially enjoyable when I see a story unfold through a still image, the way it invokes all the other senses although it relies on sight alone.” He continues, “All these images are contrary to the common belief that Canberra is a boring, lifeless city that came into existence as a result of a discord between its two closest cities. My piece shows the way that nature weaves itself into the lives of people in Canberra, which is also expressed through other pieces, amongst other ideas… I hope people will feel a sense of belonging because they are one of the 400,000 out of the 7 billion in the world who understand what these works mean, just because of Canberra.” Jessica Hioe’s entry is of the poster board outside the Copland Building on the ANU Campus. Uniquely her image is inspired by the campus at night. She explains, “although it has been stated to be ‘unsafe’, I must admit that ANU at night is the best time to walk around. It’s the only time when it looks completely beautiful with its ‘orangey’ lights around and the way the lights glow and cast funny dim shadows on the trees. It gives off an eerie feeling but no matter how peculiar the atmosphere becomes because of the lighting there is definitely something satisfying about it.” Jessica concludes, “a fragmented depiction of Canberra, the nation’s capital, is produced, but this fragmented perception of Canberra by various students is tied together through a common theme and purpose.” Visit the Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre before Wednesday May 16 to catch the In My Eyes exhibition. It is open daily Mon-Fri, 8.30am-6pm, and admission is free.

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Not so says Merchant. “Some people think he’s an actor called Graham and we write all the lines for him. Some people think he’s a comedian who’s playing a character. But this is who he is and he does think these things. What started as the Ricky and Steve show became the Karl Pilkington Show and we were simply there to prod and poke and get him talking. And out it came.”

I’M WITH STUPID justin hook Most comedians go to great lengths to point out their act is exactly that – an act. Tracy Jordan made some unsavoury remarks about his son and homosexuals and it was an act, you see, a character. He doesn’t really believe what he says. Being ‘in character’ gives you freedom to say insane things with impunity. Karl Pilkington has quite the opposite problem – very few people believe he’s real. Whether it’s playing foil to STEPHEN MERCHANT and Ricky Gervais in the groundbreaking podcast series (The Ricky Gervais Show) or being sent around the world to marvel at the otherness of others (An Idiot Abroad) Pilkington is often assumed to be a character – a hapless, ignorant round-headed buffoon – created by two of the most successful comedy writers of their generation.

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And Pilkington spouts some intensely ridiculous things; suggesting nothing gets done by planning, wondering what those things in the film Gremlins are called and claiming to have witnessed a bee having a heart attack. There’s no doubt he can deliver some off-kilter observations. But how does he feel about being called a fictional creation? “He’s annoyed at the idea that people think he’s an actor. That frustrates him. He lives in his own universe and the world doesn’t impact on him so generally other people’s opinion of him doesn’t concern him. But I think he wants people to know it’s not an act and he is reacting genuinely and he has done all those things and when you see him pissed off he’s not playing it up for the cameras.” Suffering is the name of the game for An Idiot Abroad, a show where Ricky and Steve try their hardest to make Karl as uncomfortable as possible. After the success of the first series a second was always on the cards. Selling it to Pilkington wasn’t easy. “It was a tough job to get him to do another series because he really was angry, hateful and exhausted. But he agreed reluctantly so we tried to give him the illusion he had more control. But rather like magicians with a pack of cards – you think you made a free choice but actually we forced you to take it. The same with Karl.” In the end, Pilkington went through with it to prove his mettle, explains Merchant. “He didn’t want to give us the satisfaction of seeing him freak out. Which is even more bizarre because we got exactly what we wanted.” An Idiot Abroad: Season Two is out now on DVD and Blu-Ray through Roadshow.


and the lengths he must go to in order to maintain his power. This is the first time Bell Shakespeare have toured Macbeth to Canberra in almost 20 years. Speaking to cast member Lizzie Schebesta, one quickly discovers that Macbeth will follow in the company’s tradition of viewing Shakespeare’s plays in a new and modern light.

STANDS SCOTLAND WHERE IT DID? Liam Demamiel Having to suffer through at least one of William Shakespeare’s plays at high school is one of the universal Australian experiences. Whether it be Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet or another of the 36 works the master playwright penned, teenage apathy, poor teaching and an inevitable reliance on Spark Notes sapped most people’s interest in experiencing Shakespeare’s works in the form in which they were intended to be enjoyed: on the stage. However, Bell Shakespeare, founded in 1990 with a focus on interpreting Shakespeare’s plays through a contemporary lens, has gone a long way towards reversing the Australian public’s disinterest in experiencing live Shakespeare. Bell Shakespeare’s latest touring production is MACBETH. A classic depiction of how ambition and power can corrupt, Macbeth tells the story of a man who carries out regicide in order to become king

“This is not a traditional production of Macbeth,” Schebesta tells me when asked what Canberrans can expect of the play. “It has very much been pulled apart and re-analysed to give it a new, younger feel. However, there is still fidelity to the original work,” she says. “It is definitely going to appeal to a younger generation and there are many different influences on the treatment, including Japanese horror films... At the core of it, the play is about a good man whose heart gets corrupted and we are very much truthful to this. Bell Shakespeare are a wonderful company to work for, and really gave me input into the production.” Playing all three of the play’s infamous three witches, Schebesta notes the need for companies like Bell Shakespeare to give audiences something different to traditional productions. “I play all of the three witches in one character, in a kind of possession. This makes the characters seem more real and scary. It brings a new feel to the play and gives the audience something different.” When asked what she thinks of Macbeth compared to Shakespeare’s other works, Schebesta tells me that she didn’t like the play at first. “It was very difficult for me to relate to. With themes of murder and war I always felt that it was a very masculine play. But now I realise that it has a very strong feminine energy. It is perhaps the most poetic of Shakespeare’s plays. The language is so rich, emotional and wonderful.” Macbeth opens at The Playhouse on Thursday May 17 and runs to Saturday June 2. Tickets are $33-$130 available through the Canberra Theatre Centre website or by calling 6275 2700.

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ARTISTPROFILE: U.K. Frederick

What do you do? I work in a variety of artistic media such as photography, printmaking, video and installation to find new ways of thinking about the stuff that already exists in the world. So for example, I run vinyl records under an etching press, or make photograms from old cassette tapes. When did you get into it? I guess I’ve been in love with art since I was young but the way in which my art practice draws on my other interests has really coalesced in the last couple of years. Who or what influences you as an artist? I’m very interested in the way people shape the world and how our surroundings influence who we are. So I like to observe and think about the everyday traces and objects that people ‘leave behind’. For me music and popular culture are as influential as other visual artists or artworks. Elvis is as important as dada. What’s your biggest achievement/proudest moment so far? In terms of being an artist I feel that every time something comes full circle from an idea to a process to a final artwork is something to be proud of but I guess my first solo show was the most exciting moment thus far. What are your plans for the future? I have a few key art projects I want to start once I’ve finished my PhD at the School of Art. One of these is a performance piece where I take apart my car. I also want to do some residencies and travel. What makes you laugh? Trying to krump. What pisses you off? The tendency for people to disrespect the non-human aspects of our world, like animals and the environment. What’s your opinion of the local scene? Canberra is chock-ablock full of creative people but many of them are tucked away in their own little circles. So you can always be surprised by meeting a new and amazing person who is making art. The Canberra arts community that I know is really friendly and supportive of one another, and that is as it should be. What are your upcoming performances/exhibitions? My next solo show is at CCAS Manuka in the last week of May then in early June I’ve curated a group show on the Transit of Venus at Photospace, ANU. Contact info: ursula@ukfrederick.com

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UNINHIBITED Democracy. Know what I’m saying? Worst system of governance apart from all the others, so said Churchill. Frequently misunderstood, often argued over, but in the main, a fairly reasonable way of doing business. Gives us all a minor but equal say. The thing is, as somebody else said, some are more equal than others. Conversations about space in this city are incredibly important. Be it a discussion on venues for music and performance or something more fundamental like where we all live, the planning of our city is something we should all be interested in. It’s more expensive to rent here than anywhere else in the nation. Most of us under 35 will struggle to own our own place. So we should be active. Right? Then where are we? Because if we have a look at the numbers attending community consultations regarding development in the city, one could be forgiven for assuming that most Canberrans under 55 couldn’t give a flyer. As recent community consultations affecting areas as diverse as Hawker shops, light rail systems and development of the car parking areas which inexplicably surround the lake (name me one other city in the world that devotes its prime waterfront real estate to car parks—one!), the young folk who, should they choose to stay, will form the future of this city are largely absent.

Thanks to some political difficulties in the last stages of Jon Stanhope’s third term as Chief Minister, community consultations have become a huge part of the planning process in this town—a way to demonstrate that the Government is listening to the people. Sure, they’re talk-fests full of people with vested interests. But that’s democracy. It’s really about whose lobbyist is bigger. Which group can illustrate the loss or gain of votes. Government is interested in retaining power. Groups are interested in protecting their patch of land, their ‘way of life’. So it goes. The problem is that often the loudest voices at these events tend to be those with time on their hands. Retirees feature prominently. And you can expect the older citizens to be far less interested in change, in public transport, in infill and hi-rise development, the stuff that builds more energised and exciting modern urban hubs. Any hint of noise ‘pollution’ and these folk will scream murder. Arts facilities? Music venues? Forget about it. Complaint is the curse of Canberra. Those of us who love it here and work at contributing to the kind of city we and the nation can be proud of bemoan the lack of engagement and the lack of energy in discussing and lobbying for and building a progressive urban city. We need to be vocal. As much as your presence is required at gigs, exhibitions and performances it is also necessary at these community discussions. The coffee is bad, the sandwiches old and maybe you can think of more entertaining outings for your night time. But the future of your city depends on your voice. GLEN MARTIN glenpetermartin@gmail.com

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bit PARTS WHO: Canberra International Music Festival WHAT: Music from the Silk Road WHEN: Sun May 13, 7.30pm WHERE: National Museum of Australia On Sunday May 13 hear the NMA filled with the exotic sounds of Chinese, Sephardic, Turkish, and Uyghur music played on traditional instruments. The concert will feature music from China with Dr Wang Zheng Ting, a highly respected Chinese musician and director of the Australian Chinese Music Ensemble, and tabla player Bobby Singh, one of the most sought-after musicians on the Australian world music circuit, among many others. Purchasing a ticket for the Silk Road concert will provide you with free entry to the National Museum’s wonderful new exhibition Travelling the Silk Road. For more info head to view all festival details at www.cimf.org.au .

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WHO: Canberra International Music Festival WHAT: Inspired by Gamelan WHEN: Sat May 12, 5.30pm WHERE: National Library of Australia Indonesian Gamelan has had a remarkable influence on Western modern music. This concert features a number of works inspired by Gamelan music by Australian and American composers Richard Meale, Anne Boyd, Peter Sculthorpe and Lou Harrison. The attraction of Gamelan to Western modern composers seems to be twofold: elements of rhythm which include hypnotic layers and quick tempo changes plus intonation and timbre as the pitches of the bells and gongs do not directly correspond to the Western scale. The result is the creation of a wonderful new and exciting sound. The concert will feature percussionists Michael Askill and Gary France and his ensemble DRUMatix. For more info and to view all festival details head to at www.cimf.org.au . WHO: Ray McJannett WHAT: The Seven Days WHEN: Wed May 9 – Sun May 20 WHERE: ANCA Gallery, Dickson The Seven Days is six series of photographs in a mix of old and new, produced between 1890 and 2010. The collection is presented by Ray McJannett and the images are his own as well as found photographs. The six series consist of the following descriptors: Glass (glass plate negatives from 1890), Neon (Polaroids from 1990 exploring the work of the sculptor Neil Roberts), The Seven Days (Polaroids from 1990), Cosmic Wheels (images that reflect a passage through time), Face (black and white photographs tracing different aspects of what we sometimes encounter in a face), and The Farm Series (which centres on a windswept soldier settler property on the edge of the NSW snow fields). WHO: Fast+Fresh WHAT: Play writing workshops WHEN: Mon May 21 WHERE: Canberra Theatre Centre

WHO: Turkey’s most acclaimed contemporary filmmaker, Nuri Bilge Ceylan WHAT: Once Upon A Time In Anatolia (M) WHEN: Thurs May 10 – Sun May 20 WHERE: Arc Cinema, NFSA Somewhere in the badlands of Anatolia, a motorcade weaves along a potholed highway. Inside the crowded lead police car junior detectives gossip. The local prosecutor is quietly doing the political calculus on the crime under investigation. The local medical examiner wishes he was elsewhere. Only the suspect, Kenan, sits mute – hinting that something deeper is happening here. Although this is somewhere in modern Turkey, the set-up could be from any hard boiled Hollywood noir procedural movie. But over this one long night and morning after of the criminal investigation, the new film from Turkey’s most acclaimed contemporary filmmaker, Nuri Bilge Ceylan seeks out the metaphysical place where film noir and the transcendent cinema of Bresson and Tarkovsky come together. nfsa.gov.au .

