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grocer for a cracking creamy mushroom fettucine. What did you think I meant?

Blah blah World Cup, FIFA corrupt yada yada. #443J u n e 2 5 Fax: (02) 6257 4361 Mail: PO Box 713 Civic Square, ACT 2608 Publisher Scott Layne Allan Sko General Manager Allan Sko T: (02) 6257 4360 E: advertising@bmamag.com

Editor Tatjana Clancy T: (02) 6257 4456 E: editorial@bmamag.com

Accounts Manager Julie Ruttle T: (02) 6247 4816 E: accounts@bmamag.com

Sub-Editor & Social Media Manager Chiara Grassia

HENCHMEN, HIRED HENCHMEN

ROCK THROUGH THE WIRE: REFUGEE WEEK

For some folks, turning 30 is the new midlife crisis point. What if you haven’t ticked everything off the list? What if you never had a bloody list? What if your 30th was actually five years ago and you’re staring down the barrel of 40? *Deep breaths*. While I’m sucking my thumb and rocking in the corner right about now, Tom Woodward has decided to harness the quiet terror of the big 3-0 by throwing a bash that everyone can enjoy. His old band, psych-folk rockers The Henchmen will reform and relive the heady days of the early 2000s; a simpler time when phone booths were in abundance and stonewash and facial hair was still considered daggy. The fun doesn’t stop there folks, the night is also a launch of Woodward’s comic zine and features performances by the Krewd Sisters, Konrad Lenz and the ‘sepulchral’ Melbourne sound dude, Nausea. There will also be film clip versions of musical comic strips and promises of fictional characters coming to life from the pages of Woodward’s aforementioned zine. You too may wish to pick some mushrooms* on the way to Smith’s Alternative on June 27 Doors open at 8pm and tickets are available from.trybooking. com/90367

Canberra’s Refugee Action Committee (RAC) is marking the end of Refugee Week with a gathering of some of the nation’s most engaging rhythm-makers and inspiring sound-shakers. And they are as keen as a condiment for you to be a part of it.

*Don’t pick rogue mushrooms kids. Unless they’re from the

Part of a network of concerned citizens around Australia, RAC seeks the fair and humane treatment of refugees in Australia and works to raise public awareness about the government’s obligations to give refuge to asylum seekers. In April more than 2000 people participated in the Palm Sunday Rally in Garema Place. Composed of individuals from a broad range of social/ economic/political backgrounds itself, RAC continually seeks to spread the word throughout all levels of Australia’s diverse society. On Saturday June 28, RAC presents Rock Through the Wire, a lively evening of song, dance and the spoken word in support of a more humane and dignified policy towards asylum seekers and refugees. The day will feature the sounds of Keyimba (West African funk & reggae) and Pataphysics (guerrilla hip hop). Melbournebased act Pataphysics is lead by Pat Marks, the music and arts coordinator of R.I.S.E (Refugees, Survivors, and Ex-Detainees) who will also be

running workshops on the day. Rock Through the Wire will be held at the ANU Bar at Union Court. Tickets are $22 on the door, which includes a free CD that celebrates the very best of Australia’s vibrantly diverse population, with all proceeds going towards advancing the refugee cause.

POCKET FOX: TRAINING THE ROCK STARS OF TOMORROW Well, they’re not planning on teaching them to trash hotel rooms and demand blue M&M’s, but local band Pocket Fox are hoping to enlist the vocal talents of Canberra schoolkids to help them put together their debut album. Far from just recording a few backing vocals, the band are part of a unique school holiday program that gives kids a chance to be part of the entire creative process, offering a chance to play, songwrite, try out instruments and perform with the band. Held at the Belconnen Arts Centre, the week long workshop will be running as part of the Young Music Society’s Music School. The newly formed Winter School Singers will record the debut album and then showcase their efforts at both an end-of-camp concert and on the release itself later this year. Students will also be preparing for a special flash mob performance that will take place at the Musica Viva concert of The Choir of King’s College, Cambridge. More info can be found at youngmusicsociety.org.au.

Graphic Design Chris Halloran Film Editor Melissa Wellham I thought you said you’d invited some ladies along ?

NEXT ISSUE 444 OUT July 16 EDITORIAL DEADLINE July 9 ADVERTISING DEADLINE July 10 Published by Radar Media Pty Ltd ABN 76 097 301 730 BMA Magazine is independently owned and published. Opinions expressed in BMA Magazine are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or staff.

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FROM THE BOSSMAN “Beware of interviewing your heroes.” So went the advice imparted by BMA Mag Editor Tracy Heffernan back in a mystical time known as 2002, a time when I was taking my first trembling steps into the wonderful world of music journalism and thus found myself - on the advice of my UC Professional Writing course convener Jen Webb - knocking on the door of the BMA Mag offices looking for my first gig. Tracy was good enough to take in this wide-eyed, knock-kneed youth, and offered these words as I was purloining some archaic octopus-like recording equipment for my first ever interview. The BMA Mag office back then was of a size that could give a shoebox an ego, but to this little writer-pants it was a vast cave of musical wonderment - occupied by people that I dreamed to be, working in a place that I longed to be part of. Tracy went on with her sagely advice: “Beware of interviewing your heroes. If they turn out to be dicks*, you’ll never be able to listen to their music in the same way again.” This was excellent expectation-adjusting advice. Because it’s true. I’m sure all of us have at least one artist - be they a director, musician, actor or otherwise - that we have started to dislike based on their behaviour. It creates a sense of confusing cognitive dissonance; you love the art but dislike the person. 11 years on and Tracy’s words still echo through my head every time an interview comes around. I have been very lucky in this job to talk to a lot of my ‘heroes’; Simon Pegg, Justin Hawkins of The Darkness, Fred Deakin of Lemon Jelly, Iron Maiden... The list goes on.

YOU PISSED ME OFF! Care to immortalise your hatred in print? Send an email to editorial@bmamag.com and see your malicious bile circulated to thousands. [All entries contain original spellings.] To the ARSEHOLES who think it is their god-given right to drive around Canberra: you are not threatening me when you rev your Hyandai at me when I am riding my bike across the crossing. You are simply parading your small-minded neanderthal attitude. When you rev your car and nudge it forward at me aggressively, well what - am i supposed to quiver? I especially like it when you feel the need to do this at peakhour (yes that 10 minute period), when you are moving at a 5km/h crawl, and the fact that I am riding across the crossing actually makes mequicker! And don’t pretend you’re looking out for my own safety - I’m only going at the same pace as the pedestrian who is walking right next to me and who you would have had to stop for anyway! I pay more attention to the road than you numbskulls anyway - and I’m quite aware of the fact that you haven’t seen me - so don’t try and abuse me when you get startled by my presense at the side of the crossing because you haven’t been paying attention! Grow some balls and go and get yourself a bicycle.

Were any of them dicks? I am happy to report, they were not. And so it is that we flash forward to our front cover article, in which I have the pleasure of interviewing Josh Delaney of Rat & Co. Our man Josh has just released one of the albums of the year; a beautiful, mesmeric number that calls to mind Boards of Canada whilst departing with its own sound. I have been consumed by it, so upon leaping on the phone with the man, those familiar words came to mind once more: “Beware of interviewing your heroes.” Fortunately Delaney has continued the flawless run of awesome interviewees. He is quite clearly intelligent, humble and passionate. It’s why said bright-eyed, knock-kneed young Allan got into this crazy game in the first place… To talk to talented people, to hear their stories and to discover you’d happily share a dinner table with them as well. Speaking of lovely talented people, we also have the divine pleasure of touching base with the hugely-funny-and-yet-atthe-same-time-very-stoic Justin Heazlewood, the magnificent Lloyd Cole, one of Canberra’s-nay-the-country’s-nay-the-world’s funniest comedians Dayne Rathbone (doing a charity show, no less) plus we bid a fond farewell to one of Canberra’s brightest stars in Julia Johnson and her Sirens of the Deep Sea variety. Running a magazine can be a tough old beast but times like these that make you feel lucky you get to do it. And it’s a wonderful thing to be able to share it all with you, the dear reader. I hope you enjoy. ALLAN SKO - allan@bmamag.com *she may not have said these exact words - she’s a classy lady - but nostalgia tends to insert unnecessary swear words to spice up a memory

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Image credit: Tony Mahony

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WHO: ANGO & THE BOY WHAT: CHARITY GIG WHEN: THU JUN 26 WHERE: KING O’MALLEYS

Described as the greatest rock and blues show in all the land, the original rock outlaw, Angry Anderson, teams up with Australia’s hottest young guitarist, James Southwell and his awesome band for an unforgettable night. The infamous vocalist brings his best self to the stage and with all proceeds from the gig going to Lifeline Canberra, there’s absolutely no downside. They’re sure to play plenty of old favourites, but extra brownie points if you can get Angry to play ‘Suddenly’, that poignant theme from Scott and Charlene’s wedding. Tickets $35 available at eventopia.co/. 7.15pm start.

WHO: NORTHEAST PARTY HOUSE WHAT: GIG WHEN: FRI JUN 27 WHERE: TRANSIT BAR

With a myriad of awesome reviews for their live shows and recently released album, Any Given Weekend, Northeast Party House are set to make their way to Canberra. With their mesmerising sound and catchy beats, the band prove they’re worthy of the praise that has been heaped onto them, with track ‘The Haunted’ being gifted a regular spot on the Triple J playlist. Prepare to be dazzled by the charm and charisma that these guys bring to every gig they play, combined with an attack of exciting music that will make your night. Tickets from moshtix.com.au/. $15.30. 8pm.

WHO: DAVE GRANEY WHAT: ALBUM LAUNCH WHEN: FRI JUL 4 WHERE: SMITHS ALTERNATIVE

One of Australia’s most eccentric, enduring musicians, Dave Graney, is returning to Canberra with an exciting tour for his new album, Fearful Wiggings. “If I’ve learnt anything in my years of writing about music it’s that if you’re going to do anything of worth in this tough game, you better have your own thing,” claims Graney and his In Concert tour certainly won’t disappoint. With a captivating performance, the tour showcases the best of Graney’s bizarrely poetic lyricism with an enticing combination of acoustic guitars, percussion and vibes. Grab your tickets at the door, prices TBA.

WHO: SEMANTIX WHAT: EP LAUNCH WHEN: FRI JUL 4 WHERE: TRANSIT BAR

Canberra’s very own hip-hop crew, Semantix, are bringing the beats back to their home town to celebrate the launch of their EP, Cold Plains. Having shared the stage with some pretty big names in both Australia and the international circuit, touring with the likes of Spit Syndicate, the Rugged Man, Blu and many more, Semantix have proven their worth and are quickly carving their name into the Australian music scene. The Canberra boys bring their energetic flow and hard hitting beats to put on an awesome show for all the rabid Aussie hip-hop fans out there. Tickets $10 at the door. 8pm.

WHO: YEO WHAT: ALBUM LAUNCH WHEN: SAT JUL 5 WHERE: TRANSIT BAR

For seven awesome years, Australia’s own Yeo has been touring the country to massive praise and is now heading to Canberra. The latest single from Yeo, ‘Kobe’ amassed almost 50,000 plays on SoundCloud in two weeks, which is nothing compared to the 100,000 plays on his first single, ‘Girl’. ‘Girl’ met instant approval over countless blogs worldwide thanks to its smooth electronic beats and catchy sound. With Yeo’s unbeatable energy and utterly danceable pop music in his live shows, it could be just the song to woo that special lady once and for all. Tickets $13.30 from mostix. com.au/. 8pm.

WHO: THE YEARLINGS WHAT: ALBUM LAUNCH WHEN: FRI JUL 18 WHERE: SMITHS ALTERNATIVE

Having recently released their fifth studio album, Adelaide duo, The Yearlings, are wandering their way across the country with their aptly named All the Wandering tour.The alternative country stars, whose unique careers have spanned an amazing twelve years, are delivering dark ballads, soulful roots and goosebumpinducing harmonies that will stay with you for days. So if you’re looking to liven up your Friday evening, look no further than the distinguishing sound of The Yearlings as they bring their undoubtable talent and poise to Smiths Alternative. Tickets will be available on the night at the door. Price TBA.

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rory mCCartney The frontman of late 80s band Lloyd Cole and the Commotions, LLOYD COLE has had an impressive post-band career, launching an unbroken series of albums over the succeeding years. BMA asked him about his latest LP Standards as he rested at his parents’ home after a UK tour, before gearing up for his mid-year visit to Australia. As to the themes behind the record, Cole is dismissive of the usual songwriter’s response as to what drives their music. “I didn’t have an agenda for the album, I just keep a notebook and things that strike me, which I might be able to make something out of, go down in the book. Then I sit down at my desk and write – I don’t really know how it works.” The more Cole has tried to analyse his work, the less he’s been able to gain any great insight into it. “I don’t really understand inspiration,” he admits. Cole was inspired to lay down Standards after listening to Bob Dylan’s last album Tempest. “It was apparent from his record that Dylan does not pay any attention to how old he is and is not worried about what is appropriate for a man of a certain age.” Over the last decade Cole had thought about age appropriate songs more than he possibly should have, so for Standards he released himself from those concerns. The track ‘Diminished Ex’ has a real Dylan ring about it, which Cole admits was Dylan influenced, although not a deliberate ploy. “I wrote that song the day after I heard Tempest. It was written in that tradition of rock music that is driven by the lyrics.”

Asked about his favourite song on the LP, Cole is initially reluctant to name a tune, before nominating ‘Myrtle and Rose’ because “it is my mother’s favourite.” ‘Blue Like Mars’ also gets a tick as his son Will played guitar on it. Over the years Cole has gone through different set-ups, flirting with bands, going solo, doing instrumentals and even having a ‘small ensemble’ gigging style. Pressed for his favourite approach, he emphasised the importance of varying what he does so as to get neither bored nor too comfortable with it. “I need to be shifted about, but I’m probably most comfortable going solo as I can go on stage and do what I want. If it occurs to me to play a particular song half way through, I can do it without worrying if the other people know how to play it.”

I don’t really understand inspiration

The album contains a bit more vim than Cole’s other recent releases, being more up-tempo. “When writing the album, I got to the point where I realised some songs would need a more rock and roll arrangement. I contacted [drummer] Fred Maher and [bassist] Matthew Sweet who I’ve worked with for 20 years and said, ’do you want to make a rock record?’” It was a chicken and egg scenario, where Cole probably would not have written the more upbeat songs if he hadn’t first had an inkling that he was to work with Maher and Sweet. In an unusual approach, Standards opens with a cover of John Hartford’s ‘California Earthquake’. However, this was not Cole’s choice. “Since I released Love Story in 1995, I’ve consulted my old A&R man on song orders. He insisted that this song had to go first. I thought the album should open with quieter songs and work up to this, but I was told you need a sonic statement straight away.” He and Cole argued over it until Cole gave in, at which point his advisor stated he didn’t even know it was a cover. Cole was pleased with the result as, “he was right, as the song makes a statement that this is not like albums I’ve written before.”

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Cole has found that he his audiences have consisted of an increasingly varied demographic over the years. “While younger people are in the minority, I get fans bringing along younger siblings and now I’ve got kids coming to the show who have listened to their parents’ records. I’ve had one show where there were three generations in the audience, ranging from people in their 60s to teenagers.” Going back a long way, Cole was asked about how his early philosophy and literature studies affected his music. “You hear pop music which asks metaphysical questions like ‘is there a god’ or ‘what is the meaning of life’. These are questions without answers. I was attracted to the pragmatic school of philosophy which explores issues based on certain assumptions such as ‘I exist’ and see where that takes us.” Cole finds that his early studies did impact upon his work and he even now occasionally revisits some of the books he read in the early days. Australia has had to wait a while (as has the USA) for the album which came out in Europe in last year. Cole had to wait until he could get a record label for its distribution here as “it is not like I’m distributed by a big international company, as my label is based in Germany.” He was glad of the delay as he was flat out doing the European promotions in 2013. Cole’s 2014 tour will be in solo mode, with special ‘in conversation’ shows in Hobart and Adelaide. These will have a little music, but will mainly be in presentation/seminar form. “I will talk about how I’ve progressed as an independent artist, using the internet to further my career,” says Cole. Lloyd Cole, with support to be advised, appears at The Street Theatre on Tuesday July 8. Tickets $49 +bf presale through The Street Theatre.

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LOCALITY

If you had to arrange a birthday party for a five year old, how would you go about it? If the birthday in question is that of Beth n Ben, the correct answer is with a massive onesie party on Friday June 27 at The RUC in Turner! It’s sure to be an eclectic evening of entertainment, with the birthday band’s own mish-mash of styles to be accompanied by a range of local artists. Celebrations commence at 8pm, with supports to be announced.

