Greater Fayetteville Business Journal - Feburary 18, 2022 Issue

Page 1

Free tuition

FSU announces free tuition for militaryconnected students Page 5

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022 Vol. 1, No. 19

$2.00

bizfayetteville.com

WEB EXCLUSIVE Ease Plumbing

Company expands to Fayetteville, seeks to revitalize trades bizfayetteville.com

Health Care

HealthKeeperz seeks to benefit communities it serves Page 12

Commercial Real Estate

Company partners with FTCC for maintenance program Page 16

PHOTO PROVIDED BY SWEET VALLEY RANCH

Anita and Fred Surgeon pose for a picture at Sweet Valley Ranch. Across his businesses, Surgeon employs 400 people in three states, and 170 people in specifically the GFBJ footprint.

ALL IN

Index

Economic Indicators .............................. 3 Publisher’s Notes ................................... 4 The List ............................................7, 19 Achievers ............................................8-9 Health Care .........................................12 In The News .........................................14 Commercial Real Estate .......................16 Technology ...........................................23

Surgeon’s commitment to region, entrepreneurship makes great impact on local community

SUBSCRIBE NOW SUBSCRIBE TO THE BUSINESS JOURNAL NOW AT BizFayetteville.com/subscribe Your subscription includes: • Unlimited access to stories on BizFayetteville.com • Two Business Journals mailed to you every month • The 2022 Book on Business delivered to you in January. >>

By Jenna Shackelford

F

rom a young age, Fred Surgeon remembers having an entrepreneurial spirit. In elementary school, he organized his cousins into teams around the house to complete chores in return for payment – like money, a meal prepared by an adult, or a slightly used toy or game. In college, he began putting candy boxes in stores to make some extra cash. “I realized I could make about one dollar for every candy box. And my brother would laugh because he would say, ‘Hey, you’re making a dollar.’ But what happened was eventually I had 1000 candy boxes out in Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina,” Surgeon said. “So I was making $1000 a week … I realized that in any business concept, if you’re

able to replicate it and perfect it, that concept can be used in other things.” And that was just the beginning for Surgeon. “From there, years later when we were doing Papa John’s Pizza restaurants, it was great for me,” he said. “You do one store, you learn it, and you run it well, and then you replicate it. I got involved with franchising to a degree. One of the franchises I’m involved with is Merry Maids, and right now, we’re the largest Merry Maids franchise in the world.” Over the years, Surgeon has held numerous titles in a diverse array of fields. Some of those titles include director of a special education evaluation program in Richmond County, chief finance officer for Southeastern Regional Mental Health, DevelopSee ALL IN, page 11


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February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

Page 3

ECONOMIC INDICATORS

THIS ISSUE’S ECONOMIC INDICATORS PAGE IS SPONSORED BY

RECENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATES UNITED STATES DECEMBER 2021:

NORTH CAROLINA DECEMBER 2021:

CUMBERLAND COUNTY FAYETTEVILLE MSA DECEMBER 2021: DECEMBER 2021:

ROBESON COUNTY DECEMBER 2021:

3.7%

3.2%

4.8%

4.8%

5.3%

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

HARNETT COUNTY DECEMBER 2021:

HOKE COUNTY DECEMBER 2021:

MOORE COUNTY DECEMBER 2021:

SAMPSON COUNTY DECEMBER 2021:

RALEIGH MSA DECEMBER 2021:

3.6%

4.5%

2.8%

3.0%

2.6%

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

DOWN FROM DECEMBER 2020:

6.5%

6.7%

6.1%

7.8%

8.4%

8.3%

5.6%

5.8%

26.5% UP FROM Q4 2021

25.2%

AVERAGE RENT PER SQUARE-FOOT Q1 TO DATE

STATE SALES TAX COLLECTION NOVEMBER 2021

$21,358,507

8.7%

UP FROM STATE SALES TAX COLLECTION NOVEMBER 2020

$19,630,148

5.3%

Source: NC Department of Revenue

Source: N.C. Department of Commerce

OFFICE SPACE (CUMBERLAND COUNTY) VACANCY RATE Q1 TO DATE

NOVEMBER 2021 STATE SALES AND USE TAX COLLECTION (CUMBERLAND COUNTY)

LABOR FORCE BY INDUSTRY (FAYETTEVILLE MSA) AVERAGE SALE PRICE PER SQUARE-FOOT Q1 TO DATE

$19.23 $153 UP FROM Q4 2021

UP FROM Q4 2021

$18.83

$155

AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET Q1 2022 TO DATE

17.6 MONTHS

OTHER SERVICES MANUFACTURING

3.73%

10.95% GOVERNMENT 16.28%

TRADE, TRANSPORTATION & UTILITIES 20.32%

Source: Fayetteville Cumberland County Economic Development Corporation LEISURE & HOSPITALITY

INDUSTRIAL SPACE (CUMBERLAND COUNTY) VACANCY RATE Q1 TO DATE

46.5% UP FROM Q4 2021

44.5%

AVERAGE RENT PER SQUARE-FOOT Q1 TO DATE

11.15%

AVERAGE SALE PRICE PER SQUARE-FOOT Q1 TO DATE

$4.34 $45 UP FROM Q4 2021

UP FROM Q4 2021

$3.76

$50

INFORMATION 1.83%

AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET Q1 2022 TO DATE

23 MONTHS

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES EDUCATION & HEALTH SERVICES

5.98% PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

13.96%

15.82%

Source: NC Department of Commerce

Source: Fayetteville Cumberland County Economic Development Corporation

HOMES 80

SALES DAYS ON THE MARKET

(FAYETTEVILLE AREA)

2020 vs 2021 (December) FAYETTEVILLE MSA CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE 200,000

70

LABOR FORCE

60

150,000

50

100,000

40

50,000

30

10/20 11/20 12/20 1/20 2/21 3/21 4/21 5/21 6/21 7/21 8/21 9/21 10/21 11/21 12/21

Source: Realtor.com/research

147,939

148,184

DECEMBER

DECEMBER

2020

2021

AVERAGE PRICE PER GALLON FOR REGULAR UNLEADED IN FAYETTEVILLE ON FEBRUARY 08, 2021:

$3.47 AVERAGE PRICE PER GALLON FOR FAYETTEVILLE ON FEBRUARY 08, 2020:

$2.47

0 Source: N.C. Department of Commerce

Source: gasbuddy.com


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Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

PUBLISHER'S NOTES

4424 Bragg Blvd, Fayetteville, NC 28303 910-240-9697 bizfayetteville.com

bizfayetteville.com

Celebrating diversity

PUBLISHER Marty Cayton martyc@bizfayetteville.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jenna Shackelford jennas@bizfayetteville.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Charity Brandsma Kathie Harris Jenna-Ley Jamison Monica Kreber Suet Lee-Growney Jami McLaughlin Scott Nunn Savanah Ramsey Nicole Zappone CONTRIBUTING WRITER MARKETING CONTENT Stacie Borrello CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Samantha Lowe samanthal@bizfayetteville.com ACCOUNTING Priscilla Nelson billing@bizfayetteville

The Greater Fayetteville Business Journal is published twice a month throughout Fayetteville and the Cumberland County region. News related to the region’s business sector is posted daily at bizfayetteville.com. SUBSCRIPTIONS Your free trial of Greater Fayetteville Business Journal is ending soon. To subscribe, call 910-240-9697 or visit bizfayetteville.com/ subscribe. Subscriptions cost $9.95 per month or $95 per year. REPRINT For article reprints, plaques and more contact Jenna Shackelford at 910-240-9697. ADVERTISING For advertising information, please email us at marketing@bizfayetteville.com or call 910-240-9697. © Copyright 2021 Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

NICK FEWINGS/UNSPLASH

The Fayetteville area has a diverse community, and we are better for it.

A

s I write my publisher’s comments for our February 18 issue, I decided to take a stroll down memory lane. One of my favorite things about being the publisher of Greater Fayetteville Business Journal is having the opportunity to share something personal with our readers that hopefully will be impactful. But what I have learned about writing some of my life stories down in text is that the process forces me to stop and take time to reflect, remember and remind myself of these great memories and lessons learned. One special memory takes me back to 1985, and our school’s Beta Club initiation program. I was asked to sing a very popular song at that time called “Ebony and Ivory” with a fellow classmate. For those of you who are younger than 40, you may not know that this was a song performed by Stevie Wonder (Ebony) and Paul McCartney (Ivory). The song epitomized what race relations should be in our world – people of different races living together in harmony like the keys on a piano. One of my favorite lines in the song is, “We all know that people are the same wherever you go.” My young and very talented Black friend was

also a great pianist. I was hoping to catch up with him at our 35th class reunion – in 2020, and well, you know that this never happened because COVID closed that door. Oh well, there’s always social media and the 40th reunion! Our Feb. 18 issue has a special focus on minority-owned businesses. With February being Black History Month, we did not want to miss an opportunity to highlight some great businesses and leaders in our community who have made a tremendous impact. I am so proud of Fayetteville, and our surrounding region. I know we have our own issues, but we are one of the most diverse cities in the nation, and we are better because of it. And we have made tremendous progress. We certainly can do better, and I believe we will! More about this issue. There’s a great story about another minority-owned business called HealthKeeperz, Inc., a multimillion dollar healthcare business enterprise based out of Pembroke, N.C. What an amazing story of service, faith and family. And speaking of the health care business, our next Power Breakfast series on 2/22/22 is called “The

Health Care Economy,” and we have some powerhouse panelists representing this topic. Please consider joining us by going to www.FayettevillePowerBreakfast.com. At the end of this next Power Breakfast event, we will unveil our newest annual publication, the 2022 Book on Business. You can get a free copy at this Power Breakfast or as a subscriber. And if you are receiving this latest issue of Greater Fayetteville Business Journal in the mail and you are not a subscriber, we are pleased to be offering this to you on a complimentary trial basis. If you are enjoying the journal, please go to Bizfayetteville.com/subscribe today so you can continue to receive these issues and other publications like the Book on Business. I hope you feel inspired after reading this issue, in particular. My most favorite line of the song that my classmate and I sang was, “Side by side on my piano, keyboard, oh Lord, why don’t we?” We can - with the good Lord’s help! God bless you and yours!