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Are you a young playwright? Have you ever wanted to present a short play in a theatre? Playwright Alex Broun will be running two workshops at the CTC on how to write a ten minute play. Getting an idea across in ten minutes requires strict control. For playwrights contemplating a career in television, learning to write to a timeframe is essential. For students under 19, who plan to enter the Fast+Fresh ten minute play festival on June 5-9, this is a “must attend” masterclass. Afterwards, rehearse your script at school then perform it in the festival. To book, email tony.martin@act.gov.au .

WHO: CCAS Members WHAT: The End of the World – CCAS Members Show WHEN: Opening 6pm Fri May 18, continuing on Sun May 19 WHERE: CCAS, Gorman House For several years the CCAS Members Show has been held at the Manuka space, but this year it returns triumphant to Gorman House for The End of the World! CCAS’ many talented members, new and long-standing, are entering their takes on the apocalyptic theme. You can expect a lot of variety and a lot of fun, and all works are for sale! The winners will be announced by judge Julian Hobba, Canberra 100 Program Manager for Arts and Culture. Come one, come all to the opening to end all openings.


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BIC FROM THE DID Holly orkin When BIC RUNGA was just 20 she released her first ever single, Drive, from the album of the same name. The album went platinum in the singer’s home country, New Zealand, and gold here in Australia. One of the other singles from the album, the stunning song Sway made it onto the American Pie soundtrack. That was 16 years ago now and Runga has just released her third album, Belle. Furthermore, the American Pie franchise is releasing another movie (2012 is when the world is about to end, yeah?). Three albums in 16 years may not sound like a lot but the music industry is fickle and there is something to be said for artists who manage longevity as Runga has done, so what has kept this Kiwi songbird going? “The musicians I’ve met have kept me going. Last week in the UK Jimmy Page came to my show. That knocks me out! What could be better than having Jimmy Page come to your show? He’s hanging out on the couch in our band room like it’s the most normal thing in the world and for a second I feel like these years of hard work and uncertainty have been absolutely worthwhile.”

Success always feels better if it’s hard fought and won

In those many years Runga has toured around the world and been involved with all kinds of projects, including the ultimate project of having a kid. However for someone in an industry that expects albums regularly Runga went about producing new music her own way. “It wasn’t exactly intentional [that there be so much time between albums], but I felt like I needed to take some time out in order to come up with something fresh. “I didn’t want to keep writing the same song over and over again so I went away and I had my son and focused solely on that for a bit. The industry seems very different to me now, especially after waking up from a six year career coma. The internet is very important, speaking directly to your audience, blogs, social media. I think this change is great for cottage industry type bands who can now make a living through things like Bandcamp or Topspin and be speaking directly to fans.” With fans all over the world Runga is also one of New Zealand’s top selling artists of all time, although according to her that’s not just where success lies. “New Zealand is a tiny and isolated place, and selling a lot of records in New Zealand doesn’t filter down to any other country in the world! But I’ve been lucky to have some success in things like film synchs in the US with Sway being used in American Pie, and the odd hit in places like Ireland and Japan. I don’t know how I’ve survived really but I love the work and I like the upward struggle. Success always feels better if it’s hard fought and won.”

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Bic Runga will appear at The Street on Sunday May 13, 7.30pm, supported by Ollie Brown. Tickets are available through The Street for $40 + bf.


ONE HAPPY CAMPER, EH Baz Ruddick KIM CHURCHILL had no doubt of what he was going to do upon finishing high school. He bought a campervan, packed his guitar and his surfboard and set his sights on the open road. A few years later and that fresh-faced high school graduate is now a full-time touring, road-living, songwriting, one-man experimental rock band. Kim Churchill is a rare breed of musician that you don’t meet too often. The guy grabs life by the balls. “As soon as I finished school I bought the van and I took off touring full-time. I don’t know if I had faith or ignorance. If I was going to make that sort of decision now there would be a million things I would analyse and take into consideration… I’m glad because in hindsight if I wasn’t ignorant I probably wouldn’t have done it.”

I don’t know if I had faith or ignorance

Ironically Kim’s big break in Australia came partly from his break in Canada, where he met his now-manager whilst playing a festival celebrating poutine, Canada’s national drunk cuisine (chips, gravy and melted cheese). Having signed to independent label Indica (based in Quebec), he was able to record his album Detail of Distance in Vancouver. “We had a lot at our disposal. It was like a dream come true. Led Zeppelin actually recorded part of their second album there.” Like a second home, Kim has a life in Canada that parallels his life here. “I live on the road. I have a campervan here and a campervan there. I have a lot of good friends in Canada… Especially in Quebec. The snow is banked up six meters either side of the path and I’m just this Aussie surfer dude singing songs about living in a campervan and sleeping in beach car parks. That element of my outfit fits into Quebec very well. It’s a very dropout place and I find certain festivals there are really easy to work. Touring Canada for me is almost like when The Beatles used to go to Hamburg. It’s where I really cut my teeth. I really grew up a lot on those tours. They gave me a lot of maturity.” Being an independent artist, Kim is all too aware of the challenges of competing with the deplorable pop scene. “There are so many people doing what they need to do to sell records. For me commercialism is slowly draining a lot of the depth of good music and making it very mediocre. I’d rather be an old man and be happy that I didn’t compromise myself and wrote stuff that meant a lot to me. All those little pieces of ear candy that record companies like to hear on songs like piano melodies and vocal harmonies and hooks I ended up taking off in my final cut. I’d rather not be a massive superstar but be proud of everything I created and I made.” Along with his sweet van Kim Churchill will be bringing his one man show to Transit Bar Thursday May 10, 8pm, supported by Benjalu and Microwave Jenny. Tickets are $15 +bf through Moshtix..

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THE LAST HURRICANE

IN AND OUT OF CANBERRA

hayley ferris

alistair erskine

After the announcement of lead singer Clint Boge’s departure from THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT the boys will be holding one last national tour. The tour will see The Butterfly Effect performing farewell shows to pay tribute to the last ten years and give thanks to fans for their support. I caught up with guitarist Kurt Goedhart for a chat about the Effected tour and the band’s future. The official statement from Clint about his departure was published early February. “It was about six months before the announcement that we knew for sure it was going to happen,” explains Kurt, “and that time wasn’t spent twiddling our thumbs. We wanted to do this right.” Discussing the tour Kurt says, “We thought it was the right thing to do by giving [fans] the chance to see us for the last time and get some sort of closure, not only for them but for us as well.”

Last weekend I formed a band with my friends in the hope of playing the Austin Psyche Festival in 2013. We settled on the name Black Satin and wondered if THE RAVEONETTES would mind us naming our band after them. Sune Wagner laughs happily, “We wouldn’t mind at all. Throughout our career it’s been fantastic seeing designers and artists incorporate our music, songs and titles into various pieces!”

It’s weirder when they don’t speak English and they still cry, but other than that it’s fantastic

The tour kicked off Thursday April 26 and I ask Kurt what attendees could expect. “We’ve put a lot of time into this tour,” Kurt replies. “We’re still playing all the old songs but we’ve written new sections, intros and outros. This is the last time that we’re playing live together so we thought we’d come out, give them a bit of a ‘tszuj’… We’ll be giving it our all on this one.” I informed Kurt the tour had already sold out in some places. “It’s fantastic… There are so many people out there that we’ve made an impact on… [It’s] all you can hope for as a musician.” Kurt went on, “it is a bit weird though when [fans] cry, and even weirder when they don’t even speak English and yet they’re still crying, but other than that it’s fantastic.” Have auditions already been held for a new lead singer? Kurt chooses his words carefully before he speaks: “Yes, we are looking for a new singer. Lately though we’ve just been writing, writing and writing as much music as possible.” He then says laughing, “I mean we’re doing what we can to continue this passion that we have. We’re in that stage of the process where we’re finding that out ourselves. I think once we find the right singer we’ll know. That’ll dictate a lot of the material that we’ve been writing. I can’t give you a direction our music is going in but I can guarantee you it won’t have an acoustic guitar in it.” Kurt reassures me that the band is excited for the change. “The last ten years have been great but then again the last three or four years have not been so great in our creative sense. I mean, we’ve got the job done but there was a lot more disappointment than excitement… so we’re all looking forward to the next project for us where we can go back to being excited and pumped, like it was back in the early days.” The Butterfly Effect play the UC Refectory Wednesday May 16 from 8pm supported by Numbers Radio and Greenthief. Tickets are $53.05 + bf through Oztix.

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Denmark’s dynamic shoegaze duo are headed for Canberra for the first time, in support of the legendary The Brian Jonestown Massacre. Have they toured with TBJM before? “Actually I played bass in BJM for a while and I think it will be fun. I’m really good friends with Anton. He used to live in New York where I do and we would talk music for hours on end. He lives in Berlin these days. I’m looking forward to seeing him again.”

Living this offthe-charts weird life, that’s where all the musical inspiration I need is

Their most recent release, four-track EP Into The Night, does not deviate too far from the path of the sound The Raveonettes have carved out over the course of a decade but it turns out that this is a bit of an outlier with an LP due at the end of the year, “which is very different from the EP. Making music is really based on where you are in your life and we have made the new album which we consider is like nothing we have done before. “Our new album is gloomy, still with guitars, and piano but different instrumentation. It was done incredibly fast over the course of two weeks so it’s brand new to us and we hardly knew the songs when we recorded them. So the record has a charming ignorance buoyed by the fact that we recorded it at Sunset Sound, which is really a wonderful legendary studio, which gave the process a really good vibe and push to live up to a studio with such an amazing legacy. We took it really seriously. It’s nice to be part of it and the legacy and the myths have always been the most fun part about music.” I ask about whether the Into The Night EP was specifically released to coincide with Record Store Day and Suge knows exactly where this is going and laughs, “Well yeah it was, but… well… um… I’m not really a big vinyl man. Over the years I lost interest in a lot of it. I have my collection of things that I like. I mean, I own every single Cramps album, so… and I don’t know what I could buy to get to make that better. For me my relationship with music these days is more about the experience. Getting to travel around the world, meeting crazy people, living this off-the-charts weird life, that’s where all the musical inspiration I need is. ” The Raveonettes will open for The Brian Jonestown Massacre at ANU Bar, Friday May 18. Proceedings kick off at 7.30pm and tickets are $75.55 + bf through Ticketek.


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following his killer album with Hasaan Mackey from 2011. Add the DITC’s O.C. on the mic device and it’s a sureshot.

THE REALNESS Ex-Canberran and Broken Tooth label member Maggot Mouf is set to unleash his next record Running With Scissors this May. Distributed by Obese, the album is a collaboration with producer/ DJ Sammy Scissors. In true Maggot style, the album presents a true original on the mic, exploring his current state of life and tongue-incheek topical and conceptual expression of the world around him. The album features appearances from DJ Paypercutts, DJ Buick, Mata & Must, Scott Skills, Gutz, Kid Selzy and Retainer. Check the album when it drops. Maundz has dropped a brand new mixtape entitled Tape It Back which is available for free download on www.ozhiphop.com. It’s a precursor of the next Maundz album proper, Zero, which is due on Friday May 25. Chock full of classic Maundz tunes, radio show freestyles, rare tracks and collaborations, it’s about time to get your dl on right? Also for the lovely price of free is the brand new EP from highly slept-on and underrated producer/MC Mdusu. Entitled 88 ½ (apparently the BPM of all the tunes on the release) it features ill boom-bap production from Duse himself and guest raps from the likes of Class A, BVA, Dunn D, Rigby and Wiz Kid. You can dl it from mdusu.bandcamp.com/album/88-1-2-ep. Geddit! Also just released on the hip hop tip is the latest album on Mello Music Group from Apollo Brown and O.C. Entitled Trophies the album features more boom-bap goodness from Apollo on the beats

