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2017 | A CLIMATE FOR CHANGE

GREEN SPACE CITY IQ

LINE BETWEEN SMART AND STUPID CAN BE “RAZOR THIN” ETHICAL INVESTING

PASSIVE HOUSE GETS AGGRESSIVE CLEAN TECH SOLVING BIG PROBLEMS

SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS FOR B.C.’S BETTER TOMORROW

GREEN EMPLOYERS TRAINING LEADERS ETHICAL RETURNS CLEAN-TECH IDEAS SUZUKI’S BLUE DOT


THE PORT OF PRINCE RUPERT

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@rupertport | www.rupertport.com


See article on page 14

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CONTENTS BRIEFS

GREENEST EMPLOYERS B.C. companies recognized for teaching and building a sustainable future

16

6, 8, 9, 14, 25

B.C.’S BIGGEST Alternative-energy companies

35

COMPANY DIRECTORY

36

COLUMN

2017 | A CLIMATE FOR CHANGE

GREEN SPACE CITY IQ

LINE BETWEEN SMART AND STUPID CAN BE “RAZOR THIN” ETHICAL INVESTING

COLUMN

PASSIVE HOUSE GETS AGGRESSIVE CLEAN TECH SOLVING BIG PROBLEMS

SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS FOR B.C.’S BETTER TOMORROW

GREEN EMPLOYERS TRAINING LEADERS ETHICAL RETURNS CLEAN-TECH IDEAS SUZUKI’S BLUE DOT

Sheehan—20

Worsley—34

FEATURES Ethical investing Making cities smart Greenest employers Training green leaders Passive’s aggressive path Tackling the big problems

10 13 16 22 26 32

32

Pia Huynh, Laura Torrance, Chris Wilson

DESIGN: Randy Pearsall PRODUCTION: Rob Benac WRITERS: Patrick Blennerhassett,

Susan M. Boyce, John Kurucz, Bethany Lindsay, Peter Mitham, Elizabeth Sheehan, Albert Van Santvoort, Alan Worsley PROOFREADER: Meg Yamamoto ADVERTISING SALES: Eve Abrams, Dean Hargrave, Blair Johnston, Joan McGrogan, Steve Micolino, Corinne Tkachuk SALES OPERATIONS MANAGER:

TACKLING THE BIG PROBLEMS

Michelle Myers

ADMINISTRATORS: Katherine Butler,

Marie Pearsall

RESEARCH: Anna Liczmanska,

Carrie Schmidt

Green Space 2017 is published by BIV Magazines, a division of BIV Media Group, 303 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C. V5Y 1J6, 604-688-2398, fax 604-688-1963, www.biv.com.

B.C. is a hub for Canada’s clean-tech businesses, and most were started to solve global problems

10

ETHICAL INVESTING

Canadians have sheltered $9.2 billion in environmentally astute companies

PASSIVE’S AGGRESSIVE PATH

PUBLISHER: Sue Belisle VICE-PRESIDENT, AUDIENCE AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Kirk LaPointe EDITOR: Frank O’Brien INTEGRATED SALES MANAGERS:

Promise of cheap heat – and a new Vancouver building bylaw – could open wider acceptance of ultra-energy-saving Passive Houses

26

Copyright 2017 Business in Vancouver Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or incorporated into any information retrieval system without permission of BIV Magazines. The list of services provided in this publication is not necessarily a complete list of all such services available in Vancouver, B.C. The publishers are not responsible in whole or in part for any errors or omissions in this publication. ISSN 1205-5662 Publications Mail Agreement No.: 40069240. Registration No.: 8876. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Circulation Department: 303 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C. V5Y 1J6 Email: subscribe@biv.com Cover: Homayoun Vahidi and Mitchell Reardon of Vancouver’s IBI Group Photo: Chung Chow


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Briefs

Radical resort idea applauded

Coquitlam mall only LEAP award winner in B.C.

A

“vertical microclimate resort” that could provide tropic-like conditions yearround on Vancouver Island is one of three finalists in the annual New York Radical Innovation design competition. B.C.-based Arno Matis Architecture’s vertical microclimate resort would use natural thermal and solar technology to create a unique climate, providing a warmer, brighter resort experience in any season, according to the firm’s presentation. The concept features concaveshaped towers, with an optically activated heliostat guardrail system, that bounce additional light onto resort grounds, while apertures direct additional light into suites. Geothermally heated pools and greenhouse cabanas would allow residents to swim outside and

T

sit poolside year-round. Drones would provide bar service to the highrise pools. “Concepts like these could encourage buyers to spend travel dollars locally,” says Arno Matis, who designed the climatic tower for the Bear Mountain golf resort north of Victoria. He adds it could also help Canadians suffering from seasonal affective disorder, caused by a lack of light. The Radical Innovation design awards, by global hotel developer John Hardy Group, will be presented this October in New York City.

he Coquitlam Centre mall has been recognized under the Leadership in Environmental Advancement Program (LEAP) awards for a dramatic reduction in energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It was one of three LEAP awards taken by Morguard Corp. this year. The LEAP awards are presented annually by the Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan to honour “a core operational focus on sustainability and dedication to best practices.” “Sustainability is embedded in Morguard’s culture and daily operational practices,” says K. Rai Sahi, Morguard’s chairman and CEO. Morguard took the LEAP award in the sustainability innovation and technology category for the heat recovery chiller (HRC) system it retrofitted into the Coquitlam Centre mall.

The HRC may become this region’s best tool in cutting emissions in the building sector, Sahi says. The Coquitlam Centre’s HRC project resulted in a 70 per cent reduction in annual gas consumption, a four per cent reduction in electricity and a 35 per cent cut in annual GHG emissions. The centre is also saving water due to decreased cooling tower use. Coquitlam Centre was the only B.C. project to receive a national LEAP award.

Sponsored Content

Electric Cars charging through B.C.

O

ver the past few years since purchase incentives were introduced in British Columbia (2011), Electric Vehicles (EV’s) have been charging ahead in British Columbia and are taking the Canadian auto industry by storm. The introduction of EV’s into the auto market has certainly been a success story, not only in B.C., but also across Canada. According to figures by FleetCarma, the total number of EV’s on Canadian roads was just under 32,500 by the end of March 2017 and is projected to continue on its upward trend for the remainder of the year. In 2016 alone, 11,000 EV’s were sold, a 56 per cent increase from the 7,000 vehicles sold in 2015. Our province, specifically, has always been a leader when it comes to adopting green technology, and it’s no different with green cars. According to FleetCarma, in the fall of last year, B.C. hit a major milestone – EV sales in the province surpassed 1 per cent of all motor vehicle sales, which included trucks, SUVs, buses and vans. B.C. also boasts the longest charging

network as well as the highest per capita sales of EVs in Canada. There are also government incentives available for British Columbians looking to purchase an EV. The CEVforBC™ program offers point of sale purchase incentives to consumers of up to $5,000 or $6,000 towards the purchase of a new EV. Charging infrastructure has also been popping up all over the province. Most recently in May, Accelerate Kootenays committed $1.5 million towards an initiative to expand EV charging stations to southeastern B.C. As more and more of the world’s largest auto manufacturers roll out with new EV models, British Columbians are starting to pay attention – a trend that was very apparent during this year’s 2017 Vancouver International Auto Show. Every year, the Vancouver International Auto Show offers curious visitors to testdrive a selection of the newest EV models from various major automakers. The test drives at the 2016 Show saw a total of 984 people signed up. This year, that number grew an amazing 27 per cent, with a total of

1,246 EV-curious visitors signing up. To date, Canadians have a broad list of options when it comes to EV’s, with more and more auto manufacturers unveiling new models each year. Visit your local new car dealer to learn more about the EV’s available and to test-drive the newest models in the market today. For a complete listing of EV’s eligible for purchase incentives, please visit cevforbc.ca Blair Qualey is President and CEO of the New Car Dealers Association of BC. You can email him at bqualey@newcardealers.ca.


Sponsored Content

Vancouver Mansions Opt for Geothermal By Nancy Argyle

A

long Vancouver’s prestigious Point Grey Road, three multi-million dollar luxury homes lining the “Golden Mile” have discovered the benefits of going geothermal and, although each home uses it differently, they all chose the same BC technology to install it. “This is the third house on the same street,” says Jackquie Grant, project manager at Sonic Drilling Ltd., a Surrey-based company that contracts out a fleet of rigs with award-winning, patented sonic drill heads – developed by BC engineer, Ray Roussy. “This latest project is a geothermal installation for a new house and swimming pool…we’re actually putting the drill holes and geothermal loops under the pool.” “With the remaining two houses, one used geothermal to heat their long driveway and parking lot while the other used it for a large garage with some high-end cars…I think one was a Lamborghini,” she says. “It’s owned by a Saudi prince.”

Most geothermal installations require holes to be drilled to a depth of around 300 ft. and, with challenging soil conditions in the Lower Mainland, many rigs get stuck or jammed which slows down drilling considerably and, in some cases, makes it impossible. Due to Vancouver’s location near an ocean and the end point for a number of rivers, it’s not uncommon for rigs to encounter everything from sand and clay to large boulders in the same hole and many times Sonic Drilling has been called in as a rescue rig to finish the project. Unfortunately, Vancouver’s recent Beechwood incident may have given geothermal a bad name when an inexperienced unpermitted Italian drilling crew breached an underground aquifer. This colossal blunder caused one billion litres of water to run free and resulted in the evacuation alert of 12 homes (two remain evacuated) due to fears of a sinkhole developing beneath them. In the end, the cost of damage hit $10 million and the drilling crew fled Canada. “The worst thing that crew did was

take their pipe out…they should have left it in,” says Grant. “We know how to contain artesian flows and we always do a test hole to see what the conditions are like below…plus we also do well installations so we know what we’re doing around aquifers.” Indeed, sonic drilling technology, which is now used across six continents around the world, has a few unique aspects that make it perfect for geothermal installations in difficult terrain. First, its 3-5x faster and it can easily buzz through mixed soils. Secondly, it can drill, case, place the geothermal loop and grout… all in one operation. That’s something no other drill can do and a feature that has now been patented. So, what’s next on the project list for Sonic Drilling? “We’re going to drill 15 holes to a depth of 370 ft. on Bowen Island to supply geothermal energy for a recreational area, pool house, guest house and maid house as well as the main house and bowling area,” says Grant, proudly.

Geothermal Made Easy Drill 3-5x faster through tough soil conditions. Drill, case, loop and grout in one operation. Green drilling options available. Up to 70% less mess on site.

SONIC DRILLING LTD. (604) 588-6080 www.sonicdrilling.com www.sonicgeothermal.com


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Briefs

Heat flows from waste water

India plans to drive all-electric by 2030

V

ancouver-based International Wastewater Systems (IWS), a clean tech company that developed a SHARC system that extracts heat from a building’s waste water, has become an international hit after proving itself at home. The Sail building at the University of British Columbia and Seven35 condos in North Vancouver are among the eight buildings that currently have SHARC systems installed in the Vancouver area. This April, IWS completed installation of a large system at the Southeast False Creek Neighbourhood Energy Utility, a facility that provides space heating and hot water for 4.3 million square feet of residential, commercial and institutional space in the area. IWS installed a similar SHARC package at Borders College in Scotland and has orders for systems in Europe and the U.S.

I

IWS does its manufacturing in Port Coquitlam and in the U.K. The company has been ramping up for over a year now, IWS founder and CEO Lynn Mueller says. “We’ve gone from two or three staff to 20 and we’re continuing to ramp up.” “We’re also working on introducing a water recapture unit, where we can recycle some of the waste [water] to do non-potable applications,” Mueller says.

ndia plans to move one of the world’s largest populations to all-electric vehicles by 2030,according to a Bloomberg report. The aggressive move trumps the Paris climate agreement that targets 10 per cent of electric vehicles globally by 2030. It is estimated that if India’s plan is carried out, it would require an eightfold increase in global electric vehicle production. Currently, India has an estimated 5,000 electric vehicles on the road. That compares with more than three million conventional cars and trucks sold in the country last year, according to the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers. The Times of India further reports that the Indian government plans to allow its citizens to buy an all-electric vehicle with no down payment and pay for it with the money they save on gas and

oil. India’s cheapest electric car is the $9,724 Mahindra e20 Plus. “India can become the first country of its size which will run 100 per cent of electric vehicles,” India’s Power Minister Piyush Goyal is quoted as saying. Both Norway and Germany also plan to go all-electric for vehicles within 13 years.

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| 9

Coral bleaching easing after 2014 catastrophe

Trump exit from Paris accord could prove a boon

M

US

ass bleaching of coral reefs worldwide is finally easing after three years, U.S. scientists announced this June. About three-quarters of the world’s delicate coral reefs were damaged or killed by hot water in what scientists say was the largest coral catastrophe on record. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOA A) announced a global bleaching event in May 2014. It was worse than previous global bleaching events in 1998 and 2010. The forecast damage doesn’t appear widespread in the Indian Ocean, but will still be bad in the Pacific and the Caribbean, though it is less severe than in recent years, notes NOAA Coral Reef Watch co-ordinator C. Mark Eakin. University of Victoria coral reef scientist Julia Baum plans to travel to Christmas Island in the Pacific where the coral reefs

have looked like ghost towns in recent years. “This is really good news,” Baum says. “We’ve been totally focused on coming out of the carnage of the 2015-16 El Niño.” Eakin says coral has difficulty surviving in water already getting warmer by man-made climate change. Scientists say that coral reefs are one of the first and most prominent indicators of global warming. “I don’t see how they can take one more hit at this point,” Baum says. “They need a reprieve.”

