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W W W. DA D E L S Z E N .C O M


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N E U WDENIM .COM | @ NEUWDENIM

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N O M D S T O R E . C O M 5


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b e n j a m i n

a l e x a n d e r

b e n j a m i n a l e x a n d e r . c o


KIA ORA. WHAT A TIME TO BE PUBLISHING! FIRST AND FOREMOST, WE CAN NOT EXPRESS HOW MUCH OUR HEARTS GO OUT TO EVERYONE GLOBALLY WHO HAVE LOST LOVED ONES, LOST EMPLOYMENT, LOST A BUSINESS, LOST THEIR HOMES OR ANY SENSE OF NORMALITY. NO ONE SAW THIS COMING. WE HOPE THIS ISSUE OFFERS YOU ALL A SENSE OF ENJOYMENT AND ESCAPISM. WE WANT TO THANK EVERYONE THAT MADE THIS ISSUE POSSIBLE. OUR EDITORS, WRITERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS, STYLISTS, BEAUTY TEAMS, PR, FAMILIES, FRIENDS AND THE BRANDS THAT HAVE SHOWN SO MUCH SUPPORT DURING ONE OF THE MOST CHALLENGING TIMES IN FASHION. THIS ISSUE INJECTS CONFIDENCE THAT WE ARE HERE TO STAY. WE VERY MUCH LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU ALL SOON. KIA MIHI ETHAN AND RACH EDITORS

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Available at


Publishers & Founders Grant Fell Rachael Churchward Editors Ethan Butler Rachael Churchward Creative & Fashion Director Rachael Churchward Fashion Editor Ethan Butler Beauty Director Rachael Churchward Editor-at-Large Paul Empson Art Director Tom Munday Australasian Editor-at-Large David K Shields Senior Australian Fashion Editor Sarah Birchley Fashion Editors Sydney Chris Lorimer Kelvin Harries New Zealand Hair Editor Greg Murrell at Ryder Salon New Zealand Features Editor David K Shields Australian Features Editors Chris Lorimer Sarah Birchley Senior Australian Beauty/ Melbourne Editor Justin Henry Film Editors Natasha Foster Erin Fairs Online & Social Management Ethan Butler David K Shields

Advertising Management Ethan Butler ethan@blackmagazine.co.nz Photographers Paul Empson,, David K. Shields, Luke Foley-Martin, Carolyn Haslett, Tintin Hedberg, Jason Henley, Ming Nomchong, Hugo Garay, Joseph Griffen, Amelia J Dowd Fashion Editors Rachael Churchward, Sarah Birchley, Chris Lorimer, Ethan Butler, Kelvin Harries, Fran Marto, Kristi Veliaj, Brittni Morrison Hair and Makeup Artists Carolyn Haslett, Greg Murrell, Benjamin James, Paolo Ferreira, Chris Coonrod, Margo Regan, Justin Henry, Richard Symons, Abbie Gardiner, Kane Pake, Naomi Prindiville, David K. Shields, Miriam Langelotti, Sara Fonseca, Ines Aguiar, Alessandro Squarza, Alexis Parente, Laura Spinney, Claudia Marchetti Writers Chris Lorimer, David K. Shields, Ethan Butler Sarah Birchley, Sabina Sysantos Special thanks to: Catriona Knapp, Charles Howels and the team at White Studio, David K. Shields, Stuart Shepherd, Sarah Birchley, Chris Lorimer Black Magazine is published bi-annually by: BLK NZ LTD 46A Wainui Avenue, Pt Chevalier, Auckland 1050 Ph. +64 277514684 Postal Address Australia: BLK NZ Ltd 290 Glebe Point Road, Glebe NSW 2037 Australia blackmagazine.co.nz www.facebook.com/Blackmagnz Instagram: @black_mag Printing by Soar Print Ltd Distribution in NZ and Australia by Ovato The views expressed in Black Magazine are not necessarily those of the publishers and editors. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any way without permission. Thank you. Please note all editorial and features are commissioned by our teams. We do not accept unsolicited submissions. ISSN 1177-2603

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photography paul empson creative director leonard caligiuri fashion editor kristi veliaj hair paolo ferreira for leonor greyl at calliste agency paris. makeup miriam langelotti at green apple agency milano. model chiara scelsi at women management nyc wears versace

photography paul empson fashion editor fran marto hair by pini makeup ines aguiar at solve agency lisbon model karlina caune at viva models paris wears hermes

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photography ming nom chong fashion editor sarah birchley hair lachlan wignall at work agency using oribe makeup katie angus at jam using m. a .c cosmetics model billie jean at priscillas wears gucci

photography paul empson fashion editor fran marto hair alexis parente at b agency paris makeup sara fonseca at solve agency lisbon. model raquel brito at we are models lisbon wears dress by john ricchmond belt and earrings by marche aux puces

photography paul empson creative director leonard caligiuri fashion editor kristi veliaj hair alessandro squarza at james by wella professional. makeup claudia marchetti at green apple milano model opheilie guillermand at elite models nyc wears bottega veneta

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BLACK HEARTS FAIRTRADE WITH KOWTOW NEW TO WORKSHOP: LOULOU STUDIO HELEN CHERRY WINTER 2020 ALLBIRDS SAVING THE PLANET ROTATE ARRIVES AT WORKSHOP NOM*D BRUISE NEW KIDS MONDAY HAIR CARE THE VOICE OF YOUTH: WINTER WITH SALASAI DENIM MIYAKE WITH ROLLAS WINTER UP WITH NEUW DENIM

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BLACK FASHION GOD IS A WOMEN BY PAUL EMPSON IF YOU’RE OUT THERE BY MICHAEL NAUMOFF SARAH BIRCLEY UNTITLED WEST END GIRLS BY AMELIA J DOWD PLUTO PROJETOR BY JASON HENLEY PICTURES OF YOU BY PAUL EMPSON DIE YOUNG STAY PRETTY BY DAVID K. SHIELDS A ROCK N ROLL FANTASY BY CAROLYN HASLETT

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BLACK END VERSACE EXLUSIVE BY PAUL EMPSON BOTTEGA VENETA EXCLUSIVE BY PAUL EMPSON

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Local brand KOWTOW has been a pioneer for conscious clothing since it wasfounded by Gosia Piatek in 2006, long before ‘sustainability’ became the fashion world’s favourite buzzword. Their commitment to placing workers’ rights and environmental protection at the forefront of their practices has made the brand one of the most well-loved fixtures of the New Zealand fashion industry today. For their latest collection, Kowtow explores the beauty of everyday objects (a humble tea towel is reimagined as a digital print on poplin) and takes inspiration from the works of artists Kitty van der Mijll Dekker, Constantin Brâncusi, Jean Arp and Charles & Ray Eames. The designs play with shape and colour in a way that’s set to bring life to dull winter days ahead, while still holding true to the brand’s signature fuss-free aesthetic. The collection also sees a new introduction of hand knits made from New Zealand wool, mohair, and alpaca wool, with each piece skilfully crafted by women from refugee backgrounds in India. As with every Kowtow collection, all fabrics are exclusively developed from organic, renewable and biodegradable fibres through fair trade practices that support fair wages, no child labor, workers rights, gender equality & grower community. The release of Kowtow’s new collection comes at a time where it’s imperative we make conscious and careful decisions as to how we shape our changing society, and embrace this change as an opportunity to realign the structures we put in place that determine what we value. Kowtow may already be a crowd favourite, but for those who haven’t yet embraced the slow fashion approach - now would be the right time to say hello and welcome to kinder consumption habits. As we enter a brave new world that will require increasing empathy and collaboration, Kowtow’s ethos of “preserving the planet” and “protecting the people” holds more power than ever. Photography Luke Foley-Martin. Fashion Ethan Butler. Hair and makeup Abbie Gardiner using M.A.C Cosmetics. Model and words Sabina Sysantos at 62 Management wears coat by Kowtow. Headband by Shrimps available at Workshop. Song title: The Beatles

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NEW ZEALAND’S FASHION HOTSPOT WORKSHOP WELCOME THE LATEST COLLECTION FROM PARISIAN BASED LOULOU STUDIO. COSY CASHMERE AND JACKETS CUT SHARPER THAN BREAD, DON’T LOOK PAST ONE OF THE WORLDS MOST WATCHED FASHION HOUSES AVAILABLE ONLINE HERE 56

Photography Luke Foley-Martin. Fashion Ethan Butler. Hair Benjamin James at Ryder using O&M. Makeup Hannah Richards using Mecca Cosmetica. Model Clementine at 62 Management. Shoes by Dr. Martens. Song title: Blink 182


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Photography Carolyn Haslett. Fashion Rachael Churchward. Hair Greg Murrell at Ryder. Makeup Richard Symond at M.A.C Cosmetics. Model Ruby Hargrave-Taylor at 62 Management. Boots by Stolen Girlfriends Club and scarf by Wynn Hamyn. Thanks to White Studios

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HELEN CHERRY LAUNCHES HER AUTUMN WINTER 2020 RANGE.SHOP THE COLLECTION ONLINE OR INSTORE POST LOCKDOWN AT WORKSHOP AND SELECT RETAILERS NATIONWIDE!


