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HERE WE ARE! BLKONBLK DIGITAL NUMBER 7! IN A WORLD WHERE DIGITAL PUBLISHING HAS MORE AND MORE RELEVANCE WE ARE IN LOVE WITH THE FORMAT, WE ALWAYS HAVE BEEN TO BE HONEST. AND... WE ARE NOT TALKING ABOUT PUBLISHING ON INSTAGRAM OR TWITTER. ALTHOUGH WE LOVE SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS, DIGITAL PUBLISHING REQUIRES A DEGREE OF FOCUS AND APPLICATION. BLKONBLK #7, AT 254 PAGES, IS TRUE PUBLISHING, ONLINE, WITH THE SAME RESPECT FOR OUR CONTENT AS PRINTING. BLKONBLK#7’S TITLE ‘A MODERN RHYME’ OCCURED, AS A TITLE, TO CREATIVE DIRECTOR RACHAEL CHURCHWARD AS SHE TOOK SOME TIME OUT FROM THIS MODERN DIGITAL/ONLINE/STREAMING WORLD TO READ HER FAVOURITE HARD COPY POETRY BOOK; ‘POEMS OF ALBERT LORD TENNYSON’, SELECTED BY HIS GRANDSON CHARLES TENNYSON; COLLINS, 1954’. WE FELT IT MADE SENSE TO DESCRIBE THIS ISSUE AS A DIGITAL ‘MODERN RHYME‘

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Shot by Kerry Brown in Auckland over the weekend of 27-28 February 2016. With thanks to Jos Wheeler, Matt Benns for Stephen Marr, Josie Wignall & Lili Shine for M.A.C. and Shirley Simpson |

www.workshop.co.nz

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BLACK STAR 28. Kate Sylvester/Lee MIller 30. Two Tones of M.A.C 32. Isabel’s Spell 34. Long Live NOM*d 36. Karen Walker/Magnetic 38. Neuw Authentic 40. Theo at Mortimer Hirst 42. Two Little Shrimps 44. Winter Memory (Black Star fashion shoot)

BLACK LIST/PROFILES 60. Six Pack: Film Actors feature 74: Illustrator/artist Calum Haugh

BEAUTY 78. Paradise Found 116. Punk Grey 132. Nighttime in the Switching Yard

FASHION 142. Tales From The French Quarter 158. Broken and Golden 170. She’s A Revolution 186. The Divine Ms M 200. Island Letter 216. I Think I’ll Call It Morning 230. Hell On Wheels 246. Junkyard 10


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Enquiries: sales@kaygoss.com


Publishers, Editors-in-Chief Grant Fell & Rachael Churchward grant@blackmagazine.co.nz rachael@blackmagazine.co.nz Creative Director Rachael Churchward Fashion/Beauty Director Rachael Churchward Art Director/Designer Nina Van lier Deputy Fashion Editor Ethan Butler ethanbutler91@gmail.com Assistant Editor/Producer Zeenat Wilkinson Hair Editor Greg Murrell @ Ryder Salon Australian Editor Justin Henry @Vivien’s Creative justinhenrybeauty@yahoo.com Senior Hair and Beauty Editor AU/NZ Justin Henry Australian Fashion Editor Sarah Birchley Australasian Editor-at-large David K Shields International Editor-at-large Paul Empson UK Contributing Fashion Editor Sara Dunn Online Editors Grant Fell Zeenat Wilkinson David K Shields Illustrator (this issue) Calum Haugh

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Advertising Grant Fell: +64 21 407 248 E: grant@blackmagazine.co.nz

BLKonBLK is published bi-annually by: BLK NZ LTD P.O.Box 68-259 Newton, Auckland, New Zealand Ph: + 64 9 817 9601 Web: www.blackmagazine.co.nz EffBee: www.facebook.com/Blackmagnz Toot: www.twitter.com/blackmagazine Vid: www.vimeo.com/blackmagazine Insty: @black_mag Print Subscriptions managed by iSubscribe Print Edition of Black Magazine printed by McCollams Ltd Distribution in NZ and Australia by Gordon & Gotch Ltd. International distribution by 8 Point Media. The views expressed in BLKonBLK are not necessarily those of the publishers and editors. No part of this digital publication may be reproduced in any way without permission. Thank you. We do NOT accept unsolicited submissions. ISSN number: ISSN 1177-2603 © BLK NZ LTD, 2016

Photography: Ribal Hosn at Vivien’s Creative, Melbourne Hair & Make-up: Justin Henry at Vivien's Creative Melbourne using M.A.C Cosmetics and Original Mineral styling products. Model: Lilly Nova at IMG Models


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From Nature

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A New Colour is ammonia-, PPD- and fragrance-free. Finest Pigments gloss shades contain 95-98% naturally derived ingredients. Dyes are extracted from botanical ingredients including walnuts, tomatoes, ginger and saffron. Colour that’s kinder on your hair.

rydersalon.com

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A creative space to make your mark.


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ZORA BELL BOYD JEWELLERY HOUSED AT

76A PONSONBY RD


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SHADOWS OF SUMMER Lee Miller, muse to Kate Sylvester’s latest collection was said to have actually shot several photographic images that were credited to the great surrealist Man Ray. Whilst staying with him as his student and lover in Paris in the 1920s, she was fully immersed in the world of the Surrealists; Pablo Picasso, Paul Éluard, and Jean Cocteau (she actually appeared as a statue that comes to life in Cocteau’s 1930 Avant Garde film The Blood of a Poet . Miller is also credited with rediscovering the photographic technique of solarisation. Photography, hair and make-up: Carolyn Haslett. Styling: Ethan Butler and Zeenat Wilkinson. Model: Tess at Clyne wears: Theda Trousers and Ashley polo knit by Kate Sylvester. ‘Edie Mary Jane’ platform by Marc Jacobs from Workshop. Necklace by Zora Bell Boyd Jewellery.

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TWO TONES M.A.C AW 16 Trends are a tale of two: Two directions, two tones; precision and indiviuality to be exact. Says M.A.C’s Senior Vice President of Global Artist Training, Development and Makeup Artistry Gordon Espinet “Make-up can be seen through two lenses; one of strict precision (sharp accents of sharp lips, razor black eyes or loose individuality. Stained shadows and liners and diffuse lips and skin propose a softer alternative.” Photography and hair: Carolyn Haslett. Styling: Ethan Butler. Makeup: Richard Symons using M.A.C Cosmetics and Oribe hair products. Models: Chiara and Norina Gasteiger at Clyne. Lingerie model’s own.

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IT’S IN MY NATURE Twenty years after she took the fashion world by storm by showing her first eponymous collection in a squat using her friends as models, Paris born designer Isabel Marant is still bringing fresh ideas, designs and workmanship to the fashion table. Her Bohemian-meets-Parisian style lives more strongly than ever in each collection for her contemporary Isabel Marant Étoile label. Photography, hair and makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics and Oribe hair products. Styling: Ethan Butler and Zeenat Wilkinson. Model: Tess at Clyne wears: ‘Lia’ Quilted Jacket by Isabel Marant and Freja’ pants by Hewlen Cherry, both from Workshop. Loafers by Sempre Di.

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BOTANICAL BEAUTY

NOM*d’ have stepped outside the darker square they are renowned for with their Spring/ Summer 2016/17 collection ‘High Anxiety.’ Whilst the label’s signature punk ethic and much-love black is still the backbone of the collection, High Anxiety introduces a sense of lightheartedness through a fever of colour and prints including florals, sliced beetles and rose-like embellishments. Season after season the Great Southern Brand delivers collections of international standard. This high quality benchmark is reflected in the intenational brands carried by the label’s flagship Plume stores and online store at www. plumestore.com International brands in-store now include: Rick Owens, Vetements, Comme des Garcons Comme des Garcons, Play and Parfum, Y’s Yohji Yamamoto and Y-3. Photography and hair: Carolyn Haslett using Oribe hair products Syling: Ethan Butler. Make-up: Richard Symons using M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Norina at Clyne wears: Patch Jacket in Prince of Wales Check, RRP $480, Covered Tee in Olive, RRP $140, Long Sleeve Dropped Dress in Olive, RRP $630

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IS ABEL'S SPELL Chic comfort. A crisp striped shirt always looks good under a great sweater. When Isabel Marant’s feminine/masculine Happy Sweater meets Alexander’s ‘Washed/striped’ shirt the satorial chemistry is obvious. Marant has described her woman as someone who wants to look good but also doesn’t want to spend too much time on it. Photography, hair and makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics and Oribe hair products. Styling: Ethan Butler and Zeenat Wilkinson. Model: Tess at Clyne wears: ‘Happy sweater’ by Isabel Marant and Washed Striped shirt by Alexander Wang, both from Workshop.