MARTY V. CAYTON is the publisher of the Greater Fayetteville Business Journal. 910-240-9697, Ext 101 • martyc@bizfayetteville.com


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal >>

By Jenna Shackelford

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

bizfayetteville.com

Page 5

MILITARY BUSINESS

Free college for military-connected students F

FAYETTEVILLE STATE UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES NEW RANKING, FREE TUITION OPPORTUNITIES, AND A LARGE GRANT

ayetteville State University announced at Fort Bragg this morning that it will now have tuition-free scholarships for military-connected students. FSU has long shown its support of the military presence in the region, and has sought to solidify its place as a premiere destination for the military by announcing a new Military Tuition Scholarship. The scholarship will provide free tuition to all military-connected students starting this fall. “Military veterans are diverse professionals who have unique skills and experiences, making them invaluable contributors to any organization or community,” said Col. Scott Pence, Fort Bragg Garrison Commander. “With Fayetteville State University’s affordable and flexible degree programs, along with the Military Tuition Scholarship, service members and their families can successfully complete a degree or certification on their own terms. Fort Bragg is truly thankful for the support of local colleges and universities who make it possible for service members and their families to continue their education.” FSU Chancellor Darrell T. Allison announced the findings of a recent report by Evocati, a public relations and consulting firm, that ranked the university as the “top provider of education to military-connected students along a number of variables, including academic outcomes, programmatic offerings, and a return on investment (ROI),” the press release summarized. Evocati is a veteran-owned marketing and consulting firm, and the comprehensive report analyzed 85 four-year HBCUs across the country. The report found that Black veterans were denied GI Bill benefits disproportionately compared to their counterparts; but, the research also shows that students who attend school with the GI Bill are more likely to complete a degree compared to their peers, pursuing degrees in fields such as business, STEM and healthcare. The new tuition announcement

GRAPHIC PROVIDED BY FAYETTEVILLE STATE UNIVERSITY

Fayetteville State University had a week filled with big announcements recently, to include that the university has been ranked as the “top provider of education to military-connected students

may encourage more people to gain an education and stay in the area’s workforce in industries with jobs high in demand. “Fayetteville State University is proud to be the premier destination, not just in North Carolina but in the nation, for educating military-connected students,” said Chancellor Allison. “FSU is perfectly positioned here in the Sandhills region to change the landscape on how we think about workforce readiness in today’s ever-changing job market and how we, in higher education, can support veterans and their families in their transitions to the civilian workforce. We’re excited to announce the Military Tuition Scholarship (fully paid) to further support those who sacrificed for our nation in their next chapter in life.” FSU is in the top three percent of its peers for return on investment and has the largest number of GI Bill students among HBCUs. Additionally, the school was the

highest ranked HBCU and University of North Carolina institution in Military Times’ 2021 Best for Vets college ranking. To read the full report by Evocati, visit www.uncfsu.edu/assets/Documents/ HBCU%20Military%20Report_final.pdf. This news came in the same week as several other exciting announcements from the university. Fayetteville State also announced a partnership with FedEx and a new grant from the PNC Foundation, as well as a scholarship named after FTCC President Dr. Larry J. Keen. In support of a grant proposed by Dr. Juanette Council, vice chancellor of student affairs, FedEx made a $25,000 commitment to Fayetteville State University, which has benefited 106 students so far and will continue to benefit more over time. FSU was selected as one of eight schools in the country to be part of FedEx's HBCU Student Ambassador Program.

The PNC Foundation established the PNC North Carolina HBCU Initiative which committed to distributing $2 million dollars to five HBCUs in the state. The funding included a $280,000 grant in support of FSU. “Our vision for the Fayetteville State University E-Lab is to develop the entrepreneurs and change agents of tomorrow,” said Allison. “Our students are ready and willing to contribute to the economic transformation of southeastern North Carolina and beyond, and we are grateful to the PNC Foundation for recognizing their potential and providing the resources to help make this vision a reality.” The Keen Scholarship was announced days after Keen announced his plans to retire from FTCC in 2023. The scholarship will provide two years of free tuition at FSU to qualified Fayetteville Technical Community College students who earn an Associate degree at FTCC. The scholarship will benefit 150 FTCC graduates in 2022-2023; 200 FTCC graduates in 2023-2024; 250 FTCC graduates in 2024-2025; and 300 FTCC graduates in succeeding years. “FSU has established, in partnership with FTCC, the FTCC Keen Scholarship in honor of Dr. Larry Keen, my colleague, friend and outstanding president of FTCC,” Allison said. “Just think of the major impact we could have in the first four years of this program where nearly 900 FTCC Keen Scholars would have matriculated onto FSU’s campus receiving $900,000 in scholarship funding. What a testament to the legacy of such a leader, and what a major opportunity for Fayetteville and Cumberland County to capitalize on.” “It is a tremendous honor to be linked to an initiative that will be so transformative for so many students and their families,” Keen said of the scholarship. “Thank you, Chancellor Allison and FSU. Our strong partnership will benefit our students, our community and our state. This means everything to me.”


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Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

Page 7

THE LIST

bizfayetteville.com

Largest Employers Employers -- Robeson RobesonCounty County As ranked by NC Department of Commerce As ranked by NC Department of Commerce RANK RANK

1 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13

COMPANY NAME COMPANY NAME

INDUSTRY INDUSTRY

EMPLOYEE RANGE EMPLOYEE RANGE

SECTOR SECTOR

Manufacturing Manufacturing

> 1,000 > 1,000

Private Private

PUBLIC SCHOOLS SCHOOLSOF OFROBESON ROBESONCOUNTY COUNTY PUBLIC

Educational Services Educational Services

> 1,000 > 1,000

Public Public

SOUTHEASTERN REGIONAL REGIONALMEDICAL MEDICALCTR CTR SOUTHEASTERN

Health Care Social Health Care andand Social Assistance Assistance

> 1,000 > 1,000

Private Private

ROBESON COUNTY COUNTYFINANCE FINANCEDEPT DEPT ROBESON

Public Administration Public Administration

> 1,000 > 1,000

Public Public

Retail Trade Retail Trade

> 1,000 > 1,000

Private Private

Manufacturing Manufacturing

> 1,000 > 1,000

Private Private

Educational Services Educational Services

> 1,000 > 1,000

Public Public

Retail Trade Retail Trade

250—499 250—499

Private Private

Finance andand Insurance Finance Insurance

250—499 250—499

Private Private

Manufacturing Manufacturing

250—499 250—499

Private Private

Health Care andand Social Health Care Social Assistance Assistance

250—499 250—499

Private Private

MCDONALDS MCDONALDS

Accommodation andand Accommodation Food Services Food Services

250—499 250—499

Private Private

TWO TWO HAWK HAWK EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENTSERVICES SERVICESLLC LLC

Administrative andand Administrative Support andand Waste Support Waste Management andand Management Remediation Services Remediation Services

250—499 250—499

Private Private

MOUNTAIRE FARMS FARMSOF OFNC NCINC INC MOUNTAIRE

WAL-MART ASSOCIATES ASSOCIATESINC. INC. WAL-MART CAMPBELL SOUP SOUPSUPPLY SUPPLYCOMPANY COMPANYLLC LLC CAMPBELL UNC AT AT PEMBROKE PEMBROKE UNC FOOD LION LION FOOD BB& BB& TT CYNTHIA CYNTHIA QUARLES QUARLES PRIMARY PRIMARY HEALTH HEALTHCHOICE CHOICEINC INC

Public Administration 250—499 14 DEPT DEPT OF OF PUBLIC PUBLIC SAFETY SAFETY Public Administration 250—499 14 Manufacturing 250—499 15 PRESTAGE PRESTAGE FOODS FOODS Manufacturing 250—499 15 Public Administration 250—499 16 CITY CITY OF OF LUMBERTON LUMBERTON Public Administration 250—499 16 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Educational Services 250—499 17 ROBESON ROBESON COMMUNITY COLLEGE Educational Services 250—499 17 BOTTLING VENTURES LLC Wholesale Trade 250—499 18 PEPSI PEPSI BOTTLING VENTURES LLC Wholesale Trade 250—499 18 Health Care and Social HEALTH SERVICES LLC 250—499 19 RHA Health Care and Social Assistance RHA HEALTH SERVICES LLC 250—499 19 Assistance PACKAGING INTERNATIONAL LLC Manufacturing 250—499 20 GRAPHIC GRAPHIC PACKAGING INTERNATIONAL LLC Manufacturing 250—499 20 NASH ASSOCIATES LLC Wholesale Trade 250—499 21 SPARTAN SPARTAN NASH ASSOCIATES LLC Wholesale Trade 250—499 21 SOUTHERN CORP. Manufacturing 250—499 22 ELKAY ELKAY SOUTHERN CORP. Manufacturing 250—499 22 Manufacturing 100—249 23 RUBBERMAID CLEANING PRODUCTS Manufacturing 100—249 23 RUBBERMAID CLEANING PRODUCTS Manufacturing 100—249 24 KAYSER-ROTH CORPORATION Manufacturing 100—249 24 KAYSER-ROTH CORPORATION Manufacturing 100—249 25 REMPAC LLC REMPAC LLC Manufacturing 100—249 25 Robeson County data was available from the North Carolina Department of Commerce through the second quarter of 2021 at the time of collection.

Robeson County data was available from the North Carolina Department of Commerce through the second quarter of 2021 at the time of collection.

Public Public Private Private Public Public Public Public Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private


Page 8

ACHIEVERS FSU announces new vice chancellor for information technology and telecommunications services and chief information officer Fayetteville State University recently announced that Hector M. Molina, DBA has been named the new vice chancellor for information technology and telecommunications services and Molina chief officer. In this new role, Molina will be responsible for overseeing a division of 45 IT and administrative professionals and an entire technology portfolio. Through the use of data and information technology, Molina will report to the Chancellor, with vision and leadership that will advance the teaching, research, and service missions of FSU. With his vast knowledge of information technology he has utilized his expertise toward overseeing technology procurement processes, compliance, data security, physical security, and standards and practices. "On behalf of our entire FSU community, I welcome DR. HECTOR M. MOLINA as our Vice Chancellor for ITTS. Dr. Molina is one of the most important additions to our senior leadership team as we continue to look for opportunities to enhance FSU's technology footprint. I have no doubt that Dr. Molina will be instrumental in contributing to our overarching goal of access to leading technologies on our campus and in the classroom as we continue to evolve as a first-rate educational institution," said Chancellor Darrell T. Allison. Prior to his arrival at Fayetteville State, Molina served in the U.S. Marine Corps as an ITTs/Telecommunications supervisor and as the deputy chief information officer for the last seven years at East Carolina University.

Robert P. Holding Foundation donation creates First Citizens Bank Endowed Scholarship

The Robert P. Holding Foundation donated $30,000 to the Fayetteville Technical Community College Foundation to create the First Citizens Bank Endowed Scholarship. “The Robert P. Holding Foundation has a strong sense of respect and gratitude for the work of Fayetteville Tech and the programs it offers to

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

bizfayetteville.com

What are you and your peers achieving? Have you reached a new goal? Have you acquired another business? Maybe your business has a new hire you would like to highlight.