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Photography Luke Foley-Martin. Fashion Ethan Butler. Models Imogen at 62 Management. Special thanks to Zoe and the team at Showroom 22

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ITS MAY SOUND CRAZY IF WE TOLD YOU THAT YOU CAN NOW PURCHASE SNEAKERS MADE USING SUGARCANE, EUCALYPTUS AND MERINO WOOL.BUT HOW FAR THINGS HAVE COME THAT CRAZY IS NOW A REALITY. SAN FRANCISCO BASED SNEAKER FREAKS ALLBIRDS ARE MAKING WAVES IN THE INDUSTRY WITH THEIR STAUNCH APPROACH TO SUSTAINABILITY IN FOOTWEAR MANUFACTURING. LAUNCHED IN 2014 BY KIWI, TIM BROWN, THE BRAND JUST DROPPED THEIR NEW RANGE, THE TREE DASHER, WHICH USES 30% LESS C02 THAN THE AVERAGE SNEAKER ON TODAYS MARKET. WHAT BETTER TIME TO SUPPORT A BUSINESS CREATING INNOVATIVE, SUSTAINABLE FOOTWEAR THAN THE PRESENT. SHOP ONLINE HERE.


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WITH THE LATEST RANGE FROM ROTATE BIRGER CHRISTENSEN DROPPING AT WORKSHOP, YOU WILL BE THE LIFE OF THE PARTY IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD, EVEN IF IT’S ONLY AN ISOLATION G AND T VIA ZOOM. SHOP THE COLLECTION ONLINE HERE. PHOTOGRAPHY LUKE FOLEYMARTIN. FASHION ETHAN BUTLER. HAIR AND MAKEUP ABBIE GARDINER USING M.A.C COSMETICS. MODEL SABINA AT 62 MANAGEMENT.


MAKE YOUR MARK THIS WINTER WITH NOM*d BRUISE. SHOP THE COLLECTION ONLINE HERE. PHOTOGRAPHY CAROLYN HASLETT. FASHION RACHAEL CHURCHWARD. HAIR CAROLYN HASLETT. MAKEUP ABBIE GARDINER USING M.A.C COSMETICS. MODEL GINA AT CLYNE MODELS. SNEAKERS BY NIKE. TOP BY STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB


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Photography Luke Foley - Martin. Creative Direction Ethan Butler.

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EXPERIENCE NEW LIFE WITH MONDAY. DEEMED AS LIQUID GOLD, THIS ALL NEW HAIR RANGE FOUNDED BY MODEL GEORGIA FOWLER AND JAIMEE LUPTON WILL HAVE YOU FEELING FRESH, AS WE PREPARE TO THROW OURSELVES INTO POST LOCKDOWN. SALON QUALITY,EASY ON THE WALLET AND ALSO THE EYE. SHOP THE RANGE HERE.


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INDUSTRY LEGENDS SALASAI PAY HOMAGE TO THE VOICE OF YOUTH WITH THEIR AUTUMN WINTER 2020 COLLECTION ‘YOUTH OF BOURGEOISE’. READ MORE ON THE COLLECTION HERE AND SHOP THE COLLECTION ONLINE. PHOTOGRAPHY CAROLYN HASLETT. FASHION RACHAEL CHURCHWARD. HAIR CAROLYN HASLETT. MAKEUP ABBIE GARDINER USING M.A.C COSMETICS. MODELAT 62 MANAGEMENT. HI TOPS BY CONVERSE


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Photography Luke Foley-Martin. Fashion Ethan Butler. Hair and makeup Abbie Gardiner using M.A.C Cosmetics. Model Sakura at 62 Management . Denim by Rolla’s, earring by Isabel Marant from Workshop

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M.A.C COSMETICS ARTIST ABBIE GARDINER WORKS HER MAGIC USING GOLD LITE STROBE CREAM, STUDIO FIX CONCEALER BLACK TRACK GEL LINER AND LASHINGS OF FALSE LASH MASCARA FOR A SEXY SRONG VIBE. THE BEST WAY TO RE-ENTER SOCIETY AFTER COVID


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GET READY WITH THE ALL NEW WINTER WOOLIES RANGE FROM OUR FRIENDS AT NEUW DENIM.SLIP ON YOUR VANS AND YOU WILL BE READY FOR TO HIT THE LONDON STREETS, POUR A PINT AND DANCE TO REGGIE ALL DAY LONG. PHOTOGRAPHY CAROLYN HASLETT. FASHION RACHAEL CHURCHWARD. HAIR CAROLYN HASLETT. MAKEUP ABBIE GARDINER USING M.A.C COSMETICS. MODEL RUBY HARGRAVE-TAYLOR AT 62 MANAGEMENT


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PHOTOGRAPHY AND INTERVIEW DAVID K. SHIELDS FASHION EDITOR ETHAN BUTLER HAIR EITHNE CURRAN MAKEUP PARIS BLANCHFIELD AT M.A.C COSMETICS starley wears SHOT ON LOCATION MURIWAI NEW ZEALAND COOPER TRESISEAT


WHEN WE SHOT THIS STORY, STARLEY WAS TRAVELLING THE WORLD AND HAD AT THE TIP OF HER FINGERS THE RECOGNITION AND RESPECT HER INITIAL RECORDING HAD GARNERED - WITH OVER A BILLION HITS, ‘CALL ON ME’ HAD HER LYRICS ON “REPEAT” ON EVERYONES’ LIPS ACROSS THE GLOBE. SHE WAS WELL ON THE WAY TO CONNECTING HER SOUND TO HER VISIBILITY AS AN ARTIST, AND WE ONLY EXPECTED HER “STAR” WOULD TO CONTINUE TO RISE - WITH ENDLESS AMOUNTS OF UNBRIDLED JOY, PERSONALITY AND ENERGY, HER TRAJECTORY WAS AIMED TO BE STRATOSPHERIC. TAKING IT ALL ON IN HER USUAL COMPLETELY FORTHRIGHT AND HONEST WAY, STARLEY MAKES NO APOLOGIES FOR HERSELF IN WORKING TO BE THE BEST PERFORMER AND EXECUTION OF HERSELF SHE CAN BE. SHE’S A SUPERNOVA READY TO EXPLODE. IN A PLACE THAT’S GENERALLY MANUFACTURED TO CREATE WHAT IS MOST LIKELY TO SELL – SHE’S A SHINING LIGHT IN LIVING EXACTLY AS SHE FEELS, MAKING NO EXCUSES FOR THE TIME AND EFFORT PUT TOWARDS BEING THE BEST VERSION OF HERSELF POSSIBLE. What was the first thing that attracted you to music? I can’t remember the exact moment but I do remember watching a movie called La Bamba about the life of Richie Valens. I’d watch it over and over again and was intoxicated by it - it transported me to another place. Have you grown up around music or come to it another way? As far as I can remember it was part of my life always. Music kind of runs in my family bloodline. My great grandmother was in vaudeville and my mother was a lounge singer, until she fell pregnant with her first child and left home at 19. I’m one of 5 children and she named me Starley because she always said she’d knew I’d be a singer. I’m not sure if she manifested that or it was a God thing.... either way she set me up on the path I’d take in life. Did local music or international musicians mostly develop your interest in this as a career? Definitely international, I grew up listening to Destiny’s Child, Mariah, Babyface, Phil Collins... I was inspired by singer songwriters mostly, and usually they were American. Our car had no radio when I was a kid - we’d squash in the car and I’d be the one to make up the songs that we’d all sing. How did you end up transferring to the US, and how do you feel this has impacted your “voice”? I’ve only been in the US the past couple of years. Growing up in Australia singing, mostly gospel songs in church, was what influenced me hugely. Living in the UK was probably my second biggest influence - I was there for 7 years and was impacted greatly by a lot of the pop and dance music. What influence would you consider your heritage has on your music, and the decisions of what you want from both the music and life in general? My father is Mauritian (French/African) and my mother is