President Donald Trump’s decision in June to pull out of the 2015 Paris Agreement on reducing greenhouse gas emissions could open more doors for B.C.’s clean-technology businesses. That’s the conclusion of some industry observers, who note that the overwhelming global trend by other major markets, including Europe and China, is to develop more renewable energy. The retreat of the U.S. federal government could open more space for B.C. players to fill, they say. “We have 300 companies here in the clean-tech sector, and they generate $1.8 billion in revenue every year,” says Ian Bruce, director of science and policy at the David Suzuki Foundation. “It has been one of our largest job producers in the last 10 years.” Bruce says B.C. should capitalize on attempts by markets like

China and India to become more energy-efficient in such fields as construction and bioenergy. But Bill Tam, president and CEO of the BC Tech Association, says the effect of cooling interest in renewable energy in the U.S. as a result of Trump’s announcement should not be underestimated. Tam notes the proximity of a market as large as the United States has given many B.C. greentech startups a “test bed” for further globalization, and the loss of such a market will hurt in some instances.

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10 |

GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

ETHICAL INVESTING

Canadians have anted $9.2 billion on the belief that sustainable companies will outperform the overall stock market – and allow them to sleep better at night

BETHANY LINDSAY

WAYNE WACHELL CEO, GENUS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

It’s evolved as the clients’ needs have evolved. Environmental sustainability has become a bigger and bigger issue

A

few years ago, Wayne Wachell made a crazy decision, if you believe the conventional wisdom: he completely eradicated fossil fuel stocks from his investment portfolios. But for Wachell, CEO of Vancouver’s Genus Capital Management, the move was far from radical. In fact, he saw it as a prudent shift away from an energy sector on its last legs.

“You’re investing in a dying industry – we’re in the twilight of hydrocarbons. It’s like saying if you didn’t invest in horses and buggies prior to the Model T in 1910, you’d get lower returns,” he says. “We’re going to have a four-year track record with our fossil-free strategies in July, and we beat the conventional benchmarks on the balanced funds by 1.5 per cent and the stocks by about two per cent.” He insists it’s just a myth that good returns aren’t possible without shares in industries that produce large amounts of greenhouse gases or otherwise damage the planet. Wachell isn’t alone in this thinking. By 2015, more than $9.2 billion in Canadian assets were under management as so-called impact investments

–more than double the total from two years earlier, according to the Responsible Investment Association (RIA), a body representing Canadian investment professionals interested in the environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors of finance. Portfolio managers often choose to replace oil and gas companies with technology firms and renewable energy producers, focusing on top performers like Vestas Wind Systems in Europe. So far, the financial advantages of high-performing ESG-rated portfolios like those offered by Wachell seem to be marginal, but numbers tracked by the RIA show that ethical investment funds routinely achieve similar or higher returns than the industry average. In the first quarter of this year, close to half of


| 11

Vancouver financial adviser Holly Vipond specializes in the environmental, social and governance factors of finance | SUBMITTED LEFT: Genus Capital CEO Wayne

Wachell: insists it’s a myth that good returns aren’t possible without shares in industries that produce

responsible investment funds outperformed their respective industry averages. Well-established portfolios did even better – more than two-thirds of funds with five-year track records beat out the industry standard. Wachell first began dabbling in ESG investing nearly a quarter-century ago at the request of an investor who wanted their money to match their values. Later, the move away from fossil fuels came at the behest of clients like the David Suzuki Foundation. “It’s evolved as the clients’ needs have evolved. Environmental sustainability has become a bigger and bigger issue,” Wachell says. Even the fossil fuel industry is taking note. Earlier this year, industry giants Shell, Marathon Oil and ConocoPhillips all sold off most of their assets in Alberta’s oilsands. “Their exposure to the dirty oil in the oilsands was impacting their brand. They’re all shifting towards LNG [liquefied natural gas] and natural-gas-type plays,” Wachell says. There’s another factor driving the divestment movement: the fact that environmentally iffy projects like the oilsands can also come with inherent financial risks. Clients of Vancity Investment Management are naturally shy about taking chances with their money, because most are saving for retirement, according to investment management director Andrew Simpson. That makes investing in the oilsands an unattractive proposition, even without considering the impacts on the environment and climate. As Simpson points out, Canada has ratified the Paris climate agreement, which aims to keep the global rise in temperature this century below 2 C.

“For the world to achieve that target, likely two-thirds of the existing oil assets that are in the ground are going to have to stay in the ground. That means that an oil company that is being valued on what’s in the ground could have its value cut by two-thirds at some time in the future. We think that’s a substantial risk,” he says. That’s why Vancity also avoids nuclear power entirely – major disasters like the Fukushima meltdown happen far too often to feel safe about betting anyone’s retirement savings.

large amounts of greenhouse gases or otherwise damage the planet | CHUNG CHOW

WHERE TO PUT YOUR GREEN These were among the top-performing socially responsible investing (SRI) funds in 2016. Talk to your financial adviser about the definitions of SRI, because they can range from environmental to human rights issues. QCandriam Sustainable North America: The best-performing ethical/ WK1003MIKE/SHUTTERSTOCK SRI fund in 2016, it delivered a 31.61 per cent total return. However, the fund value has flattened so far in 2017. Its holdings include Alphabet, the parent company of Google; Canadian National Railway; and Colgate-Palmolive Co. Q Halifax Ethical: A British-based international equities fund, Halifax Ethical was among the best-performing ethical/SRI funds in 2016, recording a 31.3 per cent return for investors. Halifax invests in an international portfolio of companies whose activities are considered ethical. In the first six months of this year, it posted returns of 7.5 per cent. Q Aberdeen Ethical World Equity: This diversified fund delivered a 31.1 per cent return in 2016, following a 10.13 per cent loss during the previous year. As of June 28, 2017, the fund had posted a return of 7.3 per cent. QTICRX (TIAA-CREF Social Choice Equity Fund): This U.S.-based fund invests in U.S. public companies, using certain ethical and environmental criteria. In the year ending June 28, 2017, the fund had reported a 17.4 per cent return, compared to the 17.9 per cent performance of the S&P 500.


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Ethical investing

S&P ESG vs. S&P TSX

S&P 5-YEAR ANNUAL RETURNS

June 1, 2013, to June 1, 2017 

ESG 15.4%







TSX 10.18%





   







 

SOURCE: S&P DOW JONES INDICES, JUNE, 2017

A Marvel of Nature and Industry

And as the divestment movement picks up steam, major corporations are shifting away from the same assets that ethical investors are avoiding. Amazon, Apple and Google have all made commitments to using renewable energy sources, making producers of wind, solar and hydroelectricity even more attractive to investors. “That’s actually very powerful,â€? Simpson says. Those commitments have created big opportunities for young investment professionals who want to try something new. When Holly Vipond began focusing on environmentally ethical mutual funds about a year ago, it felt like a natural fit for her personal values. “I grew up with all of the environmental issues and resource issues just as part of my life,â€? the Vancouver financial adviser says, “but also a lot of my clients ask about these things. I get clients asking me, ‘Where is my money going?’â€? At first, Vipond had trouble finding funds that suited the needs of her environmentally minded clients, but as more and more people approach her colleagues to ask about divestment and ESG ratings, she’s become the resident expert. “I can tell you that I’m the only adviser in my office who is focusing on it, out of probably 80,â€? she says. “Not a lot of advisers are doing it, but more clients are asking for it.â€? And are those clients making money? “Oh, definitely,â€? she says. É

www.kitimat.ca

edo@kitimat.ca


| 13

MAKING CITIES

SMART

Researchers say line between smart and stupid can be razor thin

PATRICK BLENNERHASSETT

Homayoun Vahidi and Mitchell Reardon of Vancouver’s

W

hat makes a city smart? In answering the question, Mitchell Reardon, who works for IBI Group in Vancouver – an international professional services consulting company – says the line between smart and stupid is “razor thin” at times. “The smart city and the stupefying city are closer together than we like to believe,” he says. “If we focus on efficiency there is a real risk that we lose that real interpersonal connection.” Reardon, the co-lead for IBI’s TH!NK, the firm’s newly launched micro-research program, refers to his time living in Stockholm, Sweden – often cited for its smart sustainability – as a good example. “One thing I really noticed about living there was how little interest or agency strangers take in supporting one

another,” he says. “So it’s difficult to engage people on the street.” Reardon coupled that with a local survey done by the Vancouver Foundation in 2012 that found the top issues for polled citizens were loneliness and feelings of isolation, not poverty or housing. He adds that this is the challenge: as cities become more automated, do we threaten engagement? A recent study by the IBI Group also found locals were more likely to help out “lost-looking tourists” if they were in a part of town that was deemed vibrant or

IBI Group say “smart city” encompasses both technological innovations and increased levels of community happiness | CHUNG CHOW


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Making cities smart

LINDA HEPNER MAYOR OF SURREY

It fundamentally takes a culture to make a city smart

had painted walls, as opposed to sterile, grey concrete. Reardon says the City of Vancouver’s VIVA Vancouver – which gives away grants to artists to spruce up public spaces – is as important as any technological innovation. “When we have density it is important that people have a comfortable place to retreat to,” he adds, “and also that they are able to come out and enjoy the place they’re a part of.” One of the industries at the forefront of the smart-cities movement is transportation. Homayoun Vahidi, a director for IBI Group in Vancouver who handles the firm’s transportation and systems practice across the province, says the next step is to become proactive. Google Maps has made getting from point A to point B much more efficient, he says, but the technology needs to make sure it’s not just creating new bottlenecks. “You don’t want to solve one problem by just moving it elsewhere,” says Vahidi. He adds the integration of big data and simulation software can help with this as transportation networks can start to anticipate traffic jams rather than simply display them for drivers. “And that’s where the simulation approach can help because we can now, in real time, use available data to see how people might react over the next few hours, and use that in how the messaging comes out so we don’t just tell people route A is bad and route B is better.” Va h id i has worked on a nu mber of i ntel l igent

transportation systems (known as ITS) across Metro Vancouver, which includes the nation’s first automated system to detect border delays and relay the information to drivers in real time. He says Vancouverites need to become OK with the concept of mobility pricing, in which commuters who travel more pay more for roads and other infrastructure. “We need to stop dancing around the ‘C’ word–congestion pricing,” he says. “It’s the best way to manage demand and generate revenue for other modes, which is smart. But the political sensitivity around it, although understandable, can keep us dumb.” One of the cities creating waves in the smart-cities realm is Surrey, which is also Metro Vancouver’s fastest-growing population. The municipality was named a Top 7 Intelligent Community two years in a row by the Intelligent Community Forum, a New York-based think-tank. The municipality has North America’s first fully integrated, closed-loop waste management system at its biofuel processing facility. Surrey also has a traffic management centre with more than 400 traffic cameras to manage the city’s sprawling road network. Mayor Linda Hepner says being a smart city isn’t just about technological innovations; it’s also about making sure citizens will actually use and benefit from them. “You’re only as smart as your people,” she says. “It fundamentally takes a culture to make a city smart.” É

Briefs It pays to build green in Langley

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he Township of Langley is making it easier to build or renovate an energy-efficient home. Under the Township’s voluntary Green Building Rebate Program, energy-efficient new construction and home renovations are eligible for a partial rebate of building permit fees. The Green Building Rebate Program encourages the reduction of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the life-cycle operation of a home. Over the next 15 years, the township expects the construction of more than 1,500 dwelling units per year – about a 50 per cent increase in the township’s housing stock by 2031. In such a fast-growing community, there is significant potential to reduce energy use and GHG emissions through energy-efficient building practices, the township says. Canada’s EnerGuide rating system is used as a standard measure of a home’s energy performance. Homes that match the EnerGuide rating system, or that meet other

Quadra multi-family development in Langley | QUADRA

high-performance standards, such as Energy Star or Passive House, can benefit from the program’s building permit rebates. Rebates are offered in amounts of up to $1,500 for construction of new high-performance single-family houses, and multifamily projects can receive up to $500 per unit. Renovations are assessed based

on their improved EnerGuide rating for decreased energy consumption, and can receive up to $750 in rebates. The township also provides financial support with the costs of involving an energy adviser with new construction or renovation projects. These certified professionals provide energy plan evaluations or

home energy assessments to help projects meet or exceed the EnerGuide rating. While the township’s program is currently targeted at new residential homes and renovations, similar programs are being considered to include incentives for commercial buildings, and the use of alternative energy systems.


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

GREENEST EMPLOYERS

B.C. companies recognized for teaching and building a sustainable future

PETER MITHAM

This year’s competition recognized 10 employers from B.C., in industries from architecture to education, housing to hospitality

E

ach year Mediacorp Canada Inc., which operates Eluta.ca, the country’s largest job search engine, recognizes employers that make significant investments in programs that reduce their environmental impact and enhance the world in which they operate.

Mediacorp recognizes employers based on four criteria: development of unique in-house environmental initiatives; success in reducing the organization’s environmental footprint; employee involvement and contributions to environmental initiatives; and positive recognition of environmental programs among potential employees and the community at large. This year’s competition recognized 10 employers from B.C., in industries from architecture to education, housing to hospitality. The following examples caught the eye of Green Space for their efforts to not only build a better world today, but also form the environmental leaders of tomorrow. BC HOUSING MANAGEMENT COMMISSION Q BC Housing may be a creature of government, but it’s not one of habit. Its nearly 700 employees pursue an environment-friendly ethic, guided by a LiveGreen employee council that tracks staff achievements in an annual

sustainability survey. While government policies require new housing projects target LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold certification, with 55 buildings registered with the Canada Green Building Council, BC Housing has reduced its own greenhouse gas emissions 30 per cent and cut energy use 25 per cent. Staff do their part by opting for low-emission commutes (employees receive discounts on the purchase of bikes and accessories). Smart cars are available for staff business trips. In addition, “meatless Mondays” let staff trade resource-intensive meats for vegetarian options, and the campus has a dedicated composting and recycling program. SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 36 SURREY Q Sustainable

organizations often talk about keeping the triple bottom line in mind, seeking positive results with respect to people and the planet as well as profits. Surrey, which is


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Doug Carter, former capital projects manager with the University of Northern British Columbia: biomass is an important energy source at the university | UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA

Perkins+Will’s Vancouver office hosts an employee-managed rooftop garden that grows fresh vegetables, herbs and fruit, and created a composting program that other office locations have adopted | PERKINS+WILL CANADA

well on its way to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions 25 per cent from 2010 levels by 2020 (they’re already down 20 per cent), has also made headway in terms of its people. To ensure its teachers flourish and can contribute with confidence, Surrey Schools both encourages saving for retirement and provides top-up payments for those who take parental leave. Moreover, the district’s 10,300-plus staff can also provide confidential feedback to management that contributes positively to working conditions. In addition to its own work to green its organization though energy-efficient heating, lighting and transportation, Surrey Schools teaches students to respect the environment through initiatives such as recycling and local park cleanup days. PERKINS+WILL CANADA Q Perkins+Will Canada

traces its roots to the practice of Vancouver architect Peter Busby. A founder and past chair of the Canada Green Building Council, Busby joined forces with Perkins+Will in 2004. Today the firm employs 181 staff at offices in Vancouver and Ontario. Staff in Vancouver work from a LEED Platinum space where weekly deliveries of fresh fruit and weekly yoga and meditation classes are offered. An early proponent of green design, the firm has long supported sustainable transportation choices among staff through subsidies that encourage transit use and other measures. Referral bonuses reward employees who draw in others for green commuting, and all staff share in the firm’s success through profit-sharing arrangements and annual bonuses.


