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COMMITMENT AND CHANGE Photo: Š Tim Johnson

s we look forward to the arrival of Spring, all of us at Cape Air/Nantucket Airlines are taking this time to reinforce and renew our level of service

with a crisp, fresh product that you can depend on. The changes coming your way include our continued focus on our new fleet of aircraft. We are working closely with manufacturers on the design of a commuter aircraft that suits the needs of our relatively short-haul routes to geographically challenged areas. Consistent with our environmental goals, this aircraft will be as fuel efficient and quiet as possible. In the long run, we continue to work with several forward looking research and design teams to deliver, in the future, the first electric or hybrid commuter aircraft in the country. Coming your way in early May is the answer to one of your most common requests, an electronic replacement for our popular commuter book. The Travel Pass replicates the ease of the commuter book with online, self-service booking at capeair.com. The Travel Pass is completely electronic so no more paper books to keep track of and the new electronic version is easily shared with family, friends and co-workers. Another electronic leap is our roll-out in early summer of our new mobile site for your smart phone and tablet offering easy, online access to the Cape Air reservations system. Of course for those of you who prefer the human connection, there is always a Cape Air reservations agent on the other end of the phone ready to book your flights and as always, no charge ever, to talk to a real live member of the Cape Air team. As we make these technological steps forward, aimed at simplifying your entire Cape Air experience, we continue our pledge to never let the technology come between us and you, the customer. As these improvements fall into place please let us know how we are doing and please know that we shall never take your business and long time loyalty for granted. Like every business, we strive to always do better and these new changes are a big step in that direction.

Cape Air founder & CEO, Dan Wolf Dan.Wolf@capeair.com 4

*Make our customers happy and have a good time doing it. B I R D’S

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The most colorful St. Patrick’s Day celebration in all of the Caribbean happens in St. Croix. Photo: David Berg, blackwoodimaging.com

PUBLISHER: Dan Wolf EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Michelle Haynes Michelle.Haynes@capeair.com CONTRIBUTORS: Lisa Ballard COPY EDITOR: Jim Hanson DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Chuck Anzalone graphicsgroup@comcast.net ChuckAnzalone.com

8 Caribbean

ADVERTISING SALES: Kim Corkran Kimberly.Corkran@capeair.com

34 Nantucket

Rosemary Dooley 508.274.6755

46 Martha’s Vineyard

Bobbi Fawcett doitnow141@gmail.com

54 Provincetown 60 Boston

Bird’s Eye View is published by Cape Air, 660 Barnstable Road Hyannis, MA, 02601

63 Cape Cod

© Bird’s Eye View, 2017 Reproduction in whole or in part PHOTO EDITOR: without permission is prohibited. Nancy Woods Advertising rates are available BirdsEyeViewMagazine@gmail.com upon request. 410.829.1101

FINANCIAL WIZARD: Laurie Jacobson For billing inquires: Laurie.Jacobson@capeair.com

Printed by: Sheridan, Hanover, NH

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64 Maine 70 New Hampshire/ Vermont Cover Photo: Cane Garden Bay, Tortola By Don Hebert

74 Ogdensburg, NY 76 Adirondacks, NY 5


Photo: John DeSouza

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OFF THE GRID IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD literally stumbled across Nigel’s makeshift bar, tucked under the palm trees in Tortola’s, way off the beaten track, Smuggler’s Cove Beach. Not only did Nigel grind fresh nutmeg on my foamy piña colada, he also grilled up a swoon-worthy shrimp dish. A born sharer of travel nuggets, I was inspired. What about the little overlooked gems often found smack dab in the middle of your vacation paradise? We came up with a few doozies including a St. John beach, accessible only on foot. The walk is easy enough that you can schlep lunch and your beach chair. Over in the Martha’s Vineyard town of Aquinnah we came across a rock in the shape of a huge toad believed to have a spiritual connection. If nothing else, finding the large granite Ice Age leftover makes for a fun hike. Also in this issue Nantucket wakes up from winter slumber against the backdrop of thousands of daffodils. For hundreds of island visitors this is the annual rite of spring while the locals revel in the official kick off to the season. In the gayest town in America** line up for the West Coast Swing as Provincetown kicks off the 25th anniversary of Gays for Patsy (as in Patsy Cline). Find details on a weekend of fun where gays dance with gays who dance with trans who dance with straight people. It is an everyone dances with everyone event and who can argue with that! My parting thought for March 20th —the first day of spring. “Spring is nature’s way of saying, Let’s party!’’ —Robin Williams

“The best piña colada in the bush!”