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Australian and part Filipino/Japanese. I was very attracted to Africa and wanted to know about my roots from a young age. When I was old enough, I saved money working in a bookstore and travelled to Mauritius. I was 18 and became greatly influenced by a lot of the zouk music there. I danced in nightclubs, and as soon as I got back to Australia I joined a Zulu (South African) band alongside 8 guys, where I learned about the harmonies and rhythms I was attracted to. I played djembe, danced and sung in that troupe - I was in that band for 2 years and learned so much I’m forever grateful for that experience. You are a force to be reckoned with, what drives you most? I live to express myself through song writing, and aside from that I’m very determined and want to live a life that’s impactful. I don’t know if I’m succeeding in that, but I’ll always keep trying! Is the massive interest you’re receiving helping your ability to be the artist you wish to be? … and how would you define success? A lot of the time it gives me major anxiety actually. I had so much success with my first single and I really wasn’t mentally prepared to receive that success. I’d spent my whole life thus far wanting really badly to make an impact, and when that song finally did that, it was a song that reflected some of my darkest moments - but yet it had major success because it was so honest. I really appreciate it because it’s validated what I’m doing, but at the same time I struggle with anxiety quite a lot, and push through it every day. What advice would you give anyone else who’s got a similar dream, when it seems yours are starting to materialise? When I was broke life was simpler, so I would say appreciate those hard moments where you struggle to see the light at the end of the tunnel. In those moments you can create magic, being that

there are lesser or no distractions. How do you prefer to work? I think I’m pretty spontaneous - I’m one of those writers who need to have life experiences to write songs that mean something to me. I usually write my best songs when I’m sad, I don’t know why but it seems to happen that way?! Where do you aim to go, in life and in your career? I want to write amazing songs that make people feel deeply, whether that’s happiness or sadness, but hopefully it’s mostly joy. I want to perform all over the world and touch people’s hands, I want to be a badass actor in a few films, and keep doing whatever I want with no limits! What’s next - is there anything that you’d like to share that defines who you are and aim to be to your audience? I’ll be setting tour dates for my debut album and then who knows! David Shields: We checked in with Starley this week for a quick update on her plans, due to the massive change in the landscape of performance for the foreseeable future - at this point she’s unsure as to when she’ll be able to return to touring, and working on ways around it. Like many of her own favourite artists, she’s started live-streaming to Instagram from her home studio setup and will also post some of these to Youtube. In another of our many discoveries at the beach, she also loves to cook - so there’s likely to be some new cooking videos too, to add to her many other obvious talents! We’ll keep you up with anything new and “news” on all things Starley as progress eventuates. She’s just dropped her new single Arms Around Me to all the usual platforms, so check it out along with her many other “stellar” offerings, and join us in waiting for the moment when we can all again enjoy her dynamic, joyous presence and sounds! Follow Starleys beautiful journey via instagram: starley


opening page : starley wears

TRELISE COOPER

this page : skirt and

PRADA, ZAMBESI

top by boots by


ZAMBESI TRELISE COOPER kahahu by KIRI NATHAN

opposite page : starley wears outfit by

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this page : jacket by and


INTERVIEW CHRIS LORIMER SELF PORTRAITS DINA BROARDHURST SHOT ON LOCATION AT STUDIO CASA SYDNEY PRODUCTION ETHAN BUTLER SPECIAL THANKS TO RACHEL BROWN at PRADA ENTENTE AGENCY and VALENTINO

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INSPIRED BY SEXUALITY, MEMORY, FANTASY AND DESIRE, SYDNEYBASED ARTIST DINA BROADHURST TAKES INFLUENCE FROM FASHION, ADVERTISING, ART AND DESIGN. DRAWING YOU INTO HER PERFECTLY POISED IMAGES, WITH THE MANTRA THAT BEAUTY EXISTS ALL AROUND US, EVEN IN THE MUNDANE, SHE SEDUCES US TO LOOK FOR A DEEPER ALLURE HIDDEN WITHIN.

Thank you for your exclusive shoot for this, our iso-issue of Black, can you describe the concept of the shoot? It’s all about light and shade: to use light to highlight colour and reflections to create a sense of optimism in these times. Remember to focus on the positives rather than negatives. Taking time for yourself, nourishing your body, creating moments with your family and loved ones, accepting what is and working with it, rather than against it. What can you share with us about the shoot’s execution? I used natural light and my home to create this message, as well as the naked form, in its raw state. Using found objects around the home to work to highlight a sense of resourcefulness, re-use and thoughtfulness about how we consume and what we really need. Lots of organic items such as fruits and flowers, Italian groceries, reusing plastic and packaging, and the little luxuries we deserve in our life to reward ourselves and give us hope and dreams. The addition of two luxury labels very close to my heart and my Italian heritage, Prada and Valentino, provided the perfect accessories to play with within this concept; their fine craftsmanship, their allure and desire, their ability to have fun, and to help us in this time to journey in spirit, evoking feelings and memories of travels and culture, and of the joys of life. What influenced the final selection of images? I’m not very good at editing things down! I wanted to include the images that had most of the layered messages within them that I described above. They are the messages I planned before the shoot when sourcing my props, during the shoot when

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finding the right corners to shoot in within my home, and also the messages I continued to draw from the images after I saw them on the screen to edit. The spaces in the home were intimate, womb-like, had the last light of the day, revealing only pockets of spaces. I wanted to show the mystery, the light & shade, the contrasts that are life, and the notion of family, home and time. The image with the clock, for example, features a clock given to me by my Nonna, the doilies were given to me by my mother, only now while she has taken time to wind down and be at home, sifting through her memories and collections, taking the time and love to pass special items onto me. It’s a beautiful time to really prioritise connection and family. Have you made self-portraits before? How was this experience for you: being the whole crew, and also the subject? I often make self-portraits for my art and I find it so cathartic. The audience could only see one aspect and think “oh, it’s just another nude”, but it runs so much deeper than that, each time you are studying yourself, the way you move, the way you have changed since the last time you shot, the impermanence of any state both physical and emotional. And that’s a really important thing to focus on right now, that this will not be forever, so let’s enjoy the time to slow down as we will never be able to again. The self-portraiture photography that I make in my art practice is my meditation, my personal discovery and growth, and I never want that to stop. It’s something that is so personal that even though it is tougher setting it up alone and using a self-timer, it is rewarding. If I’m losing the light though in some instances, I do get

my partner and my son to assists for some shots, and this contribution by having my family involved in my work is something I am very lucky for and cherish always. Do you think this is a type of shoot you might continue post-COVID-19 crisis? Always. Tell us about your life through the Covid-19 crisis lens? How is iso-life for you in general? My life has actually become got a little more hectic with production as online sales have increased a lot, I have been craving more creative time with this increase of work, so I have been trying to use my daylight hours for making and then working at night for my general admin, emails and orders. Iso-life has been wonderful as I am normally working alone every day, and to have my family around, even though we stay out of each other’s way, doing our own thing, just to know they are there and we can check-in and enjoy a lunch or a snack together is really lovely. Who are you in lockdown with? My son Leo, 14, who is homeschooling through Zoom, and my partner Max, who runs a property renovation business and is working parttime from home now. What has changed for you? And what has stayed the same? It’s pretty similar for me as an artist who already worked from home, my studio is part of where we live so I generally never left the house for work, other than to visit my printer for production checks. What are some of the daily rituals or habits you’ve adopted to create a sense of calm? Walking my puppy to get some afternoon Vitamin D and fresh air around the 4pm mark when I need a reset before I get back into work is a daily ritual I love and look forward to.


opening page : bag , shoes and earrings by

PRADA

this page : bags by

VALENTINO


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this page : bag by

VALENTINO

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all bags and boots by

PRADA

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PHOTOGRAPHY HUGO GARAY FASHION AND INTERVIEW CHRIS LORIMER HAIR AND MAKEUP NAOMI PRINDIVILLE NGAIIRE WEARS EARRINGS BY MEADOWLARK AND DRESSES BY YOUKHANA


WITH HER THIRD ALBUM IMMINENT, BUT WITH AN AUSTRALIAN TOUR INDEFINITELY POSTPONED, NGAIIRE IS BACK. PRE-COVID-19 SHE WAS RESIDENT IN SYDNEY’S PEGGY GLANVILLE-HICKS COMPOSER’S HOUSE, AND NOW IN LOCKDOWN SHE REFLECTS FRANKLY WITH CHRIS LORIMER ON THAT TIME, TALKS PNG SPIRITUALITY AND THE CONTINUATION OF HER POLYCENTRIC MIXED-MEDIA PROJECT AMID THE CURRENT CRISIS.

Let’s begin by talking about the new album’s concept, because it’s somewhat of a departure for you, isn’t it? For a very long time, I shied away from saying I was Papua New Guinean or putting it in my bios because I’d found that lack of understanding meant I got put into a box and that particular box wasn’t who I was. So I spent a while trying to figure out where to place myself, it took over ten years to not feel like I needed to place myself in any of those boxes anymore and if there’s no space for me, I’ll create my own space. It really started just over three years ago as I was coming off the end of the Blastoma album tour and it was remarked to me that, ”People are always really interested in your background Ngaiire, but no one ever seems to get it right”. There is always miscommunication as to who Papua New Guineans are, what the country is like, what the people are like, what the culture is, and that always informed what opportunities I could access as an artist in Australia. So the thought was, perhaps this is the time to start to tackle this issue here: of who I actually am? This was right at a turning point time where I started to hear murmurs of (for want of a better word) woke conversations starting to happen, as the industry was starting to become more open to diversity. So my team started discussing the idea of taking my culture and presenting it in the contemporary sphere. The time is really right now for that conversation, celebrating a person’s own culture and being proud of it as well. How long had you felt this way about the gaps in your identity alongside the music you’d been making? It actually goes a far back as my family life, which was complicated; it’s one of those blended situations. My mum was fostered into a blonde Kiwi family, so there’s that side and then there’s the PNG side as well. I’m born in PNG, then we moved to New Zealand, then