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal wants to hear from you and your business to shine a spotlight on your accomplishments. To nominate someone for GFBJ’s Achievers section, email editor@bizfayetteville.com with the subject line “Achiever.”

PHOTO PROVIDED BY FTCC

Pictured left to right: Eileen Hatch, FTCC Foundation scholarship coordinator; Matt Dellasega, First Citizens; FTCC President Dr. J. Larry Keen; Tim Richardson and Dixon Soffe of First Citizens Bank; and Sandy Ammons, FTCC Foundation executive director

enhance the lives of the citizens of North Carolina,” said Hank Dunbar, manager of charitable and philanthropic services at First Citizens Bank. FTCC Foundation manages more than 200 endowments and other funds that benefit students, academic programs, athletics, and facilities at FTCC. “We are very grateful for this generous donation to create a new scholarship for our students,” said Sandy Ammons, FTCC Foundation executive director. “We appreciate the support from First Citizens Bank and the Robert P. Holding Foundation and their commitment to the community.”

Meet FirstHealth’s inaugural chief diversity officer SHARON NICHOLSON HARRELL, DSS, MPH, FAGD has been providing dental care to underserved children at FirstHealth Dental Clinics for over twenty years. Harrell was announced as the first chief diversity officer in Jan. 2021 and since has established FirstHealth’s Inclusion Council that is composed of twenty-three professionals with a variety of diverse

backgrounds. The Council is used to help mold the health care system’s efforts in the areas of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Harrell exHarrell plained that she is looking forward to making FirstHealth the best place to work in health care. “While there are many strategies to achieve that goal, ensuring that employees feel represented, accepted, valued, and empowered is a key component.” However, the end goal of an inclusive environment extends beyond employees. “FirstHealth is working to create a culture of excellence in which all patients, families, visitors, vendors, and volunteers feel connected, treated fairly and safe, and where differences are both celebrated and supported,” Harrell said. Harrell first joined FirstHealth in 1998 as the inaugural director of dental care, and, since then, the system has been able to provide dental care to more than 29,000 underserved patients up to twenty-one years of age. Harrell obtained her dental degree from the University of North Carolina in 1987 and completed her Advanced General Dentistry Residency at the University of Maryland Dental School in 1988. In 1990, she returned to the University of North Carolina and got her master’s in public health from the Gillings School of Global Public Health. Currently Harrell is in the process of attaining the credential of Certified Diversity Executive.

FSU appoints new associate vice chancellor for strategic communications

Fayetteville State University recently announced JOY COOK was selected to serve as the new Associate Vice Chancellor for Strategic CommuniCook cations. Cook joined FSU in May of 2021 and has decades of experience as a communications strategist and media and crisis management expertise. Prior to coming to Fayetteville State University, Cook worked at North Carolina A&T from 2016-2019 as interim media relations director, marketing and public relations manager, and communications specialist. Since arriving at FSU, Cook has served as the interim media relations director and University Spokesperson. Along with her work at Fayetteville State University and North Carolina A&T, Cook is the president of Joy Cook PR Group, which she founded in 2010. In this new role, Cook will oversee the Department of Communications and manage the day-to-day operations for internal and external audiences. She will also be working closely with the Chancellor, cabinet, and deans to help strengthen and promote the University’s goals and initiatives. As the associate vice chancellor for strategic communications she will also lead the University’s communications and marketing strategies and head the Communications Council at FSU.

Fayetteville realtor installed as 2022 NC REALTORS president Fayetteville realtor WENDY HARRIS was installed as the 2022 president of NC REALTORS at a ceremony in Greensboro at the beginning of February. NC REALTORS is a nonprofit trade association that represents more than 56,000 members and 45 local associations throughout Harris North Carolina. The association was created to promote the success of its members and enhance the quality of life in North Carolina. As president, Harris hopes to continue under the theme “Building Bridges that last 100 Years” to strengthen North Carolina communities through affordability, availabilSee ACHIEVERS, page 9


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

bizfayetteville.com From ACHIEVERS, page 8

Coalition in 2017. She has also been recognized for her community and industry involvement with NC REALTORS® by receiving the following awards: 2017 NC REALTORS® REALTOR® Champion Award, 2015 Longleaf Pine REALTORS® REALTOR® of the Year, 2016 Longleaf Pine REALTORS® President’s Award, and 2017 Longleaf Pine REALTORS® REALTOR® Regional Service Award. Harris was also inducted into the RPAC Hall of Fame in 2020 and now serves on the National Association of REALTORS Major Investor Council.

ity, and sustainability. “In the next 100 years, I would like everyone in the state of North Carolina — when they think housing, economic development, industry, taxes, insurance — I want them to consider how this will impact the people who live in this state,” says Harris. “Everything starts and ends at home. I want NC REALTORS® to be the first, best and last organization everyone goes to for information and perspective.” Harris is a second-generation realtor owner of Team Harris Real Estate and has been actively involved in real estate since 2001. She is a licensed broker, Accredited Buyers Representative (ABR), Certified International Property Specialist (CIPS), Certified Residential Specialist (CRS), and a Military Relocation Professional (MRP). As a 1993 graduate of St. Andrews College, Harris received her BA in International Business with a minor in Spanish. She has been recognized for her extensive work with Disaster Recovery in N.C. by her appointment to the Governor’s Disaster Recovery

Renteria selected for Emerging Leaders of Color program The Arts Council of Fayetteville/ Cumberland County announced today that ANTONIO RENTERIA, director of operations for the council, was selected for the Emerging Leaders of Color program. Renteria was selected for the ELC program because of his tireless work and leadership in the Arts industry. He has over five years of arts administration and event management

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ACHIEVERS

experience. Some of his work includes expansion of the ArtScape Public Art Program, the annual production of large-scale events like the InternationRenteria al Folk Festival and A Dickens Holiday, and the day-to-day operations of the Arts Council’s facilities at The Arts Center on Hay Street. “I am committed to building relationships with local artists, nonprofit organizations, and other community partners who make Fayetteville a vibrant and welcoming community for artists and other creatives,” said Renteria. Currently, Renteria oversees community engagement for the Arts Council. He also is the staff liaison to the Exhibits Committee. ELC is partnered with South Arts and the Western States Arts Federation. Joy Young, vice president of programs at South Arts, said, “The ELC program offers course works and activities designed to strengthen leadership competencies, establish networks of support to your career

and your aspirations, and engage with a faculty of national leaders in the arts.”

Campbell University in top 25 percent in U.S. News & World Report annual list of best online programs Campbell University recently announced that the institution moved up 50 places in the U.S. News & World Report annual ranking of online programs. U.S. News & World Report considers colleges across the nation for its list. This year, 361 schools were considered eligible for the list, and Campbell moved up to the 87th spot. Out of the schools on the list, Campbell University’s Adult & Online Education program makes the institution the highest ranking North Carolina private school on the list, and the fourth highest on the list out of all of the North Carolina universities and colleges considered. Campbell also ranked 51st in the country for online programs for veterans and 98th for online programs for business students, the college reported.


Page 10

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

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Staff Report

Credit union expansion

B

BRAGG MUTUAL TO SERVE 26 COUNTIES IN NORTH CAROLINA

ragg Mutual Federal Credit Union was recently approved to serve 301 census tracts by the National Credit Union Association. Bragg Mutual can now serve 26 counties in North Carolina and seven in South Carolina, extending the credit union’s reach to 1.8 million people. BMFCU has served both Cumberland and Harnett counties since 1952. Bragg Mutual Federal Credit Union is one of North Carolina's fastest-growing credit unions that has offered extended services across the Carolinas. The company is a member-owned financial cooperative that provides financial services to nearly 9,400 members and currently has three offices in Fayetteville and one in Cameron. In the last three years, the cred-

“We are very excited to help

hundreds of thousands of Carolinians with not just checking, savings and loans, but financial guidance and one-on-one coaching.”

Stephen J. Foley Bragg Mutual, CEO

it union has grown more than $95 million in total assets, with a 43.8 percent increase. "We are very excited to help hundreds of thousands of Carolinians with not just checking, savings and

loans, but financial guidance and one-on-one coaching," said Bragg Mutual CEO Stephen J. Foley. "At Bragg Mutual, we have some of the highest-rated customer service in the industry and can offer people a

broader range of financial tools and products." Anyone who is a member of Bragg Mutual has more direct, surcharge-free access to their money than most traditional bank customers, with access to over 30,000 ATMs and 5,000 branches across the country, the press release said. In addition to serving everyday banking needs, Bragg Mutual also offers low loan rates and high yields on savings. “With our unique banking features and our commitment to empowering members to live confident financial lives, Bragg Mutual becomes an easy choice,” Foley said. “Wherever you are in your financial journey, we’re here for you.”


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal >>

By Jenna Shackelford

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

bizfayetteville.com

Page 11

IN THE NEWS

From ALL IN, page 1

mental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services, director of Robeson and Scotland County public mental health centers, controller for Carolina Behavioral Services, LLC and state accounting manager for NC Mentor. Today, Surgeon is the founder of Surgeon & Associates, Inc., Surgeon Home Services, LLC (Merry Maids), Crown Management Group, LLC, Visionary Management Group, LLC, Surgeon Farming Enterprises LLC, (Sweet Valley Ranch), Surgeon Pest Control Services, LLC (Mosquito Squad of Fayetteville and Southern Pines), Surgeon Property Inspection Services, LLC (AmeriSpec), Premier Healthcare Services, Inc., Cornerstone Treatment Facility, Inc. and CTFP Inc. Across three states, Surgeon has 400 employees. Across Greater Fayetteville Business Journal’s footprint specifically, which covers Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Moore, Robeson, Bladen and Sampson Counties, Surgeon said his businesses employ about 170 people. One of his more recent ventures is Sweet Valley Ranch, which was born of a vision to offer something to the community while also being involved in the community. “We introduced that to Fayetteville through our Festival of Lights attraction,” he said. After 2020 was successful for the event, he started thinking of ways he could replicate it. “I started thinking about dinosaurs,” Surgeon said. “As a result of that, we’re the only permanent dinosaur attraction in North Carolina, South Carolina. There’s not another one … We wanted to create a whole different experience.” Sweet Valley Ranch is indirectly hiring over 82 people. “It’s created new opportunities and impacted the local economy,” he said. Surgeon said that when he talks to guests at the attraction, he finds that many travel from outside of the region. “They say, ‘Oh, I’m coming from Raleigh,’ or ‘I’m coming from Virginia, Tennessee.’ Well, a lot of those people are staying at a hotel. They’re going to buy gas,” he said. “They’re going to a restaurant … They’re going to other events. To me, when you can bring people to your area to support your business and they support other businesses, that’s what it’s all about. We try to double down on that in creating Sweet Valley Ranch.” Last year, Sweet Valley Ranch raised $25,000 for local charities, like Habitat for Humanity, Rick’s Place,