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M AGNETIC IM AGE For her Spring/Summer 2016 collection, ‘Magnetic’, Karen Walker’s muse is photographer Berenice Abbott, a woman who learnt her art under the tutelage of Man Ray and whose personal style captured perfectly 20th century utilitarian, androgynous chic. “Creating images for this collection, we had in mind the considered way Berenice herself worked,” Karen says, dismissing the current vogue for shooting endless digital images, “A suitable response to today’s digital narcissism.”The ‘Magnetic’ collection is available in Karen Walker stores and Karen Walker online. Photography, hair and makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics and Oribe hair products. Styling: Ethan Butler and Zeenat Wilkinson. Model: Tess at Clyne wears: ‘Theodore’ panelled coat, ‘Mogul’ pants, ‘Vikto’ lace-up’s and ‘Moonwalk’ sunglasses, all by Karen Walker.

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ON FIRE Set me on fire! Karen Walker Jewellery’s “Magnetic’ collection has been released to coincide with her RTW collection of the same name. The collection includes these boss ‘Split Flame’ earrings among many other great pieces. In store and online at Karen Walker now. Photography, hair and makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics and Oribe hair products. Styling: Rachael Churchward. Model: Tess at Clyne.

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SWEET SUCCESS The timeless spirit of Neuw Authentics has been personified by the latest campaign featuring uber sexy, timeless model Erin Wasson. “We’re excited about the resurgence of ’90s denim. Neuw Authentics is about taking the things we love from this iconic period of time— the heavy stone washes and rigid fabrics—and applying these in a modern way.” says the brand’s Gene Powell. The modern Neuw, a 90s icon. Photography, hair and makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics and Oribe hair products. Styling: Ethan Butler. Model: Tess at Clyne wears: Success blazer and Darcy shorts by Neuw Denim. Priscilla Slingback heels by Acne Studios from Workshop. Patches by Nina Van Lier.

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PALLADIUM DREAM Belgian eyewear brand Theo.....have a Golden Dream and a Palladium Dream! The progressive eyewear company have created a luxury collection for those who like to wear their glasses like a piece of jewellery. Gold or silver coloured frames frames to create an offering beyond basic black. Each of the seven models is available in either colour from Mortimer Hirst in High Street and St Heliers now. Photography and hair: Carolyn Haslett using Oribe hair products. Styling: Ethan Butler. Make-up: Richard Symons using M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Chiara at Clyne wears Service tied jacket and blouse by Karen Walker, choker by Zora Bell Boyd Jewellery.

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AGNES AND JUNIOR: TWO LITTLE SHRIMPS In an industry dominated by the fast fashion giants and their often unethical design and production practices, it is refreshing to see a young designer working almost entirely with Faux Fur. With a background in History of Art and a diploma in Textile Design from the London College of Fashion, Hannah Weiland takes her inspiration from the witticisms of modern art and a playful engagement with pattern and texture. Shrimps is a range of beautifully crafted pieces for the forward-thinking customer with

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a taste for the fun in fashion. The first collection, now available at Workshop stores and Workshop online, blends the simplicity of the classic Breton-stripe with bright faux-furs to create coats and clutch bags that are at once nostalgic and surreal, yet also contemporary. Photography and hair: Carolyn Haslett using Oribe hair products. Styling: Ethan Butler. Make-up: Richard Symons using M.A.C Cosmetics Models: Chiara and Norina at Clyne. Chiara (left) wears: Shrimps Junior Jacket. Norina (right) wears: Shrimps Agnes Coat.


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Young New Zealand designers AW17 collections

Photography: Veronika Gulyayeva Fashion Editors : Ethan Butler and Zeenat Wilkinson Hair: Sara Allsop at Dharma (Libby) and Ashley Hoyt at Ryder Salon (Makayla) Make-up: Richard Symons using M.A.C Cosmetics Models: Libby at Unique Model Management and Makayla at Red 11

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Opening page and this page: Libby wears: Top and pants by Jarrad Godman, boots by R.M. Williams, belt by Workshop, socks stylist’s own. Opposite page: Makayla wears: Top and jacket by Jimmy D, High briefs by Kay Goss, boots by R.M. Williams, belt and socks stylist’s own.

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This page: Jacket by Jarrad Godman

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This Page: Top by Wynn Hamlyn Opposite Page: Top and skirt by Wynn Hamlyn, belted purse by MM6 from The Shelter.

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This page: Makayla wears: Jacket and top by Jimmy D, earring by Harman GrubiĹĄa.Opposite page: Makayla wears: Jacket and pants by Jarrad Godman, boots by R.M. Williams.

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This page Libby wears: Top, jacket and earrings by Penny Sage. Opposite page: Makayla wears: Jacket and top by Jimmy D, earring by Harman GrubiĹĄa.

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This page and opposite page: Libby wears: Blazer, trousers, belt and shoes by Harman GrubiĹĄa. Song title: Kodomo.G.

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Photography: David K. Shields Styling, intro and interviews: Chris Lorimer Make-up/Grooming: Wayne Chick at The Artist Group using Bobbi Brown, Fiona Midddleton using M.A.C Cosmetics Hair: Chris Coonrod at Union Management using Sachajuan, Barney Gleeson at Salon Baby

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LITERALLY THE ONES TO WATCH, THESE SIX FRESH FACES, AS SEEN ON OUR TV, CINEMA AND COMPUTER SCREENS, ARE SOME OF THE STRONGEST RECENT EXPORTS OF GREAT ACTING TALENT FROM OUR AUSTRALASIAN SHORES. WHILST HAVING WORKED IN THE FIELD FOR YEARS ALREADY AND PROVEN THEIR ACTING CHOPS IN FULL VIEW OF THE MAINSTREAM, THEIR CAREERS ARE ALL STILL IN THE MAKING AND WE ANTICIPATE AN EVEN BRIGHTER FUTURE AHEAD. SPEAKING WITH CHRIS LORIMER FROM SYDNEY, MELBOURNE, BRISBANE, L.A. AND VANCOUVER, THEY WEIGH IN ON GETTING RECOGNISED, STAYING GROUNDED, WHAT’S IMPORTANT, AND BEING THE “KID” ON SET.

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From age six Bethany Whitmore has been a career actress, launching straight into the industry playing opposite Debra Messing. Her next roles found her alongside Toni Colette and then with Rebecca Gibney. Now at the tender age of “nearly seventeen” she’s come into her own, winning moviegoers hearts leading the cast of Girl Asleep the new Australian coming-of-age film taking on the world. Within the film’s aesthetic of Moonrise Kingdom meets Where The Wild Things Are, with a touch of Napoleon Dynamite, Whitmore’s Greta is a dreamy loser entirely unmoved about the prospect of puberty who falls into a dream world when reality isn’t really going her way. Hi Bethany, tell us a little about yourself and what you do: I am a student and an actor and aspiring fashion designer. Born in Melbourne, I grew up in Surrey Hills. In year 7, my family relocated to Singapore where we lived for nearly two years. It was amazing, I was exposed to a whole new way of life and culture. I will never forget the incredible food, and people I met there. Now I live in Fitzroy, the hipster hub of Melbourne… the op-shops are to die for, more than 85% of my clothes are now second-hand. As an actor, I like bringing to life and telling the story of someone other than myself. I have been very lucky in life, and to now have the opportunity to play Greta in Girl Asleep has been a dream. I love acting because it is a creative outlet, telling stories with the potential to influence people, and from my experience of watching movies, they can help cheer you up and be your best friend when you just need a laugh. When did you become interested in the idea of being an actor? At age six, I had my very first audition for a US TV mini-series, The Starter Wife, to play Debra Messing’s daughter. Next thing I was flown to Queensland for four months to shoot my first ever role. The producers thought I was eight