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back to PNG, my parents divorced, both remarried and then I moved to Australia with my mum, so it was full on. Trying to find “where do I fit?” has always been my struggle. Music gave me a place, another family of other weirdos that I could connect with. Musicians are all just a group of misfits, trying to create stuff. And then three years ago you travelled back to Papua New Guinea to begin this creative journey? Yes, I got a grant from the Australian Arts Council and I took a small creative team with me to spend a few weeks researching and documenting, both digital and analogue. I’d never worked like this before, backwards, without the music first. And we collected hours and hours of footage. It wasn’t an easy trip; it was difficult personally, spiritually and physically. It was really special, I learned a lot about myself and about my culture, where I fit in now as someone who’s part of the Diaspora here in Australia. And also what that meant to me as a Papua New Guinean back in PNG now after having a more western upbringing. We all grew up in those three weeks; it was so intense! So you’re bringing the detail of where you come from to your audience? A kind of code breaking? Kind of, it seems like such a crazy topic to introduce people to as a thing in a pop or future soul song. It’s somewhat absurd. And making great songs that aren’t about the usual and obvious topics? I like the idea of Trojan Horses, dressing things up in a way so that the audience can find it palatable but contain a message. Is it important for your music now to have a message? I think there is a place for light-heartedness and then sometimes you need to go deeper. This is the first time that I’ve really delved into something that’s a lot more robust in its meaning. My last two albums mostly contained love songs, whereas with this one I’m tackling political and cultural issues,

ideas that you’d not normally expect to hear on the radio. It’s me maturing; I’m at a stage, and especially after having a kid you just stop giving a shit so much, where I’m just not interested in trying to fit into those previous boxes at all. So, the topics are changing, but not the style of how you present them? Exactly. It’s about evolving, knowing that I can evolve. The whole Ngaiire project has definitely been through many stages and evolutions and I never really know what people get from my past works. But I’m lucky because I’m in a position where my audience accepts my doing what I ever I want to present to them right now. Some artist’s don’t care if anyone hears what they make. I wish I were that person! [laughs] You’ve always had a strong and distinctive look, so on that note, let’s talk about image making. In the past, I just have randomly done it. Pulled things from here and there instinctively, thinking, “I like that, that sounds cool and looks cool, I’ll do that”. My problem was that I love so many different styles of music, and especially when I first came to Australia, my brain just exploded, “There are other styles of music other than Reggae?! Who’s Tori Amos? Who’s Jeff Buckley? Oh my god, I was having conniptions just listening to all this new music. Tool! I’d never ever heard anything like that… so I was just “I want to do everything!” I’m very interested in this latest super stylized depiction of yourself that you’ve used for the single Shiver, where did it come from? It was born out the whole album concept. Shiver is about those moments where you can’t put two and two together. In PNG we have a very powerful spirituality and some of it is about how we process death and grief. Also one of the things I find fascinating about PNG culture is its mysticism and that people believe in mystical creatures, Mermaids being one of those things and which is also a


“ HONESTLY, I REALISE HOW MUCH RESPONSIBILITY I HAVE AND IT’S REALLY SCARY BUT IT’S ALSO REALLY BEAUTIFUL AT THE SAME TIME; THAT YOU CAN CREATE THAT BRIDGE BETWEEN STRANGERS THROUGH MUSIC ” very popular mystical creature worldwide. For the image to go alongside this song, I wanted to combine my two PNG cultures as I’ve got geographically polar opposites: the Highlands area and the Coastal area. And I wanted to create a sense of strangeness as well, a sea world in the forest! It’s my two cultures coming together and I like how odd that seems. How do I reconcile the culture that I come from with the kind of upbringing that I’ve had? It just doesn’t make immediate sense, the absurdity of all of that. What more can you tell us about the forthcoming album at this stage? Well, we’ve started to play around with the track listing, so it’s in early formation. Shiver and Boom just a taste of what is to come. It’s been three years since that trip but in terms of working through the material, it’s definitely all happening at the right time. In the music industry, the market can change a lot over time, and it’s easy to wonder “will people still be interested?” but the fact that we sold out two shows last year before we announced the first single was a really good indication that they are! How has the composer’s residency, which is the first time for it to be awarded to a contemporary composer and also a Pacific Islander, played into the gestation and the launch of your new material? The house used to belong to Peggy Glanville-Hicks who was an

incredible classical composer. She is more famous overseas than she is in Australia. After she died her place was gifted to the nation for the future of Australian composers and one of the requirements of being resident there is that you had to create community engagement. It can be anything: in-house concerts, podcasts, anything. In the past, there have been mostly jazz, experimental or classical composers in residence, and I’m the first contemporary person to have the house. Once we got there the idea we had was to create Salon events, to help us deconstruct and wade through all the content we’d created, to give us a reason to do something with the content and start to think about what narrative we wanted to create around it. Perfectly fulfilling the needs of the house? Exactly! It was a yearlong residency so we’d just left at the end of January. It’d been an amazing time and we tried to spread ourselves across as many art forms as possible: music, painting, dance and even food. We have had different themes for each of them as well. It’s been an incredible tool to re-engage with fans and to dictate the narrative around the whole experience, saying “this is what we’re doing, come along for the ride”. And those Salons have inspired the way you were presenting live? Yes, the shows last year were where we pulled out some of the new material, an extension of what we’d been

doing in the house. We’d planned to incorporate those ideas into the bigger shows. In the past, I’ve always been “big, let’s go big!” [laughs]. But this time the idea was not to go all out to early, I think a lot of artists and performers make that mistake of “I need to do that and I need to do it now!” there’s often too much urgency about what we “need” to put out and when. Pre-COVID 19, performing, touring, just showing up for the fans was so important wasn’t it? It was really incredible job to have, to be able to share those moments with people that you don’t know. When I’m in the studio, I’m so insular: writing, recording and not seeing many people. And when I was out, and strangers would say, “Oh, I love this lyric” or “I love this track”, which is really nice [laughs] and sometimes it’s about how a particular song had helped them through a difficult time or given them pause to stop before possibly doing something drastic. It’s actually easy to forget that they’re there, still listening and still paying attention to what I’m doing. And honestly, I realise how much responsibility I have and it’s really scary but it’s also really beautiful at the same time; that you can create that bridge between strangers through music. It’s a very unsettling time for the whole world right now, how are you feeling now we are a few weeks into our level-3 lockdown life here in Australia? And what’s bringing

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FOLLOW NGAIIRE AND HER MUSIC VIA INSTAGRAM: NGAIIRE you a sense of calm? It is kind of strange because it’s not like a war that’s immediately affecting everyone in the most gruesome ways. It’s more eventual so some days I’m “everything is gonna be fine soon” and then other days I’m, “so uhhh, when do we go back to handshakes and hugs again?!” To be honest, my life hasn’t really changed much as being a freelancer and a parent I’ve already been working from home with a kid. I had to cancel my tour last month but gig cancellations aren’t that foreign to our line of work. That’s probably why I’m somewhat still in the denial stage because in some senses I still expect there to be another gig coming in at some point. As an artist, you’re constantly hoping for the next thing. The thing that I think about is whether our hope will run out if restrictions continue like this. Even though it’s tough working at home with a kid, Dan (my husband) and I are really grateful to have someone else to focus on and create a routine for us amid such uncertainty. A lot of people might not have that and be going through this alone. There’re only so many Zoom drinking parties you can have before the novelty wears off and reality sets in! Just prior to our lockdown, you released a new track, the second from the forthcoming album. What is Boom about and how does it fit into the whole concept of the album? Yeah, how’s that for timing! [laughs]. I remember releasing it and then on the same day announcing that the national tour was cancelled. Epic messaging! Boom is really the first official track from the album proper. It’s about my memories growing up in PNG and observing how my older cousins and younger uncle and aunties dealt with the subject of sex. Since the influx of missionaries to PNG a lot of cultural systems that were already in place for courting and sex were eradicated or looked down upon and replaced with a whole no sex (or not even talking about sex) before marriage system. Talk about confusing! And you can imagine the suppression, and the debauchery that would have happened in secret. I remember things being so melodramatic. I wanted to write a modernday version of those memories, and that’s what the album’s about. Bringing forth my memories of PNG that inform who I am