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Workaholic producer and taste maker Statik Selektah is back again, this time producing the entirety of the brand new Reks album Straight No Chaser on Showoff/Brick. You know what you’re getting with this one! Featuring usual suspects Easy Money, Action Bronson, Kali, JFK, Termanology and more. It’s out now. FlyLo’s Brainfeeder imprint has a big June/July planned with album releases scheduled from Ryat and Jeremiah Jay. Ryat will deliver her album Totem on Tuesday June 5 and will further refine her experimental vocal-led sound as heard on her self-released Avant Gold record last year. Her extremely spiritual sound has found its perfect home at Brainfeeder. Looking forward to hearing the results of her work. DJ Shadow is getting set to release Total Breakdown: Hidden Transmissions from the MPC Era 1992-1996 through his website. Digging into the archives of his own early material, Hidden Transmissions promises to be a fascinating glimpse into Shadow’s early work and will be available on CD and double vinyl LP for all the wax heads. Not content with releasing their music and running two awesome labels, Modeselektor are getting set to unveil the second in their Modeselektion compilation series. Vol. 2 due out in July will feature brand new exclusives from the killer line-up of Addison Groove, Egyptrixx, Monolake, Bambounou, Clark, Mouse On Mars, Lazer Sword, Phon.O, Sound Pellegrino, Thermal Team, Dark Sky, Diamond Version, Prefuse 73, Frikstailers, Siriusmo, Jan Driver and Anstam. DOPE! ROSHAMBO AKA CED NADA - roshambizzle@yahoo.com.au


METALISE Cannibal Corpse will bring their cavalcade of perversions to the country in October for the first time since 2009. They hit The Metro in Sydney on Wednesday October 6. Tickets through Ticketek. The last weekend of the month is a big one in the ACT. Tim ‘Ripper’ Owens and band are at The Basement Friday May 25 with Hazmat and The Devilzwork. The following evening is Metal Fiesta 2 featuring House of Thumbs, King Parrot, Amodus, Dark Nemesis, Frankenbok, Inside the Exterior, Na Maza, Our Last Enemy, Psynonemous, Tortured and Wretch. Then Sunday May 27 at The Phoenix in Civic is the Law of The Tongue demo launch. You can check their seven-track opus on Bandcamp right now, and what’s more its FREE: www.lawofthetongue.bandcamp.com. That’s a BIG weekend of metal. Mortal Sin have called it a day after Mat Maurer announced on Facebook: “This is an official announcement from Mat Maurer. I have decided to leave the band for personal reasons, & irreconcilable differences. Last year was an incredibly difficult year for me personally & I have decided to put my family first. Thank you to everyone who has supported me over the years. Over & out. Mat.” They had intended to continue and tour with Dave Tinelt on vocals, however they announced this week that they’re splitting. For those keeping score, that’s the fourth time. The Creptter Children hit The Basement on Friday May 11. On Wednesday May 15 Belco’s home of heavy hosts Hyno5e, Psynonemous and Tortured and the following weekend Elysian are also at The Basement on Friday May 18 with Sydney’s Anno Domini, Psynonemous and The Seer. Make Them Suffer have announced an Australian tour and hits the Tuggeranong Youth Centre Wednesday July 4 with Resist The Thought. DevilDriver pulled the pin on their Aussie tour with Darkest Hour and Six Feet Under due to the band’s front man Dez being diagnosed with pneumonia and declared unable to travel. You can get refunds on your tickets from the point of purchase. Six Feet Under are going to give it a miss but have said they will be back in Summer next year for Soundwave. The Exploited have also had to can their Aussie and New Zealand tour due to a family emergency. The Tea Party are back together and bringing their hard rocking selves to Australia for the first time since the band split in 2005 with a Saturday July 21 show at The Hordern Pavilion in Sydney Anyone at Groovin the Moo early this weekend come say ‘Hi’ as I Exist knock the frost off the main stage at 11am. Unkle K’s Band of the week: Hazzard’s Cure: Epic stoner thrash from San Fransisco. hazzardscure.bandcamp.com/album/hazzards-cure . JOSH NIXON doomtildeath@hotmail.com

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wide, touring with the likes of Karnivool, The Butterfly Effect and Cog. Their debut album This Is The Warning landed at number two on the ARIA charts and led to sold out national tours and a main stage slot at Big Day Out 2011.

GIVE THIS MAN A SHOE Claire Mitchell When DEAD LETTER CIRCUS took to the stage back in 2007, singer Kim Benzie would invariably finish each set by jumping from a speaker box barefoot and begging the audience to buy their EP so he could afford shoes. Since then the Brisbane band’s career has skyrocketed. They spread their alternative rock sound far and

We basically holed up in any space… even recording vocals in a disabled toilet

Back from a highly successful US tour, Dead Letter Circus are about to kick off the Australian Sleepwalker Tour, with a trip to our chilly capital locked in for May. And no, Benzie still hasn’t scrounged up any stage-worthy footwear. “Well somehow I never actually made the transition to wearing shoes onstage. It’s a very grounding feeling in that crazy onstage moment,” he says. So what is it about this music that has struck such a chord with people? “I think it is the personable nature of the songs and the emotion we hit with them,” Benzie says. “We are always aiming for the goose bumps down the arm moment. They are all written from a very normal human perspective too, just tales of being a human being in the more intense moments in life.” It’s not just Australians relating to their music. “It seems like the people that like alternative rock are like a tribe all over the word, just with different accents,” Benzie says. “As we were supporting [on Fair To Midland’s US tour] we were predominantly playing to an unknown audience which is awesome. Total underdogs. Our objective is to walk onstage, melt some faces and walk off stage with every hand in the air. It’s possibly the most exciting part of a band’s career so we feel really privileged to be able to live this path again.” Dead Letter Circus have invited American rockers Fair to Midland to now support them on their Australian Tour, along with Melbourne act Twelve Foot Ninja. As excited as fans are to see Dead Letter Circus back in Australia and onstage, people are still hanging out for a new album. According to Benzie, the wait should soon be over. “We basically holed up in any spare space on the American tour and worked on the songs; the van outside the venue, hiding out in a conference room of a hotel at 4am in the dark or even recording some vox in a disabled toilet of a venue.” If all goes to plan, recording is set to begin in July. In the meantime Canberra fans can get their Dead Letter Circus, Fair To Midland and Twelve Foot Ninja fix at Zierholz @ UC on Thursday May 24. Tickets are $28.60 + bf through www. deadlettercircus.oztix.com ..

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tour… I’ve got a great backing band with me and they’re primed and ready to make you feel the power!”

RIP RIP WOODCHIP, TURN IT INTO METAL SCOTT ADAMS The Ripper is coming and if you’re a Canberran and consider yourself a metalhead it’s your duty to greet the man when he (quite literally) screams into the nation’s Capital later this month. For one thing, he virtually saved metal gods Judas Priest from the dumpster when Priest’s iconic frontman Rob Halford upped and left the band in a fit of midlife crisis-fuelled pique in the early nineties. For this alone he deserves our undying gratitude. But perhaps more importantly the man has an utterly devastating voice and it’s a rare treat to be able to view such a talent in such an, erm, intimate venue as Belco’s Basement.

The goal is blow people away at all times

I’m feeling it already. As a somewhat limited vocalist myself, and knowing there’ll be a few budding young Rippers in the audience at The Basement on the night keen to find out what it takes to truly be one of the greats, what sort of advice can you give to us lesser singers? “Sleep, drink water and try your best all the time… The goal is blow people away at all times.” Are you listening, young’ns? Wise words direct from one of the masters. I could talk for ages to this man but the bottom of the page is fast approaching. Any final thoughts on the tour, Tim? “BE READY! Spread the word, this is gonna be a great tour. I have not been to Australia since the tour with Priest in like 2001. So bring it on!” Tim ‘Ripper’ Owens will flood The Basement with blood Friday May 25, 8pm. Tickets are $35 + bf through Moshtix or $100 + bf for a VIP pass including meet and greet.

So, ahead of this momentous metallic memory in the making we decided to catch up with TIM ‘RIPPER’ OWENS to find out what’s been going on in his world of late. Hello Ripper. Can I call you Ripper? You’re coming to Australia advertised as the voice of many of heavy metal’s most loved acts and we assume you’ll be offering selections from all of those artistes when you come down under. Which of the bands you’ve been in was the most challenging for you as a vocalist? And which songs do you find most enjoyable to sing live and why? “Hello there! I gotta say my own stuff is the most challenging. The Beyond Fear songs and solo songs are really tough to sing. Next I would say Charred Walls of the Damned… But whatever bands or songs I have sung I always try and do them to the top of my ability.” With that in mind, what sort of set will you be playing on this tour? ”It’s a great set. Some songs I’ll be doing that I haven’t sung in years. I’ll be doing some Priest songs from my era with the band and some classics, some Beyond Fear, solo stuff, Dio/Sabbath stuff and much, much more! This will be the best set I have done on a solo

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the word

on albums

album of the issue

Jack White Blunderbuss [Sony]

Just let me say how glad I am that this album is everything it’s meant to be. We’re talking about a guy with prodigious talent. Jack White didn’t just play in The White Stripes. He’s an inventor and a hard worker; he manages to restyle himself like a Madonna of the ‘00s while staying as authentic as your granddad’s shed. He’s a guitar hero and a mystery in a time of synthesisers and Wikipedia. What’s not to love? Not to mention that sinking feeling we all get when we hear the phrase “solo album”. Jack could have served up the tortured meanderings of the ‘mirror turned in on itself’ genre, achingly acoustic and pitched at his dearest toadying fans. I am extremely pleased to report that Blunderbuss violates these expectations in a glorious way. Jack’s obviously still passionate and creative, and he’s fine-tuned every song on this album until they gleam. He could have pitched any of these tracks to radio and grabbed a whole new crowd

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of fans. His trademark ear for a melodic hook pays loving dividends to us, the lucky listeners. Every little trick he’s learned over the years pops up somewhere: the reverbed rush of huge punk chords, the breaking voice, the sardonic humour, the waver and the warble, picks and sticks locked into perfect time, and some fresh pokerparlour piano chops. The variety is a little dizzying, as well – he’s ducking around like a professional fistfighter. Prog-rock timing changes, a peppy line like “Break neck pace/happy birthday!”, bikini party nostalgia, Get Behind Me-era spooky upright pianos – there’s way too much to list. He never feels like he has to stretch for these new sounds. They just work, with swagger and charm and a rich sonic palette that shows he’s finally getting a grip on what he can do with his new candycoloured setup at Third Man Studios. It’s obvious that this guy is an immortal who thrives on pushing his limits. We’re going to need more limits. JAMES FAHY

BEACH HOUSE bloom [sub pop]

the TEMPER TRAP the TEMPER TRAP [Liberation]

Pop music got weird in 2009/10. The acid and reverb-drenched likes of Animal Collective, Grizzly Bear and Beach House gained notice, making multiple visits to faraway shores, playing festival slots in the middle of the day to audiences one might expect at the feet of more obvious, verse-chorus indie bands. It was a welcome development but an odd one. The sound of these acts and of Beach House in particular is an intimate, night-time/early morning one, a hazy shimmering sonic texture that does not suggest a mass audience.

The Temper Trap have a hell of a lot to live up to with this second self-titled album. Propelled by breakout hit Sweet Disposition, 2009’s debut Conditions went on to sell more than a million copies worldwide, with the band subsequently touring the world and relocating to London from their native Melbourne. One thing that’s certain is the four-piece have ensured that every one of the 12 tracks collected here sounds toweringly massive and geared towards big venues, a result of them securing the productive services of Tony Hoffer (Beck, Silversun Pickups). Perhaps most noticeable though is the increased presence of icy pulsing synths on all of the tracks, with keyboardist Joseph Greer now promoted to fulltime member status. While tracks such as first single Need Your Love and the shimmering Never Again pack plenty of big hooks and showcase Dougy Mandagi’s soaring vocal range, there are arguably few real peaks here and certainly nothing to match the likes of Sweet Disposition. Indeed, the meandering Miracle sees The Temper Trap venturing as close to smooth Cars-esque MOR as they’ve ever gone before as lite house rhythms glide against soft-focus synths, while Dreams calls to mind one of The Big Pink’s post-shoegaze ballads as clattering hip hop beats lock in beneath the anthemic choruses and surging guitar fuzz. Fans will find much to like, but this isn’t quite the triumphant second act that could have been.