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Greenest employers

Perkins+Will has designed a number of LEED buildings in B.C., including student residences and research buildings at the University of British Columbia. UNIVERSIT Y OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA Q Based in Prince George, the University of North-

BC Housing employees with products from the organization’s green procurement

ern British Columbia (UNBC) is rooted in concern for its community. Since classes began in 1992, it’s taken its local mandate seriously. Today, that extends to caring for the northern environment and encouraging others to do the same. For instance, UNBC has made a virtue of what some urbanites consider a vice by funnelling campus parking revenues into a Green Fund that supports sustainability projects across campus. A campus food strategy group is building on UNBC’s long-standing farmers market and food box program that features local produce, two initiatives that contribute to the university’s designation as a “fair trade” college – one of just eight in Canada. The university also taps biomass energy from waste wood for supplementary space heating. University management, faculty, staff and students participate on several sustainability committees that extend environmental contributions on campus and throughout northern B.C. These include the Green University Centre, as well as an energy conservation loan program that supports upgrades to campus facilities. É

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B.C. GREENEST EMPLOYERS BC Housing Management Commission BC Hydro City of Vancouver Kwantlen Polytechnic University Nature’s Path Foods Inc. Perkins+Will Canada Architects Co. School District No. 36 Surrey Town of Ladysmith University of Northern British Columbia Whistler Blackcomb SOURCE: MEDIACORP CANADA INC.

Students from Earl Marriott Secondary School in Surrey show off the litter collected during a park cleanup day | SURREY SCHOOLS

UBC’s Brock Commons Tallwood House | Photo: KK Law

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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

SMALL IS THE NEW BIG WHEN IT COMES TO THE ENVIRONMENT Small B.C. businesses are taking the lead in reducing carbon emissions while lowering costs and creating jobs

ELIZABETH SHEEHAN |

H By making a range of modest investments and changing how they do things, a group of 70 companies has saved $3.3 million and collectively reduced carbon emissions equal to taking 3,500 cars off the road for good

ere’s a good-news story that could do with a little more sunlight: small-business leaders across British Columbia are reducing costs, driving growth, innovating, and finding efficiencies while creating jobs and opportunities. A nd they’re doing all this while reducing their carbon emissions. These people aren’t tree huggers running smoothie stands. Seriously, the lion’s share are business people who own and manage auto-parts shops, shipping terminals, printers, food processors and retirement homes. At Climate Smart, we’ve had the honour of working with hundreds of these business owners, and helped them capture, on average, cost savings of $27,000 a year. By making a range of modest investments and changing how they do things, a group of 70 such companies that we surveyed has saved $3.3 million and collectively reduced carbon emissions equal to taking 3,500 cars off the road for good. If these findings come as a surprise, don’t blame yourself. For years, we’ve been told that climate solutions are just too expensive.

We’ve heard that action will hurt growth and even cripple Canada’s economy. Some may still believe that. But we have close to a decade’s worth of experience that says otherwise. The fact is, in the coming years governments will introduce policy that will in turn unleash trillions of dollars in capital. Leading econom ies, i nclud i ng Ca nada, w i l l reshape infrastructure, energy systems, transportation networks and much more. They will do it not because it is fashionable, but because they have to in order to compete. With policy in place, good old-fashioned free enterprise will step in and do what it does best – innovate like crazy, and lead with solutions. Those companies that have taken steps to prepare for this low-carbon future will be better positioned to thrive. And what do they look like? As of 2015, there were 178,638 small and medium-sized enterprises operating in British Columbia. They employ about 1.4 million British Columbians. Passionate and committed entrepreneurs run these operations – people who know how to get things done and make things better. These companies

are arguably Canada’s original innovators. For a decade Climate Smart has collaborated with hundreds of these firms, rolling up our sleeves and cracking open the spreadsheets to help them profitably reduce their carbon emissions. Along the way, we’ve landed on a few key insights: AGGREGATION IS POWER Q Cli-

mate Smart companies may have modest individual footprints, but together they represent just shy of a million tonnes of carbon. We can harness the power of a bunch of small entities to create a big team. W hen you set a good idea loose across a group of people, great things happen both for them and for all of us. Small companies are deeply invested in their communities; often, their supply chains are localized. Invest in small companies and you strengthen local leaders whose good ideas cascade quickly across a community, like a handful of pebbles cast across a pond. INNOVATION ISN’T JUST FOR THE BIG PLAYERS Q Innovation

is all about redesigning processes, optimizing routes and using

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software tools to rethink business as usual. Small-business owners are close to the ground and ready to t i n ker w it h t hei r b u si ne ss models and experiment to deliver new products and services, and stay competitive. Now, with the global climate opportunity, they are bringing this same curiosity to the process of reducing emissions and cutting costs. SMALL DATA IS BEAUTIFUL Q At Climate Smart, we have been collecting sector-specific data over the past 10 years, aggregated from over a decade of engaging small businesses, and derived from actual industry-specific greenhouse gas sources. We’ve crunched this small data to create sector and geographically specific emission profiles that we call Business Energy and Emissions Profile Dashboard, or BEEPs. Local governments use BEEPs to create more effective

carbon-reduction programs by graphically rendering their community’s energy use and carbon emissions by industry and business type. T h i s i nteract ive to ol h a s received international recognition; last year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Climate CoLab awarded it the grand prize for innovation. Cities as diverse as Vancouver, Ottawa, Sudbury and even Fort Collins, Colorado, are now using the tool. We’re able to offer it to our customers and partners today because we were able to harness the power of small data. A B.C. OPPORTUNITY Q By the

time you read this, a new government will likely have taken the helm in British Columbia. Wherever the chips fall, we invite the new leaders to leverage, amplify and expand all the great work that’s been done – and is well underway – to find

The low-carbon economy is open for business. Join us.

climatesmartbusiness.com climatesmartbusiness.com

efficiencies and cut carbon in all corners of the economy. The new team can ensure that small and medium-sized businesses play an even stronger role in maintaining our competitiveness as the world shifts to a clean-growth, low-carbon economy. Private-sector leaders can punch above their weight and make a big dent in the biggest challenge of our age. Along the way, bit by bit, they will make B.C. more competitive in the economy of the future. And that’s something all of us can – or modest – the payroll may be. É Elizabeth Sheehan is the co-founder and president of Climate Smart. Visit www. climatesmartbusiness. com


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

TRAINING GREEN LEADERS Sustainable studies get specific to meet changing demands in the built – and regulatory – environment

JOHN KURUCZ

ALEXANDRE HEBERT ENERGY AND SUSTAINABILITY MANAGER, BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

I’ve yet to meet someone who is smart enough to fully understand smart buildings

W

hile the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University and Victoria’s Royal Roads University provide degrees in environmental studies that concentrate on broad environmental issues, smaller colleges and universities in the province now offer specific studies related to the nuts and bolts of building a sustainable economy.

University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) instructor Guido Wimmers is guiding academics, government and builders alike towards housing types that replace bricks and mortar with a deeper shade of green. Among his areas of speciality is the passive-house model, a construction method that emphasizes simplicity

and self-sustainability. “It doesn’t matter if the project is in Vancouver or Whistler or Prince George or Edmonton,” Wimmers says. “Builders can always adjust to the climate that they’re building in if they understand the basic building principles.”


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Wimmers, engineering program chair at UNBC and founder of the Canadian Passive House Institute, helped design the first contemporary passive structure in Canadian history. Alongside a team of architects and engineers from his home country, the legacy project known as the Austria House received international attention when it premiered in Whistler during the 2010 Winter Olympics. The project opened a plethora of possibilities of other new-age building types that have since gained traction in Canada: the smart-home phenomenon, which relies on computerized systems and timers; the Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) certification, employed in larger-scale developments; and net-zero homes, which are similar in concept to the passive-house model.

Governments at all levels are clamouring to meet greenhouse gas emission targets, and the City of Vancouver is at the forefront of that push. Wimmers has worked alongside Vancouver city staff and others at the province to understand the intricacies of a housing standard that’s been adopted into European building codes for the last decade. Vancouver has entrenched sustainable guidelines into its building codes, and Wimmers expects provincial and federal governments to follow within 10 years. Building inspectors will invariably be needed to provide the checks and balances as those new regulations are adopted. Anticipating what those specs will be is part of the yearlong master’s program at UNBC.

Alexandre Hebert, energy and sustainability manager at the British Columbia Institute of Technology, heads up the recently launched high-performance building lab | ROB KRUYT


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Training green leaders

Guido Wimmers is engineering program chair at the University of Northern British Columbia and founder of the Canadian Passive House Institute | SUBMITTED

“We are focusing on the basics of physics: they are the same in the tropics as they are in the Arctic,” Wimmers says. Alexandre Hebert is also on the cusp of helping to navigate those standards. As energy and sustainability manager at Burnaby’s British Columbia Institute of Technology campus, Hebert heads up the recently launched high-performance building lab to train builders entering into the field. The five-day course sees students in both a practical and a classroom setting where wheel-based wall assembly units allow students to examine the necessary ingredients needed for insulation and airtight insulation. The program represents a partnership with the City of Vancouver to teach the sustainable building inspectors of tomorrow. The training is purposely focused on passive housing, rather than on smart-building theories. “I’ve yet to meet someone who is smart enough to fully understand smart buildings,” Hebert says. “You are sold ideas that a computer will take care of anything. The first thing you know, when something doesn’t work, you can’t find out what it is and things get complicated.” Energy dependency takes on a different role on Vancouver Island, making the sustainable movement that much more attractive. As director of the School of Environment and Sustainability at Royal Roads University, Chris Ling says Islanders are at risk of prolonged outages due to limited connectivity to the power grid. “There’s a resiliency aspect to the passive house in that context,” Ling says. “Most of us who live in a regular house, we’re very vulnerable. Whereas if you’re in a passive house, you’ll maintain that warmth over a very long period of time.” The curriculum at Royal Roads doesn’t speak to any one specific type of sustainable housing model, he says. Rather, it’s based around a catch-all approach to anyone entering the field. “Passive housing is one particular way of doing this, but all of these green building ideas are essentially about reducing the energy demand of the residential housing stock,” Ling says. É


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Briefs

Organic farming pays more than money

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ewing to a strict organic food diet can increase your grocery bill by up to 50 per cent and might have only marginal increased health benefits, according to a new study published in Science Advances by two researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC). But there are two important socio-economic benefits that consumers can feel good about if they continue to buy only organic produce: it avoids exposing farm workers to pesticides, and the premium they pay is helping to pull the small family farm back from the brink of extinction. UBC researchers Verena Seufert and Navin Ramankutty concluded that because Canada has relatively strict regulations on pesticide use, the health benefits of eating only organic food grown in Canada are “marginal.” “Maybe some of the benefits of

organics that consumers think of when they buy organic may actually not be that strong, while organic has some other benefits that maybe we don’t think about much,” Seufert says. The premium that consumers are prepared to pay for organic food means that small family farms can earn a decent living, says organic farmer Lydia Ryall. Ryall, who has a degree in agriculture, owns Cropthorne Farm, a 15-acre farm in Delta. She not only makes a living from farming herself, but also employs half a dozen people. “We employ up to 15 people during the season, on 15 acres. It’s basically one person per acre here, and out on the Prairies it’s probably one person for 20,000 acres,” Ryall says. “Small-scale farming is not profitable in Canada,” Seufert concludes. “So, here, organic provides an advantage because it increases the profitability of farmers.”

Cropthorne Farm’s Lydia Ryall with her daughter, Kayjar | CHUNG CHOW

According to the most recent Statistics Canada estimates, there were 569 certified organic farms

in B.C. in 2011, which is just three per cent of the total farms in the province.


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

PASSIVE’S

AGGRESSIVE PATH

Cheap heat – and a new Vancouver building bylaw – could open door to wider public acceptance of ultra-energy-saving Passive Houses

SUSAN M. BOYCE

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volv, a 46-unit townhouse North Vancouver development by Guildford Brook, is tackling the thorny question of whether consumers are willing to pay for an ultra-environmentally savvy home … or not.

One of the first townhouse projects in the up-trending Moodyville neighbourhood, Evolv also lays claim to being the city’s first strata development built to Passive House standards – a set of rigourous construction and design protocols that create homes that are so energy-efficient it’s estimated annual heating/cooling bills for the 1,700-square-foot homes will average less than $20 per month, year after year. This compares with costs of $125 to $300 per month for conventional fossil fuel furnaces or electric baseboard heating. Passive Houses require high levels of air-tightness, super-insulated walls up to a foot thick, triple-pane windows, a low air-exchange rate – 0.6 per hour rather

than the five per hour found in most new homes – and advanced air filtration systems. They are also more expensive to build. Just how much more is a hotly contested number. Some industry watchers suggest a bottom-line increase of as much as 30 per cent – a figure difficult to stomach in Metro Vancouver’s expensive real estate market. Guildford Brook’s president, Yashpal Parmar, says he made the decision to go passive because he’s convinced homebuyers will pony up the extra costs – which he estimates will add no more than eight to 10 per cent to the sale price of the $900,000 to $1-million-plus Evolv townhomes – in order to reap the lifestyle benefits and long-term savings on energy bills.