—Nigel of Nigel’s Beach Bar, Smuggler’s Cove Beach, Tortola

Executive Editor, Bird’s Eye View Michelle.Haynes@capeair.com “Whose Woods These Are I Think I Know…” —Robert Frost *Make our customers happy and have a good time doing it. **Provincetown is the gayest town in America according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

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With over 1,000 acres of protected land and hiking trails, the Cape Cod town of Barnstable offers guided walks to a number of tucked-away jewels that you may never knew existed including the site of the ancestral home of patriot James Otis.

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eet the team who brings our Cape Air destinations to life. We thank our loyal group of shutterbugs for always coming thru for us. For vacation, honeymoon or a framed memory of your Cape Air vacation, call on them for the perfect image. We send a special welcome to the newest member of the Bird’s Eye View family of photographers, St. Croix’s David Berg.

Tim Johnson, Martha’s Vineyard Steve Simonsen, Caribbean stevesimonsen.com

timjohnsonphotos.com

Cary Hazlegrove, Nantucket NantucketStock.com

“Photography is not about the cameras, gadgets, and gismos. Photography is about photographers. A camera didn’t make a great picture anymore than a typewriter makes a great novel.” —Photographer Peter Adams, peteradamsphoto.com

Eliza Magro and daughter Isabel, St. John elizamagrophotography.com

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David Berg, St. Croix blackwoodimaging.com

Don Hebert, Caribbean donhebert.com

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“To see a hundred boats out on the water with their spinnakers flying is really spectacular.” —Judy Petz, Director The BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival Photo courtesy of the BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival

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© BVI Marine Guide

They Come for the Waters

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“I have lived here for twenty years,” says New Jersey-born Judy Petz. “Every day I try and take a moment to take in the stunningly beautiful scene here in the BVI especially when the seas are flat and the waters reflect the look of clear crystal.”

rom the pink flamingos in the outermost and, oh so quiet, island of Anegada to party central on tiny Jost Van Dyke, birthplace of the ‘Painkiller,’ to the watery labyrinth of the Virgin Gorda Baths—the British Virgin Islands (BVI) is a boater’s nirvana. In fact, there are more heads in berths than heads in beds. “We have more line of sight sailing than anywhere else in the Caribbean,” says Natasha Chalwell of the BVI Tourist Board. “There is no need for a compass for most of our islands are so close together you can have breakfast in Tortola, lunch in Virgin Gorda and then tie up for dinner in Jost Van Dyke.” Considered the charter boat capital of the Caribbean, your choices when it comes to island hopping run the gamut from fully-crewed with captain and an onboard chef, to a captain and you make your own meals, to bare boat-style and you do all the work. Probably the biggest misconception about boat charters is the price. It is not as out of reach as you may think. Compared to a hotel stay it can actually be a bargain, especially if you are sharing the cost with friends. A week on board can average around $4,000 and divided between two or three couples that price scores lower than most of the island hotels, especially when you eliminate the need for restaurants. As for the timing, if you enjoy the company of like-minded sailors, plan your trip around one of the biggest boating events of the year, the BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival, March 27th–April 2nd.

—Judy Petz, Director of the BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival

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Photos courtesy of the BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival / Todd VanSickle

“This is our biggest event of the year, attracting over a hundred boats from around the world,” says regatta Director Judy Petz. “Consider our waters—the Atlantic, the Sir Francis Drake Channel and the Caribbean Sea—all give boaters unique opportunities and we get to use the back side of many of our fifty-plus islands which are simply exquisite with their craggy rocks, white foamy spray and tranquil blue waters.” The regatta is described as seven days of bands, boats and beer with boaters and landlubbers eventually gathering at Tortola’s Nanny Cay, or party central. “Nanny Cay is our regatta village,” says Petz. “We feature live entertainment, food, merchandise vendors, and a number of fun events including a bikini fashion show and Mocko Jumbie dancers. This is a great opportunity for our international group of boaters to spend some time together.” E A R LY

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onch fritters washed down with a bucket of beer, enjoyed on a comfy lounge chair alongside the pristine Cane Garden Bay Beach—welcome to Quito’s—a must for the ultimate island experience. Local artist and musician Quito Rymer built his little bar and restaurant in 1983 and today the totally renovated mini-empire features a fun sports bar, a casual beach bistro and upscale rooftop dining with a water view. Steps from the water’s edge, Quito’s features live music with some of the region’s top reggae bands and the mix of locals and visitors, newbies and old-timers make this a total scene. Quito’s is the fun happening and affordable, ‘go to’ place for your quintessential Caribbean beach experience. When you taste their conch fritters you will totally agree.