With Bloom, the follow-up to 2010’s outstanding Teen Dream, the template remains the same. Atmospheric, oddly moving palatial songs anchored by the extraordinary voice of Victoria Legrand and the quivering guitar of Alex Scally. Bloom in no way redefines the Beach House brand but it is a stronger suite of songs than any of their three previous works. Tunes like Wishes, New Year and single Myths are outstanding variations on what Beach House’s audience have come to expect: luscious dream pop, songs that get under the skin instead of beating the listener over the skull. If there is a desire for bands generally to reinvent, Bloom could disappoint. It could easily be seen as a companion piece to Teen Dream and some might find this problematic. For others who appreciate the easy pomp of Beach House’s dream pop, Bloom will be a welcome addition. It’s an excellent record. GLEN MARTIN

CHRIS DOWNTON


LOWLAKES lowlakes ep [kunsthaus records]

“I’ve been waiting/it’s been so long”, howls Tom Snowdon’s ethereal falsetto in Song for Motion, opener and first single off Lowlakes’ self-titled debut EP. He’s not the only one who’s been waiting; the Melbourne band, composed of Jack Talbot, Bill Guerin, Brent Monaghan and the aforementioned Snowdon have a small legion of dedicated fans who’ve been eagerly anticipating a release for some time now. Recorded at Melbourne’s Kunsthaus Studios and impeccably produced, the EP is a small and polished affair. With four tracks and weighing in at just under 20 minutes it feels like a taste of what this talented foursome are capable of: deep atmospheres of sound gilded with delicious intricacies and subtle hooks. Think Sigur Rós and The National hanging out in a haunted house on a Saturday night, drinking red wine and playing Scrabble. It’s music that makes you nostalgic the first time you hear it. At times the lakes overflow and the details are almost drowned in emotion. The album closes with six-minute standout Arctic House. An even rolling bass line, delicate piano work and a distinctive pattern of rimshots set the background for Snowdon’s distant wail: “Would you believe if I said/that I was only passing through?” Reverbsoaked, he howls across the frozen tundra like a lost ghost. Then it’s over and you’re left wanting more. It’s an excellent debut for these talented lads and I don’t believe for a minute they’re only passing through. MORGAN RICHARDS

FOREIGN FIELDS anywhere but where i am [independent] Like many others Foreign Fields attached a fragile balloon to their debut and sent it aloft in hopes it caught an internet thermo cline. Like thousands they’d recorded it themselves in their hometown, Wisconsin in this case, in an abandoned building, and they strung it with names intended to act as beacons: Bon Iver, Radiohead, Flying Lotus. This album was simply put on Bandcamp for free. And it’s still up there, free. Like so few this tactic’s worked for Foreign Fields. The album gained traction with so many blogs and review sites that it was finally recommended to me by a friend who walks these paths with more dedication than myself. I’ve never freely acquired an album so brilliant. Comparisons with Bon Iver’s first album abound and aren’t misplaced. It has a sense of magnificent isolation. It’s sparse but a sense of melody pervades. Guitar, piano, harmonies, tones, synth and percussion all are threaded together with poetic simplicity. And it’s assured. Over half the tracks are over five minutes, drifting their length out with engrossing patience. I was convinced it was unnecessary or self-serving but listening to the album again for wastage I found every listen brought me closer to it. The themes of Thoreau-like separation and longing perspire from it like a deep, beautiful fog, right down to the last line. Excluding only Sharon Van Etten’s Tramp it is the finest album I’ve heard this year. ASHLEY THOMSON

DANDY WARHOLS this machine [beat the world/inertia] Flash back to the beginning of the noughties and The Dandy Warhols were occupying a pretty enviable position – propelled to mainstream success via mobile phone ad placements yet still indie enough to be considered ‘underground’ and ‘alternative’. Fast-forward a decade and The Dandys are still chugging along, having weathered a parting of ways from their former major label. To be fair, their last couple of albums have been solid but unremarkable affairs, with 2008’s Earth To The Dandy Warhols feeling particularly forced and unfocused. Thankfully this latest album, their eighth, is a considerably more cohesive and free-flowing beast than its predecessor. As the woodthemed sleeve art hints it’s also a far more raw, stripped-down and guitar-focused collection, with tracks like Enjoy Yourself and Sad Vacation offering some of the strongest hooks The Dandys have crafted since the heyday of Come Down/Urban Bohemia. While synths still make an appearance they’re far more subtly integrated in the mix, only really taking the foreground amidst the punky squelches of Alternative Power To The People and closing track Slide’s epic krautrock-fuelled voyage. Sure, there’s the odd bit of filler here (see the novelty jazz-swing cover of country classic 16 Tons), but on the whole This Machine sees The Dandys sounding more excited about making an album than they have for quite a while. A worthy comeback. CHRIS DOWNTON

spiritualized Sweet Heart Sweet Light [emi] Seven albums in you get the feeling that Jason Pierce – who for all intents and purposes is Spiritualized – will unlikely commence a late career deviation. Thematically and sonically, Pierce has found a groove that suits him well; midtempo, slowly peaking, gospeltinged rock that pays slight debts to psychedelia and nowave freak-outs. Every second song is about redemption with drugs and failure making up the remainder. It’s a good mix, but it’s going nowhere quickly. Sweet Heart Sweet Light is Pierce’s second album after an illness nearly wiped him out. More robust and agitated than his recovery album (Songs in A & E) it will appeal to his fans but lacks any degree of expansion or development. And saying it’s his best since the lauded but lacking Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space is hardly ringing endorsement – that album is 15 years old. If your current best is a trip to the mid-‘90s then it might be time to cash in those free passes. The only track that truly stands out (Get What You Deserve) benefits from a looping vaguely Sub-Continental string refrain, but it still fits firmly within expectations. Which is where first single Hey Jane also resides; it’s another wannabe Come Together call-to-arms, while Headin’ For The Top is a pro forma wig out. There’s still some fight in Pierce but hopefully it’s more about the future and not just reclamation of his almost stolen past. JUSTIN HOOK

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the word

on films

WITH MELISSA WELLHAM

For those of you who regularly read the film section of this fine magazine, you might have noticed that I don’t give out many four-star-film ratings. I’ve never given a five. (Though in retrospect, I think that Black Swan, The Tree of Life and Drive were probably deserving.) I’m a bit of a bitch. Please take heed, then, of my pretty gosh darn good evaluation of The Avengers. And know that the fangirl in me wants to give it a bajillion stars. I’m not sure that’s even a real numerical amount.

quote of the issue “Superheroes? In New York? Give me a break!” Civilian on the street (Stan Lee, comic book writer and co-creator of Spider-Man, the Hulk, the X-Men, Iron Man and Thor), The Avengers

tHE AVENGERS The Avengers is quite possibly the greatest superhero movie of all time. Oh, I can see you’re taken aback. You’re all, “But what about The Dark Knight? It was so dark and gritty and edgy! And Heath Ledger was a revelation!” Or perhaps you’re thinking, “Pssh, yeah, sure The Avengers has a whole lot of big names on the same screen, but I prefer quality over quantity.” I hear you, brothers and sisters. The Dark Knight was superb. And I was worried about a film with an ensemble cast this size, too. But The Avengers does more than meet expectations – it surpasses them. Joss Whedon (otherwise known as the guy behind Buffy the Vampire Slayer) has co-written and directed a film that is very funny, genuinely affecting, and features impeccably choreographed fight sequences. The film brings together Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Thor, (Chris Hemsworth), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) from previous Marvel adaptations, and lets them loose on the bad guys – as well as, on occasion, each other. Whedon’s great gift is that he knows when he needs to give each of these heroes their moment of humanity. The fact that all the characters feel fleshed-out is no mean feat. The film is as multifaceted as the superhero team it features, and packs a powerful punch. It’s a knock out. Melissa Wellham

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the five-year engagement Will I ever get tired of watching Jason Segel play the appealing everyman, punching above his weight opposite *insert relevant of-the-minute hottie*? Short answer: no. If you’re in the mood for an inoffensive popcorn film with a decent amount of corniness, comedy and laughs, then The Five-Year Engagement is for you. Violet (Emily Blunt) and Tom (Segel) are a sweet couple who get engaged after one year but after Violet gets offered a position at the University of Michigan, they pack up their life in San Francisco and postpone their wedding for the first time. Note the word ‘first.’ The film maps their relationship over the next few years - and every smarmy professor and frostbitten toe along the way. While the plot of this entertaining rom com is somewhat original, the film is a bit lacklustre in parts and pretty predictable. Luckily, Blunt and Segel have charisma in spades, and their chemistry infuses this film with charm - enough to make it more than watchable. The last 15 minutes is the best part of the film (watch it and you’ll see what I mean), but solid support actors (including Australia’s Jacki Weaver) help the film along. Overall, The Five-Year Engagement is enjoyable but not remarkable - although well worth it for Emily Blunt’s hotness and some great shots of a grilled pastrami sandwich (not even joking). MEGAN McKEOUGH

THE LUCKY ONE You go into a movie based on a Nicholas Sparks novel (other such films include The Notebook and Dear John), expecting a little cliché. Okay, a lot of cliché. Okay, an embarrassingly formulaic plot, a cast comprised of basically plastic people, and a soundtrack that causes your ears to bleed. So, given that I was expecting this when I waked into The Lucky One, please understand the significance of my statement when I say that this film was even more clichéd than I was expecting. This is the Nicholas Sparks film adaptation to end all other Nicholas Sparks film adaptations. This film packs in so many embarrassing clichés, that it makes all similar films redundant. Logan (Zac Efron) is a marine just returned from his tour of duty in Iraq, who vows to hunt down the beautiful girl in a photograph that he mysteriously found while in combat, which he believes saved his life. When he meets the girl, Beth (Taylor Schilling), he begins to fall in love with her. And so start the clichés, which include: Beth’s antagonist ex-husband, her son who has self-esteem issues, a fallingin-love montage featuring row-boating in the lake, a scene involving Zac Efron saving a child from a raging river during a thunderstorm, etc. I’m not sure who “the lucky one” in this film is supposed to be, but you’ll be lucky if you can avoid watching it. MELISSA WELLHAM


the word on dvds

BREAKING BAD S4 [UNIVERSAL/SONY]

The Illusionist [Madman]

Vince Gilligan conceived Breaking Bad as the journey from Mr Chips to Scarface. Hero to anti-hero, life to death. Walter White, the cancer-ridden school teacher would become Albuquerque’s crystal meth king. With a path that welldefined and the end-point so apparently obvious it’d better be an intriguing ride.

Based on a half-century old unproduced script by French comedian/director Jacques Tati, The Illusionist tells the story of an elderly French magician called Tatischeff whose out-dated, simplistic vaudeville act is faltering. After working his way onto a bill in London, he faces the ignominy of following a young mophaired quartet. An audience full of shrieking teenage girls empties within seconds and the magician performs to a pair of disinterested stragglers. Forlorn but not defeated, Tatischeff heads to Scotland where he wins the affections of a less cosmopolitan crowd and the heart of a young girl. Intrigued by the old man, she is swept away to the exciting world of failed performers, depressed has-beens and tough living.

It was for awhile; a breath of fresh air, a show willing to go extreme lengths to push the boundaries of what you could do on TV. The antagonist cooked meth for god’s sake – how much edgier could you get? At least Tony Soprano had decades worth of mobsterism to make things familiar. White is not a familiar character and his delusion is particularly venal, screwing over his family to save them, all the while descending further into a selfish abyss that will surely devour everything that surrounds him. Why then do we care about him? It’s a question that is getting harder to answer. Which is why this season’s shift away from Walter (Bryan Cranston, still good but repeating his performance more than ever) towards Gus Fring (Giancarlo Esposito, the real star of Season 4) works so well. Not only is Fring an intriguing and uniquely menacing character, but his world – the drug world – is the core of the show. It makes sense to spend some quality time with him and Esposito makes it worthwhile. Yet this is also problematic. Fring is another anti-hero with a skewed moral compass. It’s just another reminder viewers have few characters to sympathise with and even in the Golden Age of Drama that matters because frankly, meth is not that interesting. Breaking Bad still brings the tension and thrives on episode cliff-hangers, but four seasons in it feels as thematically constrained and insular as ever. This journey needs resolution, quickly. JUSTIN HOOK

Tatischeff is obviously Tati, and The Illusionist is a wistful and sentimental apology to his real life family. There is controversy over who the girl in the film is: his illegitimate eldest daughter or another more legitimate daughter to whom the film is dedicated. The film itself is very European as you’d expect from Sylvain Chomet whose Les Triplettes of Belleville looked like an old poster brought to life. And so, the animation is miles away from the slick highly rendered and ultra-detailed Hollywood fare and closer to Studio Ghibli’s output. But it lacks the former’s sense of daring and awe, and the latter’s sense of effervescent joy and wonder. It’s not that it’s drab – although setting it in Scotland surely didn’t help matters – it’s more that it is small scale and homely. And like Tati’s live action films, this one is almost entirely unscripted. But unlike those films, this one is not as complete and focused and only serves to remind us that Tati was an inscrutable character more anchored to places than people. JUSTIN HOOK