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“Once people experience how comfortable these homes are day to day, they won’t want to live in anything but a Passive House – it’s just that simple.” “You’re really selling the comfort of these homes more than the energy savings,” adds Scott Kennedy, partner in Cornerstone Architecture. “If you’re paying $1,000 or more per square foot – which you are in many parts of Metro Vancouver – you want to be able to sit beside the window without being cold from the draft.” James Askew, president of rareEarth Project Marketing, agrees. “Inside, a Passive House will have stable temperatures year-round – no matter what the weather’s doing. Last winter I was talking to a [Passive-House] owner in Nanaimo during the cold snap and he hadn’t even turned on the heat despite the -18 C weather.” Askew also points out that although certain components will be more expensive to install – the extra insulation, thick, insulation-packed walls, triple-glazed windows and larger overhangs for solar shading, for instance – those costs are at least partially offset because other mechanical components like an expensive furnace

Scott Kennedy, partner in Cornerstone Architecture: “ The idea is much like the old Europe farm houses — the ones with the two-foot-thick stone walls that keep you warm in winter and cool in summer” | CHUNG CHOW The Heights, a six-storey, 86-unit rental apartment in East Vancouver, is billed as Canada’s largest Passive House building | CORNERSTONE ARCHITECTURE

or air conditioning unit are no longer required. “Passive design relies on simple, durable systems with very long lifespans,” Askew explains. BUILDING CHALLENGES Q Although Parmar says

building to Passive House standards isn’t that much more complicated than traditional methods, there are some specific challenges.


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GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Passive’s aggressive path

Interior rendering of Evolv townhouses in North Vancouver, built to Passive House standards: extra costs outweighed by comfort and energy savings | GUILDFORD BROOK

Sourcing the requisite triple-glazed windows is tough because there’s currently only one supplier – EuroLine Windows Inc. of Delta, which imports them from Europe. Langley-based Cascadia Windows Ltd. says it is prepared to launch a made-in-Canada series that meets Passive House requirements. Alex Maurer, principal of Marken Design + Consulting,

the company that designed Canada’s first Passive House in Whistler in 2011, says finding qualified trades and subcontractors isn’t as easy as it is for regular construction. But this is changing as more industry workers are updating their skill sets, he adds. Maurer predicts this will definitely be the way of the future – even without the City of Vancouver’s May 1 implementation of new regulations requiring any multifamily development to be either Passive House or LEED Gold-plus as part of the rezoning process. “Passive House design originated in Germany in the late 1980s and is fast becoming the global standard for sustainable building techniques. People often think it’s just for single-family, but in Europe there are already schools, playschools, fire halls and highrises built to these standards. And, as more homes are built this way, the construction costs will come down. In a few years they could actually be less expensive [to build] than conventional homes.” Askew also predicts the resale value will be more attractive. “If you look at the housing market in five years, buyers will expect this level of construction. So if your home isn’t built to these standards, you’ll be at a disadvantage when you want to sell.” Kennedy adds the cost efficiencies of Passive House in multi-family can be expected to narrow the price gap with conventional construction. “Because it’s a bigger

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Not So Passive about Carbon Emissions BY CLAIRE ATKIN In a city where we pride ourselves on both quality of life and living green, sustainable building design seems to have it all.

V

ancouver is witnessing the rise of an increasingly popular approach to sustainable building design called the “Passive House Standard.” The standard can be applied to all building types, not just houses, and requires extra insulation, airtight windows, and optimized ventilation. High performance heat recovery ventilators supply fresh air directly to the bedroom, dining room, and living room, and exhaust stale, moisture out from the kitchen and bathrooms. The result is cleaner, healthier air and year-round comfortable temperatures throughout the entire building, even close to the windows. Equally important, they use up to 90% less energy than a standard building and the heat from a hair dryer is often enough to heat an entire home. Goran Ostojic, Vice President of Integral Group Canada West, works on commercial Passive House buildings and says passive buildings increase employee well-being. He states that when you provide the proper environment, including lighting, fresh air, comfort, and daylight, people perform better, take fewer sick days, and experience increased productivity. In some parts of the world, Passive House is the norm, but it wasn’t until the 2010 Vancouver Olympics that the concept was first implemented in B.C. The Austria House in Whistler was the first of its kind in Canada and introduced a new generation of builders, designers and developers such as Alexander Maurer, Principal at Market Design & Consulting and Monte Paulson, Passive House Specialist at RDH Building Science, to this design and construction approach. In the past year, the total number of Passive House units built or under construction in Vancouver alone increased from less than 100

to over 300 with several hundred thousand square feet of additional new development currently moving through City approvals. Alexander Maurer notes that beyond improved building quality, Passive buildings mean energy savings for businesses and residents. Goran Ostojic says that they’re high performance, but simpler to operate and maintain. Using extra insulation reduces the size and complexity of the heating systems leading to lower energy bills and less carbon pollution. Vancouver intends to be at the leading edge in zero emission design. The city is in an ideal position to capitalize on Passive Houses and other sustainable building designs. New buildings require high performance insulation and windows, which are produced locally. And because the emphasis is on limiting heat loss, wood becomes an excellent alternative to concrete and steel, which are known to transmit heat. This will drive local demand and innovation in wood construction materials and approaches. As this trend continues and local industry gets better at designing and building homes and offices that are very energy efficient, the better positioned Vancouver will be to export these skills and technologies to other jurisdictions and areas with similar objectives. Two years ago, Vancouver made a bold commitment to transition off of fossil fuels and reduce carbon emissions by 80% by 2050. In order to do this, the City is focusing on improving energy efficiency and then transitioning to renewable energy in the two sectors that produce the most carbon pollution - buildings and transportation. In 2016, the City of Vancouver adopted the Zero Emissions Building Plan. The Plan

takes many lessons from the Passive House standard and shifts the focus for energy efficiency innovation from a primarily technology based approach to also emphasize integrated building design and construction to reduce heat loss and improve ventilation. The Plan aims to reduce emissions from new buildings by 70% by 2020, 90% by 2025, and 100% by 2030. This phased approach focuses on new construction and gives local industry (including designers, builders and equipment suppliers) time to develop new skills and products, and build capacity to successfully construct cost effective low-carbon buildings. The Green Building Policy for Rezonings was recently updated to reflect this new approach and will cut carbon pollution from new rezoned buildings by 50%, while still allowing builders and developers to use natural gas without increasing construction or operating costs. This approach provides flexibility to achieve GHG reductions using simple, proven approaches and technologies. The Policy’s focus on minimizing heat loss simplifies mechanical system design and enables extra investment in the building envelope. It’s this combination of focus, simplicity and cost effectiveness that enabled a diversity of organizations such as the Urban Development Institute, the Condominium Home Owners Association, and the Pembina Institute to support the new Policy. So how effective will the City’s policy be in cutting GHG emissions? Monte Paulsen is optimistic; “The only other cost efficient approach to cutting carbon emissions out of the economy is getting people out of their car and onto bicycles or walking.” In Vancouver, it sounds like Passive House Standards fit right in. To learn more, email us at renewablecity@vancouver.ca


30 |

GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Passive’s aggressive path

YASHPAL PARMAR

MONTHLY COST TO HEAT/COOL A 2,000-SQUAREFOOT NEW HOUSE IN B.C. Electricity

$300

PRESIDENT, GUILDFORD BROOK

Once people experience how comfortable these homes are day to day, they won’t want to live in anything but a Passive House – it’s just that simple

Oil

$145

Natural gas

$125

Passive house

$15–$20 SOURCE: FORTIS BC, BC HYDRO, BC PASSIVE HOUSE

build, less exterior walls are required for the same interior footage – so less insulation is required.” He singles out the Heights, a six-storey, 86-unit rental apartment in East Vancouver that Cornerstone designed for 8th Avenue Development Group, as an example. Billed as Canada’s largest Passive House building to date, the Heights is described by Kennedy as “a super insulated ‘dumb building.’ No technology or complicated mechanical systems [to break down] – just a simple, high-quality building envelope, high-quality windows and high-quality air control through heat recovery ventilation. Conceptually, the idea is much like the old Europe farmhouses — the ones with the two-foot-thick stone walls that keep you warm in winter and cool in summer.” Bob de Wit, president and CEO of the Greater Vancouver Home Builders’ Association, sums up Passive House’s future: “The building industry will embrace what consumers are willing to buy, but we need to allow the market to decide rather than bring it in as a regulation. Personally, I would love to live in a Passive House because of how much healthier they are.” There are now about 40 Passive-House buildings in Canada, a number that is expected to rise as Vancouver’s new regulations – and public acceptance – kick in.É

We are BC’s Energy Capital. tĞƵŶĚĞƌƐƚĂŶĚĞŶĞƌŐLJ͘tĞƉƌĂĐƟĐĞĐŽŶƐĞƌǀĂƟŽŶ͘ DŝĐƌŽ,LJĚ ĚƌŽ ͻ ͛ƐĮƌƐƚϭϬϬ<tŶĞƚŵĞƚĞƌŝŶŐƉƌŽũĞĐƚ ͻ tĞŵĂŬĞĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐŝƚLJĨƌŽŵƚƌĞĂƚĞĚĞŋ ƵĞŶƚ WƌŽ ŽũĞĐƚ ͻ ŶŽƵŐŚĞŶĞƌŐLJĨŽƌϳϬͲϴϬŚŽŵĞƐĂŶŶƵĂůůLJ

WĂĂƐƐŝǀĞ, ,ŽƵƐƐĞ WƌŽũĞĐƚ Wƌ

ͻ WĂƐƐŝǀĞ,ŽƵƐĞĐĞƌƟĮĞĚŝŶϮϬϭϱ ͻ >WůĂƟŶƵŵĐĞƌƟĮĞĚŝŶϮϬϭϳ

Find out more about these aggressively passive projects ĂƚĨŽƌƚƐƚũŽŚŶ͘ĐĂͬŐƌĞĞŶͲĐŽƌƉŽƌĂƚĞͲŝŶŝƟĂƟǀĞƐ

fortstjohn.ca


Passion for Passive Certified as a Passive House Component by the Passive House Institute in Darmstadt, Germany  currently the only certified window manufactured in Canada  ThermoPlus PHC tilt & turn windows have the same attention-to-detail and superior quality for which EuroLine products are known. When you choose EuroLine products, you can rest assured that you will have a system that is built to the highest performance standards for the home of your dreams.

1.800.337.8604 www.euroline-windows.com Head Office and Showroom: 7620 MacDonald Road, Delta Open Mon-Fri 8:00 - 15:30


32 |

GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

TACKLING THE BIG PROBLEMS B.C. is a hub for clean-tech businesses – and most were started to solve global problems

ALBERT VAN SANTVOORT

KARN MANHAS FOUNDER AND CEO, TERRAMERA

If you talk to the clean-tech companies, most of them started with just a few people trying to solve a major problem

S

mall businesses are establishing British Columbia as a clean-technology hub, and the province’s biggest city is proving the incubator. Vancouver now has Canada’s largest concentration of clean-tech companies, and nearly eight out of 10 are small businesses, according to a KPMG report.

“If you talk to the clean-tech companies, most of them started with just a few people trying to solve a major problem,” says Karn Manhas, founder and CEO of Terramera, a Vancouver-based biopesticide company. Terramera was no different. Manhas started the company in his basement to find an environmentally friendly alternative to chemical pesticides. Manhas and Terramera now occupy an office space on Seymour Street and have an off-site laboratory. While Vancouver’s clean-tech sector is primarily composed of small businesses, the industry should not be underestimated. “Most of the clean-tech companies are small businesses, but many are also growing very fast,” says Manhas. Terramera, he says, has quadrupled in the last 18 months.

The industry is also expected to grow exponentially. KPMG predicts that B.C.’s clean-tech sector will generate revenue of $2.9 billion this year, a 61 per cent increase from 2016’s $1.8 billion. Growth in the clean-tech sector depends on continued innovation and lower prices, because success for green companies depends on their alternatives working better and being cheaper than their conventional counterparts. Minto Roy, co-founder of New Westminster-based Social Print Paper, tells Green Space that his company’s treeless commercial printer paper has to perform better and be less expensive than its competitors if it hopes to be successful. The same game plan has also been essential to Terramera’s success. Because many of Terramera’s customers are businesses,


| 33

Terramera chief of staff Jenna Bayuk holding plants treated with non-traditional pesticides | CHUNG CHOW Minto Roy, left, senior partner and co-founder of New Westminster-based Social Print Paper, with company president Lee Gieschen. The firm manufactures paper using agricultural waste from wheat and sugar production | ROB KRUYT

operating cost savings increase overall profits. Price competitiveness is a necessary component because businesses are often not willing to sacrifice profit for environmental considerations. Clean-tech companies also have to convince consumers and investors that their green product is better than traditional products. Terramera developed technology that targets organic compounds more effectively. It also uses its proprietary technology to develop its own products. É

FEDERAL FUNDS SPUR CLEAN TECH Canada’s 2016 federal budget earmarked $1 billion over four years for clean technology, and the 2017 budget provides some details to how that funding will flow. It proposes to make $1.4 billion in new financing available to the clean-tech sector through the Business Development Bank of Canada and Export Development Canada. It also includes $400 million over five years, starting in 2017-18, to replenish the Sustainable Development Technology Canada SD Tech Fund for pre-commercialized technologies to undertake demonstration projects. It also provides $14.5 million over four years to establish a Clean Growth Hub. “The budget points to clean technology as a huge opportunity for Canada, and that’s absolutely right,” says Clare Demerse, federal policy adviser at Clean Energy Canada.