years old with years of experience. I believe they were a bit surprised when they discovered I was six years old with no experience. They bought on some acting coaches who helped me through the experience, and taught me the basics, like not to look at the camera, and not to pat the fluffy boom. How does your family support you as you work as an actor? My whole family is hugely supportive of me, regarding becoming an actor. Especially my mum who drives me to all my auditions, helps me find the right clothes to wear to match the characters, comes interstate with me when filming and has been right by my side the whole way, and has never let me become big headed. I think having a supportive family is crucial for surviving this industry, as not only do they help you when it’s tough, but they do keep you grounded. Girl Asleep is getting such rave reviews and feedback worldwide, what were your challenges wining the lead role? I definitely found it challenging, especially since it was my first big lead. I wanted to do Greta justice because I think that she is a critical character for young girls to look up to. I wanted to get her journey right, and since she was the central character, and a passive one, that was quite difficult. I was required on set for basically every scene, however, I never once felt tired, because I was in my element with people I adored. Working all day and sometimes even all night. It was a blast! How is Greta in the film different to you in real life – and how is she similar?I think that I am quite similar to Greta because at the time we filmed, I had only just turned 15. I was still, and am still finding myself as a woman, which is Greta’s journey during the film. She and I both played with our toys up until we were teenagers, and we can both be quite reserved. However, I am growing up in the 21st century, which is a very different time to the ‘70s where becoming an independent woman was a lot harder. Also, I feel that everyone encounters a bully, everyone forms awkward crushes

and everyone struggles to find/discover themselves sometimes. How do you get into character? To me it is crucial to explore all the deeper meanings in the script and to understand the journey of not only my character, but also everyone in the story. Another thing that helps is the costumes, for once I am in their clothes, I feel like them. Once I am on set, and I am in the scene, I find the character just comes to life. I also don’t over-rehearse my lines; I learn them once I am on set, which helps keep my performance fresh. I have a photographic memory, so learning lines is not difficult for me, in saying that the art and rhythm of learning lines does take practice, but I have been practicing for ten years now. When choosing and accepting roles – what aspects are the main considerations for you? I think that the roles you take on, shape your career, and some would argue that ‘it’s not the parts you chose that define your career, but the ones you say no to’. The characters I tend to be more interested in are the ones that tell compelling stories and are challenging. What tips have you had from other more experienced actors? Stay true to yourself. Never get ahead of yourself because you never know what’s going to happen. Always put your best foot forward and try everything. Have an open mind about every role and work hard not to turn down auditions, because every audition is a chance to perform. What’s important to you? I find human connection vital, like spending time with your friends, supporting the community and those in need. I think that with the progression of technology we aren’t spending so much time together, where we don’t have a screen in our face. Bethany wears: Jacket by Marques Almeida from theaBasilou.com, dress by Kate Sylvester, pendant by Louis Vuitton Fine Jewellery. Make-up: Fiona Middleton using M.A.C Cosmetics. Hair: Barney Gleeson at Salon Baby. Hair: Barney Gleeson at Salon Baby.

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21-year-old Canberra native Ben Kindon left the Australian capital behind to chase his dream to attend one of the best national drama schools in Perth. From there to the big smoke of Sydney, and it’s paying off. After rave reviews of his performance in ABC’s Barracuda he looks continue his journey on, to L.A.’s bright lights. As stuck-up teen Martin Taylor in the show, he is both the bullying overprivileged yet driven competitor and covert love interest to Elias Anton’s Danny Kelly, but IRL Kindon’s a selfdescribed sci-fi fantasy nerd with a love of videogames and the occasional Saturday night spent role-playing Dungeons & Dragons. Hey Ben, tell us a little about yourself and what you do…I’m an actor. I’ve been performing on stage since I was a kid, and I’ve known it’s what I want to do with my life since as long as I can remember. How did you discover acting? And when did you be come interested in the idea of being an actor? When I was a toddler I used to put on little shows for my family with my sister, Stef. We would do annual Christmas shows in our living room. I would wear a little bowtie and a vest and force my grandma to listen to us belt out some Christmas carols. I first auditioned for my school play when I was 13 and I never heard anything back. To them I say, LOOK AT ME NOW. I wanted to be Indiana Jones and Luke Skywalker so bad. I would steal my dad’s ceremonial navy sword and pretend I was Aragorn in the backyard. I got so swept up in those stories I desperately wanted to be a part of them. You attended WAAPA (Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts) in Perth - how did you come to attend there and why did you choose that particular school? I spent all of high school hoping I would get there at the end. I don’t know what I would have done if I didn’t get in. I also really liked the sense of isolation there. We weren’t constantly under the gaze of industry professionals

and agents there as would have happened in Sydney or Melbourne, so we got the chance to screw up which I definitely did more than a few times. What are your thoughts on studying and learning your craft full-time versus working without formal training? I wouldn’t be the actor I am today without training. Some actors are able to pull it off; I don’t think I’m one of them. I think acting is all about confidence. You wouldn’t get up on stage in front of 400 people if you weren’t confident that what you were doing was good, that would be crazy. Acting training is very good in both giving that confidence and taking it away. Acting school taught me specificity; so that I can look at this very objective thing we do in an analytical way, and know which way to go. It gives you a method or a recipe that if you follow you know that you’ll be on the right track and there’s a certain comfort in that. However, it also gives you the insecurity of having had your art scrutinised and graded on a scale for three years. I think people who haven’t trained have less of that insecurity at times. They’re more comfortable with taking a script, jumping up and giving it their all then and there. How is Martin different to you in real life? And how is he similar? Martin Taylor is upper-middle class, racist and spoilt. I’m none of these things, that’s exactly what made it so much fun. What I will say, though, is that we’re both very competitive. Don’t challenge me to a game of Mario Kart if you value your dignity. What techniques do you use to get into character? I like music. I make a playlist for each character that I play that I’ll listen to as I warm up. I find it especially useful for period pieces. What were your favourite parts of filming Barracuda? Do you have some funny stories about being on the Barracuda set? When I was in the final stages of auditioning, Rob (Connolly, director) asked me if I had any sick dance moves I could bust out in the nightclub scene. I lied and said yes. When that scene eventually came around, there were about 40 extras

packed into this club and I had to “sexy dance”. The catch was: on the day there was no music. It was not my proudest moment. When taking on roles – what are the main considerations for you? Is having fun with a character important? Having fun is nice, but it’s not the deal breaker. It wouldn’t really be fair if I were just having fun at work every day. I’m interested in stories. That’s what drew me into Barracuda so much, it was a gripping story and I just wanted to be involved somehow. Do you ever feel famous? Do you ever get recognised and how do you deal with it? Especially for the four weeks the show was on, it was crazy. I was getting recognised just about every day. There was one shift at work where I was recognised 12 times. Someone gave my manager a note intended for me, I walked past someone who was googling me on their phone, and I’ve posed for a whole lot of selfies with strangers. It’s a strange thing, but it’s flattering to know that people enjoyed the show. What are your thoughts on being a character actor vs. a leading man - what kinds of roles do you want for yourself? I would ask, why not both? I am desperate to do a fantasy or a sci-fi though. Somebody give me magic, a sword or a blaster! What tips have other older actors shared with you? They remind me that I’m young and there’s time, you can’t build a career in a day. What is the best part about your job? When you’re so in the moment you don’t feel like you’re acting. What is the worst? The rejection. You are going to the US very soon for meet-and-greets – how are you feeling about that? What are you anticipating could happen? I expect to return with an Oscar and I won’t take no for an answer. No, I don’t know. I’m going over there to meet people and to get my face out there. It’s the beginning of a long process but I’m anxious to start it. Ben wears: Sweatshirt by J.W. Anderson, shirt by Givenchy and trousers by Raey from Matchesfashion. Grooming: Wayne Chick at The Artist Group.