Once Upon A Time In Cabramatta [Madman] Cabramatta is a small suburb some 30 ks southwest of Sydney’s CBD. Nowadays it’s a haven for inner-city types prank-slumming it, retirees on food tours and urban foragers hunting the best pho in town – as well as Australia’s largest Vietnamese community. Wasn’t always this way though. In the ‘80s and ‘90s it was Australia’s heroin capital. Deals were undertaken in broad daylight, addicts wandered the streets, shooting galleries littered the side streets and teenagers were living the thug life. Cabramatta was Sydney’s own drug ghetto. Beyond the tabloid headlines the reality was even grimmer. Families that had fled the post-war Vietnam were now fighting to keep their children away from the street and the community was fraying at the seams. Once Upon A Time In Cabramatta offers an evenhanded account of the public anger and easy demonisation of immigrants. Their stories are told first-hand in a no nonsense manner by the people who lived through it. There aren’t any overegged dramatisations or re-enactments; they’re pointless when reality is so shocking. It’s not all doom and gloom though. The third act restores some sanity, as third acts should. The community fight back with the help of an embittered publican and young Vietnamese local councillor and they win. This is another remarkable effort by SBS, reminding us our history is difficult, ugly and whichever path it takes there’s always a noisy crowd cheering for the downfall of the newcomer. Yet despite its troubles Cabramatta is now the epicentre of a thriving multiethnic community and a far cry from the footage in this doco. JUSTIN HOOK

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the word

BLACKBOX

on games

Diablo III Platform: PC, Mac Developer: Blizzard Entertainment Length: 12 hrs+ Verdict: Buy it! After announcing in 2008 that it was working on a sequel to the much-celebrated hackand-slash adventure series Diablo Blizzard have kept gamers champing at the bit for the release with various trailers. Until recently there has been no definite release date. Four years is a long time to be kept waiting but finally, on Tuesday May 15, Diablo III will be officially released to the masses. For those unfamiliar with Diablo, the core gameplay consists of taking your hero character through a set of dungeons filled with a variety of monsters, slaying said monsters and collecting the valuable items that they drop. This behaviour is normally done under the guise of various quests (kill monster x, collect item y), but everyone is really there for the items (aka the sweet, sweet loot). Core to the Diablo experience has always been the heroes that are playable, with each hero brings their own unique capabilities, strengths and weaknesses. Every series has featured variations in the type of heroes available and Diablo III is no exception. The character classes are Demon Hunter, Monk, Wizard, Barbarian and Witch Doctor, with the ever-present possibility that additional classes will be added by Blizzard in future Downloadable Content. I have always favoured a hero with a good mix of both weapon and spell damage, which in Diablo III presents the Demon Hunter and Witch Doctor as good options. These characters are meant to be in the thick of battle but will need to be shepherded from serious harm as they themselves are not intended to be the sole focus of the enemy attacks. The key to their use is buffering enemies with slowing spells or summonable minions, whilst simultaneously dealing damage. On the other end of the hero spectrum are heroes designed to wade into the thick of it, such as the Barbarian or the Monk. The Barbarian is a classic Diablo character, a ‘Tank’ designed to be capable of taking and dealing massive amounts of damage in an up close and personal fashion. The Monk is similar but with a slightly greater emphasis on improved defence and hand-to-hand combat. Finally, the Wizard is probably the most difficult character to start with (when his/her spells are limited) and is the most susceptible to physical damage, but players using the Wizard are rewarded later in the game when spells become increasingly powerful. New features in Diablo III focus mainly on the online multiplayer experience, with Blizzard promoting online leader boards and an ‘Auction House’ designed to allow players to sell particularly valuable items for real world dollars (for which Blizzard will take a cut). Thankfully the core Diablo formula remains unchanged, and you will spend many enjoyable hours slashing your way through dungeons. peter davis

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The death of Beastie Boy Adam Yauch is the biggest loss to music in some time. Like them or loathe them, the Beastie Boys drove hip hop to new heights, changed music and minds and provided a killer soundtrack to life. BMA was there back in ’92 when they lifted the roof off the ANU Bar and had everybody fighting for their right. rage has announced they will air a tribute to MCA on the weekend of Sat-Sun May 12-13, which will no doubt include the extended, cameo laden version of that track directed by Yauch. No details of date or time as we go to print. Check www.abc.net.au/rage . On the other end of the music spectrum, dust off the fake fur and big sunnies – it’s time for Eurovision. The comp is on the weekend of FriSun May 25-27 but start revising with Secret History of Eurovision (SBS, Fri May 11, 8.30pm) The free-to-air commercial networks wonder why people find other ways to watch their fave shows. After Blackbox pleaded with readers to support HBO-style drama on free to air, Ten network folks pulled Sons of Anarchy from One to screen it on SCTEN. No air date yet but in all likelihood they’ll link it to their first foray into local Underbelly style drama, Bikie Wars (SCTEN, Tue May 15, 8.30pm) and replace their Super Sunday with Bikie Tuesday. There’s finally an airdate for the much promoted fantasy drama Once Upon a Time (Prime, Tue May 15, 7.30pm). This habit of promoting shows months out but without pertinent information like when it’s on is annoying. It’s hardly likely to ensure an audience. Other new shows include Louie (ABC2, Mon May 21, 10pm) starring comedian Louis C.K, and the sure-to-be cringe worthy new real people obdoco The Shire (SCTEN, Wed May 16, 8.20pm). Everything old really is new again. A rebooted The Price is Right (Prime, Mon-Fri, 5pm) hosted by game show fave Larry Emdur kicked off this week with a tribute to Price is Right king Ian Turpie. Some other interesting old shows are quietly creeping into schedules undetected. Keep your eyes peeled for Buck Rogers (7Mate, Sat, 6.30am) and The Incredible Hulk (7Mate, Sat, 7.30am). Docos to keep an eye out for include Sunday Best: The Hollywood Complex (ABC2, Sun May 13, 8.30pm) which follows the child actors that flock to Hollywood for their big break, American Movie (ABC2, Sun May 20, 8.30pm) which follows Mark Borchardt as he makes his first independent film, Artscape: A Law unto Himself (ABC1, Tue May 15, 10.05pm) about artist and puppeteer Roger Law, and Patrick White: Will they read me when I’m dead (ABC1, Tue May 22, 10pm). Documentary series include Secrets of Superbrands (ABC1, Thu May 17, 9.30pm) a series looking at our obsession with brands, The Diamond Queen (ABC1, Sun May 13, 7.30pm), a three-parter following the life of QEII to celebrate her diamond jubilee, and Easter Island: Underworld (SBS1, Sun May 13, 7.30pm) which looks at the vast cave system underneath the island. If you’re a sporting junkie, don’t forget to book in early July for the Olympics. WIN will simulcast in HD on GEM with the promise of 14 hours live (6.30pm-9am) plus highlights twice daily. TRACY HEFFERNAN tracyherrernan@bigpond.com @ChezBlackbox


the word

Machinedrum/Jacques Greene Trinity Bar Friday April 6

on gigs

I wonder if there’s an equivalent to writer’s block in which the creative process is hampered not by lack of inspiration but a total stimulatory overload. Such is my dilemma when trying to recount the night of Friday April 6. My night kicked off with Melbourne-based ABLE8, whose set hinted at the musical wonderland ahead. An extensive array was seamlessly interwoven, from alternative hip hop and smooth soul to self-labelled ‘Nintendo/Sega-hop’. (For all you ‘80s kids, imagine playing Mickey’s Castle of Illusion on the Megadrive while listening to Samiyam.) By the end of his set the crowd was primed. Whether performing to 100 frenzied youths in a house party or a more intimate group of chilled two-steppers, Rachel Haircut (formerly known as Paqman) never seem to have any trouble grabbing a crowd’s attention. The dancefloor seemed to undergo a kind of metamorphosis, hypnotised by liquid keyboard and vintage synth. All eyes were closed in ecstatic appreciation or fixated intently upon the duo. Their synergy has evolved to the point of onstage symbiosis, in which a mutual connection with their music and audience transcends the need for verbal communication. The result of this is a skilfully produced eargasm of eclectic and euphoric sounds, as enchanting to observe as it is to listen to. Elliot was up next to lead the night into a subsonic landscape of cosmic sound bites and hypnotic beats. Chilled hip hop and 2-step was overlaid with an aesthetic blend of samples, including heavy industrial hammering mixed with ambient piano. Throughout all of this the crowd was treated to his Launchpad wizardry, on which he pounded like a modern day beat-making Hendrix. Having thoroughly enjoyed floating on the kaleidoscope of pretty melodies thus far, the time had come to tune the ears to the complex electronic craftwork of Jacques Greene. Drowsily pulsing beats eased the crowed into an intricate hybrid of progressive house and minimal techno, mingled with R’n’B and glitch-hop. To the untrained ear Jacques’ set may have sounded conventional, containing all the typical house music ingredients: heavy kicks, soaring synth and bouncy bass lines. But what sets his music apart is its execution. Each component is laid down with care and precision, patiently building to a crescendo which may only be realised after it’s hit, evidenced merely by the dubbing out of pleasantly dizzying looped vocals. Just as I felt myself melting into the hypnagogic sounds of the night, Machinedrum injected some fast-paced hallucinogenic energy. Boasting an impressive discography, including tracks for two of my onscreen favourites, Black Swan and Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim, my expectations were high. I was not disappointed. An almost limitless variety of genres were incorporated into a heady fusion of overlapping polyrhythms and cascading vocal grabs, but mixed with obvious delicacy and consideration that reflected his acoustic background. Up-tempo R’n’B and glitch-hop had everyone’s feet moving before some heavier dubstep and D’n’B were served up for the bassheads. Dancing anywhere within the vicinity of the speakers was at the individual’s peril, with arms and legs flailing hazardously in all directions. photos: ben davies

Onetalk and 2Fuddha rounded out the night with smooth beats to satiate those who had not quite fulfilled their dance quota and provided the perfect soundtrack to what had been an amazing night of genre defying, mind-blowing music. Once again Blahnket had delivered: it certainly had been a Very Good Friday at Trinity Bar. GRETA KITE-GILMOUR

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the word

The Beards, The Crooked Fiddle Band, Fun Machine, The Stiffys ANU Bar Thursday April 19

on gigs

In anticipation of The Beards’ arrival in Canberra I spent a good two weeks forming a mass of facial hair. Of course, lining up for the door I realised my modest devotion was to be eclipsed by the throng of lumberjacks, bearded women, bushrangers, hipsters and mountain men who had been grooming themselves for this night for months, if not years. The support acts for the Having A Beard Is The New Not Having A Beard album tour kicked off with The Stiffys. They sweated out a sailor-suited set, exclusively singing odes to the humble erection. Local band Fun Machine bearded up for the occasion and funked the crowd silly in the many ways they know how. Third support act, The Crooked Fiddle Band, cast their spell of serious, fiddle-driven folk rock, providing dancers with enough high speed yoga to warm up for the main event. In the brief break before the main act, standing with the restless and giggly punters, I could see the band huddling like a hairy eight-legged monster just offstage, no doubt praying to some ancient Norse god as they gave their faces one last comb-through. They exploded onto the stage in a perfectly orchestrated event: Johann Beardraven, lead singer, saxophonist and wielder of the keyboard axe, resplendent in flanny shirt rolled to the elbows and aviator sunnies; Nathaniel Beard on bass, constantly stroked his face between strums and when not doing so himself offered his beard to the outstretched hands of the front row; Facey McStubblington, guitarist and all round nice guy, donned a hat and trench coat; and John Beardman Jr, the drummer and owner of the largest beard on stage, kept his brush handy to groom between songs. By the time the band broke into There’s Just Nothing Better Than a Beard the dancefloor had reordered according to beard size: the more hirsute in the front row angling for a touch of the famous fuzz. We were treated to old favourites, If Your Dad Doesn’t Have a Beard, You’ve Got Two Mums and No Beard, No Good. Those who doubted the cult status of The Beards could not be heard over the entire room singing in falsetto, “you should consider having sex with a bearded man” (from the new single, which made it into the triple j Hottest 100 at number 99). The Beards performed a solid gig, filled with classic power ballads, reggae, folk rock and more power ballads, all beard-themed. The liberal doses of hand claps, keyboard axe posing and constant beard fondling made for a fun and silly atmosphere. The uninitiated audience members may be forgiven for thinking the music is very tongue-in-(hairy)-cheek but I wouldn’t say that in earshot of these bristled musicians. The Beards are a band that started as a one-off bearded novelty gig but as they tour to promote Having a Beard is the New Not Having a Beard, their third concept album, the message is not getting any weaker or less bushy. They are selling out venues with bearded queues down the street.

photos: david burke

The Beards were approached for an interview after the show but unfortunately were carried away by a large group of hairy fans. The only quote I got when asking if I could have a quick chat was “BEARDS!!!” and if you don’t get it, they will tell you again, louder and hairier than before. DAVID BURKE