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY SWEET VALLEY RANCH

Fred Surgeon explains that one of his favorite parts of Sweet Valley Ranch is seeing the impact it has on the community.

and Operation Inasmuch. Surgeon pointed out that businesses tend to intersect with each other, and that’s part of the way he’s come to be involved with so many businesses himself. “Maybe one day you want to sell your house. Well, you need a home inspection. There you go, AmeriSpec. Merry Maids [doesn’t] clean carpets, so we were having to refer … Now we can refer you to OxiFresh, which is part of our umbrella.” Sweet Valley Ranch has over 350 animals. So, Surgeon got involved with Mosquito Squad to help combat mosquitoes and flies that were attracted to the area. “I believe you invest the time, learn the business, learn it well, and replicate that,” he said. And that statement has rang true throughout his business ventures. Surgeon said he has always been involved in each new operation, attending trainings, being present at the office, and learning about the franchises. One of the early challenges Surgeon faced in business was being able to develop a strong relationship with a financial institution. “I felt like, when I would call and say, ‘Hey, I have this opportunity. I need some help, some support,’ I didn’t feel like I was getting personalized banking service,” he said. When Surgeon began working with Lumbee Guaranty Bank, which has a smaller footprint, he found success. Not only was he able to purchase the land for Sweet Valley Ranch, which is 300 acres, their ideas allowed him

to invest $3.5 million dollars in the property over six years. Surgeon expressed his gratitude for the ability to partner with organizations like Lumbee Guaranty Bank, Fayetteville-based Utley & Knowles, a Scotland County insurance company, and a Raleigh-based law firm in conducting his business. Now, Surgeon takes pride in being able to afford new opportunities to his employees, too. “Being 51 years old now … the highlight for me is creating opportunities for other people – not just our employees, but our contractors, our electricians, our plumbers. But focusing on the employees, where maybe we’ve hired someone and they are a cleaner, and now they’re managing an office or they’ve moved to where they are involved in training or they’re not just in a silo of residential cleaning, but they’re doing more regional, corporate responsibilities,” he said. He enjoys what he does. Surgeon describes time “looking at a camel” and “spending time in the pigeon loft,” but one of his favorite parts of his work is seeing the impact that his business has on the community firsthand. “When we open Dinosaur World, and you see all those children, or when we’re opening for our springtime adventures and you see families out there riding go-karts and you get to meet them and hear their stories, to me, that is an awesome opportunity.” His biggest supporter has been his wife, Anita. “She has gone out of her way to support me. It’s not every day you tell your wife, ‘I’m thinking about

buying a zebra,’” he said. But even though he faced many early failures, he said, Anita has been by his side every step of the way. His advice to someone starting in business is this: “When you decide, ‘Hey, I want to go into business,’ do not do it for money. Fulfill a need. You’ve got to enjoy it. “You have to give your life. You have to be all in. The money will come. But, when I invested in Sweet Valley Ranch, my goal was to have the best possible attraction farm … I’m trying to fulfill a need. I’m 100 percent all in.” Part of what being “all in” means to Surgeon is participating actively in the community. He serves on Lumbee Guaranty’s board now and as the chairperson of the Fayetteville Area Convention & Visitors Bureau board. Surgeon has a message for the local community: Great opportunities are ahead. “I’m listening to the areas where your readers are,” he said. “We’ve been through some downturns related to the pandemic and a whole lot of other things, but the future is bright. I see things building back, not just in terms of my industries, but in all the industries. The sky’s the limit. I encourage folks, if they have the desire to make a difference, and there’s a need out there, and they have passion to follow those entrepreneurial dreams, I promise it won’t be easy, but when they get to the end of the road, they’ll look back and say, ‘Wow, it’s definitely worth it.’”


Page 12

HEALTH CARE

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

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Savanah Ramsey

HealthKeeperz FAITH-BASED HEALTH CARE COMPANY SEEKS TO BENEFIT COMMUNITIES IT SERVES

F

or more than fifty years, HealthKeeperz has served the health care needs of the people of North Carolina. The company traces its roots back to 1966 when Howard Brooks established Pembroke Drug Center, a community-based pharmacy for the people of Pembroke and surrounding areas. Throughout the decades, the pressure of Brooks caring for his family of five children led to the need to innovate. Brooks took many risks and created the opportunity to provide different home care services that led the company well into the nineties. This catapulted the company into Medicare Certified Home Health, which sends nurses and physical therapists into homes to help clients. In the early 2000s, the company expanded its service offerings. Today, Healthkeeperz has four core services: Home Health, Hospice, Home Medical Equipment, and Community Alternatives Program Case Management. CAP Case Management is a program associated with North Carolina's Medicaid program. Essentially, it allows patients to have options. If one qualifies for being in a skilled nursing facility, as long as they meet the requirements of health, safety, and wellbeing, they are allowed to choose the option to be taken care of at home. "We want to be sure people are healthy at home," said Tim Brooks, president of HealthKeeperz. "Our job is to oversee their care and make sure healthcare services are being provided, and there is some sense of wellbeing for these people we care for." As the company continues to grow, the vision of the future becomes brighter. "If you think about healthcare, there's always this desire or need for people not to work in silos," stated Brooks. "So what case management does is create that bridge across different silos, which allows that idea to become used in different ways." Brooks is constantly thinking of ways to use the idea of taking a network of case managers and using it in other settings. "For example, there is a cross-pollination of people who have things like heart disease and some

“We want to be compassionate, take ownership, be excellent in care and put family first”

PHOTO PROVIDED BY HEALTHKEEPERZ

HealthKeeperz serves Alamance, Alexander, Anson, Bladen, Camden, Chatham, Columbus, Cumberland, Currituck, Davidson, Forsyth, Guilford, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Pasquotank, Richmond, Robeson, Sampson and Scotland Counties.

mental health conditions. These are not separated but treated as such. Case Management could be used to bridge them so the person is being addressed more integrally and allow providers to talk to each other," explained Brooks. Since working with CAP Case Management, the company has expanded throughout Southeastern North Carolina. Most of the customers, clients and patients of HealthKeeperz are usually people who have Medicare and are 65 years old and older. Typically, these customers need a knee or hip replacement or have several chronic conditions that need extensive care. There is a small percentage of some of the customers that are under Medicaid, which is more income-based. With COVID-19, it has been a rollercoaster trying to treat patients through HealthKeeperz. "In the beginning, there was a great deal of fear about someone

coming into the patient's homes," Brooks said. "We had patients tell our nurses and therapists, 'We'd rather you not come,' which is reasonable and I understand that. On the other side, hospitals are bombarded with patients and are asking for us to help get people home." As new variants continue to impact the world, HealthKeeperz will continue to see both sides of the dilemma, but the mission of the company stays the same to “care for all people for the glory of GOD.” Faith has been a prominent aspect since the company's inception in the 1960s, with the idea that company seeks to honor God. However, even with faith playing a role in the company's core values, it does not force others to fall in line with the faith. No one in the company is required to believe. Some people work or have worked at HealthKeeperz who disagree with the faith. However, they want to see good things happen and provide help to those who need it.

"We have this leadership philosophy that says this company doesn't flourish unless its people flourish. We all play different roles. I see my role as one in which it's my job to help create an environment where people can flourish," Brooks added. "If a nurse is here, and they are flourishing in their work, that's going to impact their life at home and their life in the community." The efforts to see people flourish and the desire to have a beneficial impact is what HealthKeeperz refers to as “Barnabas Culture.” Every quarter, anyone in the company can be recommended for the Barnabas Award. Workers within the company can nominate others and fill out a questionnaire about how the nominee has lived out the company's core values. At the end of the year, there is also a 'Big Barnabas Award' winner. The idea of the Barnabas culture is to create awareness about what you know and what you're trying to achieve. "We want to be compassionate, take ownership, be excellent in care and put family first," Brooks explained. "With all these things in mind, we want to recognize people who are living that out, and are good examples for us all to see." The concept of Barnabus Culture stems from the Bible. Barnabus was a biblical figure who guided the Apostle Paul and helped with missionary journeys. HealthKeeperz's goals for the foreseeable future are to continue being a part of something greater and to create something different in healthcare. It is heavily encouraged throughout the company to find joy in different forms – finding real joy, so that it will bleed over into one's personal life and their life in their communities or families, not just in a professional atmosphere. "I believe that we can do well, and I believe that we have in the communities we serve that ultimately have an economic impact that will also impact families and health care," Brooks said. "I believe that we can take this idea of flourishing, and the results will be huge. If at the end of my career, I look back and I can see that, I will be happy."


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

American Uniform Sales Inc 321 E. RUSSELL STREET FAYETTEVILLE, NC 28301-5743 PHONE: (910) 323-1336 • FAX: (910) 323-0660 www.americanuniform.com

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IN THE NEWS

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

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Jobs by the numbers

W

By Scott Nunn

DATA SHOWS EMPLOYMENT NUMBERS ARE GETTING BETTER. EXPERTS SAY MORE OPPORTUNITIES ARE IN THE PIPELINE.

ith the pandemic still gripping the state, the jobless rate in the Fayetteville metropolitan statistical area hit 8.2 percent in December 2020, the highest among North Carolina’s 15 metro areas and above the statewide unemployment rate of 6 percent. The 4.8 percent rate in December was 14th highest among metros, with Rocky Point at 5 percent. The state average in December was 3.2 percent. Month-over-month, the MSA’s December number was an improvement over November’s 5.1 percent. Officials with the N.C. Department of Commerce, which tracks employment, noted that because of seasonal changes it is advisable to focus on year-over-year changes. Among the state’s metro areas, Durham/Chapel Hill had the lowest jobless rate in December at 2.5 percent, followed by Asheville at 2.6 percent, Raleigh at 2.6 percent and Wilmington at 2.7 percent. Although there are soft spots in the Fayetteville employment market, the area has many new jobs in the pipeline, with businesses such as the recently announced Amazon facility. In addition to the reliability of military-related jobs, the Fayetteville area is increasingly attracting companies in the traded-business sector, which provide goods and services outside the region in which they are located. An economy relying more than ever on transportation services, Fayetteville’s location on Interstate 95 between Florida and New York makes good sense for the logistics industry, which keeps supply lines flowing. Shari Fiveash, president and CEO of the Fayetteville Chamber of Commerce believes that a big name and industry leader such as Amazon will further elevate the region’s reputation for supply line based services. ‘Having been in other communities, when one large firm like Amazon sets up, often so do others,” Fiveash told the Greater Fayetteville Business Journal. “They did their homework and others will take notice.” Having a good pool of qualified, reliable employees – often connected in some way with the military community – also is a draw for the area, especially at a time when many employers find it difficult to fill positions.