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At 18-years-old Elias Anton has made a huge impression on the Australian TV and film industry coming out of nowhere to play the lead Danny Kelly in recent ABC mini-series Barracuda. Based on the book by Christos Tsolikas, of “The Slap” and “Head On” fame, Barracuda is the story of a young man hungry to win an Olympic gold medal swimming for Australia and the lengths he’ll go to achieve it. His life gets in the way and the journey of the piece is seeing Danny’s highs and lows as he tries to connect his feelings with his circumstances. Anton is absolutely more easygoing than his onscreen character, but no less ambitious that’s for sure. Hi Elias, tell us a little about yourself… I was born, grew up and still live in Werribee, Victoria, in Australia. Currently I’m in year 12 at MacKillop College and my goal in life is to achieve a successful career as an actor. So far I have been blessed with some remarkable roles both on and off screen. Although it is a challenge juggling my career with the workload at school, I continue to persist for my love of the craft. How did you get into acting? When did you become interested in the idea of being an actor? I started when I was eleven years old. I was shy as a kid and discovered acting to help me get out of my shell. Although it benefited my self-confidence, I sometimes feel so invested into my characters that I am more comfortable living their personas than being myself. I fell in love with acting as soon as I picked up a script. I knew right from my first drama class that acting would be a major part of my life, I am blown away with how well it has played out for me so far considering the level of detail I invest in my character and how much I care. Do you need to spend time away from home filming? Is that hard? During the Barracuda shoot I spent my time at St Kilda in a hotel. It was hard living away from home; I was still seventeen and

felt I had a lot of weight on my shoulders, workload wise. As for Australia Day, I am currently in Brisbane in production staying in an apartment building, away from my family who are back in Melbourne. Although the work needs to be done and I have a lot of fun being part of it, I do tend to get homesick and miss my family. What were the biggest challenges in being in the lead role? Out of the hundreds of scenes we shot in a short amount of time, there were only three or four that I was wasn’t in. I had to memorise roughly a dozen pages every night after a twelvehour day, half of which would be spent in the pool. I had to build my physicality and performance as a swimmer, which I found difficult considering that I am not a swimmer. Your character Danny was such an angry man resolving things badly, lashing out, and coming to terms with himself for much of the show - how did you relate to him? How is Danny in the film different to you in real life – and how is he similar? Unlike Danny, I try to gather my thoughts and consider the most reasonable solution to a problem yet I was able to relate to him because much like him, I bottle my emotions. He keeps to himself with regards to how he feels; it’s about what he’s not saying as supposed to what he is. Honestly, my strongest relationship to Danny is through his drive to achieve what he desires. He wants to make it to the 2000 Sydney Olympics and is willing to do whatever it takes to get there, and that’s how I feel in regards to my acting career. What were your favourite parts of filming Barracuda? I was excited to finally be on a professional film set and tried to absorb as much as I could. Talking to the likes of Rachel Griffiths, Matt Nable and Jeremy Lindsay Taylor taught me plenty on how to hold myself on camera and being familiar with the routine of the set. Rob Connolly is an amazing director and I loved that he was lenient with the script allowing me to expand my horizons, still keeping in mind that we are telling a story and a point has

to be made after each scene. What tips have other older actors shared with you? Can you share them with us? My acting coach on set once told me “a restriction of actors is generalisation”, meaning that you must be very specific with every aspect that reflects your character’s life, back story and given circumstances. Your next role is in the upcoming film Australia Day - What can you tell us about it? I am currently in Brisbane in production of Australia Day, a feature film of which I am proud to play one of the lead roles, Sami. This film will have a broad reach importantly I believe, as it sheds light on a side of Australia that is yet to be heard. Without being too specific, the film highlights prejudice and racism of minority groups in this country and identifies the difficulties of those who battle for ethnic acceptance. What is the best part about your job? What is the worst? I love meeting new people, particularly those who have similar goals and aspirations as me. I learn from the different stories I hear and use that to benefit my performance. I also love that fact that my career is taking me places. A definite downside to this industry is rejection, if you don’t have a thick skin consider another pathway. I have dealt with my fair share of rejection so I have learnt to accept when a character isn’t right for me. What makes you smile? When I know that I have done my mum proud. I also get really happy when I get messages from fans saying that they love my performance and from other actors saying I inspire them. What’s important to you? My family is the most important aspect of my life, I can learn to deal with grief that affects me on a personal level but when something happens to someone I care for it hurts more. Elias wears: Outfit by Strateus.Carlucci. Grooming: Fiona Middleton using M.A.C Cosmetics Hair: Barney Gleeson at Salon Baby.

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A distinctive presence with his trademark curly red hair and deadpan timing, Melbourne born and raised 16-year-old Harrison Feldman has up until now been best known for his portrayal of “slack-jawed” tween Oscar Bright on ABC’s Upper Middle Bogan, even receiving a Logie nomination in 2014 for Most Popular New Talent. Now his appearance playing opposite Bethany Whitmore in Girl Asleep gives Feldman the chance to grow-up, just a little bit. As quintessentially scrawny schoolyard geek Elliot, he rises above cliché nerdiness imbuing his character with a real sense of vulnerability and wide-eyed wonder in this fairy tale about adolescent identity. Harrison, please tell us a bit about yourself…I’m currently studying year 11 at Bialik College, when my time is not spent studying or at school I am involved with scouting, and I go camping/ hiking on weekends. In my spare time I also play a range of instruments from guitar to piano to bass. Currently, as I’m playing Elliot in Girl Asleep, these past few weeks have been raining with interviews and photo shoots. Before now I never would have seen myself as a model. Next I’m very excited to be reprising my role as Oscar Bright in Upper Middle Bogan on ABC for its third season in mid-October for which I’m also appearing in one episode of a new show called Fancy Boy. When did you become interested in becoming an actor? At age four I actually wanted to attend hip-hop dance lessons but my parents for whatever reason found me an acting class instead. Eventually I scored a role in a short film, Carrot, where I first became curious about what when on behind the scenes. How does your family support you? My mum, dad and even my little sister have always been very supportive of my acting. My parents have

been my chaperone, my chauffer and my cheer squad. My Mum took me halfway around the world to attend the Berlin Film Festival for Girl Asleep. How did you get the Girl Asleep role? Director Rosemary [Myers] had seen me in Upper Middle Bogan and approached me. Initially I had to say no to the auditions due to exams at the time, but they persisted and eventually we were able to meet up. What have been your challenges in the role? I would have to say my greatest challenges with having such a large role is the coverage I’ve gained from it. There’s a lot of publicity work after the film and I found the Q&A sessions a bit nerve wracking. Otherwise, I was too busy enjoying being in character so I guess it wasn’t too challenging. What is similar about you and Elliot? And what is different? I often like to say that the Elliot character is a caricature of myself. Whilst my hair doesn’t get as bad as Elliot’s does, I do tend to forget to fix it in the morning. Elliot’s optimism and easy-go-lucky attitude is close to how my friends might describe me. How do you get into character? One of the most important things that I’ve learnt to get into character is letting go of myself. Rather than making a fool of myself or doing crazy things I would never do, I allow myself to transfer into a character that would do these things. I had to get used to the thought that nobody will laugh at me just for acting differently. What influences you to say yes or no to a role? I’ve never turned down a role due to the consideration of the character. Having fun with my character is important but it’s also very hard [for me] to not have fun. Characters similar to myself are always fun because I can play around and the research isn’t too hard. Characters that are not like me are even better as I get to experience the life of someone else. What’s it like being a “kid” on set? Being a kid on set is great fun. It means I get to enjoy time out with the other kids on

set, play card games during downtime and get to make new friends. I also don’t mind eating as much dessert as I can at the lunch and dinner buffets. When there are mostly adults around I tend to get a bit more serious. This is when I get curious about the technical side of TV or filmmaking and ask the crew lots of questions. Is confidence an important quality in an actor? I feel that in the past year my confidence has grown, as I have had to adapt to being in the spotlight. Before I would stress for weeks leading up to an interview but now I feel very comfortable when they come around. Confidence is needed to work as an actor but at the same time, for me, it’s come from being an actor. What are the best and worst parts of your job? I’ve always loved the backstage on any job. I love seeing crowds of people on set each with a unique important job doing their own thing: setting up tents, lighting, cameras, props and sound. A lowlight of my job is the stress that comes along with it and the public character I am expected to uphold. Do you think about the future? I don’t often like to think about the future. I find there is no point for it when I can live in the now. I can plan for the future but I also try and keep a strong hold on the present, otherwise I’ll only looking forward to somewhere I can never reach. What’s important to you? I know this so cliché but my family is number one. We always have so much fun together and there’s always an adventure. I am also fortunate to be surrounded by a huge extended family and friends. They have all been very supportive along the way and in return they are important to me. Harrison wears: Outfit by Dior Homme. Grooming: Fiona Middleton using M.A.C Cosmetics. Hair: Barney Gleeson at Salon Baby.