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the word

Ice Cube/KP Krew/KODAK/Prophet Rayza/DJ Daz AIS Arena Thursday April 19

on gigs

Ice Cube, west coast gangsta rap icon, in Canberra. Our predominantly white, middle-class ‘city in a park’. Who knew what was gonna go down?! On the drizzly Thursday night, anticipation buzzed inside and outside the AIS Arena as ticket-holders readied themselves for this hip hop highness to bring a different kind of culture to our capital. First up, DJ Daz dropped some Snoop Dogg, G Unit and other appropriately gangsta tunes while a crowd filled up the floor, chilled in the stalls and the ‘Slam Dunk Room’ kept the drinks flowing. Next was Brisbane-based MC Prophet Rayza who impressed without a doubt. Shaking his dreds, his energy was raw and his lyrics were bold. Considering the status of the headline Prophet Rayza was happy to be himself and provoke the crowd. “Who rocks like that?” they asked. “I rock like that!” Rayza did some cheeky self-promotion of his web and Twitter pages and posed for a photo with the crowd but this went down well. Next up was KODAK, a Weston Creek local, less beat boxer and more one-man-rave. KODAK exploded all over the stage in a haze of trance, hip hop and dup step which, while delivered with an armthrusting intensity, didn’t defy sounding like mouth sounds. KODAK’s skills might have been suited better to a different event but the crowd fed off his enthusiasm and some were dancing like it was 3am. Last on before Ice Cube himself was KP Krew (out of Kokyprik Records) whose set didn’t deliver as much as it could have. The tracks sounded a little sparse and homogenous despite the number of people on stage and a bit much walking and talking between tracks slowed the momentum. Nevertheless, KP gave a good show and the audience were reaching a high before the main act. By now the floor of the arena was packed with people, littered with cans and feeling less School Spectacular and more like something seriously dope was about to happen. Unfortunately the bar closed before Ice Cube’s set which disappointed some. As his flag was pinned below the decks people kept their eyes glued to the stage and when Ice Cube appeared his onstage presence was larger-thanlife and Canberra went loco. With the help of WC (Dub-C of Westside Connection) and DJ Crazy Toones on the decks, the set was packed with hits like Check Yo Self, blowing the place up as Ice Cube stomped all over the stage and spat his lyrics in style. In between tracks, Ice Cube and WC talked to the crowd like chillas, joking around and including us in the ‘Worldwide Westside’, which obviously excited the room. More seriously, Ice Cube gave an inspiring monologue about staying true to yourself. Straight Outta Compton proved how no one does gangsta rap like Ice Cube. Throughout the night he seemed to avoid his more notoriously political tunes for party tracks which kept the crowd dancing and the vibe upbeat. As he predicted they would, the ladies went crazy for You Can Do It. Finally, Ice Cube’s sons OMG and Doughboy stepped up to do I Am The West. It was an impressive family affair.

photos: martin ollman

Ice Cube and his entourage showed themselves to be hip hop extraordinaires, taking the music and the message seriously rather than their own egos. For the kind of global fame and lifestyle Ice Cube has enjoyed, he was genuinely in it for the crowd and the music. Canberra got loose to his set and we can only hope his promises of coming back “with a whole new show” are true. Sophia McDonald

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the word

Super Best Friends/The Fighting League/Shopgirl Transit Bar Thursday April 26

on gigs

It’s a quiet night in the city and Transit Bar is no different when BMA arrives, wearing the kind of grin on its face usually reserved for those of a slightly demented mien. It’s been a while since this reviewer has had his critical acuity challenged by some ‘live attractions’ and to be frank one is armed and ready. The slightest hint of ham-fistedness or (worse still) mediocrity is going to be given both barrels, so to paraphrase any one of thousands of reality TV contestants, ‘BRING IT ON!!’ First up are Shopgirl, featuring none other than former BMA Editor Peter Krbavac doing the drumming. Ha! We sniff hypocrisy! A man used to telling other musos what their deficiencies are getting up and doing it himself—but worse? Well, no, actually. Shopgirl are actually rather good. Basic, but good. They peddle a neat line in post-grunge riot grrl nirvana (if you’ll excuse the pun), coming on like a hometown Sonic Youth with smudges of The Shop Assistants thrown in for good measure. To cap it all off Krbavac is sporting a rather tasty Dinosaur Jr t-shirt, just for a bit of historical realness. Resolutely indie Shopgirl kick off the evening well. This run of early evening form is continued by The Fighting League, who bring a smattering of raw Oi! aggressiveness to proceedings. They’s a jolly bunch of neredowells and their strange mélange of eighties styles merge together surprisingly well. They themselves call it tropical punk, which is as good a description as any and certainly better than anything my arid little brain can come up with. If they were English there’s a fair chance they’d already be playing stages bigger than that belonging to the Transit Bar. Keep an eye out for them, and while you are doing so why not buy a copy of their triumphant vinyl LP, Tropical Paradise? But tonight is of course all about Super Best Friends, who are walking among us to launch their rather splendid new EP, Handshake. It’s a rocking little nugget too, showcasing the band’s aggressive side to good effect. In fact the most remarkable thing about SBF tonight is the heaviness of their approach. Guitarist Johnny Barrington spends most of the night assaulting his instrument with so much force you suspect it’ll be applying to have an ASBO handed down to him, whilst rhythm section Adam and Matt thunder and groove away in what can only be described as a rather good approximation of ‘proper’ music. You can tell they’ve been on the road a while promoting this beautiful, iridescent disc, as each song is delivered with a vicious tightness that hasn’t always been present in their live performances. This is what we know in the trade as ‘progress’ and it is good. The new songs are a progression too. Whilst still sticking to the band’s template enough to make tonight’s set a gratifyingly solid aural and visual treat, it’s hard to see the join between old and new, so committed are the band to tonight’s performance.

photos: kate worth

Super Best Friends have been hovering around the edges of greatness for a while now, peering at its hulk-like magnificence through the chicken wire fence that surrounds it without ever daring to suspect that anyone would hand them a pair of cutters. It’s not going too far to say that Handshake might just be the sharp, bladed implement they need to help them make the leap to the next level. On the evidence of tonight’s performance, they are ready to give it a red hot go. SCOTT ADAMS

48


GIG GUIDE May 09 - May 11 saturday may 09 Arts Exhibition - Homesick

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - Grow

Something Different

Comedy

Transit Trivia

Shane Dundas: Believe COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Wainwright’s sculptures and Malins’ large-scale drawings explore the life of the local pioneer.

Karaoke

Dance

Exhibition - animal

THE DURHAM

Trash Thursday

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential. 7.30pm start. TRANSIT BAR

From 10pm.

By Matthew Day Perez. Running until May 12.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Exhibition - Spirit of Lake Eyre Val Johnson creates paintings and drawings which capture the lake’s rhythmic patterns. Till May 13. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor. THEATRE 3

Exhibition - Maria Crinigan’s Tragedy

Wainwright’s sculptures and Malins’ large-scale drawings explore the life of the local pioneer. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - animal

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space. THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20. DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Me Right Now

thursday may 10 Arts Exhibition - Tell them I said something...

By Roh Singh. Running until May 12.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Homesick

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - Grow

By Matthew Day Perez. Running until May 12.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - The Seven Days

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Dance Latino Wednesdays 9pm.

MONKEY BAR

Live

Me Right Now

QL2 presents Quantum Leap in Me Right Now. Loose limbed, fast and furious dancing. THE PLAYHOUSE

Exhibition - In My Eyes

Live Don, Rob and Dave From 9pm.

THE DURHAM

Key Grip 7pm.

NATIONAL PRESS CLUB, BARTON

Featuring the work of 25 current ANU Art School students. Till May 16.

THEO NOTARAS MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

Supported by Benjalu and Microwave Jenny. 8pm, presale from Moshtix.

Exhibition - When Wishing Still Worked

Charles and Dave

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Paul Greene

On the Behind The Stars tour. 7.30pm, tix $10 through Oztix. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

By Sister Wives. Running until May 12.

Cue Funktion

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

An Umbilical Brother goes solo.

ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Tom Woodward, Dylan Hekimian. 9pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

friday may 11

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Shane Dundas: Believe COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Dance Cha Cha Char + Andrea Kay HIPPO LOUNGE

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space.

Arts

Yosh Party DIGRESS

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

Exhibition - Tell them I said something...

By Roh Singh. Running until May 12.

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Homesick

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22.

QL2 presents Quantum Leap in Me Right Now. Loose limbed, fast and furious dancing.

BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - In My Eyes

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

THE PLAYHOUSE

Featuring the work of 25 current ANU Art School students. Till May 16.

THEO NOTARAS MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - When Wishing Still Worked

By Sister Wives. Running until May 12.

Muso’s Jam Night

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

All you need to bring is your instruments and friends.

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Xav Ier

Me Right Now

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Timber

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20.

Exhibition - Maria Crinigan’s Tragedy

Exhibition - Tell them I said something...

An Umbilical Brother goes solo.

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

Comedy

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20.

Shane Dundas: Believe

9pm ‘til 5am with DJ Pete. Two for one drinks ‘til 11pm plus free pool all night long.

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

On the Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Tour. With Fun Machine. Tix through Ticketek.

THEATRE 3

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Comedy

Cube Thursdays

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space.

The Darkness

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

HIPPO LOUNGE

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor.

Exhibition - When Wishing Still Worked

By Roh Singh. Running until May 12.

Featuring Tit For Tat. Putting class in your glass. 8pm start, free entry.

TRANSIT BAR

Val Johnson creates paintings and drawings which capture the lake’s rhythmic patterns. Till May 13.

Exhibition - animal

By Sister Wives. Running until May 12.

Wicked Whiskers

Exhibition - Spirit of Lake Eyre

ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Exhibition - In My Eyes

THEO NOTARAS MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Kim Churchill

QL2 presents Quantum Leap in Me Right Now. Loose limbed, fast and furious dancing. Featuring the work of 25 current ANU Art School students. Till May 16.

An Umbilical Brother goes solo.

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20.

Wainwright’s sculptures and Malins’ large-scale drawings explore the life of the local pioneer.

THE PLAYHOUSE

Exhibition - Maria Crinigan’s Tragedy

Cue Funktion

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Grow

By Matthew Day Perez. Running until May 12.

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Exhibition - Spirit of Lake Eyre Val Johnson creates paintings and drawings which capture the lake’s rhythmic patterns. Till May 13. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor. THEATRE 3

House, electro and techno feat. Stoy Van Off, Solsta, Eldred. Free.

RNB Heat ‘90s Edition ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Strangeways

Tom Tomz, Chairman Wow, and Fidel Maestro get party. 8pm, free entry. TRANSIT BAR

Jemist

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Havana Nights

Free samba lesson by Subsdance 9-9.30pm. MONKEY BAR

Blaze Tripp

Presented by Eargasm. 8pm. THE CLUBHOUSE

Cha Cha Char + Andy HIPPO LOUNGE

Live Special K

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Canberra Internation Music Festival

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au . VARIOUS LOCATIONS

Red Henrys

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

49


GIG GUIDE May 11 - May 14 friday may 11 live Something Like This From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

Cue-Funktion Spartak Residency

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. With Ollie Brown. $5.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Acoustix

Performing ’80s/’90s covers from 8-10pm, followed by resident DJ. P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Mikelangelo and the Tin Star

With Konrad Lenz, Alice Cottee (No Hausfrau), Fun Machine and The King Hits. 7.30pm. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Folk Club

Exhibition - In My Eyes

Oscar

Dance

THEO NOTARAS MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

Canberra International Music Festival

Hospitality Sundays

Featuring the work of 25 current ANU Art School students. Till May 16.

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - When Wishing Still Worked

By Sister Wives. Running until May 12.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Comedy

Fusing folk with pop to create catchy melodies and memorable moments. With Alex Gibson. 8pm, $6. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Disney Concert

The ANU Concert Band and Orchestra present their Semester 1 concert of Disney faves. 4pm.

Ajapai (Tokyo)

THE CLUBHOUSE

10pm ‘til 5am with DJs Matt & Pete. Two for one drinks and free entry until 11pm. CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Jemist

P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

sunday may 13 Arts Cue Funktion

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Homesick

Cue Funktion

With Jared de Veer.

Princi

Exhibition - The Seven Days

By Roh Singh. Running until May 12.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Grow

By Matthew Day Perez. Running until May 12.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Exhibition - Spirit of Lake Eyre Val Johnson creates paintings and drawings which capture the lake’s rhythmic patterns. Till May 13. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor. THEATRE 3

Exhibition - Maria Crinigan’s Tragedy

Love Saturdays

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Urban Playground

Feat. DJs Karma, Jswiss, Hypnotic. 10pm. MONKEY BAR

Live Rise

With Dark Nemesis, Shadows In Ruin. $10. THE BASEMENT

Briscoe

Waterford, Lavers. 9.30pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Canberra Internation Music Festival

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

Nine Sons Of Dan, Love & Satellites, Sound Of Seasons, DanSweeto, Little Saturn. $10.