It’s been a bit of a mild winter thus far, so Magpies City Underground have decided to take advantage of the extended warmth(!) with a celebration of summer on Saturday July 5, full of rock ‘n’roll, surfin’ sounds, ska and reggae. The line-up includes The King Hits, The Kingstons and Space Party, as well as some other intriguing surprises including Dr Destructo and Gregory Gorilla and potential prizes for those dressed in their beachwear best. It’s gonna get hot down below and heaven knows that at this time of year you’ve got to take advantage of any extra degrees you can get, so make sure you’re there for the 8:30pm kick off, with your $10 entry fee in hand. Should the mid-week blues be getting you down, head to Hippo Co in Civic for a little bit of Wednesday night jazz. They’ve got a respectable rotation of local musicians coming through their doors to entertain you while you sample a tipple or two, with Bella Groove taking the stage on Wednesday June 25 from 8:30pm. It’s definitely worth keeping an eye on their website for appearances from other local jazz artists over the coming months: hippoco.com.au. Transit Bar is playing host to some fantastic local acts over the coming weeks, with The Second Hand Salmon looking to play their last gig before an extended “hibernation” on Thursday June 19 from 8pm. They’ll be joined for the Great Salmon Send Off by Jimmy Pike, Josh Veneris and James Anthony, with $10 getting you all the rock, reggae and fun you can handle. After the fish have exited stage left, it’s time for The Funk Revue, brought to you by Brass Knuckle Brass Band on Saturday June 28 from 8pm, also at Transit Bar. Featuring Sydney interlopers Beaten Bodies, the night will be rounded out with a strictly 45s set from Jemist. Entry is just $10 at the door. BYO dancing shoes. (You’ll need them.) Finally, I can’t finish this edition of Locality without noting one of the biggest shocks to hit my inbox in the last few months. The beautiful Julia Johnson of Julia and the Deep Sea Sirens and PROM will soon be heading off to Berlin to write a new album, play some European gigs… you know, those kind of fancy things that apparently you can’t do in Canberra. It’s awfully sad to see her go, but thankfully she has offered us a salve in the form of a farewell gig at the Ralph Wilson Theatre at Gorman House on Saturday July 5. It’ll be a while before we get the chance to enjoy her company and musicianship in the capital again, so this is definitely one for your diary. NONI DOLL NONIJDOLL@GMAIL.COM/@NONIDOLL

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ALLAN SKO Scooping up stellar reviews across the globe - including the world famous BMA Magazine ‘Album of the Issue’ plaudit - Melbourne four-piece RAT & CO’s second album Binary is indeed one of the year’s finest. The brainchild of Chet Faker bass player Josh Delaney, Rat & Co takes the mesmeric melodies of Boards of Canada (or BoC, to the cognescenti) and combines them with the warmth and urgency of live instrumentation. “I wanted to get the full live band out of it; playing that Boards of Canada kind of music,” Delaney says. “There’s probably only 100 bands in the [Intelligent Dance Music] world. There’s a lot of people that like it but aren’t playing it.” When not on the road supporting Chet Faker it seems Delaney spends his time writing. Like, a lot. “I’ve currently got 500 songs; most of them are better than the stuff we’ve released.”

Barely finding enough time to pen my own 500-word Bossman column, I ask how Delaney finds the time to pen 500+ tracks. “I’m incredibly fast… I can have a song done in about 20 minutes,” he says. “But I can sit there for two hours on another song that doesn’t come together. So for a month I’ll write 50 songs, and for another I’ll sit on one. But my full-time job is working in my studio for other bands, touring, being a session musician playing bass guitar… My life is music. The session stuff is work. Rat & Co is my pleasure. Rat & Co is my home.”

I wanted to get the full live band out of it; playing that Boards of Canada kind of music...

Sorry, back up a minute… How many songs? “500,” Delaney confirms, allowing my jaw to drop a little lower. “And that’s just a rough count; there’s more hidden in hard drives and smartphones. That’s all I’ve been doing for the last seven years. I dunno… I just keep writing.” As a big fan of Rat & Co’s work, Delaney is as interesting a character as I would hope for. As such, picking his brain about the creative process proves to be a fun exercise. “It all depends on what’s in front of me,” Delaney says on starting a track. “In my Melbourne studio I have different sections; synth world, guitar world, computer world, weird African instruments, so I’ll start a song with one and see how it develops. I will sit there humming into a microphone until I feel like it’s something that’s working. I never ever start with a beat. If you take the beats away from Binary it turns into this beautiful lush orchestral kind of thing. In fact, I’d like to release the album without percussion. That way, it’s more arty based.” This is fascinating to hear, as the beats and breaks on Binary are exemplary and - along with the samples - are the most brilliantly BoC-like aspects of the album. “I listen to a lot of old jazz and funk; I was a funk bass player until recently,” Delaney says. “BoC is funk and old R&B samples either speed up, down, rewound, with a bit of programming to give it that new-age computer vibe. So I essentially do the same thing as I think they do. It’s about repetition, all loop-based, then built and built and built. Without the drums, the rest falls away. “It’s very hypnotic,” he continues. “You can listen as many times as you want and hear new stuff. A lot of the [Rat & Co] songs have over 128 tracks and you can probably only hear about 40 of them

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and the rest are in the memory below. But if you hear it enough times, through different sound systems, you can start hearing those things. That’s what I love. It’s all about the replay value.”

With such a prolific output, Delaney confirms he has broken away from Nick Murphy AKA Chet Faker, citing that it’s been a wonderful experience but his time has come.

“I’m over playing other people’s music. I’d jump back into it straight away if I had to, but I have so many ideas… I have to explore it.” For anyone suffering from artistic rot, Delaney is a living example of the mantra, ‘You have to be in it to win it.’ “I like the idea of ‘keep writing until you find what’s right’. That’s how old hip hop producers did it. People like J Dilla, who is another inspiration for me, he has THOUSANDS of tracks. He was an absolute machine. I aspire to be like that. Same as the famous composers - they wrote piece after piece - and one stood out because those other ones were composed in the first place.” While Rat & Co is Delaney, his band mates help give a different perspective. “One member is Kaia… He’s the playlister. He’s one of my oldest friends. He’s like my musical director. Getting the consistent sound in the album is a strong thing for us.” We skip over other usual interview guff - where the Rat & Co name comes from (“just a name me and Kaia came up with in highschool; no significant reason”), his favourite tracks (“‘Vocal Insanity’ as it’s the first track I ever wrote… ‘Samurai’ because I love Japan... ‘THX’ for my love of theatre”) and album three (“it’s about 80% done”). But for the end of the interview I thought it fitting to talk about the end of the album and the beautiful closer ‘Fault’. Whereas the final track on One Uno Ein seemed to signal that second album Binary would be more BoC, I asked if ‘Fault’s lush orchestral sound would be a similar indicator for album three. “That’s very spot on,” Delaney confirms. “One album leads to the other. Binary is a two number, One Uno Ein one, the third will have a three theme… I can’t wait to play them in Canberra.” Rat & Co will be playing at Transit Bar on Thursday July 10. Doors at 8pm, tix $15 + bf from Moshtix.

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CODY ATKINSON Music and sport: unlikely bedfellows or mortal rivals? With the World Cup upon us again, the time has come to settle the score. Can the two mutually co-exist on Earth, or will it be a no holds barred fight to the bitter end between the Don’s bat and Jimi’s guitar? Cody Atkinson tries to find out.

community to sing an appropriated war song, chant, national anthem or corporate contest winner out of key and tempo. Being shit together is what communities are really about. But don’t get me started about vuvuzuelas, or “ooh, aah, Glenn McGrath” at the cricket.

Name? Music on the left, Sport on the right.

Location? Nearly everywhere.

OK, I won’t then. Ultimately you don’t go to a gig to see a guy take a speccie over Tim Rogers. You don’t watch the tennis for Roger Federer to break into a wicked guitar solo in the middle of a break point at Wimbledon.

What’s the issue with music and sport? I think sport has a music problem. And vice versa.

But how awesome would that be? Well...OK, that would be amazing. Someone get Federer a guitar, stat.

Hmmmm, what’s bringing it on now? Well, have you heard the new World Cup “anthem”? The one with Pitbull and J-Lo?

Maybe there is a place for music in sport then? Absolutely. Plenty of artists have pulled off sporting references within songs and some musos are super passionate about sport.

Age? Pretty damn old.

I think I saw a highlight of that as part of the World Cup Opening Ceremony... Which are the worst. They are notional sporting events designed to both waste a ton of money and somehow trick people who don’t like sport into watching sport later because they liked the innately choreographed routines and pageantry. Protip: people aren’t that stupid.

You don’t watch the tennis for Roger Federer to break into a wicked guitar solo

Anyway, what’s that World Cup song like? It’s trash. Total trash. Like the last one, or the one with Ricky Martin...In fact, theme songs for sporting events have a propensity to reduce even the greatest artists to the depths of mediocrity or worse. I mean, New Order have been trying to forget that ‘World In Motion’ exists for the last 20 years. Yeah, that didn’t happen. And going the other way, Basketball’s Best Kept Secrets, a compilation of hip-hop songs by NBA players, may be one of the worst CDs I’ve ever owned. Attempts by the Bryan Brothers and Jacques Villeneuve at Pan-Atlantic pop haven’t proven to be much better either. What’s it been like closer to home? Well, does everyone remember Mark “Jacko” Jackson’s ‘I’m an Individual’? Or Warwick Capper’s ‘I Only Take What’s Mine’? If you do, I feel sorry for you. And that’s before I get to Anthony Mundine’s musical oeuvre. What about the gigs/games themselves? Usually the crossover comes in the form of a dance contest to ‘Gangnam Style’ at the cricket, or the football being clumsily shown stage right of the band, dividing the attention of the interested audience. It’s the unneeded distraction from the main event, whatever that event is. How about footy theme songs and chants then? To be honest (whispers) I’m not a huge fan. You do have to recognise, however, their ability to bring together vastly different segments of the

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Like the Community Cup in Melbourne? Yeah, that’s an absolutely fantastic event blending both sport and music. But for every Community Cup there’s a Meatloaf at the AFL Grand Final.

So where does music engage sport the best? Cricket seems like a pretty safe place for artists to cross over, with indie giants such as Paul Kelly (‘Bradman’), Pavement (‘...And Carrot Rope’), the Lucksmiths (‘Victor Trumper’) and the whole work of the Duckworth-Lewis Method. Beyond that, You Am I sneak in a great footy reference in ‘Heavy Heart’ and TISM (led by Ron HitlerBarassi) used Aussie rules references liberally. And oddballs Regurgitator have taken the sporting piss a couple of times to good effect. Anything else? Well, Kraftwerk’s ‘Tour De France’ is the best anything to do with either sport or music, let alone both. In the US, the other gentile sport (baseball) has referenced by musos for years, most prominently by Yo La Tengo, who named their band after an obscure fielding error by the New York Mets in 1962. Boxing has also been used by several, including Bob Dylan’s song Hurricane and Mark Kozelek’s side project Sun Kil Moon. How about music at sporting events? What works there? Other than the greatest artistic achievement of mankind, the Canberra Raiders majestic ‘Green Machine’? Ummmmmm, yeah? You can argue me into theme songs being sung after winning a big match, or something with great sentimental value such as Liverpool fans singing ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’. And if you’ve got a brass band or the like, let them crank out every once in a while and bring some spirit back into the crowd. Other than that, play whatever you want, just do it at a low volume. So, in conclusion? There’s something to be said for the separation of church (sport) and state (music).

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Image credit: Rohan Thomson

DEEP SEA FAREWELL IAN McCARTHY

“We did our first show like nine years ago…” reflects polite and softly spoken Julia Johnson – the face and voice of Canberra’s own JULIA AND THE DEEP SEA SIRENS. “The Sirens are nearly nine years old, which freaks me out! It makes me feel so old!” Johnson spoke all about the history of the Deep Sea Sirens, as well as some of her future plans, but the most constant theme throughout our conversation, was her strong love and identification with our leafy capital, which is something that, according to her, seems to baffle many. “I don’t think I’ve ever done an interview without people being like ‘now, so why do you still live in Canberra?’ I don’t normally have a very good answer for that other than like, ‘why would I move?”. Indeed it doesn’t seem like there is much reason for Johnson to move, with Canberra clearly having provided enough inspiration for her song writing. Speaking of Canberra’s influence on her music, Johnson says, “With the album Family Pets, I never really thought about being the producer of an album before and the way I figured it out was like, I kind of wanted to close my eyes when I listened to the song – this sounds really wanky – but I wanted to have particular pictures in my head. Like I wanted to imagine a beautiful Canberra sunset with, you know, the blue Brindabellas and the really pastel sky…and I think that’s what I ended up getting.” However, after a decade plus of having “literally never created a song outside of Canberra,” Johnson seems ready to move on. In her words, “I think I’m starting to imagine myself as someone who just lives wherever the next fun project is.” And unlike many ex-Deep Sea Sirens, the next fun project isn’t in Sydney or Melbourne, but Berlin. Johnson also spoke about what exactly that project is. “There are a few ex-Deep Sea Sirens over there at the moment that I want to do a few shows with but really I’m just going there…I guess more for the writing process…I want to go over there and be immersed in a completely different scene and see how my little Canberra songs fair.”

I’m starting to imagine myself as someone who just lives wherever the next fun project is

Before she jets off, Johnson will be playing a farewell show with her band, which she hopes to make extra-special. As she puts it, “In a way I am really looking at this as the closing of a chapter the Sirens officially living in Canberra …” The show will consist of a fansuggested setlist, plus as an extra acknowledgement of her love for Canberra. “We’re also gonna throw in a few covers of either just songs from Canberra that I really want to cover,” she says. “Or just songs that have like impacted on me and my time in Canberra.” Julia’s farewell gig with the Deep Sea Sirens will be on Saturday July 5 at 7.30pm at the Ralph Wilson Theatre, Gorman House Arts Centre. Tickets trybooking.com/FFZX $20/$15/$12.

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THE REALNESS Pull on those winter woollies and get out and support Canberra based crew Semantix when they take over Transit Bar on Friday July 4, to showcase their latest EP Cold Plains. Semantix consists of members Aplus and Mattrix who handle the mic duties, Obsene on the drums and DJ Danggers on the 1’s and 2’s. Support slots will be handled by Context, Nix, Jimmy Pike and Keech. Don’t miss this great opportunity to catch some quality local hip-hop. Try Again is a brand new 10” EP by El Da Sensei, from the legendary New Jersey duo, The Artifacts. The EP features three new vocal tracks and the instrumental versions of each track. The project has been overseen by K-Def and features beats from Joc Max, B Smooth and House Shoes. The opening track sees Redefinition Records producer and co-owner Damu The Fudgemunk step from behind the boards and lace the cuts. The good folks at Traffic Entertainment Group and B-Boy Records have put together a beautiful package for the collectors out there. One of the most influential and original albums in music history, Criminal Minded by Boogie Down Productions, is now available as a unique and collectable 7” box set. The entire original album is included across five 45s, housed in a durable box lined with two versions of the B-Boy Records logo. Each 45 is enclosed in a mini replica of the B-Boy 12” jacket. Don’t sleep on this as it won’t last long. Okay, so this slipped between the cracks – this massive release from Es-K with his debut album Serenity. Es-K (Essential Knowledge) was born in Holland, raised in Kansas City Missouri and currently lives in Burlington Vermont. You may have come across him from his Spontaneous Grooves series on Cold Busted (I admit that I hadn’t!). What an impressive line up for a debut, featuring the likes of A.G. of D.I.T.C, General Steele, MC Dialect, C-Rayz Walz and Charmingly Ghetto to name a few. Buckshot, the co-owner of Duck Down Music and also one third of the legendary Black Moon and general of the Boot Camp Clik, has teamed up with New Zealand producer P-Money for their new collaborative album, BackPack Travels. The album is entirely produced by P-Money and features Joey Bada$$ and CJ Fly of Pro Era, General Steele, David Dallas and Raz Fresco. For those who prefer things a bit more beat-orientated, you may want to check out the latest signing to Stones Throw Records, Mndsgn (pronounced Mind Design). So far all we have is a tease of his potential with the track ‘Txt’, released via the Stones Throw Soundcloud page. However if his music is anywhere near as impressive as his background then look out (read his bio on the Stones Throw website). The #1 Gram Beats Collective has returned with the third instalment of their collaboration beats projects, this one titled Sweet. The #1 Gram Beats Collective is a gathering of likeminded producers and beatmakers from around the globe who all found each other through sharing snippets of their beats via Instagram. Beatmakers involved with the collective include Dr Dundiff, Blap Deli and HELLNOTE to name a few. Sweet is available for free download now. BERT POLE - bertpole@hotmail.com

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ANNE WIDJAJA When I ask JUSTIN HEAZLEWOOD why he’s written his new book, Funemployed, under his actual name, instead of his more ubiquitous “share-household name” the Bedroom Philosopher, he seems annoyed. “I hate this question,” he says. “I hate the answer. I hate thinking about it.”

Now, after having the likes of “earth mother” Clare Bowditch counsel him on his money troubles, Heazlewood approaches his artistry like a small business owner. He hopes that a new generation of artists will “grapple with that head trip” and be smart enough to do the same.

Since shelving the Bedroom Philosopher in 2012, Heazlewood has been battling with an artistic existential crisis of sorts. Following the success of ‘Northcote (I’m So Hungover)’ from album Songs from the 86 Tram (2010), Heazlewood became concerned that his image had become “too hipster for comfort”. Heazlewood deconstructs the “hipster” issue in Funemployed, suggesting that ‘Northcote’s’ success in the midst of the late 2000s indie craze led to his “nerdy guy” image being perceived as just another hipster stereotype. “I couldn’t give a shit about the hipster thing. Now it’s all I’m known for… I’m [just] a ‘Youtube sensation’ according to some reviewers. That depresses me,” he complains.

Although Heazlewood hopes Funemployed reads like a “practical manual” which “can help and entertain people (like Manuel from Fawlty Towers)”, the book is still a hilarious “confessional” of Heazlewood’s life as a comedian. At the Art Day book launch in Melbourne, Heazlewood reconfirmed his commitment to comedy by beating his world record for the longest continuous performance of John Farnham’s ‘You’re The Voice’ at nine hours, with a twelve hour reading of Funemployed. “Art Day was like a christening, wedding and funeral in one. I was giving birth to my book, getting married to my art and laying my demons to rest,” he says about the experience.