GRAPHIC BY NC DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Despite the effects of COVID-19, industries have learned a variety of lessons over the last couple of years, which has helped with unemployment numbers over time.

Fiveash believes government, economic development and education institutions have to focus not just on workforce development but on ensuring workers have the skills and qualifications employers are looking for. Fortunately, said Fiveash, the area has obtained significant grants and other funding for that work without having to pass the cost on to taxpayers. “We are … looking forward, understanding what our needs are as a community, and best using grants to get there versus. passing it on to the citizens,” Fiveash said. She pointed to Toyota, which is investing $1.3 billion for a lithium battery plant near Greensboro “Toyota works with its ecosystem and has so many partners located near their facilities,” Fiveash said. “With our military influence, we have trained, hard-working employees who are perfect for many technical jobs.” And those trained workers also start their own business with the skills they may have learned in the military. That is why business incubators are so important, Fiveash said. “Many former military (members) open businesses, but need the resources and knowledge an incubator can offer.” Robert Van Geons, CEO and president of FCEDC, expects 2022 to offer new opportunities in the workforce. “Assuming the national and global economy remains strong, we anticipate hundreds of new jobs here in Fayetteville and Cumberland County,” he said. “Importantly, these

opportunities will be in a variety of industries including e-commerce, technology, financial services and health care. These companies will be looking for employees with an array of experience, from entry level workers to highly skilled technicians.” In all non-farm sectors, the Fayetteville MSA had a net gain of 2,100 jobs in December compared to the previous month. Government added 900 jobs in December, edging out the Trade, Transportation and Utilities sector, which added 800 jobs. The hard-hit Leisure and Hospitality sector is steadily coming back, with employment growing by 1.8 percent in December and 15 percent since December 2020. At the county level, Cumberland had the same unemployment rate in December as the FMSA – 4.8 percent. Elsewhere, the jobless rate was 4.5 percent in Hoke County, 2.8 percent in Moore, 3.6 in Harnett and 3 percent in Sampson. Statewide, commerce department officials said the monthly unemployment rate improved in 91 of North Carolina’s 100 counties. Also, all of the state’s metro areas saw their jobless rates drop for the year. And, Van Geons points out, more and more companies want to come to the region. “Now, more than ever,” he said, “workforce availability and talent are driving location decisions. Our community, significantly and positively impacted by Fort Bragg, offers a young, diverse, and dependable workforce that employers can draw from. We are receiving new inquiries from companies almost ev-

ery day and are incredibly optimistic about 2022.” Teddy Warner, a business services representative with the Mid-Carolina Council of Governments, believes the biggest current challenge is matching workers with employers. He said the pandemic shined a light on the marriage of technology and work, but there's still a chasm. “COVID showed the opportunities with technology but we still need to improve it, especially as it relates to connecting job seekers to businesses and everything that comes with it,” Warner told the Greater Fayetteville Business Journal. He said that pre-COVID the program he works with had 500 people per week coming into the career center looking for jobs and training opportunities. There also were faceto-face job fairs. “We're trying our best to get back to where we can have larger events and things like that, but, you know, there's still a challenge and the technology programs just aren't there yet, in my opinion, to connect people the way that they should,” Warner said. Even when he has workers posting jobs, the potential employer may not know how to navigate the process. “A lot of businesses are going to expect an online application, a resume,” Warner said. “What if you don't have access to the internet? What if you don't have an updated resume or even understand the need for a resume. “Things used to be more in-person, face to face,” he said. “We're trying to adapt.”


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February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

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By Jenna Shackelford

Property maintenance tech program FTCC PARTNERS WITH W.S WELLONS REALTY, INC. AND GREATER FAYETTEVILLE APARTMENT ASSOCIATION FOR NEW PROGRAM

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ack in 2017, Gregory Moore, the director of customized and industry training at Fayetteville Technical Community College, said a dean at the school received news that the region needed property maintenance technicians. In an effort to fill employment gaps, the idea for a property maintenance tech program was born. “We started calling it the apartment maintenance tech program,” Moore said. “And then we realized it’s a lot more than just apartments, so we opened up the name to say property maintenance.” Moore reached out to the National Apartment Association which connected him with the Greater Fayetteville Apartment Association so they could identify which needs could be met through a program at FTCC. “They came over and visited the campus several times and we started trying to sculpt what would be beneficial to them and what would keep a person on the continuing ed side. We try to be fairly nimble,” Moore said. “We don’t want to hold somebody up for a year if we want them to be able to come and get skills and then move on, so we were asking for their input and then also with Wellons, with Mr. [Billy] Wellons being part of our board, we were mentioning to him that we were working on that so he put us in contact with Jeremy [Seeland]. Then we started including Jeremy and some other folks from Wellons in developing what the scope of the class should be and what we should cover,” Moore said. “We worked with FTCC and other members of the community to discuss the need for formal training in the apartment/housing maintenance sector,” Manager of W.S. Wellons Realty Rental division Jeremy Seeland said. “We collaborated over what we thought would be best for the student once they completed their training and how they would be able to be most effective in their career.” Seeland oversees operations, control, and physical property oversight of real estate rental properties with the company. “And then everybody knows about

PHOTO BY NATASHA BROWN/FTCC

A completion ceremony for the first class of FTCC's Property Maintenance Technician program was held on the Fayetteville campus on Dec. 15, 2021.

2020, so everything skidded to a stop,” Moore said. The first class began in October of 2021. “This program provides basic understanding of many different aspects that a maintenance technician will encounter and by having these skills and knowledge, they will be able to help both tenants and businesses excel at providing customer service. It gives each graduate confidence in being able to repair common issues as well as continue to learn and build upon the basics,” Seeland said. “It’s fairly short. It’s 280 hours, so it’s around 7 weeks of class time. It’s 8-5 during the day,” Moore said. “They do 40 hours of electrical, 40 hours of carpentry, 40 hours of plumbing, 40 hours of HVAC, and included in that is two days of appliance repair, there’s CPO certification, which is certified pool operator. Both Wellons Realty and the GFAA wanted them to include the CPO certification, so we actually went next door to the YMCA. They have a pool right beside our building at Fayetteville Tech. We did the pool portion there.” There’s also another certificate called the EPA refrigerant recovery which certifies the students to

handle changing out the refrigerants for a cooling unit. They also got a OSHA ten-hour card. “We tried to start with safety and instill safety into every part of the conversation,” Moore said. “So they get those three certifications.” The program started with nine students and ended with five, with one female and four male students. Moore hopes that more female students will continue to pursue the program, although he recognizes that maintenance tends to be male-dominated. “It’s been great to see everybody have a chance at that because it sounds like there’s a big need, not just in Fayetteville, but across North Carolina and also all across the U.S.,” Moore said. “We want to be able to get them through the class and then have them ready to go into different careers. There was one person from the GFAA who visited the class and I liked her advice. She just kind of cautioned them. She said, ‘As you go into interviews, make sure you don’t go in with too much confidence.’ Forty hours, one week of electrical, does not make you a professional electrician. It teaches you the basics,” Moore said. “But she said to be honest with them about what you’re strong in and what you’re struggling

in. Because we need these people to come out and then be mentored in the particular field… They may still need someone to walk along with them but they can improve and they’ll come to class for two months and have a good attitude and be willing to learn.” The next class will be offered in April. Moore said hands-on activities are important in the program, so the class sizes will likely stay at a maximum of 12. The program is an open-enrollment class, and with the community college system, the maximum price that can be charged is $180 dollars per person. There is an $8 fee for the OSHA card that is charged on top of the program. “I think it’s a very good value for the students,” he said. If someone is struggling to come up with that money, though, Moore said they have a variety of resources to tap into to try to help the student, like scholarships and funds from the school. “There seems to be within industry what we’re calling a silver tsunami,” Moore said. “There are a lot of older folks and we really need some other folks to come in behind this wave of retirees to come in and fill those positions. I think it’s important to your customers and to that industry … But one of the officers with the GFAA encouraged the class by saying, ‘You’re probably one of the most important people the customers could ever meet.’ They could be happy with the location and happy with the amenities, but if you are frustrated that every time you come in an appliance still isn’t repaired, or you’ve got a hole in your wall that they said would be repaired and the resident feels like they aren’t feeling listened to or are just being pushed to the side, that maintenance, or lack of maintenance, can really have a big effect on whether that person wants to stay from a retention standpoint. You want your renters to stay. That maintenance and the follow-through is a really important part for the business owners.”


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

Page 17

bizfayetteville.com >>

By Savanah Ramsey

New business school METCON COMPLETES CONSTRUCTION OF UNCP'S THOMAS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

THE COMMUNITY BANK OF THE NATION’S CAPITAL IS NOW IN THE CAROLINAS. United Bank, the largest community bank headquartered in the DC Metro Region, is excited to expand its presence in the Carolinas. For more than 180 years we have been providing excellence in service to our shareholders, customers, communities and employees. Focusing on relationships and service, we have the capacity, the expertise and the technology to meet any of your banking needs. At United, we make it easy.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY METCON

Construction of a new signature building on the UNCP campus is now complete.

C

onstruction for the new James A. Thomas School of Business at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke is now complete. "We are thankful to Mr. Thomas and to our legislators who believe in UNCP and its potential to transform our region and invested to make this building a reality," stated UNCP Chancellor Robin Gary Cummings. "We opened the doors for the first classes a few weeks ago at the start of the spring semester, and we can already see the additional learning opportunities and resources it allows. Our data shows 80 percent or more of our alumni stay in the area after graduating, meaning we're educating the future business leaders of our region. For decades to come, James A. Thomas Hall will be a modern learning environment second to none, and a space worthy of our world-class faculty, our exceptional staff, and most importantly, our students." The construction for the School of Business was headed up by Metcon, a local, minority-owned construction firm located in Pembroke. Over the years, Metcon has done many projects for UNCP and received this opportunity after an extensive interview process, competing against other construction firms in the area.