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Me Right Now

QL2 presents Quantum Leap in Me Right Now. Loose limbed, fast and furious dancing. THE PLAYHOUSE

Massive All Ages Show

WODEN YOUTH CENTRE

50

Sunday Arvo Trivia From 2.30pm. THE DURHAM

monday may 14

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22.

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor. THEATRE 3

Exhibition - Maria Crinigan’s Tragedy

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor. THEATRE 3

Exhibition - animal

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space. THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20.

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

Exhibition - In My Eyes

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Featuring the work of 25 current ANU Art School students. Till May 16.

THEO NOTARAS MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Comedy

P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Something Different

Exhibition - Homesick

TRANSIT BAR

Feat. Gordon Navara Connection, En Toaste, Hung Parliament. 9pm till late.

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Purple Sneakers

Southside Sessions

Songwriting influenced by jazz, folk, hip hop and punk. With 2Fhudda. 6pm, $5.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22.

Bands and indie DJs. 8pm, $10 on the door.

Kate Grealy

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

THE DURHAM

THE GEORGE HARCOURT INN

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

Smokestack Lightning

From 10pm.

1-4pm.

Cue Funktion

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space.

OLD CANBERRA INN

Jess Hooper

Val Johnson creates paintings and drawings which capture the lake’s rhythmic patterns. Till May 13.

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. With Shopgirl. $5.

8pm, free.

THE STREET THEATRE

Exhibition - Spirit of Lake Eyre

Exhibition - animal

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

With special guests. Bookings through thestreet.org.au or 6247 1223.

Arts

ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Cue-Funktion Spartak Residency

VARIOUS LOCATIONS

VARIOUS LOCATIONS

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20.

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au .

3rd Exit

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20.

Canberra Internation Music Festival

BEAVER GALLERIES

Wainwright’s sculptures and Malins’ large-scale drawings explore the life of the local pioneer.

Wainwright’s sculptures and Malins’ large-scale drawings explore the life of the local pioneer. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

THE MEADOWS, UC

Karaoke

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22.

Exhibition - Tell them I said something...

Big Scary, Hilltop Hoods, Kimbra, Public Enemy and oh so many more. Tix through www.gtm.com.au .

Bic Runga

HIPPO LOUNGE

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Groovin the Moo

Dance

Arts A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

Live

Something Different

Cube Saturdays

saturday may 12

Bennie James

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

An Umbilical Brother goes solo.

Love & Satellites THE BASEMENT

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

10pm ‘til late with DJ TJ. Free entry, free pool and discounted drinks.

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au .

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

With Nine Sons Of Dan. $15.

Indonesian Gamelan has had a remarkable influence on Western modern music. 5.30pm.

ANU SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Shane Dundas: Believe

Sub Squad Launch Party. W/ Against Time & Kaos, Logic, NayNay, Transforma and more.

The Falls and Evan & The Brave. 8pm, $10.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

BEAVER GALLERIES

Shane Dundas: Believe

An Umbilical Brother goes solo. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20.

Exhibition - In My Eyes

Featuring the work of 25 current ANU Art School students. Till May 16.

THEO NOTARAS MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

Dance Biscuits

Post-weekend sounds from Ryz, Peekz, Kimosabi, Steve On Weekends and more. 9pm, free. TRANSIT BAR


GIG GUIDE May 14 - May 18 Live

wednesday may 16

FLY Presents The Bootleg Sessions

Cracked Actor, Elisha Bones, Lavers. 8pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Canberra Internation Music Festival

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au . VARIOUS LOCATIONS

tuesday may 15

Exhibition - In My Eyes

Cue Funktion

The Wedded Bliss

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Featuring the work of 25 current ANU Art School students. Till May 16.

THEO NOTARAS MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor. THEATRE 3

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20. DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Exhibition - In My Eyes

Featuring the work of 25 current ANU Art School students. Till May 16.

THEO NOTARAS MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

Live Hypno5e (France)

With Psynonemous, Tortured. $10. THE BASEMENT

Canberra Internation Music Festival

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au . VARIOUS LOCATIONS

The Butterfly Effect

With Numbers Radio and Greenthief. UC REFECTORY

Something Different Fame Trivia 7.30pm. DIGRESS

Fame Trivia From 7.30pm. THE DURHAM

Tuesday Movie Night

You choose a deckchair, they’ll choose a movie. Drink and pizza specials by Bicicletta Cafe. NEWACTON COURTYARD

ARC Cinema Presents

Alex and Liz’s Trashed Quiz. 7.30pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Karaoke Love

Croon and wail your heart out on the Transit stage. 9pm start. TRANSIT BAR

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

Exhibition - Homesick

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22.

Live Toe tappin’ swing, gospel harmony, and country heartache. 7.30pm, $10.

The Chuffs

Dave Carr’s Fabulous Contraption, Lachlan Carr. 9pm. THE PHOENIX PUB

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Canberra Internation Music Festival

THE STREET THEATRE

ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

VARIOUS LOCATIONS

Bad!Slam!No!Biscuit!

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

I Love You, Bro

BEAVER GALLERIES

I Love You, Bro

Cue Funktion

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

Arts

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie.

THE STREET THEATRE

Faux Real

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre.

Arts This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie.

Macbeth

8pm.

THE PHOENIX PUB

Cue Funktion

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Homesick

BEAVER GALLERIES

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20.

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor.

Dance F.O.O.L

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Trash Thursday

Presented by Electrosex. THE CLUBHOUSE

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20.

Winter Wonderland Special.

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Featuring Tit For Tat. Putting class in your glass. 8pm start, free entry.

ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

Wicked Whiskers

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor.

HIPPO LOUNGE

Live

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

THEATRE 3

Capital Dub Style

Presents local roots and reggae bands and DJs. 8pm. TRANSIT BAR

THEATRE 3

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au .

Cube Thursdays

9pm ‘til 5am with DJ Pete. Two for one drinks ‘til 11pm plus free pool all night long.

friday may 18 Arts Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20. DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

I Love You, Bro

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie. THE STREET THEATRE

Moondog J

Presents his own brand of original Australian blues. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Canberra Internation Music Festival

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au . VARIOUS LOCATIONS

Latino Wednesdays 9pm.

MONKEY BAR

Muso’s Jam Night

All you need to bring is your instruments and friends.

P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Something Different Karaoke

From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

Transit Trivia

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential. 7.30pm start. TRANSIT BAR

thursday may 17 Arts Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

I Love You, Bro

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie. THE STREET THEATRE

51


GIG GUIDE May 18 - May 21 friday may 18 Arts Macbeth

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Cue Funktion

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Homesick

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20. ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

CCAS Members Show

The Brian Jonestown Massacre With The Raveonettes. Tix through Ticketek. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. With Deafcat. $5.

Heuristic

From 10pm.

THE DURHAM

Second Avenue

Performing from 8-10pm followed by resident DJ. P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

Cue-Funktion Spartak Residency

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. With Merewomen. $5.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

saturday may 19 Arts Arc - Au Hasard Balthazar (PG)

Part of the Robert Bresson restrospective. 4.30pm.

Exhibition - animal

Exhibition - animal

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space. THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Dance DJ Psar (Belgium) + Mike Hyper (Syd) Presented by City Kid Music. THE CLUBHOUSE

Faux Real

HIPPO LOUNGE

Academy Fridays With Mord Fustang.

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB

REV – Come As You Are

‘90s tribute night. Gangsta rap, Brit bop, boy bands, US college rock, pop punk and more. BAR 32

Cheese/Retro

Songs you love to hate to love to hate from the ‘60s and beyond. 8pm, free entry. TRANSIT BAR

Havana Nights

ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space.

KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

The Ocean

Tix through Ticketek.

ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

Elysium

Anno Domini, The Seer, Psynonemous. THE BASEMENT

Nigel Wearne

Wearne returns with his compelling blend of country and folk. With Owen Campbell. 8pm, $10. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Canberra Internation Music Festival

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au . VARIOUS LOCATIONS

52

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Cue Funktion

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

B-tham

Presented by Jigsaw Theatre and CTC.

HIPPO LOUNGE

Pearl Versus the World

Fresh tech grooves all night.

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Love Saturdays

With Ashley Feraude.

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22.

Nathan Frost

Exhibition - The Seven Days

Party By Jake

ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

KREMLIN BAR

ACADEMY NIGHTCLUB KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

8pm, free entry. TRANSIT BAR

Urban Playground

DJs Karma, Jswiss, Hypnotic. 10pm. MONKEY BAR

Live

Exhibition - Homesick BEAVER GALLERIES

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20.

Dance Hospitality Sundays

10pm ‘til late with DJ TJ. Free entry, free pool and discounted drinks. CUBE NIGHTCLUB

Melody Black

Perpetual End, Kinghts of the Spatchcock. $10. THE BASEMENT

Jocelyn Moen

A troubadour beloved of audiences in Berlin, Paris, Montreal and Toronto. 8pm, $10. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Kate Martin

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20.

Ben Wells and the Middle Names. 9.30pm.

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

THE PHOENIX PUB

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Rockzone

From 10pm.

Live Lloyd Spiegel

One of this country’s leading blues artists and most respected guitarists. 7.30pm, $12. THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

Blue Yvie 1-4pm.

THE GEORGE HARCOURT INN

Canberra International Music Festival

Music from the Silk Road feat. Dr Wang Zheng Ting, Bobby Singh and more. 7.30pm. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22.

THE DURHAM

Something Different

Canberra Internation Music Festival

Sunday Arvo Trivia

I Love You, Bro

Marvellous music in amazing places. For info www.cimf.org.au .

BEAVER GALLERIES

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie. THE STREET THEATRE

Macbeth

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Cue Funktion

A melting pot of multifaceted artforms. Till May 20.

Presented by Jigsaw Theatre and CTC.

Killing the Sound

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

Ashley Feraude Live

Macbeth

Cheese + Hazan

Surrogates

Feat. DJ Trent Richardson. KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

10pm ‘til 5am with DJs Matt & Pete. Two for one drinks and free entry until 11pm.

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

MONKEY BAR

THE CLUBHOUSE

Cube Saturdays

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor. THEATRE 3

Mixed Bag - Jamie Stevens

Cue-Funktion Spartak Residency

Returning triumphant to Gorman House with an apocalyptic theme!

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Dance

Exhibition - Homesick

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22.

Feat. Knights of the Spatchcock, EMPRA, The Toxic Men. From 9pm till late. P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

Something Different Karaoke

P J O’REILLY’S, CIVIC

sunday may 20 Arts Exhibition - animal

Exhibition - The Seven Days ANCA GALLERY, ROSEVEAR PLACE

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Six series of photographs in a mix of old and new. Till May 20.

CCAS Members Show

Returning triumphant to Gorman House with an apocalyptic theme!

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Canberra Rep Presents Speaking in Tongues

Adapted as the Australian award winning film Lantana. By Andrew Bovell. Directed by Ross McGregor. THEATRE 3

monday may 21

Southside Sessions

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space.

BEAVER GALLERIES

THE DURHAM

VARIOUS LOCATIONS

Pearl Versus the World COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

From 2.30pm.

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

Exhibition - Karl Wiebke Painting

Arts Exhibition - animal

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space. THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Fast+Fresh

Are you a young playwright? This is a “must attend” masterclass! Email tonymartin.act.gov.au . CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

I Love You, Bro

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie. THE STREET THEATRE

Macbeth

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre.

“My work explores what it means to paint” – Karl Wiebke. Till May 20.

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

I Love You, Bro

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

DRILL HALL GALLERY, ANU

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie. THE STREET THEATRE

Pearl Versus the World

Presented by Jigsaw Theatre and CTC.

Exhibition - Homesick

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES


GIG GUIDE May 21 - May 25 Dance

Fame Trivia

Biscuits

THE DURHAM

Post-weekend sounds from Ryz, Peekz, Kimosabi, Steve On Weekends and more. 9pm, free. TRANSIT BAR

From 7.30pm.

Tuesday Movie Night

You choose a deckchair, they’ll choose a movie. Drink and pizza specials by Bicicletta Cafe. NEWACTON COURTYARD

Live FasterLouder Presents The Bootleg Sessions

Waterford, Chris Finnigan, Pete Akhurst. 8pm.