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19-year-old Tiarnie Coupland started out as a cheeky child actress and has grown up in front of cameras, notably on the high school drama with a time traveling twist, Worst Year of My Life. Currently commuting in between Melbourne, Sydney and L.A. where she is looking for new projects, Coupland has been until recently starring in the third series of Channel 9’s Lovechild a series based on the real life forced adoption of babies from unmarried mothers in Australia during the late ‘60s and ‘70s, for which in 2013, then Prime Minister Julia Gillard offered a national apology to those affected. A lovechild with a lovechild, Maggie is a delinquent teen who returns to the Tarramar Girls Home from which she was given up fifteen years prior, now pregnant herself. It seems that this former good girl’s place is in the bad girl roles, Coupland has just appeared in iconic Aussie soap Neighbours, as Nikki Jackson, a tough cookie looking to defend her sister’s honour in a bare knuckle boxing fight. Hi Tiarnie, can you start by telling us about yourself and what you’ve done so far? I got into acting when I was 8 years old and since then I have been fortunate enough to work in a number of complex and challenging roles for both film (Killing Ground, The Final Winter) and TV (Love Child, Worst Year of My Life Again, and most recently Neighbours). You’re currently in the U.S., What is happening for you there right now? Yes, I’m back in Los Angeles right now, auditioning for roles and establishing myself over here. How does your family support you as you work as an actor? I am fortunate to have quite a close-knit family who are very supportive of my career. My dad and sister often help out with self-tapes, and my mum is always

there to support and encourage me to pursue my dreams. Love Child is now a very established TV series in Australia and starting to travel - and you landed such a fantastic role with Maggie - how did that come about? I auditioned for the role of “Maggie” at the start of 2015 in which I had two recalls; one with the executive producers of the series and another with Geoff Bennett (one of the show’s directors) and Ella Scott Lynch (who plays the role of Shirley - my mother in the show). I received a phone call from my agent not long after saying that I had landed the role, and needless to say I was ecstatic! Were there any challenges in being in such a “bad girl” role? Yes, Maggie is a very complex role as she is just a very vulnerable little girl who has just found out that her whole life has been a lie and so she goes to Kings Cross to found out her true identity, who she is and where she comes from. How is Maggie in the show different to you in real life – and how is she similar? Maggie is very different to me; she is a bit of a wild child! What tricks do you have to get into character? It’s not really a trick, but research plays an important part in being able to gain a true and honest representation of any given role. For example, to help me understand my character Maggie and her perspective, I did a lot of research on people finding out they were adopted and the impact it has now had on their life. You’ve had to deal with some big themes on Lovechild how do you prepare for intense scenes and topics? A week before production I worked with a dramaturge (Nadia Townsend) where we really fleshed out the more emotional scenes in the show; particularly where Maggie finds out that Shirley is her birth mother. This was a 5-minute scene where Maggie really had to flip from one extreme emotion to another and use different tactics to

get to her mum. For a number of other scenes including the one where I gave birth, I prepared myself by doing a lot of research online and watching real-life videos. What were your favourite parts of filming on Love Child? That would have definitely been working with such an amazing and dedicated cast and crew who really took me under the wing (as it was their third season together). It was also a blast to be able to wear clothing and work with props from the 70’s era. Do you ever get recognised and how do you deal with it? Yes, I have been recognised while I have been out and about. We usually have a bit of a chat, and of course take a selfie! What is the best part about your job? And the worst? Being able to live out different types of lives is always a lot of fun. Maggie is a rebel and a real wild child, which I am definitely not! Through acting, I get to experience things that I would never do in real-life on the safety of set. There is no particular worst part about the job, but you do have to play out the waiting game between roles. During that waiting game, what else do you like to do? I’ve always enjoyed both singing and modelling, as they are another forms of art in which I am able to express yourself. What makes you smile? Making other people smile and funny online dog videos (I mean, who doesn’t love them?!). If you could choose another era to live in, when would it be? Why? I would love to live in the 70’s because a lot of great artists came out at that time and they seemed very free-spirited and carefree. Of course, the fashion was also amazing! Give me a cute pinafore any day of the week! What’s important to you? My Family, friends and Poppi, my cavoodle. Tiarnie wears: Outfit by Christian Dior. Hair & Make-up: Wayne Chick at the Artist Group.

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Once a household name in New Zealand, beaming into homes each week as Shortland Street’s Kane Jenkins, 19-year-old KJ Apa is about to find a much wider audience in his latest role as Archie Andrews, the namesake character from the iconic comic books, in the CW Network’s new show Riverdale. Following an extensive worldwide star search, Apa now finds himself working alongside Cole Sprouse, Twin Peaks’ alumni Mädchen Amick and with Beverly Hills 90210’s Luke Perry as his on-screen Dad. Set in present day in idyllic of Riverdale, the series explores the surrealism of small-town life, revealing a dark and seedy underbelly beneath its wholesome façade, and fittingly this version of Archie is all-together a darker incarnation: back at school from a summer spent working in construction and having ended a secret affair with his music teacher, and falling out with his best friend Jughead. Described as “a horny, semi-hallucinogenic mystery-drama with a potentially high death toll and lots of skin”, as more information about Riverdale surfaces the makers acknowledge inspiration from “major touchstone” Twin Peaks, the hazyvibed young-love dramas The Virgin Suicides and Heavenly Creatures, with and a touch of Veronica Mars. PostComicCon appearance where the pilot episode was previewed and cast revealed, Apa’s buzz is palpable, as one fan site puts it “He’s not a natural redhead, but I literally couldn’t care less because… Archie got an upgrade.” Hey KJ, Tell us a little about yourself and what you do… I was born in Waitakere City, New Zealand and I’m half Samoan, I love rugby and music and I’ve been acting for about two and a half

years now. After finishing up on Shortland Street, early 2016, I came over to the US to try my luck [at acting]. Things worked out really well and I managed to book some decent work and now I’m currently in Vancouver filming. I’m really close with my family. I have two older sisters; the oldest has just finished her law degree and has moved to Melbourne. The other is currently studying Fine Arts at the University of Auckland. How did you get into acting? It’s funny actually - it was never something I wanted to pursue. Growing up I was really into music and rugby. It was either one, or the other. When I was about thirteen, my Mum made me join local talent agency, Red11. I never really got any work until they told me I had an audition for “Shorty”. Somehow I got the job… Thanks Mum! You cut your acting teeth on the set of a soap opera in NZ… How did you find training by learning on set? And how does your experience there help you now? I came into “Shorty” not knowing a thing about acting. I was self-conscious, nervous, anxious, pretty much everything an actor isn’t meant to be. Acting was so far outside my comfort zone. But after a while, I started to really enjoy it and I was having lots of fun. All those feelings I had at the start were gone. “Shorty” taught me a lot: being placed in a work environment [like that] at sixteen forced me to grow up fast. The ability to learn lines fast was something I got the hang of due to the pace and immense workload. I feel like if you can survive the workload at “Shorty”, you’ll be able to handle any other production. How does your family support you as you work as an actor? I guess there isn’t much my family can do for me when I’m half way around the world, but they’re always there for me when I need a chat, and they send me up the odd Marmite jar every now and then. Do you need to spend time away from

home filming? Do you find that hard? What do you miss about NZ? The only time I go home is to see my family is for Christmas or if I happen to have an extended break. It was tough at the start to be away from home, especially when I hadn’t started filming and I’m just sitting around in some random city I’d never been to. But after doing it a few times I’ve started to develop a routine that works for me and keeps me busy. You play the new 2016 version of comic character Archie, who has his 75th anniversary this year, and have even dyed your hair red to match… what did you know about the character going in? I didn’t know much about Archie. I had to search it up online before my audition. I didn’t really understand how historic the franchise was until I started learning more about it. What can we expect from the show? It’s a dark, subversive drama, based on the most recent adaptation of the comics written by Fiona Staples and Mark Wade. When choosing and accepting roles – what things are the main considerations for you? For me it’s all about the script. If I’m drawn to the script and attracted to the character then I’ll always be interested. What is your dream role? Spiderman was always my favourite superhero. That would be epic. What is the best part about your job? Definitely the travelling to new places and meeting a bunch of new people all the time. What is the worst? Going from job to job you meet a lot of new people and end up developing strong friendships whether it’s with the cast or locals in that particular place. The downside of that is that eventually you have to leave, and more often than not, you never see those people again. KJ wears: Outfit by Zambesi. Styling: David K Shields.