34 |

GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

DAVID SUZUKI FOUNDATION: BLUE DOT CAMPAIGN ENDORSED BY 51 B.C. MUNICIPALITIES ALAN WORSLEY |

R Everyone should have access to clean drinking water, food that is free from toxins and air that won’t make them ill when they go for a walk

The right to a healthy environment is good for the economy and people

ichmond, B.C., made history in October 2014. It became the f i rst mu n icipa l ity i n Canada to declare its support for the right to a healthy environment, with help from the David Suzuki Foundation’s Blue Dot movement. It’s a simple yet powerful idea: all citizens deserve to have clean air and water, safe food and a say in decisions that affect their health and well-being. Va ncouver a nd Victoria soon signed their own declarations, and the idea took off. Today, more than 51 municipalities in B.C. and 153 across Canada have made environmental rights a priority. Now, close to 16 million Canadians, more than 40 per cent of the country’s population, live in a town or municipality that recognizes these rights. For some municipalities, it’s part of a broader, more ambitious goal. Vancouver plans to become the world’s

greenest city by 2020, something Mayor Gregor Robertson believes is good for the economy and citizens. Laws recognizing the right to a healthy environment have been shown to stimulate a country’s economy, spurring innovation and strengthening competitiveness. In Canada, green technologies make up the fastest-growing industry. A 2015 Canadian Clean Technology Industry Report concluded that revenues from the sector grew at four times the rate of the overall Canadian economy. Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps is clear: “Environmental rights are key to the genuine well-being of citizens and the ability for our citizens to live healthy, prosperous lives. In Victoria, our natural environment is directly tied to economic prosperity; protecting it is important to our long-term future.” It’s not a radical idea. More than 110 countries recognize the right to a healthy environment. We can learn from them how this can spur economic progress. For example, strong environmental laws in Norway – including taxes on carbon emissions, nitrogen oxide emissions and other pollutants – have benefited the economy. The movement recognizing the right to a healthy environment started by connecting communities. Now, with the support of more than 100,000 Canadians, it has begun to unite the nation. Although progress at the municipal level is reason to celebrate, many issues can only be addressed at the federal level. For that reason, the federal government must create an environmental bill of rights. Canadians pride themselves on the beauty of the natural environment. Yet Canada consistently

underperforms against other countries on environmental protection. The Conference Board of Canada ranks us 15 out of 17 industrialized countries on a variety of environmental indicators. The costs of not sufficiently safeguarding Canadians’ access to a healthy environment are real. A recent report by the International Institute for Sustainable Development found that Canadian families, businesses and governments spend tens of billions of dollars every year on health care and lost productivity related to pollution. The report estimates that health-related costs for smog alone – including increased childhood asthma – were about $36 billion in 2015. Economic benefits aren’t the only reason environmental rights are important. Everyone should have access to clean drinking water, food that is free from toxins and air that won’t make them ill when they go for a walk. L ega l ly recog n izi ng env i ronmental rights and responsibilities will benefit Canada’s diverse economy. As many of our peer nations demonstrate, it’s also the right thing to do. Recognizing and respecting environmental rights as human rights isn’t an option; it’s an obligation. É Alan Worsley is a communications specialist at the David Suzuki Foundation, Vancouver, www. davidsuzuki.org


| 35

Biggest alternative-energy companies in B.C. RANKED BY | Total number of employees in B.C.

 

      

         



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DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR Vancouverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property management industry


36 |

GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Green Space directory

The Green Space directory provides listings of professionals and firms with expertise in all aspects of green building design, construction, retrofit and demolition. The products section offers a range of green

PRODUCTS

APPLIANCES

Ben’s Appliances Sales & Service 13664 104 Ave, Surrey V3T 1W2 ....................................p: 604-581-4307 e: contact@bensappliances.ca maytagstorebc.com Coast Wholesale Appliances Inc 8488 Main St, Vancouver V5X 4W8 ....................................p: 604-321-6644 e: info@coastappliances.com coastappliances.com Euro-Line Appliances West Inc 2912 4th Ave W, Vancouver V6K 1R2 .....................................p: 604-235-3980 e: info@elawest.com euro-line-appliances.com Miele Experience Centre Vancouver 69 Smithe St, Vancouver V6B 1C1 .....................................p: 866-758-0462 e: gallerybc@miele.ca mielevancouver.ca

DECKING, FENCING & OUTDOOR STRUCTURES Advance Lumber & Pallet Ltd 12184 Old Yale Rd, Surrey V3V 3X5 Jaspinder Brar ............................p: 604-580-4918 e: jbrar@theadvancegroup.net theadvancegroup.net Surrey New & Used Building Materials 17861 64 Ave, Surrey V3S 1Z3 Wade Schmirler .........................p: 604-576-8488 e: surreynewandused@shaw.ca surreynewandused.com Taiga Building Products Ltd 4710 Kingsway Suite 800, Burnaby V5H 4M2 .................................... p: 604-438-1471 e: marketing@taigabuilding.com taigabuilding.com West Wind Hardwood Inc 10189 McDonald Park Rd Suite 5 PO Box 2205, Sidney V8L 3S8 Shelley Nielsen ..........................p: 250-656-0848 e: shelley@westwindhardwood.com westwindhardwood.com

DOORS Vinyltek Windows 587 Ebury Pl, Delta V3M 6M8 ...................................p: 604-540-0029 vinyltek.com

ELECTRICAL & LIGHTING Brite-Lite Lighting and Electrical Distributors 1119 Cliveden Ave, Delta V3M 6G9 Craig Barrie ................................p: 604-525-5549 e: craig@brite-lite.com brite-lite.com Commercial Lighting Products Ltd 1535 Cliveden Ave, Delta V3M 6P7 ....................................p: 604-540-4999 comlight.com

building products and technologies available for construction projects in B.C. Many professional associations and buildingrelated organizations are listed as potential sources of green building information.

EcoCentury Technologies Inc 2424 Maple St Suite 111, Vancouver V6J 4Y1 Kerry Gibson ..............................p: 778-996-2669 e: kgibson@ecocentury.ca ecocentury.ca KM Roberts & Associates Ltd 18812 96 Ave Suite 20, Surrey V4N 3R1 Brian H Le Cappelain .................p: 604-882-8488 e: blecappelain@kmroberts.com kmroberts.com

EXTERIOR FINISH & TRIM Surrey New & Used Building Materials 17861 64 Ave, Surrey V3S 1Z3 Wade Schmirler .........................p: 604-576-8488 e: surreynewandused@shaw.ca surreynewandused.com

FLOORING & FLOOR COVERINGS Ames Tile & Stone Ltd 2229 Beta Ave, Burnaby V5C 5N1 .....................................p: 604-294-8453 e: burnaby@amestile.com amestile.com D Litchfield & Co Ltd 3040 Westwood St, Port Coquitlam V3C 3L7 ......................................p: 604-464-7525 e: demo@dlitchfield.com dlitchfield.com The Eco Floor Store 5511 192 St Suite 203, Surrey V3S 8E5 Jared Kreiss ...............................p: 604-576-4400 e: jared@ecofloorstore.ca ecofloorstore.ca Interstyle Ceramic & Glass Ltd 3625 Brighton Ave, Burnaby V5A 3H5 .....................................p: 604-421-7229 e: info@interstyleglass.com interstyleglass.com West Wind Hardwood Inc 10189 McDonald Park Rd Suite 5 PO Box 2205, Sidney V8L 3S8 Shelley Nielsen ..........................p: 250-656-0848 e: shelley@westwindhardwood.com westwindhardwood.com Western Reclaimed Timber 26324 River Rd PO Box 93 Stn Whonnock, Maple Ridge V2W 1V9 Amika Scott................................p: 604-462-8845 e: info@westernreclaimed.com westernreclaimed.com

FOUNDATIONS, FOOTERS & SLABS Eco Paving 145 Schoolhouse St Suite 38, Coquitlam V3K 4X8 Brad Lavigne ..............................p: 800-609-5408 e: info@ecopaving.ca ecopaving.ca

FOUNDATIONS, FOOTERS & SLABS – STAY-IN-PLACE FORMS Quad-Lock Building Systems Ltd 7398 132 St, Surrey V3W 4M7 ................................... p: 604-590-3111 e: info@quadlock.com quadlock.com

FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS Heritage Office Furnishings 1588 Rand Ave, Vancouver V6P 3G2 ..................................... p: 604-688-2381 e: info@heritageoffice.com heritageoffice.com PSL Partition Systems Ltd 1610 Derwent Way Suite 28, Delta V3M 6W1 ...................................p: 604-521-8923 e: vancouver@partitions.com partitions.com

INSULATION – EPS FOAM INSULATION Quad-Lock Building Systems Ltd 7398 132 St, Surrey V3W 4M7 ................................... p: 604-590-3111 e: info@quadlock.com quadlock.com

INTERIOR FINISH & TRIM Barrisol BC 328 Esplanade E, North Vancouver V7L 1A4 Sita Carboni ...............................p: 604-981-9663 e: sita@barrisolbc.ca barrisolbc.ca Cascadia Design Products 1614 5th Ave W Suite 100, Vancouver V6J 1N8 .....................................p: 604-739-0966 e: info@cascadiadesign.ca cascadiadesign.ca Interstyle Ceramic & Glass Ltd 3625 Brighton Ave, Burnaby V5A 3H5 .....................................p: 604-421-7229 e: info@interstyleglass.com interstyleglass.com Surrey New & Used Building Materials 17861 64 Ave, Surrey V3S 1Z3 Wade Schmirler .........................p: 604-576-8488 e: surreynewandused@shaw.ca surreynewandused.com Western Reclaimed Timber 26324 River Rd PO Box 93 Stn Whonnock, Maple Ridge V2W 1V9 Amika Scott................................p: 604-462-8845 e: info@westernreclaimed.com westernreclaimed.com

OTHER GREEN PRODUCTS Architek Sustainable Building Solutions 28 7th Ave W, Vancouver V5Y 1L6 Ronald Schwenger.....................p: 604-861-9446 e: ron@architek.com architek.com Planet Clean Canada Inc 1609 Derwent Way, Delta V3M 6K8 .................................... p: 604-327-1101 e: info@planetclean.com planetclean.com

Surrey New & Used Building Materials 17861 64 Ave, Surrey V3S 1Z3 Wade Schmirler .........................p: 604-576-8488 e: surreynewandused@shaw.ca surreynewandused.com

PAINTS & COATINGS Cloverdale Paint Inc 2630 Croydon Dr Suite 400, Surrey V3Z 6T3 ...................................... p: 604-596-6261 e: helpdesk@cloverdalepaint.com cloverdalepaint.com Kerrisdale Lumber Co 6191 West Blvd, Vancouver V6M 3X3 ....................................p: 604-261-4274 e: info@kerrisdalelumber.com kerrisdalelumber.com

PLUMBING CuraFlo of BC Ltd 7436 Fraser Park Dr, Burnaby V5J 5B9 Randy Christie............................p: 604-298-7278 e: christier@curaflo.com curaflo.com Terra Mechanical Ltd 1643 Beach Grove Rd, Delta V4L 1P4 John Rosse ................................. p: 778-858-2991 e: office@terramechanical.ca terramechanical.ca

RENEWABLE ENERGY, ONSITE ENERGY PRODUCTION Northern Alternate Power Systems Box 1243, Fairview AB T0H 1L0 Sam Glauser ..............................p: 780-835-3682 e: info@solar-store.com solar-store.com Sun Bright Solar Inc 20140 120B Ave, Maple Ridge V2X 3K5 Paul Sim ..................................... p: 604-459-4551 e: paul@sunbrightsolar.ca sunbrightsolar.ca

ROOFING Enercorp Inc 2399 132A St, Surrey V4A 9W5 ....................................p: 604-531-7046 enercorp.ca GR Green Building Products 3191 Thunderbird Cres Suite 117, Burnaby V5A 3G1 .....................................p: 604-808-7518 e: natalia@grgreen.com grgreen.com Soprema Inc 18651 52 Ave Suite 101, Surrey V3S 8E5 ......................................p: 604-576-3633 e: vancouver@soprema.ca soprema.ca


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SITE WORK & LANDSCAPING

WINDOWS

Denbow 40874 Yale Rd W, Chilliwack V2R 4J2 Willetta Les ...............................p: 888-933-6269 e: info@denbow.com denbow.com Slope stablilization, multi-storey and greenroof soil installation, green infrastructure, revegetation, seeding, Cascadia Green Retaining Walls, blow round aggregate, erosion and sediment control, stream bank restoration. Eco Paving 145 Schoolhouse St Suite 38, Coquitlam V3K 4X8 Brad Lavigne ..............................p: 800-609-5408 e: info@ecopaving.ca ecopaving.ca Surrey New & Used Building Materials 17861 64 Ave, Surrey V3S 1Z3 Wade Schmirler .........................p: 604-576-8488 e: surreynewandused@shaw.ca surreynewandused.com

STRUCTURAL FRAMING Western Reclaimed Timber 26324 River Rd PO Box 93 Stn Whonnock, Maple Ridge V2W 1V9 Amika Scott................................p: 604-462-8845 e: info@westernreclaimed.com westernreclaimed.com

Centra Windows 20178 98 Ave, Langley V1M 3G1 ....................................p: 604-882-5010 e: info@centrawindows.com centrawindows.com

EuroLine Windows Inc 7620 MacDonald Rd, Delta V4G 1N2 .....................................p: 604-940-8485 e: info@euroline-windows.com euroline-windows.com Innotech Windows & Doors Inc 27452 52 Ave, Langley V4W 4B2 Mika Laspa ................................ p: 604-854-1111 e: info@innotech-windows.com innotech-windows.com Vinyltek Windows 587 Ebury Pl, Delta V3M 6M8 ...................................p: 604-540-0029 vinyltek.com

GE0EXCHANGE BC

GeoExchange BC is the provincial industry association in British Columbia dedicated to the education, promotion and responsible design and installation of low-temperature ground-source (geoexchange) energy systems. The vision of GeoExchange BC is to see ‘geoexchange’ established as a widely recognized, reliable, high-performance and competitive heating and cooling delivery technology in British Columbia. The mission of GeoExchange BC is to promote public awareness, improve professional capabilities, research and develop literature, and provide information sharing between industry professionals and other stakeholders associated with the geoexchange industry.