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Photos: John DeSouza

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Photos courtesy of the British Virgin Islands Tourism

Off the Beach in Virgin Gorda

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rom religious to baskets to bunnies, the Easter holiday is celebrated in a variety of ways, but according to Keith Dawson of the British Virgin Islands Tourist Board, the Virgin Gorda Easter Festival is one of the most unique in the Caribbean. This year’s festival takes on special significance as the island celebrates the festival’s Golden Anniversary, April 15-17. Events for this cultural celebration include a calypso show, festival queen pageant, food fair, and the Easter Monday parade along with nightly village entertainment. Cape Air’s nonstop service between San Juan, Puerto Rico and Virgin Gorda gets you to the action in minutes.

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BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS Candy colored homes and store fronts dot the Tortola landscape. Take time to meander around Road Town, the island’s busy capital offering a photo-op around every turn.

Photo: Don Hebert

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Beaching in Tortola—HATARI! Style By Michelle Haynes

Photos: John DeSouza

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Nigel’s, Smuggler’s Cove, Tortola

here are dozens of perfect pristine beaches dotting the coast of Tortola, the largest of the British Virgin Islands, where it is a simple matter of a short walk or car ride to get to the sand. Then there is the daunting Smuggler’s Cove and I use “daunting” since it is the appropriate description found in any guide book that ventures to list this gorgeous crescent of perfection. Four-wheel drive is vital to access this tucked away beach, minutes from Carrot Bay. The uphill, 16

winding, pitted, rutted, often muddy and somewhat harrowing road to the beach is not for the faint of heart, but a resounding yes to the, “Is it worth it?” question. Smuggler’s features powdery sand, outstanding snorkeling and the most crystal blue-green water imaginable. Steps from the beach in a jungle clearing are a mismatched set of chairs and a little makeshift bar. Welcome to Nigel’s, Smuggler’s funky little beach bar and a major reason to make your way here. Nigel—owner, bartender and cook serves everything from Pinot Grigio to beer to a foaming Piña Colada with fresh ground nutmeg. Bring an appetite, for Nigel’s barbecued shrimp and chicken are amazing. This place defines, “off the beaten path,” but for intrepid souls looking for their own private slice of paradise, Smuggler’s Cove is it. B I R D’S

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ST. JOHN

Trunk Bay, St. John — Photo: ©Steve Simonsen E A R LY

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Paradise Found in St. John By Michelle Haynes

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ff the beaten track in St. John pretty much describes most of the island’s geography. The smallest of the United States Virgin Islands, two-thirds of the island is under the protection of the National Park Service so every time you turn around there is a path leading into the jungle which, in many cases, meanders down to any number of powdery white beaches. Two favorite beach choices seldom found in the guide books require a bit of effort to find but the payoff is almost total privacy on a small, picture postcard stretch of water and sand. Every time I write about Salomon Bay Beach I hear, “Shhh—don’t tell anyone about Salomon—it is our secret.” Sorry I cannot help but share and, truth be told, as recently as a month ago, at the height of the season, we had this paradise all to ourselves. One reason the crowds stay away is the getting there part. You need a good pair of hiking sneakers for the mile-plus trek along the Lind Point Trail starting out from behind the National Park Visitor’s Center in the heart of Cruz Bay. You can actually see the roof of the Park Service building as your ferry pulls into Cruz Bay. It is not by any means a strenuous hike and you can easily carry lunch, snorkeling equipment and if it fits on your back, your beach chair. There are no services here and little shade so bring plenty of water and sunscreen. For those who come to the Virgin Islands for the perfect beach, Salomon tops the list.

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Photo: ©Steve Simonsen

The Annaberg ruins—An historic, albeit tragic, reminder of the Caribbean’s slave owning past—St John’s sugar mill ruins. Somewhat incongruous against the island beauty, what is left of the ruins gives you pause to imagine life for those who toiled there in the mid 1800s. Under the protection of the Virgin Islands National Park the ruins are open to all. A trail runs through the ruins with markers describing that period in the island’s history.

Beach Photo: Eliza Magro

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Photo: ©Steve Simonsen

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nother choice, seldom found in any guide book, is the oddly named Oppenheimer Beach. Located on St. John’s north shore and just past popular Hawksnest Bay, peace and privacy rule the day here at Oppenheimer. If that name sounds somewhat familiar it is that Oppenheimer, as in Robert Oppenheimer, who earned the somewhat dubious moniker “Father of the Atomic Bomb.” After the war and before the land was donated to the Park Service, Oppenheimer purchased this stretch of beach and built a small yellow house at the water’s edge for his family. The house still stands finding new life as the island’s recreation center. Although small the beach here is a stunner and if it is privacy you are after, I have never found more than a handful of people here. The getting here part is not really that much of a challenge. Just beyond Hawksnest Bay, which can be found on every map, you pass a white picket fence and immediately after the fence is the gated entrance to Oppenheimer Beach. Parking is limited to just a few spots. Pass thru the improbable iron gate and head down the little paved road. In minutes you are there. The beach is a short drive from town so taxis will take you there for about $10 one way, but be sure to arrange for the pick-up time in the afternoon.