Senior Project Manager Samantha Locklear led the Metcon team throughout the construction period. Locklear has been with Metcon for almost eighteen years and has been a trailblazer in the construction industry for women. With this flagship project, Locklear was the key to the operations behind the new building. The design of the new building came to life when the chancellor and dean of the school went to other universities and visited their business schools to look at their foundations. A Raleigh architecture firm helped finalize the blueprint before construction began. This 62,000-square-foot, two-story building contains multiple classrooms, seminar rooms, an auditorium, cafe, media rooms and a high technology stock trading room. "UNCP is a driver for economic change and growth, and our new School of Business building, James A. Thomas Hall, will further our role and impact in southeastern North Carolina," Cummings explained. The amount of technology invested in the building also makes this the most energy-positive building on campus. The total cost of the School of Business was $35 million.

Learn more at BankWithUnited.com/BankUnited Member FDIC


Page 18

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

Page 19

THE LIST

bizfayetteville.com

Medical Clinics Medical Clinics

Ranked by Google rating and no. of Google reviews Ranked by Google rating and no. of Google reviews COMPANYCOMPANY NAME NAME LOCATION LOCATION

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EMERGEORTHO-DUNN

1

22 4

2

5

64 7

5

7

6 7 77 117 11

117 11

7

11

OPTIMAL BIO

125 Murray Hill Road Southern Pines, N.C. 28387

GOOGLE PLACES RATING

# GOOGLE REVIEWS

910-377-6650 https://optimalbio.com/?utm_source=GMB&utm_medium=Organic&utm_campaign=GMBListingSouthernPines

5

313

910-891-2432 https://emergeortho.com/triangle-region/?utm_source=GMBSocialClimb&utm_medium=EmergeOrtho-Dunn

5

30

910-377-6650 https://optimalbio.com/?utm_source=GMB&utm_medium=Organic&utm_campaign=GMBListingSouthernPine

125 Murray Hill Road N.C. 28387

Pines, 741-ASouthern Tilghman Drive Dunn, N.C. 28334

EMERGEORTHO-DUNN

910-891-2432 910-944-5600 5 30 https://www.dogwooddental.net/ https://emergeortho.com/triangle-region/?utm_source=GMBSocialClimb&utm_medium=EmergeOrtho-Dunn

DOGWOOD FAMILY DENTAL

741-A Tilghman 908 North Sandhills BoulevardDrive Aberdeen, N.C.N.C. 28315 28334 Dunn, DR. RITT KUHN DMD

DOGWOOD FAMILY DENTAL

910-692-4450 https://kuhndentist.com/dr-ritt-kuhn/

1902 North Sandhills Boulevard Aberdeen, N.C. 28315

908 North Sandhills Boulevard DR. WALTER S. MORRIS MD, FACP Aberdeen, N.C.III, 28315 390 Southwest Broad Street Southern Pines, N.C. 28387

DR. RITT KUHN DMD

COASTAL SOUTHEASTERN FAMILY PRACTICE

1902 205 West 3rd North Street Sandhills Boulevard Pembroke, N.C. 28372 Aberdeen, N.C. 28315 HOPE MEDICAL CLINIC P.A.

DR. WALTER S. MORRIS III, MD, FACP

518 Sandhurst Drive Fayetteville, N.C. 28304 390 Southwest

Broad Street ABERDEEN PHYSICAL THERAPY Southern Pines, N.C. 28387 200 North Poplar Street Aberdeen, N.C. 28315

COASTAL SOUTHEASTERN FAMILY PRACTICE

HARNETT ORTHOPAEDICS 205 HEALTH West 3rd Street AND SPORTS MEDICINE

Pembroke, N.C. 28372

716 South 10th Street Lillington, N.C. 27546

HOPE MEDICAL CLINIC P.A.

HOPE FAMILY CENTER

518 Sandhurst 210 Magnolia Square CourtDrive Aberdeen, N.C. 28315 N.C. 28304 Fayetteville,

FAKHRI INTERNAL MEDICINE: FAKHRI M PHYSICAL THERAPY IYADABERDEEN MD 741-B200 Tilghman Drive North Poplar Dunn, N.C. 28334

Street Aberdeen, N.C. 28315

ZIA ASIF MD

HARNETT HEALTH ORTHOPAEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE HOROWITZ JOEL MD 716 South 10th Street Lillington, N.C. 27546

1841 716 Quiet South Cove 10th Street Fayetteville, N.C. 28304 Lillington, N.C. 27546

HASSINGER EQUINE SPORTS MEDICINE & HOPE FAMILY CENTER REHABILITATION 450 Addor Road 210 N.C. Magnolia Aberdeen, 28315

Square Court Aberdeen, N.C. 28315 DR. DAVID D STEWART

FAKHRI INTERNAL MEDICINE: FAKHRI M MYRAIYAD DEESEMD HALL, MD 114 Broadfoot Avenue Fayetteville, N.C. 28305

Aberdeen, N.C. 28315

11

16

Dunn, N.C. 28334

ROSS TRAVIS

SouthCARE 10th WEST716 PRIMARY INCStreet

27546

HOROWITZ JOELMDMD DR. AGODICHI U. NWOSU,

11 3613 1841 16 RaefordQuiet Road Cove

Fayetteville, N.C. 28314N.C. Fayetteville,

28304

20

ANTIL MICHAEL A MD

20

450 Addor 227 Beaman Street Road Clinton, N.C. 28328 N.C. 28315 Aberdeen,

11

HASSINGER EQUINE SPORTS MEDICINE & REHABILITATION ELIZABETH D BRYAN MD PA 15 Regional Drive Pinehurst, N.C. 28374

CAPE FEAR CENTER FOR DIGESTIVE: GUPTA

DR.MDDAVID D STEWART 20 1880 114 Quiet Broadfoot Cove 11 RAKESH Avenue

15

5

10

910-692-4450 5 https://kuhndentist.com/dr-ritt-kuhn/

8

910-500-0909 910-695-9000 5 6 https://www.hopemednc.com/ https://www.mdvip.com/doctors/waltermorrismd?utm_source=listing&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=listin t=rep_ 910-944-1169 5

6

5

6

910-500-0909 https://www.hopemednc.com/5

6

https://www.aberdeenptw.com/

910-521-0099 910-893-4041 http://www.myharnetthealth.org/ortho 910-944-0779 https://www.accesstothehopefamilycenter.com/ 910-304-1045

910-814-1212 http://lillingtonmedicalservices.org/ 910-323-2626 http://www.villagesurgical.com/ 910-281-4845 http://www.hassingerequineservice.com/

5 910-944-1169 https://www.aberdeenptw.com/ 5

910-893-4041 http://www.myharnetthealth.org/ortho 5 5 910-944-0779 https://www.accesstothehopefamilycenter.com/

910-484-1156

910-304-1045

910-944-0779 http://www.accesstothehopefamilycenter.com/ 910-423-7771

ZIA ASIF MD

3622 North Main Street Hope Mills, N.C. 28348

Lillington, 102 Livermore Drive N.C. Pembroke, N.C. 28372

910-521-0099

5

910-944-5600 https://www.dogwooddental.net/

910-695-9000 https://www.mdvip.com/doctors/waltermorrismd?utm_source=listing&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=listing&stt=rep_

11 210 Magnolia 16 Court Drive 741-BSquare Tilghman 16

PHONE WEBSITE

PHONE WEBSITE

910-521-8484

5

5

5

5

4

5

4

5

4

910-323-2626 5 http://www.villagesurgical.com/

910-255-4400 https://www.pinehurstmedical.com/primarycare/michael-a-antil-md/

5

5

910-814-1212 http://lillingtonmedicalservices.org/

910-483-0018 http://www.carolinaheartphysicians.com/

5

5

4

3

910-592-8243 http://elizabethbryanmd.com/

910-281-4845 http://www.hassingerequineservice.com/ 5

3

910-323-2477 http://www.cfcdd.com/

910-484-1156

5

3

5

3

5

3

5

3

Fayetteville, N.C. 28304

20

16

20

Fayetteville, N.C. 28305

MICHAEL J. BARTISS OD, MD

MYRA DEESE HALL, MD

1902 North Sandhills Boulevard Aberdeen, N.C. 28315

210 HEALTH Magnolia Square HARNETT WOUND CARE Court CENTER Aberdeen, 803 Tilghman Drive Dunn, N.C. 28334

N.C. 28315

ROSS TRAVIS

16 205 State 20 3622 North Road 1208 Main Street DR. MICHAEL A. ANTIL, MD Pinehurst, N.C.Mills, 28374 Hope

N.C. 28348

910-692-2020 http://www.feccweb.com/ 910-230-7858 https://myharnetthealth.org/wound-care-center/

910-944-0779 http://www.accesstothehopefamilycenter.com/

910-295-5511 https://www.pinehurstmedical.com/primarycare/michael-a-antil-md/

910-423-7771

Ranking includes Google data from GFBJ coverage area (Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Moore, Robeson, Bladen and Sampson Counties).

16

WEST PRIMARY CARE INC 102 Livermore Drive Pembroke, N.C. 28372

910-521-8484


Page 20

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

BIZ LEADS Reader’s Guide BizLeads is a collection of information gathered from greater Fayetteville courthouses, state government offices and information websites. The listings are intended to help the business community find new customers and stay on top of happenings with current customers, vendors and competitors. New Corporations lists firms from the Greater Fayetteville Business Journal region that were recently incorporated in the State of North Carolina.