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER Okanagan Geothermal Ltd. Enderby ...................................... p: 250.838.0809 Jim Croken e: jim@okanagangeothermal.net Schmidt Bros. Mechanical Ltd. Vancouver .................................. p: 604.224.7068 Roland Schmidt e: roland@schmidtbros.ca

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER, DESIGNER OF SYSTEMS Energy 1 Services Ltd. North Vancouver ........................ p: 844.488.3700 Scott Miller e: info@energy1services.com

Lockhart Industries (Duncan) Ltd. Duncan ........................................p: 250.748.1731 Doug Lockhart e: lockhart@lockhart.ca

CONTRACTOR/ INSTALLER, DESIGNER OF SYSTEMS, ENGINEER (GEOEXCHANGE), SUPPLIER/DISTRIBUTOR GeoTility Geothermal Installations Corp. Vancouver .................................. p: 604.273.5776 Gordon Horbay e: ghorbay@geotility.ca Rick Nelson e: rnelson@geotility.ca Jordan Parro e: jparro@geotility.ca Stuart Yanow e: syanow@geotility.ca

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER, DRILLER Ground Source Drilling Ltd. Kelowna ..................................... p: 250.808.7155 Len Faasse e: scott@groundsourcedrilling.com Scott Steward e: scott@groundsourcedrilling.com Red Williams Well Drilling Ltd. Qualicum Beach ......................... p: 250.951.0556 Mary Sovereign e: redwoodcentre@shaw.ca William Williams e: reds_drilling@shaw.ca Thomas Williams e: reds_drilling@shaw.ca Sonic Drilling Ltd. Surrey......................................... p: 604.588.6080 Bill Fitzgerald e: bill.fitzgerald@sonicdrilling.com Ray Roussy e: jgrant@sonicdrilling.com

2017 | BOMA BC LEASING GUIDE | COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

OFFICE SPACE MEDICALTECH HUB RISES IN SURREY GASTOWN’S BODY HEAT

FALSE CREEK FLATS: THE FINAL FRONTIER ZERO-EMISSIONS MAY DEFINE NEW VANCOUVER OFFICE TOWERS OFFICIAL CIAL IALL PUBLICATION PU PUBLICAT PPUB

PUBLISHED BY

British Columbia

THE BUILDING OWNERS AND MANAGERS ASSOCIATION

FOREIGN BUYERS

STACKING STRATA

BOMA BC AWARDS

TO BOOK YOUR 2018 OFFICE SPACE AD Call Marie at 604-608-5158 or email mpearsall@biv.com Space Close: March 24, 2018

Conducting R&D and making an impact. Vancity’s new SR&ED investment tax credit loan helps bridge the cash flow gap between filing your SR&ED claim and receipt of funds. Good Money (TM) and Make Good Money (TM) are trademarks of Vancouver City Savings Credit Union.

vancity.com/sred

Good Money (TM) and Make Good Money (TM) are trademarks of Vancouver City Savings Credit Union.


38 |

GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Green Space directory

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER, DRILLER, MANUFACTURER

MANUFACTURER, SUPPLIER/DISTRIBUTOR

Sonic Drilling Ltd. Surrey......................................... p: 604.588.6080 Jackquie Grant e: jgrant@sonicdrilling.com

International Pipe Inc Selkirk ........................................ p: 204.482.4675 Kelly Culbertson e: kelly@internationalpipe.ca April Godlein e: april@internationalpipe.ca Crystal Thibeault e: pipe@internationalpipe.ca

DRILLER Ground Source Drilling Ltd Kelowna ..................................... p: 778.753.2779 Justin Faasse e: info@groundsourcedrilling.com Richard Cronin/Drilling & Grouting Consultant Abbotsford ................................. p: 604.308.3165 Richard Cronin e: drillshark@shaw.ca

ENGINEER (GEOEXCHANGE) Associated Engineering Burnaby .......................................p: 604.293.1411 Ruben Arellano e: arellanor@ae.ca Rachel Bolongaro e: bolongaror@ae.ca DEC Engineering New Westminster ......................p: 604.525.3341 Andrew Byrnes e: andrew.byrnes@decmail.ca Stu MacGillivray e: stu.macGillivray@decmail.ca Richard Marier e: richard.marier@decmail.ca Scott McAllister e: scott.mcallister@decmail.ca Tom Ren e: tom.ren@decmail.ca C.L. Tsang e: cl.tsang@decmail.ca Jim White e: jim.white@decmail.ca Tim Zhang e: tim.zhang@decmail.ca Smith + Andersen Kelowna ..................................... p: 250.762.9993 Jeff Quibell e: jeff.quibell@smithandandersen.com

ENGINEER (GEOEXCHANGE), ENGINEER (MECHANICAL) DEC Engineering New Westminster ......................p: 604.525.3341 Dale Carter e: dale.carter@decmail.ca HPF Engineering Ltd. Kamloops ................................... p: 250.828.7992 Neal Rogers e: neal@hpfengineering.com REW Associates Consulting Engineers Port Moody ................................ p: 604.505.5940 Rene Wedding e: rwedding@rewassociates.com Smith + Andersen Kelowna ..................................... p: 250.762.9993 Al Carmel e: al.carmel@smithandandersen.com Guy Harding e: guy.harding@smithandandersen.com James Kitella e: james.kitella@smithandandersen.com Bill Poremsky e: bill.poremsky@smithandandersen.com Andrew Stringer e: andrew.stringer@smithandandersen.com Smith + Andersen Falcon Engineering Ltd. Kelowna ..................................... p: 250.762.9993 Don Poole e: don.poole@smithandandersen.com

ENGINEER (GEOEXCHANGE), UTILITY Fenix Energy Solutions Burnaby .......................................p: 604.684.7241 Hart Starr Crawford e: hstarrcrawford@fenixenergy.com

ENGINEER (MECHANICAL) DEC Engineering New Westminster ......................p: 604.525.3341 Xiangyang Tan e: tan.xiangyang@decmail.ca NextEnergy West Technologies Enderby ...................................... p: 778.214.1125 Nick Croken e: nick@nextenergywest.ca

SUPPLIER/DISTRIBUTOR Enerwest Geothermal Distribution Nelson.........................................p: 250.825.4011 Garry Meadows e: garry@enerwest.net Hydron-Aire/Water Furnace Bowen Island ............................. p: 604.454.4712 Wayne Carpenter e: waterfurnacewayne@shaw.ca

UTILITY FortisBC Kelowna ......................................p: 778.215.4571 Dan Higginson e: dan.higginson@fortisbc.com

Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership 1066 Hastings St W Suite 1900, Vancouver V6E 3X1 William J Reid ...........................p: 604-687-2990 e: mcmp@mcmparchitects.com mcmparchitects.com Omicron Canada Inc 595 Burrard St Suite 500 PO Box 49369, Vancouver V7X 1L4 Karena Selnar ............................p: 604-632-3367 e: kselnar@omicronaec.com omicronaec.com Perkins+Will Canada Architects Co 1220 Homer St, Vancouver V6B 2Y5 .....................................p: 604-484-1558 e: info@perkinswill.com ca.perkinswill.com site lines architecture 23160 96 Ave Suite 200 PO Box 249, Fort Langley V1M 2R6 ....................................p: 604-881-7173 e: reception@sitelines.ca sitelines.ca

SERVICES

ARCHITECTS

Architelier Architecture + Real Estate 2633 Viking Way Suite 118, Richmond V6V 3B6 Danny Wong ..............................p: 604-773-2068 e: info@architelier.com Colborne Architectural Group Pacific Inc 1201 Pender St W Suite 730, Vancouver V6E 2V2 Richard Newell ..........................p: 604-669-4166 e: info@colbornegroup.com colbornegroup.com DIALOG 611 Alexander St Suite 406, Vancouver V6A 1E1 Lauren Camp ..............................p: 604-909-1627 dialogdesign.ca Elemental Architecture and Interiors Inc 3989 Henning Dr Suite 118, Burnaby V5C 6P8 Terra Shimbashi .........................p: 604-568-6990 e: info@eaii.ca eaii.ca Endall Elliot Associates Architecture Urban Design 910B Richards St, Vancouver V6B 3C1 .....................................p: 604-687-3008 e: design@endallelliot.com endallelliot.com Formwerks Architectural Inc 1625 5th Ave W, Vancouver V6J 1N5 ..................................... p: 604-683-5441 e: office@formwerks.net formwerks.ca Frits De Vries Architects Ltd 1834 1st Ave W, Vancouver V6J 1G5 .....................................p: 604-736-7820 frits.ca GBL Architects Inc 139 8th Ave E, Vancouver V5T 1R8 ......................................p: 604-736-1156 e: info@gblarchitects.com gblarchitects.com Iredale Group Architecture 12 Water St Suite 220, Vancouver V6B 1A5 ..................................... p: 604-736-5581 e: architect@iredale.ca iredale.ca Merrick Architecture - Borowski Sakumoto Fligg McIntyre Ltd 839 Cambie St Suite 300, Vancouver V6B 2P4 Mark Zaitsoff ............................. p: 604-683-4131 e: info@merrickarch.com merrickarch.com

Stantec 111 Dunsmuir St Suite 1100, Vancouver V6B 6A3 Graham Twyford-Miles ..............p: 604-696-8390 e: graham.twyford-miles@stantec.com stantec.com Thibodeau Architecture Design 138 8th Ave W, Vancouver V5X 1N2 .....................................p: 778-330-1139 gotad.ca

ASSOCIATIONS Association of Consulting Engineering Companies BC 409 Granville St Suite 1258, Vancouver V6C 1T2 ...................................... p: 604-687-2811 e: info@acec-bc.ca acec-bc.ca Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of BC 4010 Regent St Suite 200, Burnaby V5C 6N2 .....................................p: 604-430-8035 e: apeginfo@apeg.bc.ca apeg.bc.ca

BC Insulators - Heat & Frost Insulators 118 233 11th Ave E, Vancouver V5T 2C4 ......................................p: 604-877-0909 insulators118.org BC Real Estate Association 701 Georgia St W Suite 1420 PO Box 10123, Vancouver V7Y 1C6 .....................................p: 604-683-7702 e: bcrea@bcrea.bc.ca bcrea.bc.ca

BC Sustainable Energy Association 2947 Tillicum Road PO Box 44104 Gorge Plaza, Victoria V9A 7K1 Jessica McIlroy ..........................p: 604-332-0025 e: info@bcsea.org bcsea.org BC Tech Association 887 Great Northern Way Suite 101, Vancouver V5T 4T5 ......................................p: 604-683-6159 e: info@wearebctech.com wearebctech.com BC Water & Waste Association 1090 Pender St W Suite 620, Vancouver V6E 2N7 .....................................p: 604-433-4389 e: contact@bcwwa.org bcwwa.org British Columbia Environment Industry Association 1130 Pender St W Suite 305, Vancouver V6E 4A4 ..................................... p: 604-683-2751 e: info@bceia.com bceia.com, hazwastebc.com Building Owners and Managers Association of BC 409 Granville St Suite 556, Vancouver V6C 1T2 Paul LaBranche ..........................p: 604-684-3916 e: info@boma.bc.ca boma.bc.ca Canadian Home Builders’ Association of BC 3700 Willingdon Ave Bldg NW5 BCIT Campus, Burnaby V5G 3H2 .....................................p: 604-432-7112 e: info@chbabc.org chbabc.org Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Association 475 Georgia St W Suite 660, Vancouver V6B 4M9 ....................................p: 604-283-1040 e: info@chfca.ca chfca.ca Cement Association of Canada - Western Region 1188 Georgia St W Suite 900, Vancouver V6E 4A2 .....................................p: 604-269-0582 e: western@cement.ca cement.ca Clean Energy BC 409 Granville St Suite 354, Vancouver V6C 1T2 ......................................p: 604-568-4778 e: info@cleanenergybc.org cleanenergybc.org Greater Vancouver Home Builders’ Association 7495 132 St Suite 1003, Surrey V3W 1J8 Bob de Wit .................................p: 778-373-9780 e: bob@gvhba.org gvhba.org Mechanical Contractors Association of BC 3989 Henning Dr Suite 223, Burnaby V5C 6N5 Jane Andrew ..............................p: 604-205-5058 e: staff@mcabc.org mcabc.org Okanagan Greens Society PO Box 20103, Kelowna V1Y 9H2 Wendy Wright............................ p: 250-469-1881 e: wendy@okanagangreens.ca okanagangreens.ca Planning Institute of British Columbia 355 Burrard St Suite 1750, Vancouver V6C 2G8 ..................................... p: 604-696-5031 e: info@pibc.bc.ca pibc.bc.ca Recycling Council of BC 119 Pender St W Suite 10, Vancouver V6B 1S5 Brock Macdonald .......................p: 604-683-6009 e: rcbc@rcbc.ca rcbc.ca


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Urban Development Institute - Pacific Region 602 Hastings St W Suite 200, Vancouver V6B 1P2 ......................................p: 604-669-9585 udi.bc.ca Vancouver Regional Construction Association 3636 4th Ave E, Vancouver V5M 1M3 Fiona Famulak ............................p: 604-294-3766 e: vrca@vrca.bc.ca vrca.bc.ca