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today, living in Australia. After featuring at WomAdelaide, and then performing in a very intimate way on the beautiful Sydney Biennale ferry to Cockatoo Island, how does it feel now looking back at those gigs and knowing there may be a quite a while until you perform for an audience and get to tour again? I’m really grateful that I got to do both those before things shut down. Not just financially but spiritually as well. Those were both the type of gig you’d want to have if you knew you weren’t able to perform in the same room as an audience again, indefinitely. I miss everyone, on both sides of the stage. Has our current isolation given you time to do or make or even just consider something that you might not have otherwise? Like a lot of people, I’m really relieved for the slower pace. As a working mum, you can find yourself on the most brutal treadmill of trying to keep up with your peers who have had way more sleep and time to accomplish things. Right now I feel like this is the rest we all need. I also feel like to an extent a lot of artists are trying to continue pushing out content to show how productive or relevant they’re still being in isolation, but I think there’s a greater lesson that will be missed if we continue to prescribe to the old ways of doing things. Can you tell us about the projects that have been delayed due to COVID-19? Have you formulated any plans to change them to make things work in the current climate? Or is it best to let things lie right now? Touring, for sure, is the main thing. My album will still drop regardless which is another positive thing to have right now. I’d taken two years out from my career before in 2018 / 2019 when I was critically ill and then pregnant, so I’ve really learned about how much control I don’t have over my body or how life decides to go sometimes. Sometimes you just have to let go and to be honest, I keep saying how grateful I am for this time, but I really am. The money I have sitting in my account will run out at some point and despite having our government vote against rectifying the Job Keeper package for our Arts sector, I’m privileged to be in a country where there are other avenues of making money, for now at least. Have there been any silver linings for you in this crazy time we’ve all found

ourselves in? I feel like I could get a job on Playschool now with how animated and quickly I can smile on cue for the sake of my son’s entertainment. I might have stopped touring but I still have a full-time job of raising this human in a pandemic. What do you think the best things to come out of this crisis will be? I think there’ll only be real change and I hope we as a people realise how much more our kids have benefited with us being home a lot more. I hope we realise how tying our identity to money or work isn’t the best way to happiness. I hope we start to value each other more and that time spent with our loved ones should be time spent without our phones in our faces. I hope we realise how much more we should pay attention to how indigenous people have lived their lives for thousands of years. I hope people realise how much our arts and music practitioners buoyed them through this isolation and that there must be more support from our government when it comes to funding the Arts. And, what changes do you foresee in the music world after this crisis? The industry really needed a shakeup, to be frank. I can only see everyone’s art becoming more pure and honest. I was starting to miss that. There’s only a handful of people I listen to that I feel come from a really ordained place and I hope this connects artists to more of that rawness that can be forgotten by trying to create relevance with a cool font or a brand identity.So, what is the future of the Ngaiire project now?  And what’s your wish for the evolution of the next stage? I want to make more film, my hearts definitely in that at the moment. We’d also been working on some mini-documentaries that we’re beginning to release via our YouTube channel.Getting the composer’s house, starting to do shows and then lockdown, everything that has happened in the last while has really unlocked ideas and creative juices. It’s a huge undertaking creating all these different artworks under the one umbrella idea.  I’m very conscious about exactly what it is that I’m trying to say. Lastly, do you have a message for your fans and our readers? Be kind to yourself during this time. Be grateful for what you have and remember we are all the same. And don’t be a dick head: STAY HOME!


PHOTOGRAPHY LUKE FOLEY MARTIN WORDS BY DAVID K. SHIELDS FASHION EDITOR RACHAEL CHURCHWARD HAIR KANE PAKE using R+CO PRODUCTION RACHAEL CHUCHWARD and ETHAN BUTLER SHOT at WHITE STUDIOS

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NINA VAN LIER HAS ALWAYS WALKED TO THE BEAT OF HER OWN DRUM, AND LATELY, IN THIS MODERN WORLD OF VIRTUAL LIKEABILITY AS A MEASURE OF SUCCESS, THIS IS A STEP ABOVE AND AWAY FROM THE NORMS OF THE EXPECTED IN YOUTH CULTURE. SHE WILL NEVER COMPROMISE HER OWN SELF-BELIEFS TO BE SEEN AS ANYONE OTHER THAN THE FEARLESS LEADER WE HAVE KNOWN SINCE HER YOUTH. SHE WILL ALWAYS BE TRUE TO THIS MANTRA OF LIKING YOURSELF FIRST. SHE IS THE PERFECT REPRESENTATION OF SOMEONE WHO HAS THRIVED BECAUSE SHE KNOWS INTRINSICALLY HER SUCCESS IS BELIEVING IN HERSELF.

Freely moving within the boundaries of Tamaki Makaurau to develop and hone her own sense of self, nothing has stood in the way of her growth. Following her instincts to push hard on what she feels she must, doing justice to the trust given to us all as kaitiaki (guardian) of the whenua (land) we were charged with leaving in better shape for the generations to come, this is a personal goal. For me, that’s what I’m trying to do at the moment… combine what I’m good at (visual communication), with what I believe in - and a lot of that is to do with the relationship we have with our land in Aotearoa, and trying to heal a little bit of what the past two centuries of colonisation and urbanisation has done to the land. With the early recognition of an artistic bent via her entry into the worlds of design, photography and art, it was only a matter of time until the expected notice was garnered - flown to London to shoot at 19, and earning a scholarship to intern at FCB West in San Francisco, she grabbed the opportunity as can only be expected from someone of her obvious talent and ran at it. Choosing to live in an artists’ enclave by the name of The Convent in the Lower Haight district, it was of course a road less travelled she preferred to follow than any more traditional route, likely chosen by anyone with less self-assurance to get the most out of this or any experience. Back in Aotearoa, and returned to

learning her bloodline from the Whanganui River, she’s “home” and freelancing for now. I get fired up about being kaitiaki to the land we are from, learning and activating about how our current landscape came to be, and getting rid of invasive weeds and predators so that native plants and creatures can thrive. When I feel like screaming, thinking about the magnitude of it all and the looming climate crises, I go and dance / rave. Inspired by like-minded protagonists, who as well strive diligently and determinedly for what they believe and work towards creating a social presence reiterating this thinking - that to live is to be, and to be requires you to engage with the responsibility settled upon us in our time here? We asked Nina to expand on what her practise entails, and what it means to own her stewardship as a Māori youth with purpose in an everchanging world – effectually, what her mana requires in knowing that as a kaitiaki of the whenua for those here now and generations to come, of New Zealanders in Aotearoa, that it is an obligation and duty that is instilled in her entire being and has been since her tupuna (ancestors) arrived. At this moment I’m reading Ngā Uruora - The Groves of Life by Geoff Park at the moment. It’s an incredible environmental and social history book published in 1995, which speaks about some of the history of our land, by focusing on fertile coastal plains where

Kahikatea forests and all the life that came with them once flourished…. Kind of a mustread for anyone living in Aotearoa! Healing is hugely important to me. Healing the whenua that we belong to ; ngahere (forest), awa (freshwater), moana (ocean) - and when the land is well the people will be well ; ka ora te whenua, ka ora te tangata. In Aotearoa there are prehistoric plant and animal species like Kahikatea and Pekapeka (NZ Short tailed bat), that are endangered as a direct result of the last two decades of European settlement and colonisation. It is getting critical that we need to be actively and urgently protecting, restoring, and regenerating the natural world around us. I see this huge communication gap between the people who are really knowledgeable about ecosystems, and the vast majority of people, especially in the city, who might be interested and willing to take action but just do not have the knowledge or facility to do so. On top of that, conservation just isn’t that glamorous - well, maybe planting trees is cute, but the reality of it is that a lot of it entails controlling invasive introduced weeds, and introduced pest animals. That’s where I’m trying to centre my practise as a designer and photographer around - being a designer, something that I can bring to the table is visual communication, and we must use all our abilities available to restore her mana. Recently a book she wrote, photographed and produced, was selected as a finalist in the Ngā Aho 101


“ IF YOU LOVE WHAT YOU DO, AND WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS WHAT YOU HARD OUT BELIEVE IN, THEN YOU’RE GOING TO FEEL FULL AND DRIVEN RIGHT? ” Awards in the student category – we asked her to explain in more detail the reasoning behind the entry, and the mahi (work) overall. Ngā Wai o te Waitematā is a photobook that considers the reconnection between urban inhabitants of Tāmaki Makaurau and its undervalued, degraded awa. Ko te wai te ora ngā mea katoa; Water is the life giver of all things, our relationship with land and water is an integral part of te ao Māori. Ko au te awa, ko te awa ko au ; but devastatingly, the poor health of the city’s waterways reflects a society distanced from the land. As urban inhabitants of Tāmaki Makaurau, it is easy for us to feel helpless and distanced when all we see is pollution by rural farming. Tūrangawaewae is a word that many urban Aucklanders might not understand or relate to. Having a sense of place to stand, of belonging to somewhere, can seem a remote concept in the modern cityscape, sculpted in concrete by surveyors. The freshwater taonga of Tāmaki Makaurau - its waterways, woven across the isthmus and flowing into the Waitematā - are not often associated with this urban landscape, and are unknown, undervalued, and systematically abused. This work maps the urban awa of central Tāmaki Makaurau through a te ao Māori lens - that is, that water is both sacred and intrinsically tied to people. Both textual and visual tones are quiet and personal, shying away from

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paralyzing modes of environmental communication. The photobook focuses on emotional connection to urban awa by presenting snapshots of sites that commanded emotional weight (the sacred calm at Purewa Creek, the eerie sadness of Opoututeka’s contaminated waters) using a first-person lens, as both writer and photographer. The photobook aims to connect readers to local waterways that they might not know about, helping them to see these sites as taonga with inherent value. Photographic, typographic, and production decisions were made to realise this work. The gravity of this issue was the intended first impression, and so I made the book almost one metre wide when opened to command physical and mental attention. Despite the large format, I maintained a quiet tone and narrative to facilitate meaningful emotional connection. I curated the photographic arc to guide the reader through images celebrating the waterways of Tāmaki Makaurau to more troubling scenes of derelict waterways trickling from forgotten drains. The eggshell stock printed on the HP Indigo Press quietens the imagery, bringing cohesion to the diverse photographs. A similarly reserved approach was taken typographically, with light-toned titles and lightweight body copy gravitating towards the page’s quieter bottom edge. The exceptions to this treatment are on the opening and closing

spreads, which bear high contrast solid black with bold white text. Whakataukī written on these two spreads ground the work, defining the message of the book in visual and semantic language. By presenting purposeful, emotionally driven images of these taonga, the photobook prompts readers to rethink their roles as urban inhabitants of Tāmaki Makaurau, bound to the waterways flowing into the Waitematā. The work leaves readers with the duty to be active kaitiaki of the waterways championed in Ngā Wai o te Waitematā. As becomes most obvious the further in conversation you delve with Nina, one thing becomes very clear – this young woman of substance is on a mission to heal our troubled whenua, with a fervour that seems in general lacking in most of today’s youth. We must honour her mahi and efforts to restore this taonga to it’s true state, and be thankful that there is a new generation of inhabitants who feel this connection to Aotearoa and are doing their very best to return her to health. If you love what you do, and what you’re doing is what you hard out believe in, then you’re going to feel full and driven right? David Shields: We wholeheartedly agree, and look forward to following the future steps of Nina’s journey, in her quest to return our homeland to it’s true glory. Nina wears hitops all by Converse.