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IN THE LATEST OF OUR PROFILES OF YOUNG/ EMERGING NEW ZEALAND ARTISTS,WE FEATURE AUCKLAND ILLUSTRATOR/ARTIST CALUM HAUGH WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FABULOUS HEADINGS SEEN THROUGHOUT THIS ISSUE. LIKE MANY OF THE YOUNG CREATIVES WE FEATURE, CALUM IS MULTITALENTED AND PLAYS IN THE BAND GALAXY BEAR AS WELL AS BEING A KICK ASS ILLUSTRATOR

Who are you and what do you do? My name’s Calum, and I’m an illustrator. I’m just finishing up my third year doing communication design at AUT, majoring in communication arts. But that’s just a overly complex way of saying I sit at uni and draw pictures. I’ve been getting quite into lettering and doing posters, for gigs and that sort of thing. Oh yeah I’ve seen some of your posters around, what got you into that? Well I’m in a band and we needed a poster for our first gig. It seemed like the logical step to get the guy who does illustration to do them. Tell us more about your band! How was that first gig? We’re called Galaxy Bear, because our drummer wears a giant teddy bear head. We properly formed earlier this year, but most of us had been playing together and writing songs since college. There’s five of us, but at that first gig we only had four. Me, my brother Lucas, Alex and the Bear

(who has no name). Michael joined shortly after on guitar. As well as posters, I know you have been working on a ‘zine. What is it about?Myself and some people from uni worked on a zine for a project. We called it Stomping Ground and we interviewed a bunch of Auckland musicians and creatives. While it’s taken a back seat because of our final projects, but we’re keen to continue working on it once that’s all over. It’s actually how I met Grant at Black, we interviewed him about his time in The Headless Chickens. Has illustration always been your thing?Yeah well I really like to draw as a kid, I’d always be doodling dragons and dinosaurs and Star Wars characters, things like that. I tended to doodle quite a lot all throughout my education. And I didn’t really see myself doing anything else once I left school. How do create your illustration, do you have a medium that you stick to? I really like to work in ink on paper, but

I’ve been recently experimenting with some digital manipulation. I like to take the line drawings and recolour them in photoshop, and play around with overlapping colours. But I’ll probably get bored of that soon Where do you go to for inspiration? I read a lot of comic books, and spend probably an unhealthy amount of time looking at other illustrator’s stuff on the internet.What are you listening to? Summer Feeling by the Eversons. What are you reading? The End of Oil by Paul Roberts. A perfect day off? I think it would have to be lounging around at home, right after I’ve handed in my final uni assignment. Calum wears hoodie by Odd Sock Gang.

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Photography: Charles Howells Hair concept: Ryder Salon for Davines Make-up: M.A.C Cosmetics Models: Julia and Jenna at Red 11, Veronika, Libby, Liv & Bernie at Unique, Chiara, Norina & Simone at Clyne Performers: Yuri Guaii, Zakk d’Larte, Medulla Oblongata, Leda Petit, Busty Springfield and RIP Drew Blood Words in story by Greg Murrell

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Opening page: Bernie: Hair: Nicholas Macaulay. Make-up: Danielle Xi. Clothing by World. These pages: Veronika: Hair: Keegan Nelson. Make-up: Tanya Catterall. Clothing by World.81


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PARADISE FOUND THERE'S THIS PLACE WHERE YOU CAN JUST BE YOURSELF OR SOME OTHER SELF AND IT DOESN’T MATTER WHETHER YOU ARE A BOY OR A GIRL OR NOT A BOY OR A GIRL PUT ON SOMETHING, ANYTHING EVERYTHING YOUR NAME IS ON THE LIST THIS IS YOUR STAGE

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Previous page and these pages: Hair: Fraser Foulagi. Make-up: Angelica Boquiron. 84Clothing by World.


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This page and opposite page: Jenna: Hair: Greg Murrell. Make-up: Kie Kie Stanners. Clothing by World. 87


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Both pages and following pages: Chiara: Hair: Greg Murrell. Make-up: Cara Marinovich. Clothing by World.

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Both pages: Leda Petit: Hair: Nicholas Macaulay. Makeup: Chay Roberts. 92 Outfit Model’s own.


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Both pages: RIP Drew Blood: Hair: Benjamin James. Make-up: RIP Drew Blood. Outfit designed by Nicholas Macaulay and constructed by Katie Brown. 95


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Both pages and following pages: Libby: Hair: Benjamin James. Make-up: Lochie Stonehouse. Clothing by World. 97


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Both pages: Medulla: Hair: Nicholas Macaulay. Makeup: Sam Dalzell. Outfit designed by Nicholas Macaulay and constructed 101 by Katie Brown.


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Previous pages and these pages: Norina: Hair: Greg Murrell. Makeup: Josie Wignall. Clothing by World. 104


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Busty Springfield: Hair: Nicholas Macaulay. Makeup: Sam Dalzell. Outfit designed by Nicholas Macaulay and constructed by Katie Brown. 107


Both pages: Simone: Hair: Jannine Jones. Make-up: Sharon Ngen. Clothing by World. 108


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Both pages: Zakk: Hair: Monique Hoareau. Makeup: Sarika Patel. Outfit designed by Nicholas Macaulay and constructed by Katie Brown.

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Both pages: Liv: Hair: Jannine Jones. Make-up: Greta Andrews. Clothing by World. 112


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Both pages: Yuri Guaii Hair: Nicholas Macaulay. Make-up: Yuri Guaii. Outfit model’s own.


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Photography: Charles Howells Fashion Editor: Rachael Churchward Hair: Tommy Stayton at Stephen Marr using R + Co Grooming: Richard Symons using M.A.C Cosmetics Body art: Calum Haugh Models: Veronika, Nick, Ed and Connor at Unique

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IT'S THE ANTI...THE ANTI ESTABLISHMENT ESTABLISHMENT HEY YOU! HEY PUNK. THE FREE KIDS OF MOSCOW MAKING CHANGE. GLASNOST GLADIATORS. STREET FIGHTERS NOT DELINQUENTS. INDEPENDENT AND FREE 1975 - 1992

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This page: Veronika wears: T-shirt by Neuw Denim, customised with patch by Nina Van Lier.

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This page and opposite page: Connor wears: Trench by Neuw Denim with patches by Nina Van Lier, jeans by Abrand, chains by Zora Bell Boyd Jewellery. 121


This page and opposite page: Nick wears: Jacket and pants by Workshop, patches by Nina Van Lier.

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This page and the next three pages: Ed wears: T-shirt by Neuw Denim, patches by Nina Van Lier, pants and belt model’s own. 124


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Both pages: T-shirt by Neuw Denim.

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This page and opposite page: Veronika wears: T-shirt and jeans by Neuw Denim, patch by Nina Van Lier, belt by Nom*d, boots model’s own. Fashion Assist: Nina Van Lier. 130

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Photography: Tintin Hedberg at Hell Studios Hair & Makeup: Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative using Pat MacGrath Labs Cosmetics and L'Oreal Professionel styling products; extensions from Westend Hair Fashion Editor: Brittni Morrison Model: Ella Grace at Vivien’s Models Manicurist: Lunel Laque

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Opposite page: Jacket by Discount Universe, brooch from Shag Melbourne, pom by Rebecca Minkoff. This page: Mesh top by Discount Universe, top by Zhivago and rings from Shag Melbourne.


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This page: Coat by Discount Universe.