I couldn’t give a shit about the hipster thing. Now it’s all I’m known for

The last known sighting of the Bedroom Philosopher was in 2012, with the release of ‘Northcote (YouTube Comments)’ featuring new lyrics to ‘Northcote’ based on YouTube comments posted on the original video. The video has now reached almost 20,000 hits. A satire on the irony of hipsterdom, wrapped in social media pastiche… The irony of the Bedroom Philosopher is so circular, trying to unpack it leaves your head spinning. Maybe this is the reason that Heazlewood has decided that for now, the Bedroom Philosopher is “either dead or napping.” “Comedy is an artistic prison when you have to be funny or your art is meaningless,” Heazlewood surmises about his current disdain for the Bedroom Philosopher. He describes his second book as an “emotional audit” into why he became bored of the Bedroom Philosopher. In an attempt to “repair” his “artistic soul”, Heazlewood interviewed a hundred other Australian artists, including Gotye, John Safran and Clare Bowditch, to investigate where he’d gone wrong. “I was feeling very isolated. I was in my lone wolf ivory tower and I needed to check in with others and realise that we’re all in the same boat,” he reflects.

“In 2012 I was burnt out, bitter and in $20, 000 of debt. I’d basically ridden the Bedroom Philosopher into the ground through poor self-management.” Heazlewood argues that starving for your artist is not only unrealistic, but reinforces the idea that, “being an artist isn’t a legitimate profession” and “sends the message that we are amateurs doing it because it’s fun and to get paid in beer”. He believes that artists’ aversion to money is also an “Australian thing”. “Artists are the worst managers because they have no business brain and [that’s] crossed with Australian selfdeprecation,” he remarks. “[As an artist] it’s not polite to let on how much you have in the bank or some shit. -This had to end. Each and every one of us has to take ourselves seriously enough to be paid for our time.”

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Heazlewood will also use material from Funemployed for a new radio show on Radio National and plans to tour nationally in July. The Funemployed tour includes a stop in Canberra, where he spent many “magical” years as a “shitstirrer” student living in Belconnen.

“I’m grateful I went to university in Canberra and not Sydney or Melbourne,” Heazlewood says about his time studying at the University of Canberra. “Being from Tasmania, I was easily intimidated and it was such a small to non-arts scene here I had space to do my own thing. I saw opportunities and thought, ‘I’m getting in before anyone else does’ and fortunately there was literally no-one else competing!” He even wrote a regular column titled “StruthBeTold” for this very magazine. In spite of Heazlewood’s new name, fans of the Bedroom Philosopher needn’t yet mourn the loss of the satirist who made post-modernity both coherent and funny. Although he explains that releasing the EP as Justin Heazlewood was a “step away from the Bedroom Philosopher name” because the name currently “shits” him, his comedy hasn’t strayed far from the achingly selfconscious deprecation of the Philosopher. The Funemployed EP, which accompanied the release of the book, features a “hauntingly lo-fi…dole trilogy” of “Centrelink soundart” and a new single titled ‘I Don’t Know What I’m Doing With My Life’. With a new found enthusiasm for art and a new (original) name, Heazlewood may just put the Bedroom Philosopher name to rest where it belongs – in the dark, dank depths of North Melbourne sharehouses. Justin Heazlewood will be launching Funemployed at Smith’s Alternative on Saturday July 12. 2pm. $15 at the door, all ages.

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DANCE THE DROP I saw my own breath this morning. As soon as I stepped outside I was a human fucking steam train. My passengers were germs and bacteria on a one way trip to Fluville. Ah-Choo Choo indeed. Winter is officially here in all its stingingly frigid glory. We must resist. Regardless of the fact that it feels as if you’ve been hit in the face by a huge money shot from Iceman then spooned Christopher Pyne on a glacier, it isn’t an excuse to stay away from the debauchery of club land. It is true, winter in Canberra means that less young people venture far from their illegally downloaded collection of Game of Thrones episodes. The catharsis for this - for true party addicts, is the tried and tested ‘house party’. Everybody has at least one immense house party yarn. The myth of the pregnant squirter, ants nest Adam, the midget and Mr Brunker. These are all fine tales born from my experiences within the hallowed walls of a suburban shindig. You just can’t get away with things like vomiting into a wine glass, in a club environment. The unfaultable clubbing elite pass it off as ‘tacky’ and ‘awful’ – but at a house party it transforms into folklore, a legendary gaff which only serves to immortalise the perpetrator. House parties are where the myths of gruesome anti-heroes and heroines are forged. Shitting your pants on your friend’s balcony may very well be the pinnacle of your existence on this earth. Your steamy, corny butt mud may live on in the annuls of history well after

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you have shuffled off this mortal coil. Do not let the icy weather chill your impetus – the future is already written, you are already destined to become a legend, now go forth and fulfil that destiny you crazy unpredictable bunch of loonies. For those of you who prefer to keep most of their smelly bodily fluids on the outside of their favourite clubbing gear, there are a lot of warm and wonderful events to keep your cheeks toasty on the weekend. Ironically, Indian Summer has chosen to visit us in winter. The achingly cool act will be showering punters with deadly UV rays at Meche on Saturday 20th June. This event is co-hosted by Univibes so you should probably hit the goon bag pretty damn hard before you head in, just to be safe. Who is harder, the ACT or NSW? You can come and see which vascular champion will reign supreme at Hard NV’s special camo themed battle night on Saturday 5th July. NV will play host to a slew of ACT and NSW’s finest hard dance DJ’s throwing shapes at each other in second hand army gear. If that’s not enough to coax you out of your hard earned cash them Im all out of ideas. Ex Canberran A-Tonez is currently crushing his flat brimmed opposition like ants, announcing his inaugural contribution to the Ministry of Sound mixed CD series. On The Down-load is brimming with face melting club bangers, all expertly squeezed together by the black hatted turntable terror himself. Anthony is set to become one of the biggest Ministry drawcards over the next twelve months so get onto iTunes and grab yourself a copy so that you can say that ‘you liked him before he was cool’. TIM GALVIN tim.galvin@live.com.au

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including The Vacant Lot, Several Devils, Bladder Spasms and Cult Killers. Tickets for the show are $30.60 +bf from Oztix.

I have a very important question. Is napping punk? I mean on one hand, napping is typically the mark of a person who well truly doesn’t give a single fuck, but on the other dozing off can quickly lead into more dangerous territories like cuddling. Plus, let’s be honest, you probably look adorable when you doze off. Still, I’m going to take a leap of faith here and say that napping is pretty punk. That would officially make Jeff the most punk Wiggle. It takes a special kind of person to look tough in purple! Anyway, let’s move on. I’d like to start out by wishing the best of luck to Revellers as we see them off on their first national tour, alongside Sydney friends Nerdlinger. To further the excitement, Revellers have also just released their new EP Your Round, which along with some very curious cover art, boasts six new tracks of classic Reveller punk anthems. Starting with Thursday June 26, when Adelaide’s Grenadiers will be stopping by the Magpies City Club. Support will be coming from local favourites The Barren Spinsters, Yoko Oh No, Bacon Cakes and Jack Livingston. Entry will cost you a fair $10 on the door. Also on Thursday June 26, you can catch The Vibrators from the UK on their first ever Australian tour. They’ll be at the Croatian Club in Turner on Thursday June 26, joined by local and interstate bands

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Saturday June 28 will see the Magpies City Club overrun by causeconscience punters. Punx For a Cure will feature a massive line-up including interstate acts Oslow (Sydney), Yo! Put That Bag Back On (Sydney), Unbranded Animals (Sydney), David M Johnson (Wollongong) and GONER (Sydney) along with locals Hygeine, Swoon Queen and Jack Livingston. The show will cost you $10 on the door, with all proceeds going toward the Leukaemia Foundation. Brisbane’s Columbus will be hitting up the Magpies City Club on Saturday July 12, which also just happens to be my eight-I mean nineteenth birthday (Allan taught me that one). But more important than the number of times I’ll have circled the sun, is the other bands who will be ripping up the stage. Perth’s Ruthless will be there, along with locals Lost Coast and Katanarama. This one will only set you back $10 at the door. As always, make sure you’re tuning into 2XX every Monday night from 9:30pm for your weekly dose of local, national and international punk and hardcore. Also, if napping is punk, I’m about to spend a good eight hours sticking it straight to the man! IAN McCARTHY punk.bma@gmail.com

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carrie gibson There is plenty happening at camp MATTERSPHERE this year. From humble beginnings in 2009 to a mere five years later, the world is now poised at their fingertips. The band have reached many personal goals over the five years, however the greatest piece of news for the boys thus far has them reeling in the success of placing at number two on the US Hot Singles sales charts for ‘Hearing You’ (the band’s debut single from their highly anticipated introductory self-titled album). The band is stoked. “It’s a matter of turning it all into mileage at the moment,” states vocalist Eddie Deakin. “We are busy paving the way for this new album, getting as much exposure as we can.”

decision to move from covers to original music and here’s why. “I turned on Triple J one day and heard the host hyping up this band – ‘this is going to be Australia’s next greatest thing’. I have to say it was absolutely fucking crap,” admits Deakin. “It was just like someone had recorded it in a garage with a vocalist who sounded like his nuts were caught in a rabbit trap. I was dumbfounded, I went through different emotions; just absolute anger to fear – if this was Australian rock music, then it was in trouble.”

We, just like many others, want to show the world our interpretation and simply want to make our mark

Mattersphere are a hard rock five piece based in Canberra who cannot deny their roots to rock and roll. “It stems from my childhood,” says Deakin. “I grew up with bands like Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, Kiss and it was these types of bands that inspired me. Rock is a freedom; it’s something you can really get into, something that has been lost over the years. We hear from young bands who hear us and mention ‘we are trying to get that eighties sound’. We respond with, ‘well we’re trying to catch up to you guys,’” he says with a laugh. “So there are also a lot of differences with the generations who write and play the music of today – the seventies and eighties were the best times for rock and roll”. According to Deakin, when it comes to rock and roll it’s hard to find a bad rock band, although when it comes to rap music he is adamant it’s all bad. “You can’t put rock and roll in a box and say there it is,” he says.” It’s diverse, it’s subjective and has a certain vibe about it and it’s all good. There are so many great musicians out there. We, just like many others, want to show the world our interpretation and simply want to make our mark”. The formula for Mattersphere is indeed effective and has created a dynamic standout self titled album, an album that has been described as containing a hard rock assault, thundering base and head throbbing guitars. An album which was motivated by a

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Growing up in the eighties, it was all about getting the ladies. “We want the ladies to have a great time at our shows,” states Deakin. Mattersphere dearly hold onto the philosophy that aiming the show at the focus of the lovely ladies because the men won’t be too far behind. “We are aiming to please everyone of course yet this is an important part of the experience,” he says. “I’m sure women don’t particularly like being in the moshpit – the moshpit is what killed rock and roll.” Since 2009, the band has been incorporating their philosophies into their music. In that time what has been one of the biggest trials for the band as well as the biggest triumph? “Biggest trial is by far finding members who are willing and committed,” Deakin says. “It’s a lifestyle many cannot undertake – due to the woes of adulthood and I think sometimes people get a bit scared of success. There are two types of people; people who make any excuse to not do something and those who will make any excuse to do something.” Promoting the latest album has created ear buzz both on shore and over the waters, a buzz the band intend on broadening during 2014. But first Mattersphere will support the iconic Angry Anderson in their home city during his national tour on Friday July 11 at The Basement and are also set for several interstate shows with a promising remainder of the year. Catch Mattersphere, along with Johnny Roadkill, Reign of Terror and Na Maza, support Angry Anderson + The Band of Doom at The Basement on Friday July 11. Tickets $25 +bf from oztix. 8pm. 18+.

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METALISE So with three week period of shows to cover this issue as well as a bunch of stuff happening just up the Hume Hwy comes with a reminder for all of you in metal bands looking for some coverage for your show or venue: doomtildeath@hotmail.com. I will ensure you get some print on your gig/album/EP/7”/cassette/music video/box social. There are tonnes of shows coming up so get organised! Norse are at the Basement in Belconnen on Friday June 27 on a huge bill with Aeon of Horus, Hadal Maw and Apparitions of Null. Friday July 4 at ANU Bar is the power of metal that is contained within Voyager and Caligula’s Horse. And Abrynth, Fenrir, Claret Ash and Beast Impalor are at the Basement on Saturday July 12. Then there is the big Corrosion of Conformity, Weedeater and Lo! show on Saturday July 19 ANU Bar which is a must see. Or rather it was. The financial backer of the tour, Redline Music, must have strayed too far into the red line and the tour has been a casualty of litigation with the promoters bank roll. If you bought tickets, you can get a full refund at the point of purchase. To take the sting away, just back from a ridiculously successful and momentum building tour of the USA, King Parrot come back for a winter warmer at the ANU Bar on Thursday July 17. Matt “Skitz” Sanders has felt the toll of the bands hectic touring schedule and stepped off of the drum throne to be replaced by former member of The Bezerker (play your fastest blast!) Todd Hansen. Todd blasted his way through the infamous masked period for the infamous Earache records industrial act and he is more than talented enough to fill the chair vacated by two of Australia’s absolute blastingest brutalisers in Matt Rizzo and Matt Skitz. Buried In Verona, Antogonist AD and Stories are on at The Magpies club on Thursday July 24. August sees Flaming Wreckage, Tortured and …Is Dead at the Basement on the Friday 1 and sleepmakeswaves, Breaking Orbit and Teal at the ANU on Saturday 2. I Exist, Legions, Blight Worms and Take Control on Friday August 8 at Magpies. The incomparable King Buzzo of the Melvins is at the Transit on Saturday August 23 for a special solo show. Further down the track you have Conan in September at the Basement and Sinister and Toxic Holocaust at the Basement also in November. That is a tonne of stuff for the fridge calendar just for Canberra! Carcass and Earth were brutal and now it’s going to be time for Tankard, Neurosis, High On Fire, Pelican, Protest The Hero, Devildriver Cannibal Corpse, Maybeshewill, Sepultura, Accept and Gorguts shows to come before the end of the year and that doesn’t cover what HASN’T been announced yet. JOSH NIXON doomtildeath@hotmail.com

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E X H I B I T I O N I S T ARTS | ACT

HAPPINESS IN (MAGA) ZINES chiara grassia When your voice can be potentially reached by millions via the internet, why bother circulating through print? Well, sometimes you want your voice to be heard but maybe not by millions. Maybe just hundreds, or dozens. While trawling through countless blogs and feeds can feel like navigating a graveyard of yesterday’s thoughts, ZINES are a document of the moment in which they’re made in, their tangible paper form adding another layer of permanence. We’re physical creatures; we haven’t been distilled into entirely cyber form, not yet at least. There’s a pleasure in flicking through thin pages, underlining phrases that cut deep and dog-earring the corners for later reference. The medium of zines – essentially handmade, independently produced and distributed magazines – has been around for decades. What makes up a zine? Passion and obsession, which are kind of interchangeable. They can be made by anyone and can be about anything. Essentially anyone with access to paper, pen and a photocopier can make one. They can be therapeutic to make, an instant relief to dump all the clutter inside your head onto a blank page and let the photocopier bind it all together, sealing shut your thoughts. But a blank page can also be intimating; filling in the empty spaces can feel like a battle as your thoughts race towards the end product rather than enjoying the process of making them. Making one is an exercise in patience, a firm reminder that not everything has to be intensely instant. They’re not fuelled by socially acceptable motivational factors, such as money or fame. Like other creativity pursuits, motivation has to come from within. They challenge you to dig deeper. Unlike other publishing formats, zines are not censored by other voices – no editors, no advertising, no marketing plan. They’re usually – but not always, a solitary pursuit. A late-night, bedroom activity; a side-project, a hobby. Making zines feels like an extension of my head. That’s what reading them feels like too – an intimate insight into the life of someone else, regardless of how abstract the content seems. I found my first zines Impact Comics and Landspeed Records, lying under the counter amongst the street press stacks, but it wasn’t until a friend posted me a copy of her zine that prompted me to start my own. The zine, a stack of crisp A4 pages folded in half and photocopied, was about her high school experience and included crude drawings and wobbly handwriting and photographs. It was sloppy and poignant and exhilarating and I needed to make one. I started scrawling. I wrote about the two subjects I could write confidently about: music and myself. I dedicated my zine to my favourite ‘oddball musicians’ and wrote zealously about Graham Coxon and Blixa Bargeld, cutting and pasting text alongside cut and paste images and scribbled drawings

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(honestly, I haven’t progressed since). I finished my first zine when I was sixteen years old, scoffing my lunch so I could spend the remainder of my break feeding the library photocopier with a stack of silver coins. This process would continue, collecting loose change and bussing around to various libraries to photocopy my thoughts. I’d mail them out to addresses I’d never been to before, to friends I may or may not meet in person but who I’d correspond with for years, swapping these scruffy, funny things. It made me feel like I was part of something bigger; creating them and sending them instantly made me part of a larger network, one that stretched world-wide, of creators. Because zine culture is more than just paper: community is a key aspect. That’s why casual onlookers are consistently perplexed that a medium seemingly primitive in this age of internet domination still exists, still thrives. Online and offline worlds comfortably overlap. Online distributions (distros) are flourishing and so are their real-life equivalent, zine fairs, an ample chance to put name to face, buy or swap zines (trades) and make new friends. For how dispersed Australia is, there exists a close-knit zine scene, held together by the physical hub of Sticky (the only specifically zine shop in the country) who also organise fairs and workshops, as well as numerous other individuals doing the same. Geographically specific collectives keep cropping up countrywide, from Frankston to Toowoomba. Canberra’s own zine scene wavers, depending on who is around to revive it. Currently that place is taken up by the Canberra Zine Emporium, who begun as organisers of a zine fair as part of 2013’s You Are Here festival and have evolved into a group holding events, workshops and meet-ups, as well as managing a zine vending machine. The Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House have latched onto the idea of zines, establishing the Zine Lounge earlier this year. The space was created to compliment the Behind The Lines 2013 exhibition (zines are a perfect fit with democracy), but has since taken on a life of its own, spurning school holiday zine making workshops for kids and readings as well forthcoming zine launches. It may feel like an unusual space to celebrate the underground medium, but the MOAD isn’t the first public institution to showcase zines. The National Library of Australia houses a massive zine collection and the upstairs of Woden library has a few boxes to rummage through (a well-kept secret). The Zine Lounge, a drop-in space to read and create zines, at The Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House is open daily from 9am-5pm. The Canberra Zine Emporium have a slew of events, including workshops and zine launches, coming up. Keep an eye on their facebook page for all events as well details on the location of the zine vending machine.