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BUBBLING WITH ENTHUSIASM, LUCIANE BUCHANAN IS SOMEONE WHO IS BOTH DELIGHTFUL AND INVESTED IN LIFE. A KIWI WOMAN YOU WILL CHEER ON IN ALL OF HER ENDEAVOURS. SHE WEARS HER HEART FOR ALL TO SEE, AND IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF TALENT, PERSISTANCE AND DRIVE. AND QUITE HONESTLY, AFTER SPENDING AN AFTERNOON WITH HER, I’LL BE STANDING THERE WITH EVERYONE ELSE CHEERING HER ON! PHOTOGRAPHY, FASHION AND WORDS DAVID K. SHIELDS

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LUCIANE HAS STARED ON OUR SCREENS IN AOTEAROA APPROACHING NINE YEARS NOW, LEADING TO HER FEATURING IN LOCAL PRODUCTION FILTHY RICH FOR 2 FUN-FILLED SEASONS. FROM THERE, SHE’S BEEN GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO REINTRODUCE TRIPITAKA, FROM THE 1970’S JAPANESE HIT MONKEY, TO THE LATEST GENERATION OF YOUTH IN THE NEW LEGENDS OF MONKEY, VIA THE MAJOR PLATFORM OF NETFLIX. SHE GRASPED THIS OPPURTUNITY WITH BOTH HANDS, AND AS ADEPT AS THOSE HANDS ARE IN MARTIAL ARTS, SHE ALSO INSTILLED A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF THE CHARACTER WITH DIMENSIONS UNSEEN IN THE ORIGINAL. LIKE US, YOU WILL BOTH ENJOY HER ENDEAVOURS THUS FAR AND LOOK FORWARD TO WHAT WILL FOLLOW ON FROM THESE.

Can you give us a little insight into who Luciane Buchanan is as an artist? I’m a believer in everything happening for a reason, so cliched, but every ounce of rejection or stroke of luck proved this to be true. I know I’ll be involved in the projects I need to, and they will come. I just have a crazy work ethic and drive, so I don’t see any other option. I mean, I will still stress about money between jobs, but I never think it’s time to do something else! It’s weird, it’s kind of like my naïve, sub-conscious confidence. I have a strong sense of self and where I come from. I’ve always known what I wanted to do. I’ve never listened to anyone’s advice on ‘what I should be doing’. I stand up for what I believe in, but honestly I’m not confident in all situations. I have to remind myself to get rid of the imposter syndrome sometimes, and that I’m here for a reason. To do what you want to do, you kind of have to be your own biggest supporter which can be really hard sometimes. How did you get the role on Monkey? I did 2 self-tape auditions at my lovely agent’s office in 2016, the first tape was two scenes and then added fight beats. I can’t watch that video, it’s so cringeworthy. I filmed it in the backyard with Kanye West’s ‘Fade’ playing in the background, as I threw punches at the air. Months later at my friend’s birthday, I got a call from my agent Gail saying I got the part. I remember telling my friends but not

wanting to make a big deal because it was her birthday party! It was a cool moment, and I later called my dad and he was over the moon. At the time I had just finished my degree, was on another TV series ‘Filthy Rich’, and now had work lined up after - I was so relieved! Was the relationship with the other cast members impactful? I can’t really sum up how much I love my cast members Chai, Emilie and Josh. They are all individually such awesome talented humans. We have such a special bond, which really helps with our scenes. We work on a fantasy kids show, so the world is big and silly, so we are constantly in hysterics when we are around each other. Did the process of making the show exceed or live up to your expectations? The second time around was actually harder! Starting season 1 with a new character was scary and exciting, but I think I had no idea what to expect. This time I knew what to expect, but the scripts were so much more dense with action, comedy and emotion. We shot 10 episodes in 12 weeks which is extremely fast, and I worked almost every day - that meant I had to be on my A-game all the time. It was a challenge, but in these times you figure out what you are capable of as an actor and the reward is so sweet. So yeah, I’m pretty proud of myself for enduring that hard shoot. I think we made something really special. There were so many ‘best parts’ of

shooting season 2, one being the exchange of some epic performances from my scene partners. I’m such a nerd but I live for those moments when it just works. Chai Hansen, who plays Monkey, and I would have a debrief every night in the car before being dropped home, of what worked and what we’d be doing the next day. I loved these chats. We supported each other really well because it was nonstop for both of us. On some of those hard days we’d be dreaming of a day off, and kids who were fans of the first season would be visiting or were extras on set, and would be so excited to meet us. They’d give us big hugs, make us cards, or ask really insightful questions about our characters. This was an awesome reminder for me to realise this is why we are here, this is what makes it all worth it. How do you prefer to work? Over the years I’ve found what works best for me - I’ve had many trials and errors haha…. I don’t think there is a right or wrong way because every experience is so different, but I like having some creative collaboration with directors and writers. On Monkey I got to work with the writers to express where I think my character will go in this season, which was pretty cool. With directors, I like extensive rehearsals where we can talk about the story, offering my take on the character. Then on the day with that prep done, executing the performance and then having

BELLA FREUD from workshop , skirt by KSUBI opposite page : outfit by ZAMBESI following page : sweater by RIKA from workshop

opening page : luciane wears sweater by

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“ WHETHER IT BE A SENSE OF ESCAPISM, ENTERTAINMENT, OR A CALL FOR REFLECTION FOR ALL KINDS OF AUDIENCES. I WANT TO KEEP LEARNING FROM ALL ASPECTS OF FILMMAKING; ACTING, WRITING AND MAYBE ONE DAY DIRECTING ”

the director come in with added direction, and any minor technical things. I don’t really like to be told exactly what to do from start to finish, because then you lose the spontaneity and that’s the magic. It all comes down to trust between directors and actors. How has “growing up” in the NZ film industry influenced your career thus far? Being born and raised in Auckland, Aotearoa is all I’ve known and I’m pretty biased, but we live in a great country. This land inspires me. I think in terms of my career, this is the place where the doors are open for me. I started acting at 17 and so far at 26 I feel really lucky to have had the experiences I had. People took a chance on me and I’ve learnt what I know on the job. There is so much I have yet to do here, as well as wanting to work overseas. But I think we offer a unique perspective of the world and it’s pretty special. I think what is so cool about being a part of ‘The New Legends of Monkey’ is that little brown girls and boys who watch the series see themselves represented on screen. I know I didn’t have that growing up. Whether they are aware of it or not, it’s cool that I get to play an intelligent bad ass hero who goes against the grain to save the world. That’s why I love playing Tripitaka so much, and if we get another series I’d love to flesh out this character even more. Do you think this is something that permeates any other aspect of ‘you,’ or can you separate yourself from this easily? I find what I do and who I am very hard to separate. In terms of characters I feel 108

I can separate myself very easily, because it isn’t about me as Luciane. I just know my work ethic and how I collaborate with crew, is to achieve the best that I can do, not only for my own personal goals but for the project as a whole. I’m a big fan of film/TV and I just love the whole filming process, so I’m always so grateful to be working. I’m still figuring it all out, but it seems to be working out so far. Who inspires you the most? My family. They sacrificed so much for us kids to live a great life and that is my reasoning for why I work so hard, and that’s where I get it from. I try to do my best in everything because they support me so much. They literally watch every episode of anything I’m in, it’s so cute. I’m also inspired by the wonderful work that is out there. In lockdown I’ve made a list of film/TV recommendations from friends and online reviews, and I’ve successfully made my way through most of them. I’m usually an avid TV show binger and try see as many films as I can at the cinemas, but this has granted me an over-indulgent amount of watching time. The bar continues to get higher, and I’m loving it. What can you tell us about the “next” and your hopes for the future? Acting is my first love and I will always want to further my career, as I’m only 26. But I also don’t want to limit myself to one thing. I think this new love for writing is where I want to continue to grow. I wrote my movie initially because I wanted to play someone like this character, and no one is going to do it for you, so I had to get to work. It’s my first script and I feel really lucky to have received

funding from the NZ Film Commission and Script to Screen, who have been so supportive. It’s based on many aspects of my life and looks into language and cultural identity in the contemporary NZ context. It will be a bilingual film in English and Tongan, and I have the wonderful Vea Mafile’o (For My Father’s Kingdom) directing it, and Eldon Booth and Alex Lovell who I worked with in ‘My Friend Michael Jones’ producing it. The collaboration so far with these guys has been such a highlight. I’m so excited and yet shit scared, to finally get to play this character after workshopping this script for almost 2 years. Who knows where this will take us, but I hope to carry on working with these guys in the future. I’m also working on a handful of scripts, all centred around Tongan lives which I’m really enjoying learning about. So who knows what’s next! Honestly, I just want to be working, with a balanced personal life. I definitely have the itch for storytelling and for that to be my little contribution to the world. Whether it be a sense of escapism, entertainment, or a call for reflection for all kinds of audiences. I want to keep learning from all aspects of filmmaking ; acting, writing and maybe one day directing. I want to work with an abundance of creatives that I look up to, and work on meaningful productions. I definitely want to see more of our people and our stories on screen in my lifetime, because they are important. I hope my 40 year old self is screaming ‘It happened gurl!’ Special thanks to Workshop Ponsonby for the fash!