Arts Exhibition - animal

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space. THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Exhibition - Futures Pass Remains

Studio glass by Brenden Scott French. Till May 22. BEAVER GALLERIES

I Love You, Bro

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie. THE STREET THEATRE

Macbeth

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Pearl Versus the World

Presented by Jigsaw Theatre and CTC. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

An Inspector Calls

Arc - Let The Bullets Fly (MA15+)

Tempo Theatre presents JB Priestley’s classic tale. 62752700. BELCONNEN COMMUNITY CENTRE

wednesday may 23 Arts Exhibition - animal

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space.

Fame Trivia 7.30pm. DIGRESS

Presented by Jigsaw Theatre and CTC.

Art by Andrew Moynihan.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - animal

Macbeth

Featuring Tit For Tat. Putting class in your glass. 8pm start, free entry.

I Love You, Bro

HIPPO LOUNGE

THE STREET THEATRE

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre.

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie.

Cube Thursdays

Macbeth

COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

CUBE NIGHTCLUB

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Live

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Pearl Versus the World

Presented by Jigsaw Theatre and CTC.

9pm ‘til 5am with DJ Pete. Two for one drinks ‘til 11pm plus free pool all night long.

Live

MONKEY BAR

Dead Letter Circus

9pm.

Muso’s Jam Night

P J O’REILLY’S, TUGGERANONG

From 10pm.

Transit Trivia

Flex your noggin. Table bookings essential. 7.30pm start. TRANSIT BAR

thursday may 24 Arts Exhibition - animal

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre.

Exhibition - Incompatible Elements

Nathan Kleyn

Latino Wednesdays

THE PHOENIX PUB

THE PHOENIX PUB

Pearl Versus the World

Exhibition - Handful of Stew

Wicked Whiskers

THE DURHAM

7.30pm.

ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

Dance

THE STREET THEATRE

ComedyACT Open Mic

Trivia Night

Part of a showcase of the best new Hong Kong film. 7pm.

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie.

I Love You, Bro

Karaoke

Something Different

friday may 25

Macbeth

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space.

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

Live

7.30pm.

KREMLIN BAR

Arts

Something Different

Jeff, Sonio and Luke’s Quirky Quiz

This stunning work delves into the mind of a teenage chat toom junkie.

TRANSIT BAR

BEAVER GALLERIES

THE FRONT CAFE AND GALLERY

I Love You, Bro

An evening of cocktails, burlesque, comedy and drag. Feat. Deb Delicious, Tammy Paks and more. 7pm.

Bell Shakespeare presents William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Tix through Canberra Theatre Centre.

Exhibition - Homesick

7.30pm, free.

Alev

ARC CINEMA, NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE

THE STREET THEATRE

Croon and wail your heart out on the Transit stage. 9pm start.

All you need to bring is your instruments and friends.

Paintings, prints and sculpture by David Frazer. Till May 22.

Something Different

Part of the Robert Bresson restrospective. 2pm.

Karaoke Love

THE PHOENIX PUB

tuesday may 22

Arc - Pickpocket (M)

Art by Josephine Starrs and Leon Cmielewski

With Fair to Midland (USA) and Twelve Foot Ninja. Tix through Oztix. ZIERHOLZ @ UC

Adam “Noimportant” Hadley’s Farwell HE’S LEAVING US! HE’S LEAVING US! CANBERRA WILL MOURN! MOOOOOOURN! From 9pm. Love you Hads x THE PHOENIX PUB

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Exhibition - Reside Art by Rachel Bowak.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE GORMAN HOUSE

Pearl Versus the World

Presented by Jigsaw Theatre and CTC. COURTYARD STUDIO, CTC

Comedy

From 10pm.

Melbourne International Comedy Festival

Charles and Dave

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Something Like This

Roadshow! Bookings: 6275 2700.

THE DURHAM KING O’MALLEY’S, CIVIC

Ruby Boots

Dance

The Wise Up Tour with The Wedded Bliss and The Ellis Collective. Tix $9 + bf through Moshtix. 8pm. TRANSIT BAR

Fleshy and bold photographs by Spiro Miralis document his friends and lovers in his own space.

Sebastian McFox

KNIGHTSBRIDGE PENTHOUSE

The Crunch

HIPPO LOUNGE

Purple Sneakers

Your favourite late late late night indie disco. 8pm, free entry.

THE PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

TRANSIT BAR

OUT

may23

bURLESQUE bONANZA! bOY AND BEAR METAL FIESTA 2 GRAVEYARD TRAIN CHARGE GROUP ...and more!

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FIRST CONTACT

SIDE A: BMA band profile

Sub Detonator Where did your band name come from? It’s named after a new tune from Agency Dub Collective due out on their next album later this year. We thought it was a tough, bass-heavy name that also leaves something to the imagination – a good description of our music. Group members? A simple power trio format: Marcos on five-string electric bass; Dub Ninja on drums and dub effects; Rondo on guitar, dub effects and samples. Describe your sound: A bass-heavy, tight rhythm section sound, somehow managing to sound spacious, stripped back and atmospheric while massively heavy at the same time. Classic modern dub, with charging steppas, some one-drop and break beats layered with strange samples and sonic explorations all played with a live band. Who are your influences, musical or otherwise? Agency Dub Collective because the three of us founded the group in Canberra in the late ‘90s. What’s your biggest achievement/proudest moment so far? Getting together again after ten years apart and having instant chemistry, writing four new tunes effortlessly at our first jam session only one month ago. What are your plans for the future? To continue writing tracks, self-produce an EP this year and support Agency Dub Collective when they tour Australia and New Zealand next summer. What makes you laugh? Cynical jokes and dark humour. What pisses you off? Bad mainstream music, and how it manages to get worse every year, while there is all manner of amazingly good independent music being created all around. What’s your opinion of the local scene? It ebbs and flows. I think it’s on the up now, with some interesting bands and good new venues that support independent music around at the moment. What are your upcoming gigs? Our premiere show is on Thursday May 17 at Transit Bar with Iron Gate Sound. It’ll be a classic dub/reggae sound system style night with free CD giveaways to the first 50 heads through the door. Contact info: Rondo: 0432 867 858, agencydub@yahoo.com

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Aaron Peacey Aaron 0410 381 306 Activate Jetpack activatejetpack@ hotmail.com Adam Hole Adam 0421 023 226 Afternoon Shift Adam 0402 055 314 After Close Scotty 0412 742 682, afterclose@hotmail.com Alcove Mark 0410 112 522 Alice 0423 100 792 Allies ACT (Oxfam Group) alliesact@hotmail.com/ myspace.com/alliesact Amphibian Sound PA Clare 0410 308 288 Amplif5’d Classic rock covers band Joy 0407 200 428, joybarac-heath@hotmail.com Annie & the Armadillos Annie 6161 1078/0422 076 313 The Ashburys Dan Craddock 0419 626 903 Aria Stone, sax & flute, singer/ songwriter (guitar) Aria 0411 803 343 Australian Songwriters Association (Keiran Roberts) 6231 0433 Arythmia: Ben 0423 408 767/ arythmiamusic@gmail.com Backbeat Drivers Steve 0422 733 974, www.backbeatdrivers.com Big Boss Groove Andrew 0404 455 834, www.bigbossgroove.com.au Birds Love Fighting Gangbusters/DIY shows - bookings@birdslovefighting.com Black Label Photography Kingsley 0438 351 007 Blister Bug Stu 0408 617 791 Bridge Between, The Rachel 0412 598 138, thebridgebetween.com.au Bruce Stage mgr/consultant 6254 9857 Capital Dub Style - Reggae/Dub Events + DJs facebook.com/CapitalDubStyle Rafa 0406 647 296 Caution Horses Nigel 0417 211 580 Chris Harland Blues Band 0418 490 640 chrisharlandbluesband@yahoo.com.au Clear Vision Films rehearsals/film clips/stunts - 0438 647 281 wcoulton.clearvisionfilms.com Cole Bennetts Photography 0415 982 662 /colebennetts.com Cris Clucas Cris 6262 5652 Crooked Dave 0421 508 467 Danny V Danny 6238 1673/0413 502 428 Dawn Theory Nathan 0402 845 132 D’Opus & Roshambo hifidelitystyles@yahoo.com DJs Madrid and Gordon 0417 433 971 DJ Latino Rogelio 0401 274 208 DJ Moises (RnB/Latin) 0402 497 835 or moises_lopez@hotmail DNA Vic 0408 477 020 Drumassault Kate 0414 236 323 Easy Mode Daz 0404 156 482, easymodeband@gmail.com Entity Chris 0412 027 894 Epic Flagon band@epicflagon.com Fighting Mongooses, The Adam 0402 055 314 Final Warning Brendan 0422 809 552 Fire on the Hill Aaron 0410 381 306/ Lachlan 0400 038 388 4dead Peter 0401 006 551 Freeloaders, The Steve 0412 653 597 Friend or Enemy 6238 0083, www.myspace.com/friendorenemy Gareth Hailey DJ & Electronica 0414 215 885 GiLF Kelly 0410 588 747, gilf.mail@gmail.com Groovalicious Corporate/Weddings/ Private functions 0448 995 158 groovalicious@y7mail.com Guy The Sound Guy live & studio sound engineer, 0400 585 369, guy@ guythesoundguy.com HalfPast Chris 0412 115 594 Hancock Basement Tom 6257 5375, hancockbasement@hotmail.com Happy Hour Wendy 0406 375 096 Haunted Attics band@hauntedatticsmusic.com Hitherto Paul 0408 425 636

In The Flesh Scott 0410 475 703 Inside the Exterior Nathan 0401 072 650 Itchy Triggers Andrew 0401 588 884 Jacqui Seczawa 0428 428 722 JDY Clothing 0405 648 288/ www.jdyclothing.com Jenn Pacor singer/songwriter avail. for originals & covers, 0405 618 630 Jim Boots 0417 211 580 Johnny Roadkill Paulie 0408 287 672, paulie_mcmillan@live.com.au Karismakatz DJ Gosper 0411 065 189/ dj@karismakatz.com Kayo Marbilus myspace.com/kayomarbilus Kurt’s Metalworx (PA) 0417 025 792 Little Smoke Sam 0411 112 075 Los Chavos Latin-Ska-Reggae facebook.com/loschavosmusic Rafa 0406 647 296 Andy 0401 572 150 Manilla Green Herms 0404 848 462, contactus@manillagreen.com, Mario Brujo Gordon world/latin/ reggae/percussionist and DJ. 0405 820 895 Martin Bailey Audio Engineer 0423 566 093 Words for You: writer/publicity/events Megan ph 6154 0927, megan@wordsforyou.com.au Mercury Switch Lab Studios mercuryswitch@internode.on.net Missing Zero Hadrian Brand 0424 721 907 hadrian.brand@live.com.au Moots aspwinch@grapevine.com.au Huck 0419 630 721 MuShu Jack 0414 292 567, mushu_band@hotmail.com MyOnus myonusmusic@hotmail.com/ www.myspace.com/myonus No Retreat Simon 0411 155 680 Ocean Moses Nigel 0417 211 580 OneWayFare Chris 0418 496 448 Painted Hearts, The Peter 6248 6027 Phathom Chris 0422 888 700 The Pigs The Colonel 0422 412 752 Polka Pigs Ian 6231 5974 Premier Audio Simon 0412 331 876, premier_audio@hotmail.com Rafe Morris 0416 322 763 Redletter Ben 0421 414 472 Redsun Rehearsal Studio Ralph 0404 178 996/6162 1527 Rhythm Party, The Ross 0416 010 680 Rob Mac Project, The Melinda 0400 405 537 Rug, The Jol 0417 273 041 Samsara Samahdi 0431 083 776 Sansutra J-Ma 0403 476 350 Simone Penkethman (Simone & The Soothsayers, Singing Teacher) 6230 4828 Soundcity Rehearsal Studio Andrew 0401 588 884 Solid Gold Peter 0421 131 887/ solid.gold@live.com.au Super Best Friends Matt 0438 228 748 Surrender Jordan 0439 907 853 Switch 3 Mick 0410 698 479 System Addict Jamie 0418 398 556 The Morning After (covers band) Anthony 0402 500 843/ myspace.com/themorningaftercovers Tiger Bones & The Ferabul-Zers Danny feralbul@aapt.net.au Tim James Lucia 6282 3740, LUCIAMURDOCH@hotmail.com Top Shelf Colin 0408 631 514 Transmission Nowhere Emilie 0421 953 519/myspace.com/ transmissionnowhere Udo 0412 086 158 Undersided, The Baz 0408 468 041 Using Three Words Dan 0416 123 020, usingthreewords@hotmail.com Voodoo Doll Mark 0428 650 549 William Blakely Will 0414 910 014 Zero Degrees and Falling Louis 0423 918 793 Zwish 0411 022 907


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BMA Magazine 394 May 09 2012