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MAGIC POWERS baz ruddick

Billed as one of Australia’s most influential and dynamic stage and screen actors, Ursula Yovich plays a plethora of female characters in Vanessa Bates’ THE MAGIC HOUR. A modern day adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales, The Magic Hour takes traditional fairy tales and plonks them in the gritty streets of suburban Australia. We, the audience, follow the story through seven different characters all played by Yovich. Dark, twisted, humorous and affecting, The Magic Hour takes the audience on a magical ride, telling fairy tales from the harsh and ‘bleak gutters’ of everyone’s overlooked backyard. With a preliminary run in Western Australia with the Deckchair Theatre two years ago, The Magic Hour has embarked an extensive tour of Eastern Australia and the Northern Territory. I spoke to Rockhampton-bound Yovich about dynamic character changes, breaking down the fourth wall and her own personal take on The Magic Hour. Anyone who has seen Yovich on the stage will attest to her dynamic skillset as an actress. A singer, a dramatist and a cabaret performer on stage, screen and television, Yovich has proved herself as an actress capable of shifting throughout human experience. “It’s challenging because the characters are complex. You can hate them one minute and then really, really feel for them the next. That’s what I really love about it,” says Yovich. “The writer, Vanessa Bates, is a really wonderful writer and has a great rhythm to her texts which can make really complex human beings.” It is this writing, in her opinion, that is the real strength of the play. Hailing from Maningrida in Northern Arnhem land, as an Aboriginal actor Yovich often deals with themes of Aboriginality through her acting, having starred in ABC dramas Redfern Now and The Gods of Wheat Street. However, she assures me that her characters in The Magic Hour could be played by “anyone”. “The reason I wanted to take on this project was the fact that there was no mention of my Aboriginality,” she states. “In fact, all of the characters could be played by anyone.” Yovich states the production as Carla, grandmother to Little Red Riding Hood, who recounts the misadventures and mischievous dealings of her hoodie-clad wayward teen granddaughter. The story goes on to showcase a twisted take on other Brothers Grimm characters, including Rumpelstiltskin and Rapunzel, with all the tales being told by a character that is left of centre. “These are the voices we don’t hear much of and I think it is important to be able to hear those voices,” notes Yovich. “I think it’s important to know and to feel what the people who have less have to deal with in their lives. They are warped and they are full of humour and flaws and sadness.” This warped twist on the fairy tales is what gives the production its real ‘magical element’. One of the challenges of starring in a one-woman play is the incorporation of the audience as a ‘silent character’ when the ‘fourth wall’ is broken down and the audience is directly engaged with. This as an actress, according to Yovich, was tough as it meant conditioning herself to not expect anything. “Sometimes as a performer you get really, really used to certain things –how people are reacting, etcetera,” she says. “And you think when you don’t hear something that you normally would you are like ‘oh god!’. But generally with this play people are just listening and taking it all in. I love the fact that people are just sort of listening and reacting.”

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The Magic Hour is on at the Street Theatre from Friday–Sunday July 4-6. Tickets are $35/$32 concession, available from the venue.

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A R T | C O M E DY | D A N C E | L I T E R AT U R E | T H E AT R E

IN REVIEW

Marks by the Unknown The Front Gallery and Café Friday–Monday June 13–23 Oscar Wilde once declared that “all art is quite useless”. The phrase is one of those effortless Wildean truisms, a manifesto for aesthetes revelling in perfect disinterestedness. But of course art is not useless at all. If nothing else, art is a vital conduit for the imagination. It can reveal the psyche – both the artist’s and the spectator’s – releasing it from the constraints of the body, into something wholly other, something approaching freedom. However, this notion of art as revelation can be confronting and challenging. As Wilde wrote, “all art is at once surface and symbol. Those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril”. Far from perfect uselessness, the exhibition Marks by the Unknown operated from a real emotional, political and psychological imperative. Tilly Davey, a Canberra-based artist and arts facilitator, curated the exhibition to showcase works by the ‘marginalised souls’ she works with at the Art Haven at Ainslie Village. Davey’s work with her clients at Ainslie Village is less about churning out masterpieces than it is about collaboration and connection. In her drop-in sessions, local residents come in to chat, unload, unwind and explore their creativity. But she is never didactic about what they produce. “I see my role as really more about building trust,” she said. “It’s about building a relationship between us and then, that trust is what allows us to create a mark.”

there is a ‘freedom’ in art that she personally finds in her practice and this is something she has tried hard to impress on her clients. She said that, “part of what I do is just to say, you can let go, this is for you to do whatever you want. There is no right, perfect way to be.” The exhibition was also a way of encouraging a sense of community and of breaking down barriers of fear. And in the current political climate, in which fears of increased divisions between socioeconomic groups have intensified, it’s this sort of acknowledgment of the power of art, trust and community that is sorely needed. CLAIRE CAPEL-STANLEY

The exhibition aimed to give an insight into the lives of many individuals who are often unknown in our community. Many of Davey’s clients struggle with mental illness, social disadvantage and isolation. She reminded me that in Canberra, these experiences are all-too-familiar, but often go unacknowledged. Marks by the Unknown also suggests these experiences are not confined to a particular group. As part of the exhibition, Davey has published a collaborative zine comprising works by creative friends across Australia on the difficult subjects of mental illness, addiction, homelessness and isolation. Art has the ability to give voice to these struggles, but it also has a therapeutic potential. As an artist herself, Davey notes that

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UNINHIBITED So, it had happened again. I’d been blissfully scouring the shelves of a second-hand bookshop when the shop-keeper, a wren-like woman in her sixties with wild blonde hair and wearing black leather pants, did it, she asked her question. “What do you do for a living?” It wasn’t as if she’d said, “Do you mind if I get nude?” or “Why is it you have a face like a burns victim?” She simply wanted to know how I earned a crust. I moved in closer against the shelves in an effort to show that I was terribly busy trying to decide how to spend my money in her shop. But I had to be polite. I said, “I’m a…the best way to… journalist… fiction… stuff.” My response was pathetic, awful, almost downright disrespectful. Why was it so hard to tell this gregarious woman what I do? There’s no doubt that most people with a creative practice have been in a similar situation. And, I think, it all comes down to two key things: understanding and value. It’s true that the only person who understands what it’s like to try to write a decent story or column (let’s not even go near novellas or novels) is the person who’s trying to chose the right words and put them in the right order.

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photomedia and assemblage, but do I understand what it takes to create a drawing or painting or a piece of public art? Nuh. And the performers – the dancers and choreographers. I admire them, I’m inspired by them, but I could never truly understand the work they do. Let’s face it – artists are the freaks of the Australian workforce. That second key to all this: value. How do we value what we do when we barely understand it ourselves? Recently I’ve been listening to Gossling’s Harvest of Gold. Because it’s an absolute cracker. How much work has gone into every chorus and verse and bridge, every sound, every layer – it’s meticulously crafted. How much blood, sweat and tears has been invested in something that many – thousands with any luck, hundreds of thousands – are enjoying. And maybe some are even being moved by it. Is this album really worth just $20, the cost of a laksa and a flat white? No. It’s worth more, so much more. All creative practice, every single artistic endeavour, be it big or small, successful or unsuccessful, public or private, is worth an infinitesimal amount. How do we communicate that? How do we make politicians take notice and take action, particularly in these increasingly threadbare times? Perhaps it all comes down to confidence. Perhaps I should have said to that shop-keeper, “I’m a writer. Some of it is fact, some of it is fiction, and, Christ, I’d be dead without it.” nigel featherstone

Do I know what it’s like to be in a band, to write a song, to get it to sit up and swagger, to play the thing in front of a hundred drunken patrons? Nope, no idea. The visual arts? I love them, especially

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A R T | C O M E DY | D A N C E | L I T E R AT U R E | T H E AT R E

ARTISTPROFILE: Dionisia Salas What do you do? Painting. When, how and why did you get into it? It probably started on a trip to Spain with my family when I was 9. We visited del Prado and I was terrified by one of Goya’s Black Paintings: Saturn Devouring His Son. I couldn’t separate the image from the reality of my childhood nightmares but I was fascinated by the way the brushwork came together to form the features and flesh. Every time I go back to Spain I go to see his paintings. I am interested in how the imagination is taken over by imagery and how paintings can trigger us emotionally.

Of what are you proudest so far? My family, my friends... What are your plans for the future? To move back to Australia for now! What makes you laugh? Friends, my niece and her dog. What pisses you off? Laziness. What about the local scene would you change? Canberra needs more Artist Run Initiatives and cheap spaces to exhibit. Upcoming exhibitions? The Alderman, July 2014, Melbourne Platform Contemporary Art Spaces, August 2014, Melbourne (solo) Kings, November, Melbourne, ANCA, November 2014, Canberra. Contact Info: dionisiasalas.blogspot.com/

Who or what influences you as an artist? Music. There is a lot to feel there, stuff that can’t really be articulated, but it seems to easily open doors into a sort of other dimension, which includes a sense of emotions, vivacity, mortality and physicality.

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IN REVIEW

It’s Dark Outside The Street Theatre Tuesday–Saturday June 3–7 A couple of years back, Canberra audiences were wowed by the magical production The Adventures of Alvin Sputnik: Deep Sea Explorer. Alvin Sputnik combined puppetry and lighting effects in a beguiling show that brought out the full range of emotions, from laughter to tears. To say its simple approach was a dazzling success is not overstating its appeal. Drawing on the prestige of Alvin Sputnik (a very hard act to follow), the team behind that triumph was back with another multi-mode production It’s Dark Outside. The audience settled into a theatre that had been shrunk by drawing curtains across the back rows of seats, creating a more intimate atmosphere. In an unusual move, the puppeteers, dressed head to toe in black, checked out the audience before the lights went down and the show began. Behind them, the stage bore only a simple black chair and black draped table, before a large projection screen. This sparse setting was about to be transformed into a wonderland. This ambitious new show from the Perth Theatre Company combined puppetry, animation, live action and shadow theatre to tell a tale of the insidious loss of memory that accompanies dementia. This battle, which sometimes leaves people mere shells of their former selves, was told with a mix of beauty, sadness and lots of fun. The struggle against the infirmities of the body and the confusion arising from objects seemingly changing location (and form) by themselves were portrayed with a delicate humour. It’s Dark Outside adopted a western theme, with vistas of painted deserts and an Indiana Jones like character with a net, who captured the illusive memories shed by the main character, an elderly man. Memories appeared in midair as fluffy clouds, like thought bubbles. Sometimes, these tiny clouds transformed into more solid memories, such as a beloved dog or a newborn baby. Zs from a sleeping figure became solid, luminous objects. A tent became a horse, then a dog. All the while, the action swapped between live characters, puppets, cartoons projected on the front of the screen and silhouettes from actors behind it. The action flowed with constant changes between modes. Transitions were faultless and the cast imbued the puppets with vigor, while always handling them so gently.

RORY McCARTNEY

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Image credit: Richard Jefferson

Puppetry highlights included the elderly man and a tent dancing together in time and a thought cloud which morphed into a dog, all a-quiver with excitement in anticipation of being thrown a ball. Powerful emotions were expressed through the manipulation of inanimate figures, in a production which combined wonderful imagination and great artistic talent. All this occurred against the keyboard driven soundtrack from composer Racheal Dease, who also provided the haunting vocals, “I’ll be your light/ when it’s dark outside”. Apart from these, not a word was spoken during the performance. Truly, a fitting successor to Alvin Sputnik.

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A R T | C O M E DY | D A N C E | L I T E R AT U R E | T H E AT R E chin, I considered how this obvious substance-abuser may well have a point. I therefore decided to compose this fortnight’s article in terms with which my challenger would be familiar, so I seek your forgiveness should the following be not only coarse, but barely fathomable. For yet more legal reasons, I shall refer to the plaintiff as ‘Matthew’. Complaints have been made, accusations slung and doubts cast.

‘Dear Matthew,

The efficacy of my selfless output has been called into question by those whose misgivings primarily concern their own scholarly shortcomings. This is an alarming development, and one which took place on Friday last. As I took refuge in a local tavern, a fellow patron of dubious composition, having apparently recognised my comely fashions and flawless moustache, took it upon himself to offer unsolicited advice on how I may better my literary output, which I provide for free and for your own betterment. Having spluttered a mouthful of foaming ale across the table in astonishment, I forced myself to loosen my tightening grip on both my own hubris and the cane with which I initially intended to thrash my accuser from the premises. In further testament to my superiority, I decided to take on-board what may, for all I knew, be insightful commentary.

Please leave Canberra. You are of little use here, and future generations depend upon your removal.

From what I could decipher through the complainant’s muddied drawl, his chief indictment was that my own vocabulary threw up an unnecessarily opaque barrier between my intended message and its receipt. In short, a perceived verbosity did, in and of itself, sustain only a superfluous obfuscation ‘twixt herald and addressee, rather than expedite the intended clarity sought by all. I spied my interlocutor with suspicion as he sat self-satisfied opposite, his elbow struggling to make sound contact with the table, often sliding from view as if greased with the spittle continually pouring from his gaping mouth. However, determined to take his advice on the

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Restricting language to words of no more than two syllables is only of use when attempting your accurate description: ‘nonce’, ‘oaf’ or ‘git’ being three examples. Drawbacks to this policy are highlighted when required to describe your contribution to civilisation: ‘negligible’, ‘poisonous’, ‘retrograde’. Dictionaries are not things to be feared, Matthew, unless I am required to use one to beat you senseless. Infinitely more fearful is the ease with which your social group breed - the prisoner population is booming, and homelessness already a problem. What we need are scientists, leaders and poets. Poets able to write in words of more than two syllables, like ‘imbecile’. I trust this open letter is plain enough for you to grasp, and to consider what everyone you have ever met thinks are the only two courses open to you: reform your ways and refine your existence; or take a drive to the south coast, swim out to sea and keep going. Just keep going. Yours in open contempt, gideon foxington-smythe

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bit PARTS I HEART VIDEO ART WHAT: Art exhibition WHEN: Wed Jun 25 WHERE: ANCA Gallery Image credit: Danny Wild

I Heart Video Art is an initiative of the Australian National Capital Arts (ANCA) which brings together works by ten Canberra artists – Alexander Boynes, Nicci Haynes, Caroline Huf, Ellis Hutch, Janice Kuczkowski, Blaide Lallemand, Heike Qualitz, Dan Vukovljak, Danny Wild and Amelia Zaraftis. The exhibition exploits the common virtues of video, including its ability to capture the movement of the human figure and uses both visuals and sound to create something personal that reflects each artists’ observations of modern life. The exhibition opens Wednesday June 25 at 6pm and runs until Sunday July 6. Entry is free. NEEL KOLHATKAR WHAT: Comedy WHEN: Sat Jul 5 WHERE: Zierholz @ UC Neel Kolhatkar, known for bringing the laughs with his flawless impersonations, faultless accents and sharp observations about society, presents all of the above and more in his side-splittingly funny show, GENeration comedY. After over eight million YouTube views and a string of sold out shows in Sydney, Adelaide and Melbourne, Kolhatkar is one of Australia’s fastest rising young comedians and is now set to perform in Canberra. Check out Kolhatkar and his awesome show, GENeration comedY, for a night of laughter and fun that you and your buddies won’t soon forget. Tickets are available at uclive.com.au or at the door. $34.70. SCANDINAVIAN FILM FESTIVAL WHAT: Film Festival WHEN: Tue–Sun Jul 8–20 WHERE: Palace Electric Cinema Bringing together critically acclaimed and award winning films from Finland, Iceland, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, The inaugural Scandinavian Film Festival has something for everyone. Experience an incredible variety of cultures with some of the most charmingly colourful films from Scandinavia in the atmospheric setting of the Palace Electric Cinema. Check out the intriguingly named comedy The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared, which tells the unlikely story of a 100 year-old man who keeps stumbling onto extraordinary circumstances or get groovy in glamorous 60s fashion with the dramatic Waltz for Monica. Tickets via scandinavianfilmfestival.com. IMPROVENTION 2014 WHAT: Theatre WHEN: Wed–Sun Jul 16–20 WHERE: The Street Theatre

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Australia’s largest spontaneous theatre and comedy festival, Improvention, bursts into the spotlight with a line-up of outrageous improvisational theatre pieces, including a fully improvised zombie musical. Although zombies are pretty popular right now, there’s never been a move to incorporate the gore of zombies and the whimsical fancy of musicals into one package – until Zombsical. The best part? You get to decide who lives and dies. The festival showcases some of the best international and local improvisational acts and provides hours of entertainment with a myriad of theatresports and Thank God You’re Here-style shows. Tickets $25–35 from thestreet.org.au.