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This page: Jacket by Thurley, belt by Amanda Wise. Opposite page: Jacket by Discount Universe. Photo Assists: Stuart Chenn & Alexis Liersch. Song title: Warren Zevon, 1976. 139


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Photography: David K Shields Fashion Editor: Marianne Malafosse Hair: Graeme Cumming at Sync Productions Make-up: Annabel Barton at Vivien’s Creative Model: Kawani Prenter at IMG Models

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Opening page: Blouse and skirt by Macgraw, beret by Suzy O’Rourke, sandals by Zimmermann, brooch and stockings stylist’s own. This page: Blouse by MacGraw, beret by Suzy O’Rourke. 145


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Opposite page: Dress, corset, leather belt, trick book anchor, stockings and velvet shoes, all by Prada. This page: Shirt, corset, belt and skirt, all by Prada, gloves stylist’s own.

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Above: Suit, hat and bag, all by Gucci, brooch, stylist’s own. Opposite: Body suit with gloves, fringed top all by Ipsen, skirt; By Johnny, sandals by Zimmermann, stockings stylist’s own.

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This page: Leather dress and coat by Christian Dior, hat by Suzy O’Rourke. 150


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Opposite: Jacket by Sass & Bide, shirt by Macgraw, top; By Johnny, pants by Romance Was Born, fez by Suzy O’Rourke, heels by Christian Louboutin, socks stylist’s own.This page: Dress and jacket by Burberry. 153


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This page: Jacket and gloves by Romance Was Born, shorts and blouse by Zimmermann, bag by Anya Hindmarch, stockings stylist’s own. 155


This page: Jacket and gloves by Romance Was Born, shorts and blouse by Zimmermann, bag by Anya Hindmarch, stockings stylist’s own.

This page: Dress (worn as top) by Dolce and Gabbana from matchesfashion.com, skirt by The Vampire Wife from matchesfashion.com, lace shirt by Macgraw, bag by Christian Louboutin. Fashion assist: Eve Whiunui.

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Photography: Michelle Beatty Fashion Editor: Margot Robinson Hair and Make-up: Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative using Make Up Forever and Kevin.Murphy Model: Phillipa H at Chic Model Management Production: David John and Tony Sargent

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Opening page: Bomber Jacket by IRO, dress by Nice Martin. Opposite page: Sweater by Kenzo from stylebop.com, skirt by Sass & Bide, shoes stylist’s own.This page: Top and pants by Daniel Avakian, shirt by Sass & Bide.

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This page: Studded leather jacket by Discount Universe, silk scarf stylist’s own. 163


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Opposite page: Sweatshirt by Karen Walker, leather skirt by Kate Sylvester, shoes stylist’s own. This page: Top and trousers by Lacoste.

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This page: Turtleneck by IRO, bomber jacket by Moschino from stylebop.com, jeans by Tome. 167


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Opposite page: Shirt and bodice by Sass & Bide, pants by Daniel Avakian, shoes stylist’s own. This page: Dress by Strateas.Carlucci. Post Production: Mikaela Westerholm. Photo Assist: Jade Mallick. 169


Photography: David K Shields Fashion Editor: Chris Lorimer at DÊbut Management Make-up: Wayne Chick at The Artist Group using Bobbi Brown Hair: Iggy Rosales at Union Management using Aveda Model: Harmony Boucher at Priscilla’s Model Management


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Both pages: Shirt by Anna Quan, jacket by Karen Walker, boots model’s own.

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This page: Coat by Raey from matchesfashion. com, boots by R.M. Williams.

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Opposite page: Jacket by Off-White, trousers by Raey. from matchesfashion.com This page: Jacket by Tommy Hilfiger, top by Pageant, jeans by Stella McCartney from matchesfashion.com

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This page: Jacket by Tommy Hilfiger, jeans by Stella McCartney, boots model’s own. Opposite page: T-shirt by J.W. Anderson, trousers by Raey from matchesfashion.com, boots by R.M. Williams.

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Opposite page: Coat by Raey from matchesfashion.com. This page: Sweatshirt by Karen Walker, jeans by Balenciaga, boots model’s own. 181


This page: Singlets by Jac +Jack, belt by R.M. Williams, jeans by Vetements. Opposite page: Jacket by Tommy Hilfiger, top by Pageant, shorts by Jac+Jack, boots model’s own.

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This page: Top by Duskii over t-shirt by Lonely Hearts, pants by Neuw Denim, boots by R.M. Williams. Song title: Kutimam.6am

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Photography: Charles Howells Fashion Editor: Rachael Churchward Hair: Carlos Elias at Helmut Make-up: KieKie Stanners for M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Makayla at Red 11 Models Location: The Vitrine

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This page: Shirt by Karen Walker worn under top by Helen Cherry. Opposite page: Top by Nom*d, knickers by Kate Sylvester, vintage lace (over shoulder) from Tango, shoes (worn throughout) by Acne Studios from Workshop, stockings (worn throughout), stylist’s own.

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This page: Shirt by Étoile Isabel Marant from Workshop, trench coat by NOM*d.

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This page: Suit and neck scarf by Kate Sylvester, vintage hat from Tango. Opposite page: Shirt by Karen Walker.

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This page: Shirt by James Perse from Workshop, knickers by Kate Sylvester, vintage Kimono from Tango.

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This page: Pants and top by Helen Cherry, shirt by Karen Walker, vintage Versace belt from Tango. Opposite page: Vintage embroidered flounce from Tango, top stylist’s own.

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This page: Jacket by Helen Cherry, knickers by Kate Sylvester, vintage shawl from Tango. Assistant Fashion Editor: Zeenat Wilkinson. Film Maker: Veronika Gulyayeva. Special thanks: White Studios, The Vitrine. 199


Photography: David K. Shields Fashion Editor: Chris Lorimer at DĂŠbut Management Make-up: Wayne Chick at The Artist Group using Bobbi Brown Hair: Chris Coonrod at Union Management using Sachajuan Model: Roger at Priscillas

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Opening page: Dress by Lover, bra by Lonely (worn throughout), ruffle headband by Tanya Carlson. This page: Top by Jojo Ross worn over top by Alice McCall, pants by Akira, briefs by Lonely, sandals by Beau Coops, ruffle neck choker by Tanya Carlson. 202


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This page: Top and dress by Alice McCall. Opposite page: Scarf, jacket, cummerbund and shorts, all by Akira, shoes by Third Form. 204


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This page: Top and skirt by Calvin Klein, boots by Dion Lee, earrings by Sarina Suriano, ruffle neck choker by Tanya Carlson. 206


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Opposite page: Dress by Christopher Esber, boots by Dion Lee, ruffle neck choker by Tanya Carlson. This page: Top by Bec and Bridge worn over shirt by Christopher Esber, trousers by Coop.

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This page: Top by Jojo Ross worn over top by Alice McCall, ruffle neck choker by Tanya Carlson. 210


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This page: Dress by Lover, boots by Dion Lee, earrings by Holly Ryan. Opposite page and following page left: Jacket by Zambesi, earrings by Lucy Folk, ruffle neck choker and cuff by Tanya Carlson.

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Opposite page: Dress by Rachel Gilbert, sandals by Beau Coops. Song title: Shuggie Otis.

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Photography: Cara O’Dowd at Début Management Fashion Editor: Sarah Birchley Set Stylist: Jacqui Ives Hair: Dale Dela at Prema using Bumble and Bumble Make-up: Cat Smith @ Union Management using M.A.C Cosmetics Models: Georgie Perkins at Priscilla’s and Emma MacGowan at IMG

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Opening page: Georgie wears: Blouse by Macgraw. This page: Georgie wears: Dress by Sportmax, neckpiece by Prada, heels by Miu Miu. Emma wears: Pants and jacket by Miu Miu, top by Ellery, heels by Prada, bag by Gucci. 218


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This page: Georgie wears: Dress by Sportmax, neckpiece by Prada, heels by Miu Miu. Opposite page: Emma wears: Blouse by Macgraw, skirt by Sportmax, fur by Fendi.

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This page: Georgie wears: Dress and capelet by Prada, heels by Miu Miu, rings by Holly Ryan Jewellery. 223


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This page: Georgie wears: Jumpsuit by Sportmax. Emma wears: Dress by Christopher Esber. Opposite page: Georgie wears: Blouse by Gail Sorronda, pants by Ellery, fur by Fendi.

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This page: Georgie wears: Top by Third Form, skirt and belt by Prada. Opposite page: Emma wears: Dress and bag by Miu Miu, jacket by Max Mara, neckpiece by Gucci, boots by Macgraw.