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R S K A D FO Y E D OL ZINSUNIT H E T D AR BR ZK A A N R IA S BEK AS TOW Y H AP KEUPONIA R P OG A OT AND MIELA H P IR AN HA DEL MO

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D MO

EL

S


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D T WAR T E SL RCH .C A H HU . A YNEL C ing MLETT L s O AR CHA ER u HASBY O C A IN L N Y PH OR RARD OLY S, RUAK A A V R T R L OG EDI IE GR CA ODE NA T N B O I N PH SHIO P ABS HA t N M nd A a a FA KEU TIC A OR MA SMES GIN AYL ENT CO DEL VE-TGEM MO RGA ANA HA62 M at

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opening page : top by

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ROTATE

HELEN CHERRY

from

under dress by

ROTATE

from

WORKSHOP

WORKSHOP, visor by COS opposite page : dress by ROTATE SEE BY CHLOE from WORKSHOP

this page : dress by

over blouse by


this page : blouse by

SEE BY CHLOE

from

WORKSHOP

song title : starley photo assistant cal post

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PHOTOGRAPHY AND FASHION DAVID K. SHEILDSÂ MAKEUP RICHARD SYMONS at M.A.C COSMETICS HAIR EITHE CURREN ALL CLOTHING BY KIRI NATHAN MODEL PHOEBE HUNTER AT VANITY WALK

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PHOTOGRAPHY TINTIN HEDBERG FASHION EDITOR BRITTNI MORRISON HAIR AND MAKEUP JUSTIN HENRY using MARC JACOBS BEAUTY and ORIBE HAIR STYLING PRODUCTS MODEL ZOE BLUME at CHADWICK MODELS

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opening page left : dress by PAR MOI, earrings by UNDERGROUND SUNDAE opening page right : corset by VIOLET NOLAN, necklaces by JY JEWELA, earrings by RELIQUIA JEWELLERY this page right : top and leggings by EMILY WATSON, earrings by VALET STUDIO this page left : jumpsuit by VOVO THE LABEL, earrings by RELIQUIA JEWELLERY, necklaces by UNDERGROUND SUNDAE

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this page left : jacket and headband by VOVO THE LABEL, top by ANNA QUAN, pearl necklace by GABRIELLE THE LABEL necklaces by CA JEWELLERY this page right : scrunchie and earrings by VALET STUDIO, necklace by PAR MOI song title : mightnight oil


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PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL EMPSON FASHION EDITOR FRAN MARTO MAKE UP INES AGUIAR at SOLVE AGENCY LISBON HAIR BY PINI MODEL KARLINA CAUNE at VIVA MODELS PARIS


opening page : suit and silk scarf by

HERMES this page : trench coat by HUGO BOSS, sunglasses by TOM FORD opposite page : suit by DUARTE, stilletos by

JOMMY CHOO


this page : suit PERTEGAZ

by


above : suit by

DUARTE,

stilletos

by

JIMMY

suit by

GUESS

CHOO

opposite :

first assistant : jalen james post

production : the

greenroom sessions australia song title :

A riana G rande


opposite page : suit

GUESS this MAX MARA song title : by

page : suit by

ariana grande

first assistant : jalen james post

production : the

greenroom sessions australia


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PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL NAUMOFF at VIVIEN’S CREATIVE FASHION EDITOR MONIQUE MOYNIHAN at NETWORK AGENCY HAIR AND MAKEUP KRISTYAN LOWE at DLM using M.A.C COSMETICS and ORIBE HAIR PRODUCTS MODEL KERRYN PAASILA at IMG MODELS


opening page : skirt , jacket and bustier

by 4 MONCLER SIMONE ROCHA, earrings by MIU MIU, shoes by COACH and stylist ’ s own stockings opposite

page : earrings by VALET this page : shirt , pants and shoes by BALLY, earrings by

MIU MIU


opposite page : jacket and skirt by

COACH, earrings by MIU MIU and shoes by BALLY, stylist ’ s own stockings this page : jacket by TRELISE COOPER, shoes by PRADA, earrings by MIU MIU and stylist ’ s own stockings


this page : dress

MICHAEL LO SORDO, earrings by VALET and stylist ’ s own

by

gloves


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opposite page :

MIU MIU this page : MIU MIU skirt worn as top , earrings by VALET earrings by


opposite page :

PARIS GEORGIA, jacket by EMPORIO ARMANI, bag by COACH this page :

leotard by

dress and necklace

EMPORIO ARMANI

by


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this page : skirt , jacket and bustier

by 4 MONCLER SIMONE ROCHA, earrings by MIU MIU, shoes by COACH and stylist ’ s own stockings song

title : john legend


PHOTOGRAPHY MING NOM CHONG FASHION EDITOR SARAH BIRCHLEY HAIR LACHLAN WIGNALL at WORK AGENCY using ORIBE MAKEUP KATIE ANGUS at JAM using M.A.C COSMETICS MODEL BILLIE JEAN at PRISCILLA’S 172


DIOR, hat by FENDI this page left : knit by PRADA, shoes by GUCCI, jacket by OROTON, skirt by NANUSHKA this page right : trench coat by BURBERRY opening page : jumpsuit and shoes by

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this page : dress by

ZIMMERMANN,

shoes by

opposite page : bag and dress by

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GUCCI GUCCI


this page : skirt by

FENDI,

bag ,

shoes and dress by

GUCCI opposite page : skirt by COACH, top by NANUSHKA, boots by ZIMMERMANN


this page : cardigann by pants by

PRADA,

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GUCCI

FENDI,

camisole by

COACH,

opposite page : shirt , skirt and bag by

boots by

ZIMMERMANN


GUCCI opposite page : knit singlet FENDI, skirt by GUCCI, jacket by PRADA song title : sonic youth photo assist : alistair woods fashion assist : jessica rolfe

this page : dress by by

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PHOTOGRAPHY AND FASHION DAVID K. SHIELDS MODEL FLYNN at RPD MODELS GROOMING DAVID K. SHIELDS FASHION ASSISTANT MADELEINE KNOWLES 185


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opening page : shirt and tie by ZAMBESI, pants by KIRI NATHAN this page : overcoat and dress by COS

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this page : coat and dress by

COS

opposite page : skirt

KIRI 189 NATHAN

and sash by


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ZAMBESI and VANS for ZAMBEI

this page : pants by shoes by

oppsosite page : dress and kÄ kahu by

KIRI NATHAN

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this page : outfit 192LELA JACOBS

by


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opposite page : outfit by

LELA JACOBS this page :

contemporary kilt

by COS, top by DYLAN MALONE

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this page : boots by

KIRI NATHAN

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CO

this p

and pant


OS,

clothing by

page right : coat

ts by

ZAMBESI

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WD R O J DRIME OD A I R EL S LO ON M A RI CO HY R CH RIS AIR P T A H H GR ITO C EN O TO N ED KEUPGEM nd EV N O PH SHIO d MA NA IS a PTO FA IR an N MA PAR HAM S HA NIO LEYSON DEL S at Ung SI ALLI K MO i L us DE WIC MO H A D at C

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opening page : top and tunic by

COS, necklace by MEADOWLARK opposite page : hats , socks and shoes by

MIU MIU, vintage COMME DES GARCONS PLAY X BEAMS BOY t - shirt , skirt by MOSCHINO this page : dress and belt by MAGGIE MARILYN, shoes by COS


this page : earrings

MEADOWLARK, jacket , shirt and shorts by PRADA opposite page : earrings by MEADOWLARK, coat by MIU MIU by


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opposite page : jacket , bustier and skirt by

MAGGIE MARILYN

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this page : top and

skirt by WYNN HAMLYN, bustier by MAGGIE MARILYN opposite page : top by WYNN HAMLYN, choker models own

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dress and belt by

MAGGIE MARILYN, hi - tops by PRADA, earrings by

MEADOWLARK photographer ’ s assistant : KEVIN LIM thanks to STUDIO 501 song title : pet shop boys