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the word

on albums

album of the issue The Amazing Snakeheads Amphetamine Ballads [Domino] “I’ve got a feeling in my bones/like no feeling I’ve had before/it’s shaking me down/it’s shaking me to my core,” howls The Amazing Snakehead’s Dale Barclay on opener ‘I’m A Vampire’, echoing my thoughts. My body jerks helplessly every time I listen to Amphetamine Ballads; it’s the heady bass, the slash of the guitar and the Snakehead’s ultimate calling card, Barclay’s undiluted Glaswegian accent. I am feverish while listening. The first seven songs feel like a swift smack to the head and the last three shoot straight through my chest and make me weep. Amphetamine Ballads feels like a close cousin of Husbands, the debut of English band Savages. Both bands have stepped out of nowhere, fully formed, with debut albums that draw upon sounds that have achieved cult status but never penetrated the mainstream during their time. While Savages have adopted a black and white aesthetic – a clear nod to the iconic starkness of Joy Division and Patti Smith – the Snakeheads take to the stage wearing slippery button-up shirts with garish patterns, eyeballing the audience. And like Savages, The Amazing Snakeheads’ underrated weapon is the pulsing bass that holds everything together. Dangerous, sexy and surreal. Amphetamine Ballads starts off all sweat and swagger, with kicker ‘I’m A Vampire’ followed by the even better ‘Nighttime’. With a confident strut and proof that

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it’s all in the delivery, it features the album’s filthiest lyric – “I’m a soul sucker, I’m here to suck your soul”. ‘Swamp Song’ stomps along, ‘Here It Comes Again’ feels like whiplash and ‘Flatlining’ introduces another key component to the Snakehead’s unhinged sound – a woozy, wailing saxophone. Although the main comparison that’s been tossed around is to The Birthday Party, The Amazing Snakeheads are more akin to the (arguably more interesting) offshoots in the Nick Cave family tree – Rowland S. Howard, PJ Harvey, Einstürzende Neubauten, Mick Harvey. This music is dark, sliced with humour and an honesty that doesn’t feel forced. A crunchy guitar line opens the sinister ‘Where Is My Knife?’, which feels playfully evil as Barclay coos, “she weeps and she moans and she cries ‘oh lordy’/you’re my favourite so far, I think I’ll call you Sally/forget the rest, now I’m your daddy,” before repeating the song title. Throughout the entire album, Barclay is in total control of his voice, knowing exactly how to make the biggest impact, whether that’s lashing out or restraining it to a fractured whisper. ‘Every Guy Wants To Be Her Baby’ employs both of these sides, shifting the mood completely by dragging you into the early hours of the morning with a wornout narrator for company. While the first two quarters of the album is more aggressive, gripping on relentlessly, the last few songs shouldn’t be instantly dismissed as fodder. With repeated listens, they reveal hooks to rival the earlier tracks and an unexpected tenderness. ‘Heading for Heartbreak’ is a slow burner that picks up pace only to splinter off quickly, the snare cracking like steady gunshots. Barclay’s voice drops to a murmur, the song carried by a stretched out guitar line that could easily be slipped into Rowland S. Howard’s Teenage Snuff Film. For all their flashier moments, the Snakehead’s intensity lies in their pacing, creating tension with bold silences and guitar lines that drift in and out. The best example of this is album highlight ‘Memories’, which is studded with spoken word pauses, repeating a mantra that encapsulates the band’s approach to the current state of rock and roll: “take it by both hands and shake it if it needs it.” chiara grassia

Ned Collette & Wirewalker Networking In Purgatory [Dot Dash] Born in Melbourne but now living in Berlin, indie artist Ned Collette was raised in a family with strong links to opera. Over time, Colette has used a variety of styles, from a guitar with loops, to a conventional band setup, to more complex arrangements with synths. Networking in Purgatory, which takes the latter approach, was a long distance project, recorded partly in Germany and partly in the studio of compatriot Joe Talia back in Melbourne. Collette is a chameleon when it comes to vocals, sounding washed out in some tracks, very smooth and melodic in others, and squeaky at times. The overblown keyboard cascades in opener ‘At the Piano’ almost slide across the precipice from music to muzak. The very short title track is a bit of fluff, employing ambient humming offset against a whistling sound and vocals rolled out with a chant like cadence. ‘Meltemi’ is a similarly playful instrumental, consisting of electronic murmurs and the noises like a kid’s whistle. Don’t get sidetracked by the oddities and you will find that, a bit like the curate’s egg, this LP is good in parts. Collette can create beautiful melodies and carve out poetic word pictures with lyrics such as ‘every piece of junk is just material Tourette’s’. Better tracks include the retro psych-pop ‘Bird’, with keys sharp as bright pins, and ‘Across the Frozen Bridge’ with its long acoustic lead-in. ‘Vanitas Quack’ entertains with shuffling synths and piano shards, while ‘Echoes Toes’ stands out with its swooping electronica and lyrics passed out slowly like cards from a dealer, all to a complex percussive beat. This is an enigmatic album for those who enjoy something a little experimental, which refuses to comply with the usual expectations for indie music. RORY McCARTNEY

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Spartak Five Points [Feral Media]

Perfect Pussy Say Yes To Love [Pod / Inertia]

Karl Frederick The Pretense [Independent Release]

While Canberra-based trio Spartak describe themselves as currently being in a flurry of activity, in truth they’re a local band that never seems to stop moving, with a busy live performance schedule that’s also seen them undertake repeated overseas tours. It’s been scarcely six months since Spartak released their Fifth Edition: Selected Recordings 2010-13 retrospective (which also chartered the recent addition of Matt Lustri on guitars / bass alongside founder members Shoeb Ahmad and Evan Dorrian), and now this latest EP Five Points offers up five new tracks, some of them recorded while Dorrian was based in London. Particularly apparent upon first listening is the almost complete absence of noise influences here, with the trio’s increasing move towards more melodic song structures being firmly in evidence. There’s also an emphasis upon free-flowing, almost mantra-like arrangements powered by stripped-back, gliding rhythms that suggest krautrock’s motorik pulse at points. ‘On Conditions’ certainly leads this EP off with one of its most hypnotically lulling offerings as Ahmad’s almost dream-state vocal reaches out over a wash of juddering electronics, gliding drum machine rhythms and eerie background ambience, and even when the live drums lock in halfway alongside programmed handclaps, the sense of sleepwalking motion never really fades. By contrast, ‘Nightshift’ sees more poppy influences coming to the fore as a vaguely Joy Division-esque bass line rears up against jangling guitars and brittle, mechanistic rhythms, before ‘Catch/Control’ sees Dorrian’s baritone vocals taking centre stage against cold, sweeping electronics and relentlessly gliding snares, subtle traces of guitar trailing in towards the end against icy analogue synth swells. In this case the key is the subtle balancing of elements, something Spartak definitely have down.

Blessed with one of this year’s more arresting names, New York-based noise / punk five piece Perfect Pussy have certainly enjoyed a rapid rise in profile, playing acclaimed sets at this year’s SXSW Festival just a few months after the independent release of their demo EP I Have Lost All Desire For Feeling. It’s definitely not a bad outcome for an outfit originally formed as a fictional joke band for a friend’s independent movie. To date they’ve chiefly built their reputation around frenetic and volatile live performances and singer Meredith Graves’ intense stage presence, something that this debut album Say Yes To Love manages to capture pretty well whilst clocking in at an ultra-lean 23 minutes in running length. As thunderous blasts of rapid-fire drums and layered atonal guitar riffs collide with Graves’ post riot-grrl shouted vocal delivery, tracks like ‘Driver’ and ‘Bells’ see Perfect Pussy drawing from influences that feel more post-hardcore and math-rocky than anything else. Indeed, there’s an almost clinical precision to a lot of the guitar atonality going on here, matched beautifully with drummer Garrett Koloski’s ultra-tight time signatures. Elsewhere though, ‘Interference Fits’ sees things uncoiling a bit in favour of a vaguely Sonic Youth-esque wander through jangling indierock riffs, squealing feedback and Graves’ multi-tracked yells that’s easily this album’s most loose and pop-centric offerings. It’s a pity though that the slightly affected lo-fi production aesthetic here renders Graves’ lyrics more or less unintelligible for most of this album. The decision to close the tracklisting with a sudden wander out into minimalist electronics featuring a lengthy dip into silence also feels like it’s stealing valuable time from what’s already an incredibly short album.

Melbourne based Karl Frederick’s love of both electronica and music has seen him ply his trade as a DJ and a solo acoustic artist. These passions have been combined in his debut LP that mixes a producer’s creativity with musician credibility. Essentially a solo effort, he gets a little help from some friends to sweeten the deal in a record that crosses the indie-pop and dance genres.

Chris Downton

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Opener ‘Extortion’ displays multiple personalities in its attempt to be all things to all men. Rich with layers of melodies, the song contains a heavy electronic dance music overlay, shards of rock guitar, a splash of world music, a glimpse of funk and even some spoken word. So much diversity can be dangerous, as a track with too many characteristics can end up with no character at all. However, here it works. ‘You & Me’ is equally complex, layered in both vocals and melodies and with multiple tempos. The title track is an electro smorgasbord with its brash beats, assorted sound effects and production that gives it a palpable 3D quality. ‘Hit the Floor’ recalls the gritty cache of Jonny Telafone and benefits from an injection of female vocals, while there’s some RÜFÜS bounce to ‘Wide Angle Lens’. Frederick uses a dash of hip hop in ‘Catch 22’, with its tangle of beats and pitch patterns that range from pin prick highs to deep grunters. While his music was spawned from the wonders of electronica, Frederick does not embrace all modern technology equally, making critical comment about the celluloid nature of relationships based on social networking. Listen to this LP once for the overall sound, a second time for the messages and a third time just to move to the many danceable grooves. RORY McCARTNEY

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The Angels 1974 – 2014, 40 Years of Rock, Vol 1 40 Greatest Studio Hits [Liberation] The Australian recording industry shed a collective tear on Wednesday June 4 2014, at the sad news of the death of Bernard Neeson. Universally known as Doc, he was the hyperactive, exhibitionist frontman of the band The Angels, which lit a fire under pub rock in the 1970s. Unfortunately, their fame was only matched by the farce of their later history, where in-fighting between members saw Neeson split with formidable guitarists the Brewster brothers and the formation of spin-off groups, all drawing on the aura of the original. The bad feeling was so strong that none of the other original Angels members appeared in the documentary on his life which screened on the ABC a few weeks before his death. Recalling the triumphs, not the tragedies, this greatest hits LP rises above the fray. It is even broad minded enough to include tracks from the Brewster albums in addition to songs by the original Angels line-up. Drawing on records from across the years, the collection should satisfy the most ardent Angels fan, being a celebration of their full bore, riff driven rock. Roaming through the three disks, it’s not hard to pick out signature band rhythms and riff patterns. The guitars scale the heights in ‘No Secrets’, before the song ends with a whispered, “can you please tell me what the time is?” The screaming antics of Neeson, so powerful onstage, crash through in ‘I Ain’t The One’.

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Befitting their style, this collection is mainly flat out, only slowing for the harmonica tinted ‘Whitest Lady’ (not their best work) and the acoustic ‘Turn It On’. Apart from thrilling guitars, there are the powerful choruses in tracks such as ‘Comin’ Down’, a sprinkling of keys in the long ‘Wasted Sleepless Nights/ Darkroom’ combo and a taste of saxophone in ‘Eat City’. The cherry-picking of songs from LPs has thrown up some interesting songs, such as ‘Don’t Waste My Time’ from the 1986 album ‘Howling’. While it was an unusual arrangement for the band, displaying strong 80s influences with its slow, electro fuzz vibe, it’s a great song nonetheless. Thanks to the quirks of commercial radio tastes, ‘We Gotta Get Out of This Place’ may have been their highest charting single, but it is short on genuine Angels cred. It brings a big sound courtesy of the horns/sax content, but this cover of a song by The Animals is relatively tame by Angels standards. Although ‘Let the Night Roll On’ showed further evidence of a mainstream softness, ‘Back Street Pickup’ and ‘The Dogs Are Talking’ demonstrated that their core strengths were still alive and well, with plenty of sass and hot riffage. Purists may turn their noses up at the last three tracks on disk three, being picks from the Brewster spin-off albums. However, they serve to round off this collection, enhancing its value as an anthology of achievement s under The Angels moniker. Screaming Jets’ frontman Dave Gleeson (who provided lead vocals for the Brewsters’ band) is no mean rock singer and the selected tracks have enough Angels guitar DNA present to make them legit inclusions. Disagree? Have a closer listen to ‘Broken Windows’. Anyway, forget about the infighting! With fiery vocals, hair ripping melodies and the machine like precision of the Brewsters, this is music to lose yourself in. Of course, the crowd favourite ‘Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again’ was a compulsory inclusion. While it lacks the infamous punters’ response, the planned Volume 2 (live tracks) is sure to contain it.

Brody Dalle Diploid Love [Caroline Records] Brody Dalle is no amateur to the rock game, and it shows as she launches back into it on debut and long-awaited solo album Diploid Love. Previously the front-woman of Spinerettes and the Distillers, the solid rock shell of Dalle’s latest is dripping with attitude and coated in raw energy that charges the record. Wasting no time for gentle introductions, it kicks off with the Undertones-like chords of ‘Rat Race’, a nod to the money-grabbing habits of men in suits. Bold and brash, the anthemic ‘Don’t Mess With Me’ is exhilarating as it shifts from the snarls of its verses to the soaring chorus. The halfway mark sets a change of tone. Her growls soften to croons with the bittersweet edge of ‘Dressed In Dreams’ and the pairing of a piano thread and syntheticbeats of ‘Carry On’. There are several notable guest appearances, with input from The Strokes’ Nick Valensi, Garbage’s Shirley Manson and Queens Of The Stone Age’s Josh Homme, Dalle is clearly the centrepiece here, demanding our attention. Subtle touches are placed throughout the record that add to its innovation, such as the frantic horns on the first two tacks and the samples of her kids on ‘Meet the Foetus/ Oh The Joy’. A lot of ground is covered over the course of the versatile collection of nine tracks, all tied together with strong, seasoned song writing and a beautiful no-nonsense realness to Dalle’s execution. Though polished and clearly well-thought out, the punk dynamism of Dalle’s past remains. Combined with compelling honesty, it gives Diploid Love lasting punch with both surface interest and deeper emotion. Brody Dalle is definitely back and this time, she isn’t taking any shit ANGELA CHRISTIAN-WILKES

RORY McCARTNEY

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singles in focus by cody atkinson spoon ‘the rent i pay’

Jeff Lang I Live in My Head a Lot These Days [ABC/Universal]

The Middle Names I Need Space [Reuban Records / MGM]

It’s a thrilling moment when Jeff Lang takes an instrument in his hands, such is his power to make the strings speak. While his 15th LP lacks the frenzy of Chimeradour, it is more engaging than his last release, the relatively sedate Carried in Mind, Lang possesses a versatile musicality in his voice, readily apparent from the opening song ‘Watch Me Go’ with its a cappella beginning. Then the first tempting string sounds arise like snakes uncoiling from a basket. Lang’s high pitched voice shuffles through many moods, ranging from the conspiratorial to the desperate and giving each song its own atmosphere. This album makes considerable use of backing vocals, combining deep male growls with softer female tones in ‘Pull of the Drift’. Through it all, guitars snarl, purr and move sinuously about like living things. Lang’s lyrics don’t just paint pictures; they fill in the intricate details, as seen in ’This City’s Not Your Home Town Anymore’. He treads terrain on which other songwriters rarely step, with tales of possessive relationships, street violence and drink spiking. On the lighter side, there’s a song about being at the movies and getting confused between watching the screen and being part of the action.

Tasmanian indie-rock five piece band The Middle Names certainly haven’t rushed into recording this debut album I Need Space, having spent the last couple of years performing at Australian festivals including the Falls and Dark MoFo as well as providing tour support to the likes of Ball Park Music and Snakadaktal. The end result is immediately evident in the tightness of the group on the 12 tracks collected here, which see them balancing sharp ninetiestinged pop hooks with female backing vocals, subtle synths and vocalist Ben Wells’ often bittersweet lyrics to strong effect. It also certainly doesn’t hurt that studio collaborator Magoo (Regurgitator, Midnight Oil) contributes a ripping mix that places the emphasis on clear vocal interplay and powerful rock drums. Indeed, ‘Mind Of My Own’ absolutely thunders along as a jagged Kinks meets QOTSA’s robot-rock riff gets hammered out against thumping tribal beats, Ali Probin’s backing harmonies and Well’s yelled chorus hooks.