CUMBERLAND COUNTY

Nsurance LLC 158 Rachel Rd Fayetteville Agent: Nathan Newsome Rapha Urgent Care PLLC 1905 Skibo Rd ste 106 Fayetteville Agent: Jacob O Balogun Dramatic Play Learning Academy LLC 2398 Riverchase Place Fayetteville Agent: Zelinda Artis Shirley Home Care LLC 304 Neville Street Fayetteville Agent: Monica S Kenner Cedar Creek Fish Farm LLC 7270 Matt Hair Road Fayetteville Agent: Duane D. Stone Sr. Hope Church of Hope Mills Inc. 3613 Camson Rd. Fayetteville Agent: Eleuterio Sanchez Jr

Reilly Road Properties LLC 150 N. McPherson Church Rd. Ste B Fayetteville Agent: George D. Regan Jr. Southern Luxe Rentals and Property Management LLC 5234 Hidden Valley Pl Fayetteville Agent: Derrick Larue Jarmon Wilson Technology LLC 816 Larkspur Drive Fayetteville Agent: Ronald Jay Wilson Menace Music LLC 85 Woodwind Dr Spring Lake Agent: Tre Porter Jr Presha Transportation LLC 735 Wiltshire Rd Fayetteville Agent: Vernon Terrell Presha Efflorescence Beauty LLC 154 London Ct #8 Fayetteville Agent: Ashley Jones

Jo on the Go LLC 3596 Gazella Cir Fayetteville Agent: Joy Graves

Fayetteville Agent: Abundant Living Consulting Corporation LLC

Another Helping Please Catering LLC 463 Balfour Place Fayetteville Agent: Tonya Detrice Jenkins

BabyIveyLLC 3939 Rosehill Rd Fayetteville Agent: Yahmena M Ivey

Jonesz Trucking and Styling LLC 3575 S Peak Drive Fayetteville Agent: Sharlene Raynor Jones Gem Ratings LLC 2514 Spinnaker Dr. Fayetteville Agent: Rachel L Council PML Solutions Inc 824 Bedrock Dr. Fayetteville Agent: Tonya D Echos ALIVE MOVEMENT 706 Windy Hill Cir. #B Fayetteville Agent: Daniel Danhyo Kim 9615 FAYETTEVILLE ROAD LLC 307 Person Street Fayetteville Agent: J. D. Gilliam Colvin & Paye Funeral Directors LLC 2515 Murchison Rd Suite B Fayetteville Agent: Michael Colvin General Truck Repairs LLC 100 Hay Street Ste 503

The Fade Suppliers LLC 2908 Rayburn Dr Eastover Agent: Winston West Mohammed Living My Blessed Life LLC 713 Rustland Dr Fayetteville Agent: Tracye Renee DeVane Naturally Exquisite Styles by Sha LLC 1432 Deer Trail Dr Apt 106 Fayetteville Agent: Asharri Morielle Haswell Top Tier Notary Services LLC 7237 Reedy Creek Drive Fayetteville Agent: Montietta Shanice Wilson Webb's Transportation LLC 2304 Cumberland Bay Dr Apt 202 Fayetteville Agent: Nelson Lee Webb III Flip Holdings LLC 6216 Yadkin Rd Fayetteville Agent: Thomas Frank Moody Freight Guy LLC 318 Circle Drive Fayetteville Agent: Robert Lee Guy

Mogul World LLC 3051 Stone Carriage Circle Apt G Fayetteville Agent: Kenneth Bryant K & J Design Wear LLC 1876 Ellie Avenue Fayetteville Agent: Kimberly F. King Financial Investments Group LLC 119 Old Gate Rd Fayetteville Agent: Kfir Nurieli H - Pro Home Inspection Services LLC 2705 Fordham Drive Fayetteville Agent: Tyrone Hendry Right Hand Hermetics LLC 2806 Norcliff Dr. Fayetteville Agent: Chad E. Brack

bizfayetteville.com

Fayetteville Agent: Cheryl Boone On Demand Solutions LLC 3011 Tettenbury Dr Fayetteville Agent: Darleathia Haliburton B.A.T.A. dispatching and logistics L.L.C. 816 Hilton Drive Fayetteville Agent: Marlon Robinson So Faded Barber Lounge LLC 2945 Hope Mills Rd Suite 112 Fayetteville Agent: Axel Rivera 78 South Homeowners Association Inc. 2939 Breezewood Ave Ste 100 Fayetteville Agent: Little and Young Inc.

4733 Banks Ct Hope Mills Agent: Elliot Skillern

Drive Fayetteville Agent: Anthony Leroy Woods

The Wright Freight LLC 1479 Snowy Egret Drive Fayetteville Agent: Decarlos Antonio Wright

Huscle&Braid LLC 1926 Shiloh Drive Fayetteville Agent: Colbi Taylor

DAB II Rentals LLC 1930 North Pearl St. Fayetteville Agent: Darryl Antonio Bonner II All Season Long Lawncare LLC 321 Bedfordshire Place Fayetteville Agent: Martrina Cierra Powell Mcken trucking LLC 816 Foxcroft Drive Fayetteville Agent: Shamar Antonio McKen

Millows Transport Services LLC 1637 Tysor Dr. Fayetteville Agent: Jimillah Denise Jackson

Guate-Mex LLC 7711 S Raeford Rd Ste 102-199 Fayetteville Agent: Mind Creation Vision and Solution LLC

TWIN OWL RENTALS LLP 5511 Raeford Rd. Ste 100 Fayetteville Agent: Korey L Revels

Glow Head Inc 1601 Holloman Drive Fayetteville Agent: Garlinda Michelle Price

House of Fupaa LLC 4487 Ruby Rd Fayetteville Agent: Savonnie Washington

589 Braxton LLC 589 Braxton Blvd Fayetteville Agent: Shereka Shackleford

K Code LLC 6060 Hunters Run Fayetteville Agent: Vensent Lemont Goodman

BossMan Transport LLC 1089 Strickland Bridge Road Fayetteville Agent: Cherie Renee McCall

C & A Consultant Services LLC 310 Durant Dr.

Skillz Landscaping LLC

NC Turtle Research & Rescue Foundation Inc 211 Woodrow St. Fayetteville Agent: Ginger Zuravel Anubis Properties LLC 740 Dalmore

DSM Liquidations LLC 5150 Marsh Rd Fayetteville Agent: Devan Stuart Miranda The Country Mini Mart LLC 2219 La Dunham Rd Fayetteville Agent: Shadad Abdo Ali Sharaf Abby's Empanadas LLC 2036 River Rd. Fayetteville Agent: Alberto Lagos JAS AUTOMATION LLC 7842 Amesbury Rd. Fayetteville Agent: James Sutton AYAAN87 INC 256 S Main St Spring Lake Agent: Numan Gondal The Wright Family Shih Tzus LLC. 515 Grand Wailea Dr. apt 1213 Hope Mills Agent: Amanda Grace Pastore Elite Financial Mentors LLC. 4512 Plainview Fayetteville Agent: Chanelle L Woodward


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

BIZ LEADS

bizfayetteville.com

2MANY T'S LLC 1012 Cork Oak Circle Fayetteville Agent: Tichella Shanea Britton Lemaj Holdings LLC 5741 Crenshaw Dr Hope Mills Agent: Jamel Dumas D LAND LOGGERS LLC 1711 Rock Branch Rd Eastover Agent: David E Gill J Solez LLC 149 Wading Creek Ln Apt 102 Fayetteville Agent: Jayson F Fernandez Renee's Compassionate Senior Care Services LLC 7534 Selwyn Ct Fayetteville Agent: Renee King

Southern Girl Kitchen & Treats LLC 1712 Ellie Ave Fayetteville Agent: Mary Bell 401 Garage LLC 215 Windsor Drive Fayetteville Agent: Aaron Jamal McIver Iron Mike Auto Rentals LLC 1905 North St Apt I Fayetteville Agent: Michael Doron Shannon II Fayetteville 271 LLC 207 Fairway Drive Fayetteville Agent: Aces High Inc. Fayetteville 272 LLC 207 Fairway Drive Fayetteville Agent: Aces High Inc.

Effortless Essence LLC 2569 Cumberland Creek Drive. Apt. 101 Fayetteville Agent: Brittany O'Neal

THE CONSTRUCTION COUSINS L.L.C. 4118 Riverpoint Dr Fayetteville Agent: Michael Jaiden Iannone

Prodigious Lifestyle & Co LLC 517 St Thomas Rd Fayetteville Agent: Franceska Jasmine Dwarica

Proud Peacock Bridal LLC 952 Screech Owl Dr. Hope Mills Agent: Shonte Christina Stallings

Parisi Family LLC 3915 Gaithersburg Lane Hope Mills Agent: Nicolino Parisi Jr

K&T Solutions LLC 5353 Red Tip rd STE 106 Fayetteville Agent: Tewlee Boone

NC Living Solutions LLC 6555 Angleton Ct. Parkton Agent: Dontelle Requiem Ross Leuyin Ministries Inc. 2604 Burke Ln. Fayetteville Agent: Leuyin Garcia Sr Just N2 Logistics LLC 6640 Brookstone Lane Apt 307 Fayetteville Agent: Zhanae Danielle Gilmore JC Jordan LLC 3335 Winterwood Drive Fayetteville Agent: Chaka Gaither Jordan Circle X Garage LLC 5956 Richfield Ave Hope Mills Agent: Julio Louzada Godinho Jr. Ahmazing Grace LLC 1910 Stockton Drive Fayetteville Agent: Cloria Otis World Wide Marketing LLC 1790 Michelle Ct Fayetteville Agent: Byron Pargo BeautyyByRo LLC 6765 Candlewood Dr. Fayetteville Agent: Roselande Dorce Everything'Meh L.L.C

6711 Watertrail Dr Apt 204 Fayetteville Agent: Imysia Sales Old Glory Motorcycles LLC 173 Birch Avenue Spring Lake Agent: Michael J Emmons R. Homer Smith Farm LLC 6383 Sisk Culbreth Rd Godwin Agent: Elaine Thornton Rainey All In One Cleaners L.L.C. 1824 Paisley Ave Fayetteville Agent: Michael J Zamora Glamour Girl Productions LLC 8504 Amish Drive Fayetteville Agent: Valerie Michelle Parker Indulge Fashions Boutique LLC 2209 Baywater Dr Fayetteville Agent: Ashley Yvette Walker Murray's Tattoo Company LLC 1045 Thistle Gold Drive Hope Mills Agent: WIlliam Morgan Murray III Vibe Gastropub LLC 131 Hay St Fayetteville Agent: Ambery Stardust Edge

Olympia Transports LLC. 805 Rumford Pl Fayetteville Agent: Loranzo O Thomas All American Transportation LLC 1125 Butterwood Circle Fayetteville Agent: Victor Luis Cirino Rodriguez Legacy Frenchies LLC 921 Mourning Dove Pl Fayetteville Agent: Angely Payano Harris J & K Delightful Services LLC 7269 Pebblebrook Drive Fayetteville Agent: Ebony Kenita Green Jason's Electrical LLC 336 Vanstory Street Fayetteville Agent: Jason Brandon Gilliam Graham's Transportation LLC 6642 Keeler Dr Fayetteville Agent: Peter Lee Graham Jr Bolanos Maldonado Properties LLC 3005 Stonecutter Circle Fayetteville Agent: Gerson Edilmar Bolanos Maldonado Marymary LLC 430 Roundtree Dr

Page 21

Fayetteville Agent: Mary Grace Marcelo

Fayetteville Agent: Gary K Sims

Mf Truck & Auto Repair LLC 5547 Yadkin Rd Fayetteville Agent: Moises J Figueroa

MELVIN'S APPARELS & SERVICES LLC 4542 Raeford Rd Ste A9 Fayetteville Agent: Smeca D Melvin