There is no shortage of romantic hideaways on the island of St. John, recently used as a location for the popular reality show, The Bachelor.

Location for the reality hit, The Bachelor—Frenchman’s Reef & Morning Star Beach Resort, St. Thomas Photos courtesy of the USVI Department of Tourism

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Location for the reality hit, The Bachelor— Frenchman’s Reef & Morning Star Beach Resort, St. Thomas

n estimated 9.5 million people tune into the ABC reality hit The Bachelor and these are just not any viewers for these millions represent the coveted demographic of 18 to 49 year-olds with an annual income of $100,000 plus. So when the United States Virgin Islands (USVI) scores as THE location for an upcoming Bachelor episode it is a major coup. “The Bachelor is such a great franchise with a dedicated viewership in the millions,” said Luana Wheatley, Director of the USVI Film Office. “We are always proud when they choose us as a location for The Bachelor and his dates, and the exposure for the US Virgin Islands is awesome.” Filmed on St. Thomas and St. John the episode has already aired and by now folks know the outcome of bachelor Nick Viall’s search for true love but the ripple effect from the show continues. “The impact to the destination is tremendous when you combine the national television exposure with the direct economic benefits to our community through jobs and valuable work experience,” said Commissioner of Tourism Beverly Nicholson-Doty. Photo: ©Steve Simonsen

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Wearing of the Green means time to party in St. Croix

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Photos: David Berg/ Blackwoodimaging.com

tip of the Tam o’shanter to Wendy Solomon of gotostcroix.com for sharing St. Croix’s St. Patrick’s Day celebration. For 48 years the island of St Croix has pulled out the proverbial stops to celebrate all things Irish. Parade floats, dancers, locals, and visitors make their noisy way to the Christiansted Boardwalk, where local bar owner and entrepreneur Derek Shupe has a floating stage, sponsored by Heineken, with live bands all day. The boardwalk becomes a sea of green as everyone enjoys the live entertainment and proximity to their favorite watering hole. It all happens on Saturday, March 18th and is open to one and all.

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U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

Photo courtesy of gotostcroix.com

W H AT A DAY F O R A DAY D R E A M

If you are in need of a Caribbean moment, log onto gotostcroix.com/live for a real time look at St. Croix’s Christiansted Harbor for your viewing pleasure 24/7. E A R LY S PR I N G 2017

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Photos: Kelly Greer

THE TASTE OF ST.CROIX

Bring an appetite to St. Croix’s foodie extravaganza–April 5-8, 2017 The Taste of St. Croix features culinary creations from over fifty local chefs as well as

an international cast of winemakers, rum distillers and celebrity chefs. The event happens at St. Croix’s Divi Carina Bay Resort & Casino with tickets starting at $95.

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S T. TH OM A S

Photo: Don Hebert

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s the Caribbean’s first duty free port the island of St. Thomas continues the tradition as a shopper’s paradise with a mind boggling array of shops found along the twisting alleys and tiny streets overlooking the harbor in Charlotte Amalie. Designer handbags, jewelry, perfume, watches and leather goods are all found here at pretty reasonable prices and duty free still prevails. Note: Check the cruise ship schedule found in the handy guides around St. Thomas and at the airport and pick your shopping day for when the ships are not in port and you will find the shopkeepers have a lot more time and you are not contending with the crowds.

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Photo: Don Hebert

apphire Beach, Magens Bay, and Bird’s Eye View favorite Coki Beach— St. Thomas has no shortage of the warm crystal water and powdery sand beaches that have been luring visitors to the Virgin Islands for generations. The best, bring nothing and find everything, beach is the conveniently located Coki. Enjoy a water side lunch with an umbrella drink while you settle in with a good book or some serious people watching. If your other half gets itchy for snorkeling and diving you are steps away from the award winning Coki Dive Center offering equipment rentals, lessons and day trips.

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No scuba training needed for your Sea Trek adventure at Coral World Ocean Park, St Thomas. A certified Sea Trek guide leads you along an underwater trail teeming with undersea life. The 30-minute dive takes you down a maximum depth of 20 feet.