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PHOTOGRAPHY JASON HENLEY FASHION EDITOR KELVIN HARRIES HAIR LAURA SPINNEY MAKEUP MARGO REGAN MODEL LUCIE at PRISCILLAS

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opening page left :

coat by KATE SYLVESTER, scarf by HERMES, shirt by ANNA QUAN opening page right : outfit by PRADA opposite page : shirt by ANNA QUAN, top and pants by

CHRISTOPHER ESBER, belt by EMPORIO ARMANI this page : top by NICOLE OLIVERIA, trackpants by

NIKE, socks COS, shoes by EMPORIO 213 ARMANI

by


this page : jacket and pants by

MICHAEL LO SORDO, shirt by ANNA QUAN, jeans by H&M opposite page : outfit by PRADA

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opposite page : knot top by

MIU

MIU

under dress

ROMANCE WAS BORN, jeans by RAEY at matchesfashion . com , bucket hat by H&M, boot by ASOS this page : by

beaded top and

NICOLE OLIVERIA, shirt by ANNA QUAN, necklace by MIU MIU, boots217 by ASOS

pants by


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opposite page : top and pants by

MIU MIU,

boots

models own this

page : top by JW ANDEERSON over shirt by NICOLE OLIVERIA, skirt by JW ANDERSON FOR UNIQLO, boots models own

song title : rex orange county

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PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL EMPSON FASHION EDITOR FRAN MARTO MAKE UP SARA FONSECA at SOLVE AGENCY LISBON HAIR ALEXIS PARENTE at B_AGENCY PARIS MODEL RAQUEL BRITO at WE ARE MODELS LISBON

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opening page : jacket by

UNGARO, earrings by MARCHÉ AUX PUCES this page : dress by ROBERTO DIZ opposite page : dress and tule top by

ANA LOCKING,

earrings by

MARCHÉ AUX PUCES


jumpsuit by earrings by

PERFECT MOMENT, MARCHÉ AUX PUCES


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opposite page : sequin overalls by

P.A.R.O.S.H, sequin top by ROBERTO DIAZ, earrings by MARCHÉ AUX PUCES this page : dress by ROBERTO DIZ, earrings by MARCHÉ AUX PUCES


opposite page :

JOHN RICHMOND, belt dress by

and earrings by

MARCHÉ AUX PUCES this page : satin catsuit

2ND SKIN CO, earrings by MARCHÉ AUX PUCES first assistant : by

jalen james post

production : the

greenroom sessions australia song

title : the cure


DS L E R HI . S TLE K U VIDAN B LDS A E I YD H PH R ETK. SH CTS UT A U O R TO D OG EDI AVI ROD S SCST T N O P D PH SHIO ING AIR at DKL PO FA OOM M H ICIO T CA GR ng O&BEN STAN usi DEL ASSI MO OTO PH

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opening page : top

COS, ROLLA’S, hat by BRIXTON this page : pants and blazer by

jeans by

and sweater vest

COS, coat by NEUW DENIM by


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this page above : trench coat and pants

SPELLBOUND WORKSHOP, shoes by COS top by CALVIN KLEIN this page below : coat by NEUW DENIM,

by

from

sweater and pants by

COS

opposite page :

shirt and pants by

R.M. WILLIAMS


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jacket and pants

WORKSHOP DENIM, hat by BRIXTON,

by

dress as shirt by

MM6 MAISON MARGIELA from THE SHELTER


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opposite page : leather jacket by this page : coat by

ZAMBESI,

WORKING STYLE over sweater vest by COS, pants by NEUW DENIM NEUW DENIM photo assistant : cal post song title : blondie

pants by

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T ET D L S R HA WA ER N H Y D OL URCat RY ONS R H A M CA C LL HY AELRRE D SYS GINE, P A R L H N GR R AC G MUCHA ODE CLY T 62 O M AT A E RI OT R PH DITOIR GR EUP TICSIZZI LOR N E HA MAK SME LS, -TAY O I E SH CO OD R AVE C FA . M . A N RG at M ATY HA B RU

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opening page :

ROTATE WORKSHOP opposite page : jeans by ROLLAS, top by GANNI from WORKSHOP this page : dress , coat and pants by KATE SYLVESTER over top by GANNI from WORKSHOP dress by

from

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this page : suit and blouse by

HELEN CHERRY, boots by STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB, scalf by WYNN HAMLYN opposite page : blouse by GANNI under dress by

ROTATE from WORKSHOP ?? by ????????????


this page : blazer by

ACNE STUDIO

and dress by

GANNI from WORKSHOP, belt by R.M. WILLIAMS opposite page : coat and pants by

RORY DOCHERTY, KAKAHU by KIRI NATHAN, shoes by VANS


this page : jacket by

LOULOU STUDIO WORKSHOP, jeans by ROLLAS, lingerie by LIAR LIAR opposite page : from

jacket and hat by

RORY WILLIAM DOCHERTY, scarf by WYNN HAMLYN photo assistant : cal post thanks to white

studios song title : the kinks


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LONGSTANDING CONTRIBUTING BLACK MAG PHOTOGRAPHER AND INTERNATIONAL EDITOR PAUL EMPSON WORKS HIS MAGIC WITH A TEAM OF EUROPEAN CREATIVE LEGENDS TO SHOOT CHIARA SCELSI AT WOMEN MANAGEMENT NYC AND OPHELIE GUILLERMAND AT ELITE MODELS NYC IN TWO EPIC FASHION HOUSE EXCLUSIVES. VERSACE AND BOTTEGA VENETA

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PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL EMPSON CREATIVE DIRECTOR LEONARD CALIGIURI FASHION EDITOR KRISTI VELIAJ HAIR PAOLO FERREIRA for LEONOR GREYL at CALLISTE AGENCY PARIS MAKE UP MIRIAM LANGELOTTI at GREEN APPLE AGENCY MILANO MODEL CHIARA SCELSI at WOMEN MANAGEMENT NYC SPECIAL THANKS TO EZIO DONNARUMMA at VERSACE MILANO

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opening page : striped

cotton shirt , vinyl black trench with gold toned

medusa buttons , virtus printed fanny pack and

medusa gold earrings all by

VERSACE

this page :

black satin dress with

heritage neckline , striped cotton shirt with flower

application , medusa gold

earrings , virtus mini chain

bag , tie dye printed tights and embellished open toe

mules all by VERSACE opposite page : black wool blazer with gold toned medusa buttons , striped cotton shirt , gold loop earrings and gold medusa chocker all by VERSACE

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opposite page : blacksatin dress with

squaredneckline , medusa gold

earrings , virtus printed fanny pack and gold earrings all by

VERSACE

this

page : nappa leather

( biker )

jacket features

voluminous sculptural

shoulders , black crepe mini skirt and crystal and gold earrings all by

VERSACE

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this page : medusa

gold earrings , shield sunglasses and black sculptural crepe shirt

VERSACE T he

all by song title : BJ C hicago K id 258


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this page : sculptural shoulder short crepe

top , wool dress trousers , printed over the knee

boots , shield sunglasses and flower crystal and gold ring all by

VERSACE opposite page : heritage neckline black dress with flower application , tie dye

printed long sleeve

shirt , gold loop earrings and gold medusa chocker all by VERSACE first assistant : jalen james . special thanks to circus studios milan . shop the versace here

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PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL EMPSON CREATIVE DIRECTOR LEONARD CALIGIURI FASHION EDITOR KRISTI VELIAJ HAIR ALESSANDRO SQUARZA at JAMES BY WELLA PROFESSIONAL MAKEUP CLAUDIA MARCHETTI at GREEN APPLE MILANO MODEL OPHELIE GUILLERMAND at ELITE MODELS NYC


opening page : trench coat in shiny leather with ribbed and elastic

panel at waist ,

wide leg trousers in

stretch nylon canvas , bottega veneta spiral and sandals in nappa leather all by

BOTTEGA VENETA this page : short jumpsuit in fluid gabardine , tailored design with notched lape all by

BOTTEGA VENETA opposite page : trench coat in shiny leather with ribbed and elastic

panel at waist , hobo bag

in handwoven leather , paper calf shoulder strap with signature triangular buckle by

BOTTEGA VENETA


this page : hooded leather coat with asymmetric zip fastening by

BOTTEGA VENETA


opposite page : long sleeved leather shirt

with cut - out detailing

at pocket , five pocket

leather jeans and coiled belt in intrecciato

BOTTEGA VENETA this page :

calf all by

trench coat in shiny leather with ribbed and elastic panel at

waist , maxi bottega veneta jodie

rounded hobo bag in intrecciato nappa woven by hand with

a curved , seamless structure all by

BOTTEGA VENETA


opposite page : trench

coat in compact cotton ,

self - fastening waist belt with signature

triangular buckle ,

bottega veneta curve sandal mules with padded intrecciato nappa lamb leather straps and bottega veneta snap square clutch bag made with intrecciato weave leather all by

BOTTEGA VENETA

this page : trench coat in

compact cotton ,

self - fastening waist belt with signature triangular buckle by

BOTTEGA VENETA : jalen james fashion assistant :

assistant

leonardo ferri shop the range here


Profile for Black Magazine

Black Magazine Issue 32