Lang’s love of exotic instruments sees the appearance of a hurdy-gurdy, Turkish electric baglama and even some industrial percussion, clanging around in ‘Gunshot Nights’. He achieved a sound more akin to a live performance by a novel mixing method. This involved playing the sounds, for the individually recorded instruments, from speakers spaced about a single mic. This increased the interplay between the instruments and gave extra depth to the album. Breaking new ground again, Lang doesn’t play notes, he conjures them up. Another breathtaking effort from the maestro. RORY McCARTNEY

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First single ‘Remember Me At All’ meanwhile sees the UK-tinged guitars locking into a vaguely skanking groove before suddenly exploding out into a feedback-laden chorus section that carries more than a hint of early You Am I in its swagger, before ‘My Brother And I’ drops the pace down a few notches whilst nodding towards Britpop’s heyday as Noel-esque riffs spiral against thudding, reverb-laced drum breaks. While there’s a slight sense that a lot of this record sits in the one gear throughout, it’s the quality of the songs themselves as well as the band’s road-honed tightness that for the most part push this one through. All up, I Need Space sees The Middle Names offering up a strong debut. Chris Downton

Spoon are back once again, continuing their once unfathomable run around the top of the US Album Charts. Britt Daniel controls proceedings on ‘Rent I Pay’ with his impassioned Texan drawl, sauntering all around a simple backbeat and stabbing guitars. Nothing too fancy here, nor does there need to be when you execute the simple so well.

Caribou ‘Can’t Do It Without You’ The only thing expected of a new Caribou release is that it’ll probably be different from the last one. ‘Can’t Do It Without You’ sees Dan Snaith largely cribbing from another one of his guises, the much clubbier Daphni. While there a touch of the unexpected here, it’s not as strong as you usually get from Caribou. It’s not a bad track, but that’s probably as good as it is.

dick diver ‘new name blues’ Their first release since their critically acclaimed album Calender Days, ‘New Name Blues’ is a slice of slowed down pop that gets taken to a dream-scape around the two minute mark. A saxophone takes over from the jangly guitar, and the vocals disappear completely. Surprisingly catchy, and hard to get out of your head.

Seekae ‘another’ Seekae made the transition that so many instrumental outfits, such as PVT, have undertaken before them, and have moved into the world of vocals. Seekae still retain the digitally-inspired minimalism that served them so well on +Dome. ‘Another’ is cool, calm and collected, staying restrained rather than soaring.

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the word

on films

WITH MELISSA WELLHAM

Shailene Woodley is the newest up-and-coming actress in Hollywood that everyone is talking about – and after her performance in The Fault In Our Stars, I finally get it. She starred in TV series The Secret Life of the American Teenager, but it was her role in The Descendants in 2011 that made people take notice. Since then she’s been perfectly adequate opposite Miles Teller in The Spectacular Now, and hindered by a clichéd script in Divergent. But her performance in TFIOS keeps the film afloat – it will be interesting to see what she does next.

quote of the issue

“I fell in love the way you fall asleep. Slowly, then all at once.” – Hazel (Shailene Woodley), The Fault In Our Stars

Edge of Tomorrow

The Trip to Italy

The Fault In Our Stars

Heading into the U.S summer season of blockbusters you might be feeling a cold sweat coming on. Remakes, reboots and sequels, oh my! Edge of Tomorrow has no umbilical cord to an existing saga, it’s based on a short novel All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka, and that thriftiness applies to the film. Edge of Tomorrow is a frenetic burst of energy that thrills and enthralls while carrying zero baggage. An alien race called ‘Mimics’ invade the Earth and take control of Europe. The army plans a surprise attack on the Mimic stronghold in France and embed a cowardly public relations contractor, Major William Cage (Tom Cruise), to record the outcome. On the battlefront Cage gets covered in the blood of an Alpha Mimic and begins to repeat the same day each time he dies.

The Trip to Italy is a continuation of the award-winning TV series that follows Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon, playing fictionalised versions of themselves, eating and doing celebrity impersonations all over Italy. If you love Michael Winterbottom’s previous collaborations with Coogan, such as TV series The Trip and Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story, then you’ll most likely love this. Critics are cooing over this film – it has a rating of 89% on rotten tomatoes... and yet the humour (?!) was lost on me.

The Fault In Our Stars remains true to its best-selling Young Adult source material; which many film critics aren’t going to like.

After the first few resets of Cage’s day it appears that Edge of Tomorrow is working from the playbook of a really good episode of The Twilight Zone that has received a Red Bull transfusion. Director Doug Liman makes a story built on repetition constantly feel vibrant and fresh. Sadly, Liman just cannot keep his camera steady, and while it services communicating the chaos of the beach storming sequence that serves as survival prime time for Cage, it’s jarring throughout. Edge of Tomorrow is a shining example of a neat concept with a blockbuster budget that has faith in executing the core premise. cameron williams

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As far as I could tell, the appeal of this film comes from the so-called witty repartee of the two main characters. While their conversations are mildly entertaining, this film borders on and finally teeters over into being self-indulgent and repetitive. I found myself wanting to shout ‘stop doing celebrity impersonations and have a real conversation.’ Which they did, in a forced manner, as if the director thought ‘oh this film probably needs a bit of substance, let’s have a few cursory musings on infidelity.’ You might think the one saving grace of this film, would be that it’s supposed to be a foodie’s delight. Alas, unless you can speak Italian you won’t really know what they are eating. This film has an undercurrent of ‘aren’t we just so clever and marvelous’. I spent two hours watching two men have mildly entertaining conversations. Just how exactly does this constitute a decent film? EMMA ROBINSON

Hazel (Shailene Woodley) is dying of cancer. A trial drug has momentarily halted the onslaught of the disease, but she knows she is dying. Hazel tries to keep her distance from oher people, but when her parents force her to go to a cancer support group, Hazel meets Gus (Ansel Elgort) who shares her same acerbic wit and outsider status – and who might give her something to live for. TFIOS is a mopey, schmaltzy, overly earnest, weepy, tearjerker. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing. It’s a movie about kids with cancer in love, after all; and aimed at a teenaged audience, with a message encouraging them to live and love as hard as they can. And it must be noted, as well as being a mopey, schmaltzy, overly earnest, weepy, tearjerker – TFIOS also displays wry wit and dry dialogue, smooth direction, and powerhouse performances. Shailene Woodley’s sensitive portrayal of Hazel stops the film from veering too far into cloying, saccharine suffocation; and while you might not understand why Ansel Elgort has been cast as Gus in the first half of the film, in the second half you will suddenly get it. A final warning: take some tissues. This tearjerker is pretty effective at jerking the tears from your eyes. MELISSA WELLHAM

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Godzilla

Maleficent

Gareth Edwards – director of the impressive Monsters, a low-budget alien movie set in Central America – has created a Godzilla movie with the same attempt at heart as seen in his debut. Of course, all that emotional engagement seems pretty lame, when the impressive bulk of Godzilla appears on screen.

Watching movies like this reminds me of how brutal some of the original stories of our favourite fairy tales are. Reimaginings of classic fairy tales are fantastic when done well and Maleficent mostly delivers.

Ford Brody (Aaron TaylorJohnson) is a soldier just returned home to his wife (Eliabeth Olsen) from his most recent tour, when he is called overseas to Japan to get his father Joe (Bryan Cranston) out of jail. Joe has become something of a deranged conspiracy theory type, as he tries to discover the cause behind a nuclear explosion that killed Ford’s mother years ago. Our stoic hero heads to Japan… and all pandemonium predictably breaks loose. Undoubtedly the best thing about Godzilla is how little I knew about the film going in. The trailers for the film didn’t give much away, and so I was expecting a rehashing of the 1998 Godzilla. Edwards’ effort is nothing of the sort. There’s a new mythology surrounding the monster, and an entirely unexpected set up for the destruction and devastation that follows. Godzilla himself is an impressive deep-sea creature, which bears no small resemblance to Reptar from Rugrats. It’s probably not a good thing that Godzilla (with his tiny, reptilian brain) is the most interesting character in the film – but this is a monster movie, people. Not a ‘man movie’.

Angelina Jolie plays the titular character, who was born a fairy full of love and good intentions. But, like so many fairies (and indeed young women) she fell for the wrong guy who betrayed her love and robbed her of her power and dignity. Her story arc after this is one that many can relate to (who hasn’t wanted to curse an ex who trampled over their heart?) and the evolution of her character is both engaging and, at times, hilarious. These kind of dark fairy tales occupy an odd space – they aren’t technically films for adults, and yet there is a lot more in them for grown-ups than there is for children. The scene that leads Maleficent to curse the baby of the man who broke her heart was a little uncomfortable to watch – the undertones of assault were not that subtle. And yet, this is the beauty of fantasy and science fiction ��� these genres allow us to explore these very relevant themes such as how one event or act of betrayal can define us as a person but with fantastical settings and cool looking monsters. Maleficent is a story that tells us we don’t have to let bitterness and hatred consume us. EMMA ROBINSON

melissa wellham

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43


the word on dvds

Veep – The Complete Second Season [warner] Veep is the best comedy on TV at the moment. After its debut season was unfairly saddled with comparisons to The Thick of It (Armando Iannucci created both similarly-themed shows) it has swiftly become its own entity; part screwball comedy, part office satire and part politico takedown. Veep’s first season was full of first time nerves and purpose finding, just like a new recruit to parliament – although not quite as disastrous as certain soon-to-be Victorian Senator. This time around the show overflows confidence. Selena Meyers (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) starts this season the face of a faltering administration. Having just suffered a heavy mid-term election loss, the unseenPresident sends his ‘veep’ out to front the cameras and explain away the result. All the while her staff buzz around, staining the Oval Office carpet, falling over each other, bickering, one-upping each other to get and just being a general cloud of chaos. This is where Veep works. Whilst the Washington setting is critical, it’s more about a bunch of idiots doing idiotic things but somehow still managing to get through the day. It just so happens an ordinary day includes foreign policy meetings, pork barrelling (almost literally, in one early episode) and running the country. Or ruining it, almost. Julia Louis-Dreyfus continues to make a case for being one of the most physically talented comedians of the past decade. Her timing, phrasing and gestures are impeccable but her ability to use her body to heighten a sense of insanity is second to none. Tony Hale’s Emmy Award winning turn as personal aide Gary Walsh is diminished this season, leaving more room for obnoxiously useless Jonah Ryan (Timothy Simons) to steal the limelight. Veep is a show that keeps on getting better. justin hook

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Ray Donovan [Paramount]

puberty blues [LABEL]

There are few things I am less interested in seeing than Angelina Jolie’s 73-yearold father snorting drugs, screwing hookers and being a general wiseass. Ordinarily this wouldn’t be such a big deal but Voight’s Mickey Donovan spends almost every screen moment he has aggravating his son, Ray, that it’s impossible to ignore him. And even though his performance of the venal, no-nonsense father/gangster won plenty of attention and awards it’s actually a bit of a one-note wonder. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves a bit. Ray Donovan is a fixer. He pays off the paparazzo, cleans up celebrity crime scenes before the police get there, extorts, strong arms, gets his way all the way. You’re never quite sure who he is working for – it appears to be the Alzheimerridden Hollywood type Ezra Goldman (Elliot Gould) – but it’s not the sort of job where you have to get your boss to sign a flex sheet, so who knows. Ray is ruthless and efficient, skills that served him well in fixing a family situation 20 years ago. And that’s where Mickey comes into the picture. Ray might have framed him up for murder. Awkward. As the season progresses, Ray’s professional and personal lives unravel and intertwine. Through it all Ray continues to get the job done, albeit with ever increasing temper tantrums. Eventually, it seems the job will entail killing his father. Liev Schreiber as Ray is outstanding – all tightly wound menace and restrained familial anger, despite looking like a squirrel with a cheek full of nuts. With Mickey in prison, Ray became the father figure for brothers Terry and Bunchy and the tension between the brothers is one of the most successful elements of the show. It might not hit every target, but Ann Biderman’s other major creation – Southland – was a brilliant LA-based slow burner so there’s a high hope for Ray Donovan.

You won’t find a better local drama this year than the second season of Puberty Blues. But chances are you didn’t even find Puberty Blues at all because it aired on a struggling network lost for ideas about how to promote it. Despite a brilliant and highly-praised first season and nothing really changing, it simply couldn’t muster any sort of audience. No good will carried through. No tipping point was reached. For all the bluster about local audiences demanding better quality drama when they presented it free, on a platter, it withers on the vine. Maybe Puberty Blues suffered because it didn’t try to say anything ‘big’. That’s what made it so unique. Sure, low key suburban setting of families and lives in transition is nothing new but the keen sense of pitch – from music selection to wardrobe to the ads playing on old cathode ray TVs – was extraordinary. The risk in these sorts of shows that aim to capture a period is that they portray the perception of the era not the reality of it. No matter how good or accurate the dialogue could be – it’d get lost in the distraction of creaky sets, unconvincing tight shorts and bad wigs. In this respect it has much in common with cult favourite Freaks and Geeks and both are as good as each other, nailing the ‘vibe’ without being showy. And worry not; root, moll, rack off and an abundance of old slang gets a good run. In a show about the awkwardness of youth it’s fitting the young stars – Ashleigh Cummings, Isabelle Cornish and especially Brenna Harding – manage to easily hold their own against the likes of veterans like Dan Wylie, Claudia Karvan and Susie Porter. Puberty Blues is no attention grabber but in an age of overstimulation and epic fantasy struggles it’s much more than a pleasant retreat. justin hook

justin hook

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BONE OF CONTENTION TATJANA CLANCY I had a rather large, err, ‘bone’ to pick with DAYNE RATHBONE. The last time we met I was a very green ABC presenter; trying to impress my Program Director by inviting an emerging comedian onto my program for a spot of improvisational radio. It went badly, with Rathbone unaware of the conventions of broadcasting live to a local radio audience. Did he remember what he had said? “Was it when I asked if it was alright to say I had had sex last night”? Rathbone asks innocently.

I thought you had sex last night

Well yes, that was one of the hairy moments that caused me to hover over the emergency ‘dump’ button and had my producer looking increasingly tense. “Because I didn’t mean I had sex last night,” he continues. “I meant did you have sex, ‘cos you sort of winked or smiled and I thought you were in a good mood ‘cos you got lucky and wanted to talk about it but were too professional to do so.” I’m, of course, now laughing fairly hysterically while my interview subject just looks slightly bemused. Rathbone’s uncomfortably awkward star has been on the rise since his 2011 Raw Comedy win. His building profile, touring and writing has led to the upcoming full-length production It’s Me Mandela, a comic retelling of his homeland’s history featuring all three of his brothers, including Brumbies player Clyde Rathbone. Was it hard to convince his siblings to participate? “My Mum made them do it,” says Rathbone. So they don’t resent him then? “I’m sure they’ll be happier once they get into it. Luke has to play a prostitute and Clyde is a horse that gets ridden and whipped by Van Riebeek.” Rathbone is as deadpan and sweetly irritating in person as he is on stage. Quietly confident in a seemingly harmless ‘geeky boy next door’ exterior, I found myself softening, however my former ire did give me the push to ask what we’re all thinking: is his maddeningly simple persona all an act? How could he possibly think that detailing how he vomited in his mouth on live radio be okay? (Another terrifying moment on air). “Well it’s pretty obvious that it’s put on,” explains Rathbone. “I’m playing the character of Mandela in the show. If anyone’s confused they could go to Wikipedia and see that he’s been dead for a while already and see his picture, that’s not me.” Future plans include the release of a webseries documenting Rathbone’s odd little world made by filmmaker and fellow comedian Mike Nayna, more writing and touring and ‘boning up’ on the subtleties of radio craft. “Since we last spoke I’ve become a successful comedian and learnt what not to say,” he says. “I also know that you have to end things with the words ’I’m just joking!’ so people get it.” See It’s Me Mandela at the Canberra Theatre Centre on Saturday July 5 at 8pm. Bookings via Canberra Theatre. Use codeword ‘Madiba’ for $15 tickets. A portion of the proceeds will be raising money for Lifeline.

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45


the word

on gigs

DZ Deathrays, Palms, Foam Transit Bar Thursday May 29 Perth’s Foam hit the stage first, minimal stage decorations and all. They were, unabashedly, in the camp of grunge revivalism. The hair flailed around, the guitars chugged and shredded alternately. The enjoyment of Foam is largely dependent on your like of grunge/ alt rock the first time around. For mine they were enjoyable, a nice blend of then and now, with enough to distinguish themselves from other similar bands. Palms are all about the melodies. Palms may operate from a base guitar skuzz and a tight rhythm section, but it’s still the melodies that shine through. The underlying sound is somewhat reminiscent of 50s and 60s rock, but with a bit more of an edge. Think a harder version of Jeremy Neale (who made a cameo via a pub video machine), or a less neurotic Weezer. More than anything, Palms play a consistently good set from start to finish. It’s past cliché by now, but it’s hard to believe how two guys make that much noise. DZ Deathrays decided to come out of the gate with one of their bigger songs (‘No Sleep’) and the crowd seemingly knew that they were in for a real show. Long anointed as the “next big thing” of Australian music, DZ have delivered a number of solid releases, but are lauded for their live show. With performances like this one, it is easy to see why. DZ don’t have pretensions to do much other than to rock out, but why fuck around with a good thing? Playing a blend of older and newer material and occasionally with a guest third member, DZ did what DZ do well, namely riffed out party punk that gets the crowd going. Nothing wrong with that.