BUILDING CONTRACTORS Bucci Developments Ltd 1669 3rd Ave W Suite 202, Vancouver V6J 1K1 ...................................... p: 604-688-7011 e: admin@bucci.com bucci.com Division 15 Mechanical Ltd 6582 144 St, Surrey V3W 5R4 ....................................p: 604-214-8730 e: info@div15mechanical.com div15mechanical.com Double V Construction Ltd 13303 78 Ave Suite 406, Surrey V3W 5B9 Shane Van Vliet ......................... p: 604-590-3131 e: info@doublevconstruction.com doublevconstruction.com Ecosol Design & Construction Ltd 2124 Venables St, Vancouver V5L 2J4 Arno Schmidt .............................p: 604-254-0258 e: arno_ecosol@telus.net ecosolrammedearth.ca Enersolv Design + Build Ltd 4016 1st Ave, Burnaby V5C 3W4 ....................................p: 604-684-7244 e: admin@enersolv.ca enersolv.ca Inspired Renovations 1351 Grant St, Vancouver V3S 8V1 Allen Hemmelgarn .....................p: 778-859-7366 e: info@inspiredrenovations.ca inspiredrenovations.ca Kindred Construction Ltd 2150 Broadway W Suite 308, Vancouver V6K 4L9 ......................................p: 604-736-4847 e: info@kindredconstruction.com kindredconstruction.com Maskeen Group 12708 80 Ave, Surrey V3W 3A7 ...................................p: 604-502-9096 e: info@maskeen.ca maskeen.ca

Naikoon Contracting Ltd 342 Esplanade E Suite 3, North Vancouver V7L 1A4 Joe Geluch .................................p: 778-340-1566 e: info@naikoon.ca naikooncontracting.com Total Construction Inc 1751 Capilano Rd Suite 200, West Vancouver V7P 3B5 Alex Barbachkov ........................p: 604-770-0616 e: info@totalproject.ca totalproject.ca Velsen Homes Gabriola Island Adam Velsen ..............................p: 250-247-8808 e: adam@velsen.ca velsen.ca

Wales McLelland Construction 6211 Fraserwood Pl, Richmond V6W 1J2 Julia Vigini .................................p: 604-638-1212 e: jvigini@walesmclelland.com walesmclelland.com Wales McLelland Construction has been operating in Vancouver for over 40 years with professional expertise in general contracting, design-build, construction management, sustainable and LEED™ building, tilt-up construction, and pre-design planning and consulting services.

COMMUNITY & URBAN PLANNING GreenCity Planning Services PO Box 211 Stn Del Ctr, Maple Ridge V2X 7G1 Adrian Kopystynski ....................p: 778-872-4525 e: greencity@shaw.ca greencityplanningservices.com Mosaic Homes 2609 Granville St Suite 500, Vancouver V6H 3H3 .....................................p: 604-685-3888 e: moreinfo@mosaichomes.com mosaichomes.com rareEarth Project Marketing 134 Abbott St Suite 502, Vancouver V6B 2K4 Greg Lowe..................................p: 604-681-4610 e: greg@rareearthmarketing.ca rareearthmarketing.ca

TTO O BOOK B Y O U 2018 YOUR GREEN G RE S PAC AD SPACE

Stantec 111 Dunsmuir St Suite 1100, Vancouver V6B 6A3 Graham Twyford-Miles ..............p: 604-696-8390 e: graham.twyford-miles@stantec.com stantec.com

CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL RECYCLING DEPOTS ABC Recycling Ltd 8081 Meadow Ave, Burnaby V3N 2V9 .....................................p: 604-522-9727 e: info@abcrecycling.com abcrecycling.com D Litchfield & Co Ltd 3040 Westwood St, Port Coquitlam V3C 3L7 ......................................p: 604-464-7525 e: demo@dlitchfield.com dlitchfield.com Ecowaste Industries Ltd 3031 Viking Way Suite 100, Richmond V6V 1W1 .................................... p: 604-276-9511 e: info@ecowaste.com ecowaste.com Pacific Metals Recycling International 8360 Ontario St, Vancouver V5X 3E5 ......................................p: 604-327-1148 e: mlotzkar@pacificmetals.ca pacificmetals.ca

CONSTRUCTION WASTE HAULERS 505-Junk 3537 6th Ave W, Vancouver V6R 1T5 ......................................p: 604-505-5865 e: info@505junk.com 505junk.com

DIALOG 611 Alexander St Suite 406, Vancouver V6A 1E1 Lauren Camp ..............................p: 604-909-1627 dialogdesign.ca Golder Associates Ltd 2920 Virtual Way Suite 200, Vancouver V5M 0C4 ....................................p: 604-296-4200 e: solutions@golder.com golder.com Hatch Ltd 1066 Hastings St W Suite 400, Vancouver V6E 3X2 Mellissa Winfield-Lesk ..............p: 604-689-5767 e: hatch@hatch.com hatch.com Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd 4185A Still Creek Dr Suite 200, Burnaby V5C 6G9 .....................................p: 604-294-2088 e: mail@kwl.ca kwl.ca Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd 2955 Virtual Way Suite 500, Vancouver V5M 4X6 ....................................p: 604-669-3800 e: info@klohn.com klohn.com MCW Consultants Ltd 1185 Georgia St W Suite 1400, Vancouver V6E 4E6 ...................................... p: 604-687-1821 e: mcw_van@mcw.com mcw.com Opus 889 Harbourside Dr Suite 210, North Vancouver V7P 3S1 ......................................p: 604-990-4800 e: info@opusinternational.ca opusinternational.ca

CONSULTING ENGINEERS AECOM 3292 Production Way Suite 330, Burnaby V5A 4R4 .....................................p: 604-444-6400 e: canadacommunications@aecom.com aecom.com Ausenco 855 Homer St, Vancouver V6B 2W2 .................................... p: 604-684-9311 e: info.nam@ausenco.com ausenco.com Citiwest Consulting Ltd 9030 King George Blvd Suite 101, Surrey V3V 7Y3 .....................................p: 604-591-2213 e: office@citiwest.com citiwest.com

Stantec 111 Dunsmuir St Suite 1100, Vancouver V6B 6A3 Graham Twyford-Miles ..............p: 604-696-8390 e: graham.twyford-miles@stantec.com stantec.com

Ladysmith...Working together to build our future. A proud recipient of Canada’s Greenest Employers award six years in a row!

Call Marie at 604-608-5158 604-608-5 or email mpearsall@biv.c mpearsall@biv.com Space Close: June 19, 2018

www.ladysmith.ca


40 |

GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Green Space directory

COST CONSULTANTS Advicas Group Consultants Inc 31 Bastion Sq Suite 100, Victoria V8W 1J1 John Granger..............................p: 250-383-1008 e: admin@advicas.com advicas.com Altus Group 1040 Georgia St W Suite 630 Box 26, Vancouver V6E 4H1 ..................................... p: 604-683-5591 e: info@altusgroup.com altusgroup.com Target Zero Waste Consulting Inc 1567 Deep Cove Rd, North Vancouver V7G 1S4 Jeff Levitt ...................................p: 604-788-7024 e: info@targetzerowaste.com targetzerowaste.com

COUNSEL FOR GREEN BUILDING DESIGN Blue Camas Consulting Ltd 757 18th Ave W, Vancouver V5Z 1W1 Dave Peterson............................p: 604-417-7028 e: dave@bluecamas.ca bluecamas.ca

Vancouver City Savings Credit Union (Vancity) 183 Terminal Ave, Vancouver V6A 4G2 Israel Garcilazo ..........................p: 604-877-7582 e: israel_garcilazo@vancity.com

Wood WORKS! BC An initiative of the Canadian Wood Council Lynn Embury-Williams ...............p: 877-929-9663 wood-works.ca

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS Core Group Consultants Ltd 8988 Fraserton Crt Suite 320, Burnaby V5J 5H8 .....................................p: 604-299-0605 coregroupconsultants.com Developing Solutions Inc 1578 8th Ave W, Vancouver V6J 4R8 Nora Stevenson .........................p: 604-222-1200 e: devsol@telus.net Urbanics Consultants Ltd 409 Granville St Suite 1207, Vancouver V6C 1T2 ......................................p: 604-669-2724 e: info@urbanics.com urbanics.com

EDUCATION/TRAINING BCIT School of Construction and the Environment Burnaby Campus 3700 Willingdon Ave, Burnaby V5G 3H2 .....................................p: 604-434-5734 e: construction@bcit.ca bcit.ca/construction

GeoForce Energy Box 1080, Fort Langley V1M 3V6 .................................... p: 604-897-3411 e: info@geoforceenergy.com geoforceenergy.com

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING naturally:wood 1130 Pender St W Suite 1200, Vancouver V6E 4A4 .....................................p: 604-685-7507 e: info@naturallywood.com naturallywood.com

ENERGY MANAGEMENT FIRMS Avalon Mechanical Consultants Ltd 1245 Esquimalt Rd Suite 300, Victoria V9A 3P2 Bob Landell ................................p: 250-384-4128 e: avalon@avalonmechanical.com avalonmechanical.com EnerNOC 576 Seymour St Suite 600, Vancouver V6B 3K1 .....................................p: 778-331-0500 e: information@enernoc.com enernoc.com Kambo Green Solutions 555 Burrard St Suite 325, Vancouver V7X 1M7 Angela Foster .............................p: 604-629-7813 e: angela@kambo.com kambo.com QMC Metering Solutions 17 Fawcett Rd Suite 341, Coquitlam V3K 6V2 .....................................p: 604-526-5155 e: info@qmeters.com qmeters.com

Stantec 111 Dunsmuir St Suite 1100, Vancouver V6B 6A3 Graham Twyford-Miles ..............p: 604-696-8390 e: graham.twyford-miles@stantec.com stantec.com

ENERGY SERVICE COMPANIES Ameresco Canada 2608 Granville St Suite 360, Vancouver V6H 3V3 Doug Wall ..................................p: 604-684-4984 e: dwall@ameresco.com ameresco.ca Corix Utilities 1188 Georgia St W Suite 1160, Vancouver V6E 4A2 .....................................p: 604-697-6700 e: info.utilities@corix.com corix.com Ecolighten Energy Solutions 705 15th St W, North Vancouver V7M 1T2 Ryan Coleman ............................p: 604-971-2088 e: info@ecolighten.com ecolighten.com Fenix Energy Solutions Ltd 4016 1st Ave, Burnaby V5C 3W4 Hart Starr Crawford ................... p: 604-684-7241 e: hstarrcrawford@fenixenergy.com fenixenergy.com

ARCADIS Canada 1080 Mainland St Suite 308, Vancouver V6B 2T4 ...................................... p: 604-632-9941 e: info.canada@arcadis.com arcadis.com Binpal Engineering Ltd 8232 120 St Suite 215, Surrey V3W 3N4 ...................................p: 604-596-3815 e: info@binpaleng.com binpaleng.com Hatfield Consultants 850 Harbourside Dr Suite 200, North Vancouver V7P 0A3 ..................................... p: 604-926-3261 e: hcp@hatfieldgroup.com hatfieldgroup.com Hemmera 4730 Kingsway Suite 1800, Burnaby V5H 0C6 .....................................p: 604-669-0424 e: phemsley@hemmera.com hemmera.com Keystone Environmental Ltd 4400 Dominion St Suite 320, Burnaby V5G 4G3 ..................................... p: 604-430-0671 e: keyinfo@keystoneenvironmental.ca keystoneenvironmental.ca NEXT Environmental Inc 2550 Boundary Rd Suite 215, Burnaby V5M 3Z3 Harm Gross ................................p: 604-419-3800 e: hgross@nextenvironmental.com nextenvironmental.com

PGL Environmental Consultants 1185 Georgia St W Suite 1200, Vancouver V6E 4E6 Duncan Macdonald....................p: 604-682-3707 e: information@pggroup.com pggroup.com Recollective Consulting Inc 128 Hastings St W Suite 210, Vancouver V6B 1G8 Eesmyal Santos-Brault ..............p: 604-669-4940 e: info@recollective.ca recollective.ca SLR Consulting (Canada) Ltd 1620 8th Ave W Suite 200, Vancouver V6J 1V4 ......................................p: 604-754-3874 e: sneville@slrconsulting.com slrconsulting.com

Stantec 111 Dunsmuir St Suite 1100, Vancouver V6B 6A3 Graham Twyford-Miles ..............p: 604-696-8390 e: graham.twyford-miles@stantec.com stantec.com

GREEN WALLS & GREEN ROOFS Denbow 40874 Yale Rd W, Chilliwack V2R 4J2 Willetta Les ...............................p: 888-933-6269 e: info@denbow.com denbow.com Green over Grey - Living Walls & Design Inc 555 Burrard St Suite 900, Vancouver V7X 1M8 ....................................p: 604-837-0333 e: info@greenovergrey.com greenovergrey.com

INDOOR AIR QUALITY SERVICES Design Intent Balancing Services Ltd 32615 Marshall Rd, Abbotsford V2T 1A8 Damian Evans ............................p: 778-552-1487 e: designintent@shaw.ca Envirotech Air Inc 17358 104A Ave Suite 8, Surrey V4N 5M3 George Daschko.........................p: 604-951-2330 e: enviropc@telus.net envirotechbc.com Sterling IAQ Consultants Ltd 2844 Bainbridge Ave PO Box 84014, Burnaby V5A 4T9 Michael Glassco ........................p: 604-678-1284 e: michael@sterlingiaqconsultants.com sterlingiaqconsultants.com

INTEGRATED GREEN BUILDING CONSULTING SERVICES Architek Sustainable Building Solutions 28 7th Ave W, Vancouver V5Y 1L6 Ronald Schwenger.....................p: 604-861-9446 e: ron@architek.com architek.com Built Green Canada 8615 104 St, Edmonton AB T6E 4G6 Jenifer Christenson ....................p: 855-485-0920 e: info@builtgreencanada.ca builtgreencanada.ca Capital Home Energy Inc 1778 2nd Ave W Suite 250, Vancouver V6J 1H6 Luke Dolan .................................p: 604-562-0387 e: info@capitalhomeenergy.com capitalhomeenergy.com EA Energy Alternatives Ltd 37471 Hwy 16 E, Telkwa V0J 2X2 Kevin Pegg .................................p: 250-846-9888 e: sales@energyalternatives.ca energyalternatives.ca Light House: Sustainable Building Centre 425 Carrall St Suite 90, Vancouver V6B 6E3 ......................................p: 604-677-3126 e: info@lhsbc.com lhsbc.com


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Recollective Consulting Inc 128 Hastings St W Suite 210, Vancouver V6B 1G8 Eesmyal Santos-Brault ..............p: 604-669-4940 e: info@recollective.ca recollective.ca Recollective is a values-driven green building consulting firm specializing in facilitation, Passive House, LEED, Living Building Challenge and energy modelling.