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This page: Emma wears: Blouse by Ellery, shorts and boots by MacGraw. Georgie wears: Blouse by Sportmax, pants by Yousef Akbar. Photo assists: Reece McMillan and Micaela Mandorff. Hair assists: Florence Oka @ Prema Hair. Set build assist: Brad Noonan. Song title: Gil Scott Heron, 1971.

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Photography: Natasha Foster Fashion Editor: Erin Fairs Make-up: Maree Spagnol using MAC Cosmetics Hair: Luke Nicholson at Debut Management using Oribe Producer and Set Design/Prop Stylist: Olga Lewis Models: Julia at London, Holly at Debut, Nick and MJ at IMG, Lilly at Priscilla’s, David at FiveTwenty. Bike kid: Billy Lewis

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Opening page and these pages: Julia wears: Dress by Aje, corset and bra by babylikestopony, hat from Blake Watson, neckpiece by Something Shit, stockings by Agent Provocateur and heels by Louboutin. Pesto wears: Trousers by Bally, jacket from Route 66, shirt by Dries van Noten , jewellery from Sofia Fitzpatrick. Billy wears: Jacket from Route 66. 232


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Above: Julia wears: Dress by Miu Miu, bag by Louboutin, necklaces by Ryan Storer, wrist and neck cuff by Something Shit, Scorpion ring by Heart of Bone. Opposite page: Julia wears: Jacket from Wheels and Doll Baby, dress from Aje, stockings by Agent Provocateur, gloves by Gucci, bracelet and neckpiece from babylikestopony. Pesto wears: Jacket from Route 66, vintage t-shirt, rings and necklace by Sofia Fitzpatrick.

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Left to right:Lilly wears: Jacket, shirt, skirt and belt by Prada and bag by Miu Miu. Holly wears: Jacket and skirt by Miu Miu, stockings by Agent Provocateur, shoes by Jimmy Choo. MJ wears: jacket, shirt, stockings and hat, all by Prada, bag by Michael Kors. David wears: Trousers by Bally, jacket from Route 66, shirt by Dries van Noten, all jewellery from Sofia Fitzpatrick. Pesto wears: Jacket from Route 66. 237


This page: Holly wears: Jacket by Miu Miu. MJ wears: Jacket, shirt and hat by Prada. Opposite page: MJ wears: Jacket by Christian Dior, tutu from Gallery Serpentine, bodysuit and necklaces stylist’s own. David wears: Jacket and pants by Bally, t-shirt by Ksubi, skull necklace by Sofia Fitzpatrick.

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Left to right: Lilly Wears: Top by Gucci, “Bad Barbie” ring by Heart of Bone. Pesto wears: Vintage jacket. MJ wears: Jacket by Christian Dior, tutu from Gallery Serpentine, fishnet bodysuit stylist’s own, ‘Bad Bunny’ ring by Heart of Bone, clutch by Jimmy Choo. David wears: Jacket and pants by Bally and t-shirt by Ksubi, skull necklace by Sofia Fitzpatrick.

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L-R: MJ wears: Boots by Discount Universe, gloves by Gucci, neckpiece by Something Shit. Lilly wears: Pants, jacket and boots, all by Bally, hat from Route 66 and belt from Gallery Serpentine. Holly wears: Jacket by Discount Universe, skirt by Zimmerman, boots by Miu Miu. Opposite page: MJ wears: Jacket by Discount Universe, gloves by Gucci, neckpiece by Something Shit. Lilly wears: Vintage hat from Route 66. 242


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Left to right: Lilly wears: Jacket, shirt, skirt, all by Prada, belt, bag and boots by Miu Miu. Holly wears: Jacket and skirt by Miu Miu, stockings by Agent Provocateur, heels by Jimmy Choo. MJ wears: Jacket, shirt, stockings, corset and hat, all by Prada, bag by Michael Kors. Photo Assist: Micaela Mandorff. Hair Assist: Suzanne Henderson Make-up Assist: Samantha Lee using MAC and Becca Cosmetics. Thanks to Hell On Wheels, Newtown, Sydney.

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Photography: Tane Coffin at Vivien’s Creative Fashion Editor: Samara Wilson Make-up: Joel Phillips at Vivien’s Creative Hair: Kyye using R and Co Models: Brandon, Adam and Alex at London Management

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Opening page left: Brandon wears: NY Bomber, jeans and shirt (around the waist) from Miss Brown Vintage. Adam wears: Jeans by Neuw Denim, beanie (worn throughout) by Hickey Freeman, chain necklace model’s own. Opening page right: Brandon wears: Jacket by Lacoste from Miss Brown Vintage, shirt by Neuw Denim, shorts by Oakley. Adam wears: Flannelette shirt from Miss Brown Vintage, t-shirt by The Critical Slide Society, jeans

by Rolla’s, shoes by Vans, socks by Stance. Alex wears: Shirt by Boohoo, jeans by Rolla’s, shoes by Alexander McQueen, socks by Falke. This page: Alex wears: Reebok jacket and shirt from Miss Brown Vintage, jeans by Neuw Denim, shoes by Alexander McQueen. Brandon wears: Reebok jacket from Miss Brown Vintage, jumper by Puma, shirt by Neuw Denim, shorts by Guess, sneakers by adidas, socks by Falke.

Opposite page: Left to right: Adam wears: Jacket from Miss Brown Vintage, pants by Puma. Alex wears: Shirt and jacket from Miss Brown Vintage, shorts by Puma, shoes by Alexander McQueen, socks by Falke. Brandon wears: Top by The Critical Slide Society, pants by Puma, shirt (around waist) by Neuw Denim, sneakers by adidas.

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This page: Brandon wears: Jacket from Miss Brown Vintage, shirt by Rolla’s. Opposite page: Adam wears: Jacket from Miss Brown Vintage, hoodie by Oakley, jeans by Neuw Denim, sneakers by Vans, socks by Stance, necklace model’s own. Brandon wears: Jumper from Utility Surplus, jeans by Rolla’s, shirt (around waist) by Tommy Hilfiger.

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This page: Left to right: Brandon wears: Jacket by adidas, shorts by Rolla’s, socks by Falke, shoes by adidas. Alex wears: Jacket by Rolla’s, shirt by The Critical Slide Society, jeans by Neuw Denim, shoes by Alexander McQueen. Adam wears: Singlet by Oakley, jeans by Neuw Denim, shirt (around waist) from Miss Brown Vintage. Opposite page: Adam wears: Shirt from Miss Brown Vintage, jeans by Rolla’s, necklace model’s own.


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Photography: Cara O’Dowd Fashion Editor: Bettina Batti Make-up: Liset Garza Hair: Cameron Rains at The Wall Group using Bumble and Bumble Models: Sasha at Elite New York

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Opening page: Coat by Karen Walker, dress by NikaTang, pants by Sass & Bide, shoes by Tibi, earrings by Fay Andrada. This page: Top by Karen Walker. Opposite page: Turtleneck, trousers and shoes all by Tibi, blazer by Karen Walker, socks by American Apparel, bracelet and earrings by Fay Andrada. 257


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This page: Dress by Nika Tang, earrings by Fay Andrada. Opposite page: Top and shoes by Tibi, jacket by Burning Torch, jeans by Elle Sasson, hat stylist’s own. 259


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This page: Top by Tibi, pants by Tomorrowland, shoes by Karen Walker. Opposite page: Top by Tibi, pants by Tomorrowland, shoes by Karen Walker. 261


This page: Shirt by Mara Hoffman, dress by Adam Selman, shoes by Tibi, tights stylist’s own. Opposite page: Coat by Karen Walker, dress by Nika Tang, earrings by Fay Andrada. Fashion assist: Akari Saito. 262


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Photography: Nicholas Harding Fashion Editor: Phoebe Clare McKay Hair and Make-up : Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative using Kevin.Murphy products and Makeupforever Model: Catherine Grant at Scene Model Management

All clothing by Kakopieros

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Jewellery (worn throughout) from Kwoczek, ball gag (worn throughout) from Max Black. 267


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Profile for Black Magazine

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Tena Koutou! one of the advantages of digital publishing is the opportunity the platform affords to make alterations or add in content at a...

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Tena Koutou! one of the advantages of digital publishing is the opportunity the platform affords to make alterations or add in content at a...

Profile for blkonblk