Julian Wright LLC 2337 Bentridge Lane Fayetteville Agent: Julian Antione Wright Q.U.E.E.N. Inc. 5447 Yadkin Rd Ste 102 Fayetteville Agent: Christa McLaurin SORIANO HOME IMPROVEMENT LLC 1083 Strathdon Ave Fayetteville Agent: Melvin Mejia Soriano SN Finances LLC 6779 Buttermere Drive Fayetteville Agent: Sparkle Nesbitt Movie Book Collectibles LLC 308 Davis St Fayetteville Agent: Spencer White Xurge Digital Media LLC 2800 Raeford Rd. Ste 2-87094 Fayetteville Agent: William Santiago OneWay Enterprize LLC 208 Northwest Avenue

Fayetteville Stingers LLC 1960 Coliseum Drive Fayetteville Agent: Kenneth Bishop Jr Joint Special Operations Foundation Inc 3423 Camberly Drive Fayetteville Agent: Ronald Haynes Laboy Enterprises LLC 201 Hay Street Suite 2000 Fayetteville Agent: R. Jonathan Charleston Freddy's Automotive LLC 6891 Deerhorn Ct Fayetteville Agent: Clayton Amaniah Blough Sandhills Realty & Property Management LLC. 5819 Weatherford Road Fayetteville Agent: Tracie Sparks CHINA GARDEN 88 INC 1047 Murchison Rd Ste 112 Fayetteville

Agent: Bijin Liu JJDM LLC 6204 Guildhall Way Fayetteville Agent: Debbie Martin Salek Preschool Champions LLC 6550 Celestial Pine Drive Hope Mills Agent: Andrea Michelle McGillivray Damien Barry LLC 2241 Stornoway Ct Fayetteville Agent: Damien McNeill DEELEE HELPING HANDS INC. 2603 Cattail Circle Fayetteville Agent: Jeannette Deelee Down South Transport LLC 4833 Arlington St Hope Mills Agent: Danny Mack Yarborough Jr Theshaitouch LLC 6792 willowbrook drive Fayetteville Agent: Oralee Jovanne Scott Mookey's Community Development Corporation 1219 Patrick Dr. Fayetteville Agent: Donald Lee Carr Jr.


Page 22

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

bizfayetteville.com

>>

Staff Report

Data mining in Fayetteville CALIFORNIA-BASED COMPANY EXPANDS TO FAYETTEVILLE, PLANS TO CREATE 19 NEW JOBS

T

he Fayetteville Cumberland Economic Development Corporation just announced that a California-based data mining company, Plan C Crypto, will open a regional headquarters facility in Fayetteville. Plan C Crypto plans to begin operations at its new location in the latter half of 2022. This will be the company's fourth mining facility in North Carolina, as it seeks to expand to other regions across the United States. This leading project will be in an already-existing, industrial-zoned facility. "Fayetteville has everything we want to see for a world-class facility, including a business-friendly climate, strong existing infrastructure, and talented workforce," Plan C Crypto CEO Antonio Bestard stated. "We will use demand response proof of

work mining to bring zonal grid stability at the substation level and bring high-paying jobs to the region." With this new facility, Plan C Crypto expects to create nineteen new jobs in 2022, with more opportunities for experts in electrical, security, and information technology in the coming years. The company hopes to hire military veterans and spouses to fill these positions. "Attracting high-tech jobs and new investments to Cumberland County and Fayetteville is a major priority for our community, and this announcement is an indication that we are achieving results," said Robert Van Geons, FCEDC President and CEO. "Our region is an ideal location for innovative companies focused on business growth. By opening its regional headquarters here, this cryptocurrency facility shows we are

The expansion of the data mining company will create jobs and lead new investments to the area, the FCEDC says.

a competitive location for technology-driven operations. We are grateful for the support of Elaina Ball, CEO and General Manager of Fayetteville Public Works Commission, and her team, and for the hard work of FCEDC Vice President Rob Patton, whose efforts were critical in bringing this project to our community. Announcements like these would not be possible without the support we receive from the City of Fayetteville and Cumberland County."

“Attracting high-

tech jobs and new investments to Cumberland County and Fayetteville is a major priority for our community, and this announcement is an indication that we are achieving results.” Robert Van Geons

FCEDC President and CEO

Our Business is Helping Yours Save As a public power company, with local control over all our services, and find ways to make cost-saving improvements. We also offer direct PWC has a greater ability to meet customers’ needs. We do more than savings through incentive program bill credits when you take steps to provide our commercial customers with quality, reliable electric, water conserve and increase the efficiency of your operations. and wastewater services. In addition to ensuring the capacity to meet growing needs, we make it ‘our business’ to help you save To contact our Customer Programs Department Customer Focused. on your utility bills. Working directly with business and or find details on our incentive programs, visit Community Strong. industrial customers, we can help you resolve issues faypwc.com/non-residential-incentive-programs.

17249


Greater Fayetteville Business Journal >>

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

bizfayetteville.com

By Scott Nunn

Page 23

TECHNOLOGY

‘I want you’

EXPERT EXPLAINS WHY GOVERNMENT UTILIZES CIVILIAN HELP FOR DEFENSE AND TECH JOBS

S

ince World War I, Uncle Sam’s “I want you” message has rallied Americans to serve their country. But the iconic poster’s intended audience goes beyond individuals – the message encouraged support for the nation’s defense, both from individuals and from private companies, in times of peace and war alike. And truth be told, not only does Uncle Sam want civilian help, he needs it, according to Lou Huddleston, president and CEO of Operations Services, Inc. (OSI), the Fayetteville company the retired Army colonel founded in 2010. “I think the key thing that everyone has to remember … is that the federal government has never been able to function without private enterprise, without private industry,” Huddleston said. Huddleston, who spent 31 years on active duty, including service in Afghanistan, spoke recently with the Greater Fayetteville Business Journal about the role OSI and thousands of other private companies play in helping the federal government – both defense and nondefense – carry out its ongoing operations. Such services not only help keep one of the world’s largest military installations operating smoothly, they also are an essential part of the Greater Fayetteville economy, providing vital work that generally goes unseen. “We focus on services,” Huddleston said. “We're not a manufacturer. We don't make anything. We don't produce a product.” OSI provides services to various government agencies, going beyond the Pentagon. “The primary focus is the Department of Defense and, to some degree, the Department of Homeland Security,” Huddleston said. “OSI has a broad business base.” It’s also an area in which many entrepreneurial veterans start businesses and find employment, he said. And even when OSI’s scope of business is narrowed down to “services,” that’s a broad category. OSI, for example, provides government organizations with professional services in areas such as leadership

FROM

THE EXPERTS

PHOTO PROVIDED BY OSI

Lou Huddleston, CEO and president of Operations Services, Inc., said his company and many others meet a need by providing services to the United States government.

training, information technology, cybersecurity, systems analysis, logistics and management. “We consult with government organizations, and we provide them with subject-matter experts to support them in doing their operations,” Huddleston said. “Those operations can cover a significant and broad spectrum.” For example, Huddleston said, OSI could advise the FBI on management of its fleet of vehicles or consult with FEMA on warehousing and storage. “We could provide computer programming services to the Air Force or the Navy,” Huddleston said. “We could do computer systems design or computer facilities management. We could provide administrative services support. We could do a multitude of things.” The key point, he said, is that, at least at OSI, services are not narrowed to one thing. Huddleston said private contractors provide a broad range of services to government agencies, among them finance and insurance, transportation and warehousing, oil and gas, construction, professional, scientific and technical services, manufacturing, wholesale trade, agriculture, forestry and fisheries, utilities and real estate. “Those are generally the sectors,” Huddleston said. “And OSI for example, is in the middle of that, with

professional scientific and technical services. What we do is, is again, simply put. If there is a government agency and it's performing some form of operation – and it doesn't matter what type of operation it is – they may need support to do it. What we do is provide them with subject-matter experts to be able to do that.” Of the 10 main sectors of government contracting work, about 17 percent is made up of professional, scientific and technical services, OSI’s primary focus. As the saying goes, an army marches on its stomach; it also relies on thousands of other supplies and services. Ensuring that supplies, services and people – among many other assets – are available when and where they are needed. That falls under the umbrella of logistics, the detailed management of how and when to move resources to the places they are needed. If an effective logistics system is in place, the end users likely won’t notice it. It’s when the system fails – even at a small point – things can go awry: empty shelves at the grocery store or an assembly line factory at a standstill because the supply chain is broken, for example. It’s a usually hidden service that has become all-too visible during the COVID-19 pandemic. And the stakes are much higher for defense preparedness and effective government operations. Guaranteeing that logistics systems are accurate, reliable and secure is a big part of what OSI does. “We primarily focus on cyber security and contractor logistics support,” Huddleston said. “And in the area of logistics support, we focus on the higher end of it and that has to do with analytics, helping various government defense organizations with the analytics of how they manage supply chain management.” But why would the most powerful military in the world’s most powerful nation need help from civilians? As Huddleston pointed out, the military and the government have never been completely self-sufficient – they’ve always needed the help of private entities.

“That’s been true from the inception of the country, at times of war and times of peace,” he said. “Government agencies have requirements and clearly, the government doesn't make stuff or produce things,” Huddleston said. So just as Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and General Dynamics make specific products that the government buys, the same holds true for certain services. Outsourcing those services is the most efficient and least-expensive way to attain them, Huddleston said. “You can't expect the Department of Army to hire a government employee, a civilian government employee, or a uniformed service member to handle all of their requirements,” he said. “So there are a number of requirements in any given year that require outsourcing.” That's where companies such as OSI step in – it fills the gap of services that the government can’t afford and also services it might do well. “Keep in mind it costs more to maintain a soldier to do, let's say, systems engineering or run a computer system or what have you,” Huddleston said. “The government's got the overhead of that soldier.” And it’s not always an either/or proposition. Even when the military can provide the service in house, it may need to be augmented from outsourcing. Huddleston explained: “Oftentimes – and we've experienced this on many of our contracts – let's say you have a requirement for 10 intel agents in a division. Some could be government employees and civilian government employees and some could be contractors, all doing the same type.” “I'm giving you a very simplified example of that but it's a way of covering the void.” It’s a reality that, at the end of the day, undergirds why Uncle Sam’s message remains important, both in war time and in peacetime. “It's the reality that you can't build a federal government that would have enough employees for everything,” Huddleston said. “That would break the bank.”


Page 24

Greater Fayetteville Business Journal

February 18, 2022 - March 3, 2022

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