Stantec 111 Dunsmuir St Suite 1100, Vancouver V6B 6A3 Graham Twyford-Miles ..............p: 604-696-8390 e: graham.twyford-miles@stantec.com stantec.com Wisent Environmental Inc 19055 Airport Way Suite 124, Pitt Meadows V3Y 0G4 Brad Mepham ............................p: 604-628-9028 e: info@wisentenviro.com wisentenviro.com

INTERIOR DESIGN DIALOG 611 Alexander St Suite 406, Vancouver V6A 1E1 Lauren Camp ..............................p: 604-909-1627 dialogdesign.ca Kasian Architecture Interior Design and Planning Ltd 1500 Georgia St W Suite 1685, Vancouver V6G 2Z6 .....................................p: 604-683-4145 e: carol.jones@kasian.com kasian.com

BUS

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BC’S BEST AND BRIGHTEST

INNOVATION TECHNOLOGY

BCIT APPLIES 3D PRINTING TO MAKE PROSTHETIC HANDS FOR KIDS IN NEED

SPECIAL FEATURE

50 ORIGINAL INNOVATIONS DEVELOPED IN BC THE LATEST & GREATEST IN BC’S GAMING & DIGITAL MEDIA INDUSTRY

BC’S LEADING INNOVATORS: GUEST COLUMNS AND INTERVIEWS

INDUSTRY

Stantec 111 Dunsmuir St Suite 1100, Vancouver V6B 6A3 Graham Twyford-Miles ..............p: 604-696-8390 e: graham.twyford-miles@stantec.com stantec.com

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Connect Landscape Architecture Inc 2305 Hemlock St, Vancouver V6H 2V1 .....................................p: 604-681-3303 e: info@connectla.ca connectla.ca DIALOG 611 Alexander St Suite 406, Vancouver V6A 1E1 Lauren Camp ..............................p: 604-909-1627 dialogdesign.ca Durante Kreuk Ltd 1637 5th Ave W Suite 102, Vancouver V6J 1N5 Peter Kreuk ................................ p: 604-684-4611 e: info@dkl.bc.ca dkl.bc.ca

INNOVATION 2017 Discover the leading edge of B.C.’s best ideas in business, technology, science, resources, construction, culture and recreation. Contact: Marie Pearsall 604-608-5158 or email mpearsall@biv.com

ENTERTAINMENT

ENTERTAINMENT

mango design co 2246 Parker St, Vancouver V5L 2L9 Tanya McLean ............................p: 604-875-1730 e: tanya@mangodesignco.ca mangodesignco.ca Omicron Canada Inc 595 Burrard St Suite 500 PO Box 49369, Vancouver V7X 1L4 Karena Selnar ............................p: 604-632-3367 e: kselnar@omicronaec.com omicronaec.com P+A Interiors Inc 1807 Fir St Suite 201, Vancouver V6J 3A9 Shelley Penner ........................... p: 604 255 2049 e: info@painteriors.ca painteriors.ca Square One Interior Design 1201 Pender St W Suite 720, Vancouver V6E 2V2 Jennifer Hamilton ......................p: 604-678-1085 e: jennifer@sq1.ca sq1.ca SSDG Interiors Inc 1111 Melville St Suite 300, Vancouver V6E 3V6 ...................................... p: 604-685-4301 e: info@ssdg.com ssdg.com

MEDICINE

FINANCIAL

TECHNOLOGY

Space Close: September 19, 2017


42 |

GREEN SPACE 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

Green Space directory

Our Designs Landscape Architects & Associates Inc 1335 Fernwood Cres, North Vancouver V7P 1K3 Donna M Rodman ......................p: 604-929-0776 e: donna@ourdesigns.ca/oceanspirit@telus.net ourdesigns.ca Universal design, riparian planting design, health-care planning and design. Additional office: Nelson, B.C. Stantec 111 Dunsmuir St Suite 1100, Vancouver V6B 6A3 Graham Twyford-Miles ..............p: 604-696-8390 e: graham.twyford-miles@stantec.com stantec.com

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS ITEC Systems Designs Ltd 20092 93A Ave Unit 4, Langley V1M 3Y4 Harold Forsyth............................p: 604-882-9500 e: hforsyth@itecsys.com itecsys.com McCuaig & Associates Engineering Ltd 33 8th Ave E Suite 201, Vancouver V5T 1R5 ......................................p: 604-255-0992 e: info@mccuaig.net mccuaig.net

PRODUCTS & TECHNOLOGY PROVIDERS Aurora Solar Technologies Inc 980 1st St W Suite 210, North Vancouver V7P 3N4 Gordon Deans ............................p: 778-241-5000 e: info@auroracontrol.com auroracontrol.com BQE Water 900 Howe St Suite 250, Vancouver V6Z 2M4 Alain Consigny ...........................p: 604-685-1243 e: info@bqewater.com bqewater.com Delta Controls Inc 17850 56 Ave, Surrey V3S 1C7 .....................................p: 604-574-9444 e: marketing@deltacontrols.com deltacontrols.com dPoint Technologies Inc 1455 Georgia St E, Vancouver V5L 2A9 James Dean ...............................p: 604-488-1132 e: jdean@dpoint.ca dpoint.ca Ecofluid Systems Inc 200 Granville St Suite 1800, Vancouver V6C 1S4 Cameron Whitelaw....................p: 604-662-4544 e: info@ecofluid.com ecofluid.com Pureworld Solutions Inc 4916 River Reach, Delta V4K 4A4 George Terry...............................p: 604-878-8092 e: george@pureworld.ca pureworld.ca Sybertech Waste Reduction Ltd 33191 First Ave PO Box 3009, Mission V4B 3A9 Adam Mitchell ...........................p: 888-888-7975 e: amitchell@swrl.com swrl.com Terra Mechanical Ltd 1643 Beach Grove Rd, Delta V4L 1P4 John Rosse ................................. p: 778-858-2991 e: office@terramechanical.ca terramechanical.ca

RENEWABLE ENERGY Alterra Power Corp 888 Dunsmuir St Suite 600, Vancouver V6C 3K4 .....................................p: 604-669-4999 e: info@alterrapower.ca alterrapower.ca

Ballard Power Systems Inc 9000 Glenlyon Pky, Burnaby V5J 5J8 ......................................p: 604-454-0900 e: marketing@ballard.com ballard.com Bullfrog Power 134 Abbott St Suite 304, Vancouver V6B 2K4 ..................................... p: 604-688-1101 e: info@bullfrogpower.com bullfrogpower.com Chinook Power Corp 4388 Prospect Rd, North Vancouver V7N 3L7 Stephen Cheeseman ..................p: 604-924-4494 chinookpower.com Delta-Q Technologies Corp 3755 Willingdon Ave, Burnaby V5G 3H3 .....................................p: 604-327-8244 e: info@delta-q.com delta-q.com EA Energy Alternatives Ltd 37471 Hwy 16 E, Telkwa V0J 2X2 Kevin Pegg .................................p: 250-846-9888 e: sales@energyalternatives.ca energyalternatives.ca Fenix Energy Solutions Ltd 4016 1st Ave, Burnaby V5C 3W4 Hart Starr Crawford ................... p: 604-684-7241 e: hstarrcrawford@fenixenergy.com fenixenergy.com Global Bio-Coal Energy Inc 1055 Hastings St W Suite 1070, Vancouver V6E 2E9 Sonia Shoukry ............................p: 604-683-7955 e: info@globalbiocoalenergy.ca globalbiocoalenergy.ca Innergex Renewable Energy Inc 666 Burrard St Suite 200, Vancouver V6C 2X8 .....................................p: 604-633-9990 e: info@innergex.com innergex.com Legend Power Systems Inc 1480 Frances St, Vancouver V5L 1Y9 ......................................p: 604-420-1500 e: info@legendpower.com legendpower.com Nexterra Systems Corp 650 Georgia St W Suite 1300 PO Box 11582, Vancouver V6B 4N8 ..................................... p: 604-637-2501 e: sales@nexterra.ca nexterra.ca Palcan Energy Corp 4250 Wesbrook Mall Suite 1152, Vancouver V6T 1W5 ....................................p: 604-288-7822 e: info@palcan.com palcan.com Peace Energy Cooperative 1204 103 Ave Box 2567, Dawson Creek V1G 5A1 Wendie Demyen ........................p: 250-782-3882 e: admin@peaceenergy.ca peaceenergy.ca Schneider Electric Canada 3700 Gilmore Way, Burnaby V5G 4M1 ....................................p: 604-422-2642 e: canadian.pss@schneider-electric.com schneider-electric.ca Synex International Inc 1444 Alberni St Suite 400, Vancouver V6G 2Z4 ..................................... p: 604-688-8271 e: gsunell@synex.com synex.com Vancouver Renewable Energy 130 Broadway W, Vancouver V5Y 1P3 Rob Baxter .................................p: 778-869-8333 e: main@vrec.ca vrec.ca

Westport Fuel Systems Inc 1750 75th Ave W Suite 101, Vancouver V6P 6G2 .....................................p: 604-718-2000 e: info@wfsinc.com wfsinc.com

Uncover Editorial + Design Vancouver Shana Johnstone .......................p: 604-763-5780 e: shana@uncovereditorial.ca uncovereditorial.ca

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

WASTE MANAGEMENT/ SOIL REMEDIATION

DIALOG 611 Alexander St Suite 406, Vancouver V6A 1E1 Lauren Camp ..............................p: 604-909-1627 dialogdesign.ca Glotman Simpson Consulting Engineers 1661 5th Ave W, Vancouver V6J 1N5 .....................................p: 604-734-8822 e: info@glotmansimpson.com glotmansimpson.com RJC Engineers 1285 Broadway W Suite 300, Vancouver V6H 3X8 Carlee Groves ............................p: 778-728-0445 e: cgroves@rjc.ca rjc.ca Weiler Smith Bowers 3855 Henning Dr Suite 118, Burnaby V5C 6N3 .....................................p: 604-294-3753 e: wsb@wsb-eng.com wsb-eng.com

SUSTAINABILITY CONSULTING Avid Consulting Group Ltd 610 Granville St Suite 3113, Vancouver V6C 3T3 Jo Anne Gin................................p: 778-317-8814 e: joanne.gin@avidconsulting.ca avidconsulting.ca Big Picture Communication 349 Georgia St W Box 2211, Vancouver V6B 3W2 Jason Steeghs............................p: 604-880-9636 e: info@bigpicturecommunication.com bigpicturecommunication.com Biocentric Business Solutions 1140 Castle Cres Suite 190, Port Coquitlam V3C 5R5 Chris Knoll..................................p: 604-328-7253 e: chris@biocentric.ca biocentric.ca Green Workplace Vancouver Nicholas Lamm ..........................p: 604-338-2429 e: info@greenworkplace.ca greenworkplace.ca Greenomics Corp 2116 Triumph St, Vancouver V5L 1K9 Erich Schwartz ...........................p: 604-790-1490 e: erich.schwartz@greenomics.ca greenomics.ca

Recollective Consulting Inc 128 Hastings St W Suite 210, Vancouver V6B 1G8 Eesmyal Santos-Brault ..............p: 604-669-4940 e: info@recollective.ca recollective.ca Recollective is a values-driven green building consulting firm specializing in facilitation, Passive House, LEED, Living Building Challenge and energy modelling.

Annacis Waste Disposal Corp 7231 120 St Suite 446, Surrey V3W 0M6 ...................................p: 604-594-7848 e: paul@annaciswaste.com annaciswaste.com Belkorp Environmental Services Inc 1508 Broadway W Suite 900, Vancouver V6J 1W8 ....................................p: 604-688-8533 belkorp.com Covanta Burnaby Renewable Energy Inc 5150 Riverbend Dr, Burnaby V3N 4V3 Russ Anderson ...........................p: 604-521-1025 covanta.com Denbow 40874 Yale Rd W, Chilliwack V2R 4J2 Willetta Les ...............................p: 888-933-6269 e: info@denbow.com denbow.com Slope stablilization, multi-storey and greenroof soil installation, green infrastructure, revegetation, seeding, Cascadia Green Retaining Walls, blow round aggregate, erosion and sediment control, stream bank restoration. ECO-TEK Ecological Technologies Inc PO Box 309 Stn Fort Langley, Langley V1M 2R6 Kimron David Rink .....................p: 778-298-6835 e: kimron@ecotek.ca ecotek.ca Progressive Waste Solutions - Vancouver District 25 Fawcett Rd, Coquitlam V3K 6V2 .....................................p: 604-525-2072 e: vancouver@progressivewaste.com progressivewaste.com RecycleSmart 3751 Shell Rd Suite 100, Richmond V6X 2W2 ....................................p: 888-892-1796 e: info@recycle-smart.com recycle-smart.com Revolution Resource Recovery Inc 19500 56 Ave, Surrey V3S 6K4 Chris Thompson .........................p: 604-539-1900 e: christine@aforceofnature.ca aforceofnature.ca Urban Impact Recycling Ltd 15360 Knox Way, Richmond V6V 3A6 .....................................p: 604-273-0089 e: mike.sales@urbanimpact.com urbanimpact.com Wescan Disposal 925 Sherwood Ave Unit 6, Coquitlam V3K 1A9 Dispatch .................................... p: 604-526-9511 e: sales@wescandisposal.com wescandisposal.com


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