PHOTO BY MEGAN LEAHY

the word

on gigs

PHOTO BY DAVID BURKE

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CODY ATKINSON

Freedman Does Nilsson The Street Theatre Saturday May 31 A grand piano dominated the stage, awaiting the arrival of Tim Freedman who, unlike Harry Nilsson who was petrified of appearing on stage, has never been reluctant about jazzing it up in front of a crowd, preferably as often as possible. Songs were interspersed with monologues, with Freedman taking on the persona of Nilsson. Speaking with an American accent, he unreeled the dramas and high points of Nilsson’s unusual life story. The set included songs Nilsson wrote for others, such as ‘Cuddly Toy’ written for the ‘Monkees’, and other’s songs that Nilsson made his own, including ‘Everybody’s Talkin’. Songs by Randy Newman, much admired by Nilsson, included ‘You Can Leave Your Hat On’, which Freedman played banging out its theme with one hand while clasping his forehead with the other. A surprising exclusion was ‘Without You’, perhaps because its high notes were too challenging. Freedman played the role with considerable pizzazz, adopting a relaxed, playful style with lots of scatting. At times he gave the impression of a hesitant Nilsson, getting confused over the right key for one song and losing his way in another. After interval, it was Freedman playing Freedman with songs from The Whitlams and his solo career. ‘No Aphrodisiac’ and the ‘Charlie’ trilogy were rolled out with Freedman’s trademark piano wizardry. He can change the character of a song, by alterations in tempo or jumping between a light touch and a heavy dose of fortissimo. Freedman admitted to being ‘a bit pissed’ during the first half, due to having wine on an empty stomach after missing dinner due to rehearsals. So the randomness in the Nilsson half was more accidental than intentional. However, Nilsson, being a party animal, may have thought it an appropriate portrayal. RORY McCARTNEY

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the word

on gigs

Spartak, Mornings, Power Moves Transit Bar Thursday June 5 For one reason or another, by the time I walked in the door Power Moves was just finishing their set. Given the quality of the debut EP of earlier this year, I could easily believe the positive comments about the set that I overheard. Vale Mornings. Another Cinnamon Records band, another farewell show. Originally starting out as Jordan Rodger’s solo bedroom project, Mornings evolved their way through a couple of albums and a few other assorted releases. For their last show, they went out with a bang and not a whimper, with a blend of hypnotic post punk and slashes of frantic fury. Mornings seemed to save some of their better song-writing until near their end with tracks off Liquid Ill such as ‘Milo and Otis’ and ‘Don’t Wait Up’ proving to be stand-outs on the night.

PHOTO BY MEGAN LEAHY

Headliners Spartak have long been known for tempering traditional song structures with a sense of free-flowing experimentalism, however the last year or two has seen a fair shift for the band. Swelling out to a four piece and contracting back to three, Spartak have foregone some of the more eccentric elements for more formal pop structures. The launch of the Five Points EP was the focus of the gig and much of the material from that release got an airing on the night. Spartak don’t play bangers. They do something a touch more impressive, with a variety of moods and motions, with a mix of live and electronic instrumentation. This felt like a culmination for Spartak, a show of what they have been building towards. CODY ATKINSON

the word

on gigs

PHOTO BY MEGAN LEAHY

A Drone Coda, Yes I’m Leaving, Raus Smith’s Alternative Saturday June 7 It’s such an unexpected joy when a local band decides to change it up completely and the change works. Case-in-point: Raus. Originally a solo keyboard based project, Raus was best described as being intriguing live but without taking that next step. By adding a second member, a drummer/synth player, Raus transforms into something that’s attention grabbing. With solid beats punctuating stuttering and sweeping synths, a cacophony of noise wept the room, pierced by the distinct vocals of Rory Stenning. Cute, light, cheerful. These are words that you are unlikely to associate with Yes I’m Leaving. Far more likely are words like “pounding”, “awe-inspiring” and “destructive”. The Sydneysiders play with intensity, with passion. Smith’s is both a great and a terrible venue for them; great in the sense that you can just sit there and absorb everything, terrible in that you can’t stand up in front of the stage. Everything felt like it was in its right place, with the drums hitting so hard that they were propelling across the stage, guitars hitting like a bomb and the bass holding everything together. A Drone Coda had top billing on the night, for the launch of their Demonstration Model EP. Like Yes I’m Leaving, A Drone Coda were not exactly shrinking violets on stage. With howling vocals coming from all directions and busts of guitar rattling around in the small room, A Drone Coda were a different type of intense. Not reckless, raw and rumbustious, but more measured and deliberate. Like any decent post-punk, A Drone Coda leveraged the heavier moments off the quieter, creating a sense of tension, a palpable energy through the room. CODY ATKINSON

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the word

on gigs

James Blunt, Busby Marou The Royal Theatre Saturday June 7 The punters probably had never heard Busby Marou on the radio stations that play James Blunt. So the boys from Rockhampton made sure the crowd knew who they were, with big stenciled letters on their gear. The boys loved the exposure to bigger audiences (and the catering that came with major gigs). With Tom Busby’s sweet vocals and Jeremy Marou’s dazzling guitar work, their countryfolk was a fitting crowd warmer for the night. It’s a funny sight, a big bloke like Marou playing a little ukulele, but you’ve never seen anyone so expert with the diminutive instrument as when he’s playing ‘Underlying Message’. James Blunt and his four piece band came on dressed in flying suits, in keeping with the Moon Landing tour theme. Blunt knocked away the piano stool so he could play standing up. This let him give a more dynamic performance, either dancing to the song, or swinging the mic out so he could move away from the keys while singing. For a pop crooner he had a pretty rock n’ roll presence, dashing along the edge of the stage, guitar in hand, glaring at the crowd open-mouthed in the style of AC/DC’s Angus Young. Blunt carried the audience with him all the way. The crowd sang along, loudly and frequently, doing a great job with the chorus of ‘Carry You Home’. It’s easy to feel isolated at the back of the sold out theatre, so Blunt did a quick, midsong lap around to spread the love. The house lights went down and everyone put their mobile lights on to provide some stars for ‘Same Mistake’. All the favourites were included, with intense deliveries of the emotive ‘Miss America’ (about Whitney Houston) and ‘Goodbye My Lover’. RORY McCARTNEY

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ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Wed Jun 25 - Sat June 28 Listings are a free community service. Email editorial@bmamag.com to have your events appear each issue. wednesday june 25 Art Exhibitions Unruly Orchestrations

Experimental artworks by staff of UC Faculty of Arts & Design. Jun 13-29. Tue-Sun 10am-4pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

TYRA 2014

Local youth art competition award and exhibition. 9am-5pm weekdays. Free TUGGERANONG ARTS CENTRE

Kensuke Todo: A Survey

Kensuke Todo extends his bi-cultural perspective to sculptures and drawings. 12-5pm Wed-Sun. Free. ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Fabrique

An exploration of jewellery by Maria Klingner. Jun 13-29. Tue-Sun 10am4pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Introspection

3 exhibitions: Wanderlust, Detail & Never Without. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. Until Jul 6.

The Factory Musical

The Pacific Les Miserables. 7.30pm. $30/$63. CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

The Home Front

Improvised theatre exploring the lives of women in Australia. 7.30pm. $35 +bf/$25 +bf. THE STREET THEATRE

M16 ARTSPACE

Wanderlust - Group Exhibition 11 Canberra artists explore the act of walking. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Treasures Gallery

The Library’s greatest treasures & best known stories. Daily 10am-5pm. Free. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

Detail

By Tony Dalla Venezia. Intricate meanderings. Jun 19-Jul M16 ARTSPACE

Karaoke Curry-Oke Wednesdays

Hosted by Jonathan Davis. 8pm. Free Entry. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Live Music CMC Presents local and touring bands

With Josh Rennie-Hynes. 7.30pm. Price TBA. SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE

Graveyard Train

Dark country & hillbilly from Melbourne. 8pm. Presale via Ticketek. TRANSIT BAR

On The Town Hump Day Wednesdays

Kick back mid-week with drink specials. 5pm. TRANSIT BAR

Theatre Bell Shakespeare’s Henry V

Live Music The Night Cafe

Special K

Fun, laughs & prizes! 7.30pm. Free. POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

thursday june 26 Art Exhibitions Fowl Play

By Janet Angus. Jun 26-Jul 6. WedSun 11-5pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE (MANUKA)

TYRA 2014

Local youth art competition award and exhibition. 9am-5pm weekdays. Free

Live Music

Emma Le Strange’s fresh approach to anatomical drawing. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free.

ZIERHOLZ @ UC

IQ Trivia Fun

Luminous World

Never Without

Dumb things I’ve done. 8pm. $35+bf.

A Little French. A Little Jazz. 6-8pm. Book at: politbar.co

TUGGERANONG ARTS CENTRE

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

Alex Williamson

Trivia

M16 ARTSPACE

Contemporary work by Australian and New Zealand artists, including a Indigenous art. Until June 29.

Comedy

Grenadiers

With The Barren Spinsters, Yoko Oh No, Bacon Cakes & Jack Livingston. 7.30pm. $10. MAGPIES CITY CLUB

Ango & The Boy

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

With Oscar. 5pm afternoon session. 10pm band. Free. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Commissar Shmirnov’s Lowly Dog’s Heart Band

With multi genre DJs Robot, Black Temple & Neko Glitter. 7pm-1am. $TBA. MAGPIES CITY CLUB

Northeast Party House

Album launch for their debut ‘Any Given Weekend’. 8pm. Presale via Moshtix. TRANSIT BAR

On The Town On&On Presents Play Mode

Sweat it out. 9pm. $10 before 11pm. MECHE

Something Different Tarot Card Reading

6–8pm. Free entry. Must book. Call Marisol on 0404 364 820 POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Tom Woodward’s Birthday Bash

Piano Lunches

SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE

All proceeds to Lifeline. 9pm. $35. With Bec Taylor. 12.30pm – 1.30pm. Free. All welcome. SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE

Thursday Jazz

With James Muller Trio. 7.30pm, $10. SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE

Several Devils

Supporting The Vibrators. Time TBA. $TBA THE BASEMENT

New Empire

With a new single in tow. 8pm. Presale via Moshtix. TRANSIT BAR

Theatre The Home Front

Improvised theatre exploring the lives of women in Australia. 7.30pm. $35 +bf/$25 +bf. THE STREET THEATRE

Bell Shakespeare’s Henry V

11:00am & 7:30pm. $35 - $79. THE PLAYHOUSE

Showtune

Musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman. 8pm. $40/$35 CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

friday june 27 Art Exhibitions TYRA 2014

Local youth art competition award and exhibition. 9am-5pm weekdays. Free TUGGERANONG ARTS CENTRE

8pm, Price TBA.

Australian Burlesque Festival Produced by Dolores Daiquiri & Rosy Rabbit. 6.30pm. $50/$95. THE ABBEY

Theatre Bell Shakespeare’s Henry V

2:00pm & 7:30pm. $35 - $79. THE PLAYHOUSE

Mr McGee and the Biting Flea

10am & 1pm. $20 - $22.

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

The Home Front

Improvised theatre exploring the lives of women in Australia. 7.30pm. $35 +bf/$25 +bf. THE STREET THEATRE

Showtune

Musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman. 8pm. $40/$35 CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

saturday june 28 Art Exhibitions Unruly Orchestrations

Experimental artworks by staff of UC Faculty of Arts & Design. Jun 13-29. Tue-Sun 10am-4pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Fowl Play

By Janet Angus. Jun 26-Jul 6. WedSun 11-5pm. Free. CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE (MANUKA)

6:30pm. $35 - $79. THE PLAYHOUSE

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ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Sat Jun 28 - Wed Jul 2 Something Different

Live Music

Karaoke

Kensuke Todo extends his bi-cultural perspective to sculptures and drawings. 12-5pm Wed-Sun. Free.

CanTeen Charity Golf Weekend

Decades

Karaoke Love Winter Competition

Fabrique

GOOLABRI GOLF COURSE AND FUNCTIONS

Kensuke Todo: A Survey

ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

An exploration of jewellery by Maria Klingner. Jun 13-29. Tue-Sun 10am4pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Introspection

Final golf comp raising money for CanTeen. Jun 28-29. $25/$50. Book at: goolabri.com

Mid Winter Market

Stall holders & local artists present environmental, sustainable & unique pieces. 12-5pm. Free.

3 exhibitions: Wanderlust, Detail & Never Without. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. Until Jul 6.

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Wanderlust - Group Exhibition

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE (GORMAN HOUSE)

M16 ARTSPACE

11 Canberra artists explore the act of walking. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Treasures Gallery

The Library’s greatest treasures & best known stories. Daily 10am-5pm. Free. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

Detail

By Tony Dalla Venezia. Intricate meanderings. Jun 19-Jul M16 ARTSPACE

Never Without

Emma Le Strange’s fresh approach to anatomical drawing. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Live Music Punx For A Cure

Leukaemia Foundation Fundraiser. With Oslow, Raptrz, Hygeine & others. 6pm. $10. MAGPIES CITY CLUB

Keyimba

With Pataphysics. West African Funk, Reggae, Soulful Guerrilla Hiphop. 8pm. $22. Free CD. ANU BAR AND REFECTORY

The Surrogates 10:30pm. Free.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

The Funk Revue

With The Brass Kunckle Brass Band, Beaten Bodies & Jemist. 8pm. $10. TRANSIT BAR

Finn

Roots/blues. 9pm. Free. OLD CANBERRA INN

On The Town Select Saturdays

Horror Film 1

Performative re-enactment of experimental 60s film. 3pm. Free.

Theatre Showtune

Musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman. 2pm & 8pm. $40/$35 CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

MrMcGee and the Biting Flea

Celebrating the music of The Church. 3pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Acoustic Sunday

Karaoke Madness

The Acoustic Sessions

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

GUNDAROO COLONIAL INN

With Minh Ha. 2-4pm. Free IRON BAR

Irish Jam Session

Traditional Irish musicians from late afternoon. Free. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

CanTeen Charity Golf Weekend

Final golf comp raising money for CanTeen. Jun 28-29. $25/$50. Book at: goolabri.com GOOLABRI GOLF COURSE AND FUNCTIONS

The Home Front

Showtune

THE STREET THEATRE

CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

sunday june 29

Musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman. 2pm. $40/$35

monday june 30

Art Exhibitions

Art Exhibitions

Unruly Orchestrations

TYRA 2014

Experimental artworks by staff of UC Faculty of Arts & Design. Jun 13-29. Tue-Sun 10am-4pm. Free.

Local youth art competition award and exhibition. 9am-5pm weekdays. Free

Kensuke Todo: A Survey

Trivia

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Kensuke Todo extends his bi-cultural perspective to sculptures and drawings. 12-5pm Wed-Sun. Free. ANU DRILL HALL GALLERY

Fabrique

An exploration of jewellery by Maria Klingner. Jun 13-29. Tue-Sun 10am4pm. Free.

TUGGERANONG ARTS CENTRE

Rainman’s Trivial Excuse

Transit trivia returns with your host Rainman. Book now on (02) 6162 0899. 7pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

tuesday July 1

BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Luminous World

Contemporary work by Australian and New Zealand artists, including a Indigenous art. Until June 29. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

58,000 songs to choose from. 8pm late. Free.

Trivia Trivial Tuesdays

Hosted By IQ Trivia. 1st Prize $75. 7pm. Free Entry DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Something Different

Theatre

Improvised theatre exploring the lives of women in Australia. 2pm & 7.30pm. $35 +bf/$25 +bf.

TRANSIT BAR

With Kartel. Tunes from the 70’s to now. 4-7pm. Free.

10am & 1pm. $20 - $22.

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Four weeks of heats & one grand final. $1000 cash grand prize! 9pm. Free.

Comedy Open Mic Comedy

With Shahed Sharify. 8pm, $5. SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE

wednesday july 2 Art Exhibitions Fowl Play

By Janet Angus. Jun 26-Jul 6. WedSun 11-5pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE (MANUKA)

Never Without

Emma Le Strange’s fresh approach to anatomical drawing. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Glint

Connections between printmaking and glassmaking. Until Aug 3. Free. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Introspection

3 exhibitions: Wanderlust, Detail & Never Without. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. Until Jul 6. M16 ARTSPACE

Wanderlust - Group Exhibition 11 Canberra artists explore the act of walking. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Touch

Best installation you’ll never see. A tactile experience. 6pm, 6.30pm, 7pm, 7.30pm. $6/$10. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Treasures Gallery

The Library’s greatest treasures & best known stories. Daily 10am-5pm. Free. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

Detail

By Tony Dalla Venezia. Intricate meanderings. Jun 19-Jul M16 ARTSPACE

With Rob Pix, DJ Willi + Rocamic. 9pm. $10 before 11pm. MECHE

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ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Wed Jul 2 - Sun Jul 6 Karaoke

Theatre

Curry-Oke Wednesdays

Showtune

Hosted by Jonathan Davis. 8pm. Free Entry. DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

On The Town

Musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman. 8pm. $40/$35 CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

friday july 4

Hump Day Wednesdays

Kick back mid-week with drink specials. 5pm. TRANSIT BAR

Something Different Perception Deception Exhibition Hands-on exhibits to surprise your senses and challenge your mind. 9am5pm. Until May 2015. Admissio QUESTACON

Art Exhibitions 3 Brisbane Women

Sculptural & performative works from Brisbane artists. Jul 4-8. Tue-Fri 115pm. Sat 10-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE (GORMAN HOUSE)

Touch

A tactile experience. 12.30pm, 1pm, 1:30pm, 2:00pm, 6:00pm, 6:30pm, 7:00pm, 7:30pm. $6

saturday july 5 Art Exhibitions Never Without

Emma Le Strange’s fresh approach to anatomical drawing. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Fowl Play

By Janet Angus. Jun 26-Jul 6. WedSun 11-5pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE (MANUKA)

Glint

Connections between printmaking and glassmaking. Until Aug 3. Free. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Introspection

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

3 exhibitions: Wanderlust, Detail & Never Without. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. Until Jul 6.

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

Live Music

Wanderlust - Group Exhibition

Freakbikes and Related Mutations

Semantix

Martini Masterclass

Join Matthew Cossey for hands-on liquid learning & laughs. 6pm -7pm. $40. Book at: politbar.co

A ride through the world of freakbike construction. 6pm. Free. QUESTACON

Theatre Showtune

Musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman. 8pm. $40/$35 CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

With Context, Jimmy Pike, Nix & more. 8pm. $10. TRANSIT BAR

Azlan

With special guest. 5pm afternoon session. 10pm band. Free.

Tarot Card Reading

Touch

Best installation you’ll never see. A tactile experience. 6pm, 6.30pm, 7pm, 7.30pm. $6/$10. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Live Music

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

Stories from Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders about warriors. 3-5pm. Free. BELCONNEN ARTS CENTRE

Theatre Showtune

Musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman. 8pm. $40/$35 CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

The Magic Hour

Thought you knew Grimm’s fairy tales? Think again. $25/$35. 7.30pm. THE STREET THEATRE

Laura Palmer

EP Launch. Supports TBA. 8pm. $10. MAGPIES CITY CLUB

Chicago Charles & Dave 9.15pm-12.15am. Free.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Fash ‘n’ Treasure

Fashion and treasures market, clothes and much more. 10am-3pm. $3. EXHIBITION PARK IN CANBERRA (EPIC)

Talks Glint - Gallery Floor Talk

Connections between printmaking and glassmaking. 2pm. Free. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Theatre It’s Me Mandela

Comedy & charity spectacular. 8pm. $15+bf/$23+bf. Tickets: canberratheatrecentre.com.au CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Showtune

Musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman. 2pm & 8pm. $40/$35 CANBERRA REPERTORY SOCIETY

The Magic Hour

Thought you knew Grimm’s fairy tales? Think again. $25/$35. 7.30pm. THE STREET THEATRE

The best installation you’ll never see. A tactile experience. 12.30pm, 1pm, 1:30pm. $6/$10. By Tony Dalla Venezia. Intricate meanderings. Jun 19-Jul

Serving Country Creatively

Art Exhibitions

Touch

Something Different

IQ Trivia Fun

thursday july 3

M16 ARTSPACE

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Trivia

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

11 Canberra artists explore the act of walking. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

6–8pm. Free entry. Must book. Call Marisol on 0404 364 820

Fun, laughs & prizes! 7.30pm. Free.

M16 ARTSPACE

Something Different

Detail

M16 ARTSPACE

3 Brisbane Women

Sculptural & performative works from Brisbane artists. Jul 4-8. Tue-Fri 115pm. Sat 10-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE (GORMAN HOUSE)

Comedy Neel Kolhatkar

GENeration comedY. 7pm. $35+bf. ZIERHOLZ @ UC

Live Music Yeo

Supporting his new single ‘Kobe’. With Magnifik & more. 8pm. Presale via Moshtix. TRANSIT BAR

Monster Beach Party

With The Kingstons, The King Hits & Space Party. 8.30pm. $10.

sunday july 6 Art Exhibitions Detail

By Tony Dalla Venezia. Intricate meanderings. Jun 19-Jul M16 ARTSPACE

Wanderlust - Group Exhibition 11 Canberra artists explore the act of walking. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Never Without

Emma Le Strange’s fresh approach to anatomical drawing. Jun 19-Jul 6. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Live Music The Acoustic Sessions

With Matt Dent. 2pm-4pm. Free. IRON BAR

Irish Jam Session

Traditional Irish musicians from late afternoon. Free. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

MAGPIES CITY CLUB

The Surrogates 10:30pm. Free.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

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51


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Sun Jul 6 - Sat Jul 12 Theatre

Comedy

The Magic Hour

Wayne Brady

Thought you knew Grimm’s fairy tales? Think again. $25/$35. 4pm. THE STREET THEATRE

tuesday July 8 Art Exhibitions 3 Brisbane Women

Sculptural & performative works from Brisbane artists. Jul 4-8. Tue-Fri 115pm. Sat 10-4pm. Free.

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE (GORMAN HOUSE)

Karaoke Karaoke Madness

58,000 songs to choose from. 8pm late. Free. POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

Karaoke Love Winter Competition

Four weeks of heats & one grand final. $1000 cash grand prize! 9pm. Free.

7:30pm. $89

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Karaoke

Hibiki

Textiles, painting, print & photography influenced by Japan. Jul 10-27. WedSun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

NAIDOC Exhibitions

Film

Live Music

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au

ANU Anime Society Screenings

Justin Heazlewood

Acoustic experimental indie folk. 8pm. $15/$20. SMITH’S ALTERNATIVE

Acoustic Soup

Organic food and local music. 7pm. $8/$10. ANU FOOD CO-OP

On The Town Hump Day Wednesdays

Kick back mid-week with drink specials. 5pm.

HUW DAVIES GALLERY

Live Music Soweto Gospel Choir 7:30pm. $79 - $89

CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

Chicago Charles & Dave 9.15pm-12.15am. Free.

KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Something Different

QUESTACON

QUESTACON

thursday july 10

wednesday july 9 Art Exhibitions Touch

Best installation you’ll never see. A tactile experience. 6pm, 6.30pm, 7pm, 7.30pm. $6/$10. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Glint

Connections between printmaking and glassmaking. Until Aug 3. Free. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Art Exhibitions Winter Garden

Japanese pop culture. Jul 10-27. WedSun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Touch

Best installation you’ll never see. A tactile experience. 6pm, 6.30pm, 7pm, 7.30pm. $6/$10. THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Proving My Existence

By Aaron Garlick. Jul 10-20. Wed-Sun 11-5pm. Free CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE (MANUKA)

M16 ARTSPACE

Touch

Best installation you’ll never see. A tactile experience. 6pm, 6.30pm, 7pm, 7.30pm. $6/$10. By Aaron Garlick. Jul 10-20. Wed-Sun 11-5pm. Free

School Holiday Workshops

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au

Winter Garden

Japanese pop culture. Jul 10-27. WedSun 12-5pm. Free.

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au

Art Exhibitions

THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Workshops

School Holiday Workshops

saturday july 12

Naked Girls Reading

IQ Trivia Fun

Workshops

QUESTACON

M16 ARTSPACE

Lloyde Cole

Fun, laughs & prizes! 7.30pm. Free.

School Holiday Workshops

Jul 10-27. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free.

Trivia

School Holiday Workshops

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Hosted by Jonathan Davis. 8pm. Free Entry.

Live Music

Workshops

6–8pm. Free entry. Must book. Call Marisol on 0404 364 820

Workshops

Curry-Oke Wednesdays

TRANSIT BAR

THE STREET THEATRE

Tarot Card Reading

Spirit of Country & Blaktism. Jul 10-27. Tue-Thu 10-4pm. Weekends 12-4pm. Free.

TRANSIT BAR

Returning for his Australian tour. 8pm. $49.

Something Different

3 girls read aloud from various books. $15. Book at: politbar.co

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au QUESTACON

friday july 11 Art Exhibitions Touch

A tactile experience. 12.30pm, 1pm, 1:30pm, 2:00pm, 6:00pm, 6:30pm, 7:00pm, 7:30pm. $6 THE COURTYARD STUDIO

Live Music Flyying Colours

Proving My Existence

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE (MANUKA)

Glint

Connections between printmaking and glassmaking. Until Aug 3. Free. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

NAIDOC Exhibitions

Spirit of Country & Blaktism. Jul 10-27. Tue-Thu 10-4pm. Weekends 12-4pm. Free. HUW DAVIES GALLERY

Hibiki

Textiles, painting, print & photography influenced by Japan. Jul 10-27. WedSun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Film ANU Anime Society Screenings Jul 10-27. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

With Bruges and more. 8pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Live Music

Mitch/ Oscar

Columbus

5pm afternoon session. 10pm band. Free. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Lost Coast, Katanarama & Ruthless. 8pm. $10. MAGPIES CITY CLUB

Saturday Rock

With Blazing Boots. Canberra’s top rocking Country band. 8-11pm Free. GUNDAROO COLONIAL INN

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@bmamag


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE Sat Jul 12 - Sat Jul 19 Several Devils

tuesday July 15

Rock/garage/punk. Time TBA. $TBA. THE BASEMENT

On The Town Chrome

DJs playing industrial, EBM, dark electro & alternative. 9pm-late. $5/$10. NV NIGHTCLUB

Workshops School Holiday Workshops

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au QUESTACON

sunday july 13 Live Music

Karaoke

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

Film

58,000 songs to choose from. 8pm late. Free.

Karaoke Love Winter Competition

Four weeks of heats & one grand final. $1000 cash grand prize! 9pm. Free. TRANSIT BAR

Something Different Euroscience at Questacon

Celebrate Europe’s scientific achievements with shows & demonstrations. Jul 14-18. Info at: questaco QUESTACON

IRON BAR

School Holiday Workshops

Traditional Irish musicians from late afternoon. Free. KING O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au QUESTACON

Workshops School Holiday Workshops

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au QUESTACON

monday july 14 Something Different Euroscience at Questacon

Celebrate Europe’s scientific achievements with shows & demonstrations. Jul 14-18. Info at: questaco QUESTACON

Workshops School Holiday Workshops

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au QUESTACON

Euroscience at Questacon

Karaoke Madness

Workshops

Irish Jam Session

Something Different

Improvention

International festival of unscripted theatre & comedy. Jul 16-20. Bookings & info at: thestreet.org.

The Acoustic Sessions

With Derryth Nash. 2pm-4pm. Free.

Comedy

wednesday july 16 Art Exhibitions Winter Garden

THE STREET THEATRE

QUESTACON

Jul 10-27. Wed-Sun 12-5pm. Free.

Connections between printmaking and glassmaking. Until Aug 3. Free. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

NAIDOC Exhibitions

Hosted by Jonathan Davis. 8pm. Free Entry.

Improvention

Hump Day Wednesdays

Kick back mid-week with drink specials. 5pm. TRANSIT BAR

International festival of unscripted theatre & comedy. Jul 16-20. Bookings & info at: thestreet.org. THE STREET THEATRE

Something Different

Live Music

Euroscience at Questacon

Crooked Colours

Celebrate Europe’s scientific achievements with shows & demonstrations. Jul 14-18. Info at: questaco

8pm. Presale via Moshtix TRANSIT BAR

Something Different

QUESTACON

Euroscience at Questacon

Trivia

Celebrate Europe’s scientific achievements with shows & demonstrations. Jul 14-18. Info at: questaco

Fun, laughs & prizes! 7.30pm. Free.

QUESTACON

Tarot Card Reading

Workshops

6–8pm. Free entry. Must book. Call Marisol on 0404 364 820

School Holiday Workshops

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au

saturday july 19

QUESTACON

Art Exhibitions

thursday july 17

Hibiki

Improvention

M16 ARTSPACE

Comedy

On The Town

Comedy

Textiles, painting, print & photography influenced by Japan. Jul 10-27. WedSun 12-5pm. Free.

friday july 18

DIGRESS COCKTAIL BAR

Spirit of Country & Blaktism. Jul 10-27. Tue-Thu 10-4pm. Weekends 12-4pm. Free. HUW DAVIES GALLERY

QUESTACON

Curry-Oke Wednesdays

POLIT BAR & LOUNGE

Glint

Science experiences for kids aged 10–15. Jul 8-17. Info at: questacon. edu.au

Karaoke

Proving My Existence

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE (MANUKA)

School Holiday Workshops

M16 ARTSPACE

IQ Trivia Fun

By Aaron Garlick. Jul 10-20. Wed-Sun 11-5pm. Free

Workshops

ANU Anime Society Screenings

Japanese pop culture. Jul 10-27. WedSun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

Celebrate Europe’s scientific achievements with shows & demonstrations. Jul 14-18. Info at: questaco

Winter Garden

Japanese pop culture. Jul 10-27. WedSun 12-5pm. Free. M16 ARTSPACE

International festival of unscripted theatre & comedy. Jul 16-20. Bookings & info at: thestreet.org. THE STREET THEATRE

Proving My Existence

By Aaron Garlick. Jul 10-20. Wed-Sun 11-5pm. Free

CANBERRA CONTEMPORARY ARTS SPACE (MANUKA)

Glint

Connections between printmaking and glassmaking. Until Aug 3. Free. CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

OUT

July 16

White album obits bangarra the chop shop ...and more!

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53


FIRST CONTACT SIDE A: BMA band profile

Aaron Peacey 0410381306 band.afternoon.shift@ gmail.com.au Adam Hole 0421023226

Afternoon Shift 0402055314 Amphibian Sound PA Clare 0410308288 Annie & The Armadillos Annie (02) 61611078/ 0422076313 Aria Stone sax/flute/lute/ harmonica, singer-songwriter Aria 0411803343

The Sticky Bandits Where did your band name come from? Originally, the band name came from Home Alone, a movie that the three brothers in the band loved when they were younger. Group members? Rhett Dickerson (Vocalist and Rhythm Guitar), India Jones (Vocalist), Jesse Robinson (drums), Tim Robinson (bass) and Dan Robinson (Lead Guitar). Describe your sound: Slow Blues Rock. Who are your influences, musical or otherwise? Classic rock and roll, like The Beatles and Jimi Hendrix, to modern music of all genres. Personal influences also vary, however we all very family oriented and have a very tight group of family and friends that are a massive support in our lives. What’s the most memorable experience you’ve had whilst performing? Playing at Little Brooklyn in Kingston, having a massive amount of friends and family there cheering us on and supporting us. Of what are you proudest so far? Writing, practicing, and recording our 6 song demo at the end of last year. It was something that we had all wanted to do for ages and it was amazing to finally get it done. What are your plans for the future? Gigging, writing and recording some more songs. What makes you laugh? We are all very laid back people. We have regular jam sessions that quite often become a bit of a joke. Once Rhett starts laughing it generally sets the rest of the band off. What pisses you off? How hard it is to make a living as a musician. What about the local scene would you change? More venues to play original music. Even if there was somewhere that hosted open mic nights. The problem is that too many venues are stuck in this pattern of only having bands of a certain genre, and that limits the opportunities to play more live music. What are your upcoming gigs? RAW showcase at Uni Pub on the 30th of July. Contact info: facebook.com/thestickybandits45/ thestickybandits45@gmail.com

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Australian Songwriters Association Keiran (02) 62310433 Back to the Eighties Ty Emerson 0418 544 014 Backbeat Drivers Steve 0422733974 backbeatdrivers.com Bat Country Communion, The Mel 0400405537 Birds Love Fighting Gangbusters/DIY shows-bookings@ birdslovefighting.com Black Label Photography Kingsley 0438351007 blacklabelphotography.net Bridge Between, The Cam 0431550005 Capital Dub Style Reggae/dub events Rafa 0406647296 Chris Harland Blues Band, The Chris 0418 490 649 chrisharlandbluesband @gmail.com Cole Bennetts Photography 0415982662 Danny V Danny 0413502428 Dawn Theory Nathan 0402845132 Danny 0413502428 Dorothy Jane Band, The Dorothy Jane 0411065189 dorothy-jane@dorothyjane.com Drumassault Dan 0406 375 997 Feldons, The 0407 213 701 FeralBlu Danny 0413502428 Fire on the Hill Aaron 0410381306 Lachlan 0400038388 Fourth Degree Vic 0408477020 Gareth Dailey DJ/Electronica Gareth 0414215885 Groovalicious Corporate/ weddings/private functions 0448995158

In The Flesh Scott 0410475703 Itchy Triggers Alex 0414838480 Jenn Pacor Singer-songwriter avail. for originals/covers 0405618630 Johnny Roadkill Paulie 0408287672 paulie_mcmillan@live.com.au Kayo Marbilus facebook.com/kayomarbilus1 Kurt’s Metalworx (PA) 0417025792 Los Chavos Latin/ska/reggae Rafa 0406647296 Andy 0401572150 Missing Zero Hadrian 0424721907 hadrian.brand@live.com.au Moots Huck 0419630721 Morning After, The Covers band Anthony 0402500843 Mornings Jordan 0439907853 MuShu Jack 0414292567 mushu_band@hotmail.com Obsessions 0450 960 750 obsessions@grapevine.com.au Painted Hearts, The Peter (02) 62486027 Polka Pigs Ian (02) 62315974 Rafe Morris 0416322763 Redletter Ben 0421414472 Redsun Rehearsal Studio Ralph 0404178996/ (02) 61621527 Rug, The Jol 0417273041 Sewer Sideshow Huck 0419630721 Simone & The Soothsayers Singing teacher Simone 62304828 Sorgonian Twins, The Mark 0428650549 Soundcity Rehearsal Studio Andrew 0401588884 STonKA Jamie 0422764482 stonka2615@gmail.com Strange Hour Events Dan 0411112075 Super Best Friends Sam White sam@imcmusic.net System Addict Jamie 0418398556 Tegan Northwood (Singing Teacher) 0410 769 144

Guy The Sound Guy Live & Studio Sound Engineer 0400585369 guy@guythesoundguy.com

Top Shelf Colin 0408631514

Haunted Attics band@hauntedatticsmusic.com

Zoopagoo zoopagoo@gmail.com

Undersided, The Baz 0408468041

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BMA Magazine 443 - 25 June 2014