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sea, view from a cozy seat that requires no getting wet, or meet some new friends around Lorikeet Garden, home to a wide assortment of rainbow-colored parrots. Enjoy a nature trail, picnic areas and the chance for an up-close look at the prehistoriclooking iguanas. Tip here, for the ultimate photo moment catch the iguanas at feeding time. Coral World has been voted the “Best Tourist Attraction & Eco Tourism Activity” for over 10 years by Daily News readers. An overcast day, too much sun or the need for some quiet time in a gorgeous setting, Coral World makes for a great day.

f you are beached out, shopped out and looking for a Caribbean diversion on the island of St. Thomas, Coral World Ocean Park is one of those, something for everyone, attractions. Nose to nose encounters with sea lions and sea turtles, a semi-submarine ride for an, under the

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U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS At Coral World Ocean Park you can stay dry while traveling eight feet under water in your own air conditioned sub for an up close and personal look at the sea life and coral reefs around Coki Point. Erik Miles Photography

Coral World Ocean Park’s Turtle Pool features a guided visit with these 100 pound sea creatures. A portion of the ticket price goes towards a special fund aimed at the protection of threatened and endangered sea turtles worldwide.

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VIEQUES

Photo: Cristina Salvesen von Essen

“Once you submerge your face into the waters of Vieques you are instantly transported to another world. A world where the fish are friendly, the turtles hang loose, coral surrounds you, and you find surprises in any nook and cranny. If the landscape and people of Vieques don’t make you fall in love with the island, a look under the turquoise waters will be enough to take your breath away.” —Cristina Salvesen von Essen, dive instructor, Black Beard Sports

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Photo: E. P. Anderson Photography

“We heard that Vieques is a beautiful island with untouched beaches and great local flair, as well as a reputation for being very gay friendly, which was important to us for our same sex wedding. Once we visited we knew we found a hidden gem.” —Laura and Ryan

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VIEQUES

“Vieques is really on the map for same sex destination weddings which makes sense because it has always been a very gay-friendly island. We now have more and more wonderful venues creating unique, out of the box, personalized weddings set in the most beautiful surroundings you can imagine.” —Kelly Thompson, viequesinsider.com


NANTUCKET DAF F ODI L F ES TIVAL — APRI L 28 -30, 2017

Nantucket is home to several million daffodils with blooms in early March to the end of May. Photos: © Cary Hazlegrove/NantucketStock.com

The antique car parade rolls downtown to the village of ’Sconset on the other end of the island. Pack a picnic, grab a bike and ride down to join them.

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wallows, butterflies, and herring runs—Mother Nature presents us with a variety of spring harbingers, but for thousands of folks the surest sign of the season, and an annual rite of passage, happens on the little island some thirty miles out to sea. The Nantucket Daffodil Festival began 41 years ago as a somewhat simple garden club event designed to jump start the island’s early spring business. Planes and boats are filled with hundreds of visitors heading for the streets, stores and parks. Events include dozens of daffodil-themed parties and a rather epic-sized antique car parade ending with a swellegant “tailgate” party. Tailgate being somewhat of a misnomer for the champagne and lobster is served on grandmother’s 34

china and crystal. Sponsored by the Nantucket Chamber of Commerce the festival is not only popular for winter weary locals and visitors but plays a major part in the island’s economy as the official kick-off to the season. “Festival founder Jean MacAusland of Gourmet magazine was about food and flowers,” said Nantucketer Mary Malavase who is also a certified daffodil judge. “Jean was concerned about the lack of spring business on the island and she also happened to own a vintage Rolls, so a daffodil party, and an antique car parade, followed by a fancy picnic was right up her alley. The response from locals and visitors is truly unbelievable and continues to grow every year.” Check out the Nantucket Chamber of Commerce for a complete schedule of events or, if you prefer a more quiet time to enjoy the show of yellow and white, opt for mid-week or even early May. The streets are emptier, the inns are offering special rates and you’re on your own to explore. B I R D’S

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Photos: © Cary Hazlegrove/NantucketStock.com Spring Fever, Nantucket style!

What can you say about an island that throws a party for a flower? It is a doozy of a party!

A daffodil by any other name is not just a daffodil. “We look at each entry for substance, color, and freshness and let me tell you, the growers and judges take it very seriously.” —Mary Malavase, American Daffodil Society board member and an accredited judge

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“I was so intrigued taking grapes and squishing them up and naturally fermenting them and coming up with unbelievably beautiful, multi-layered, complex, sautéed liquid.” —Jayson Pahlmeyer, Pahlmeyer Winery—posted on Wines and Winemakers

May 17–21, 2017

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hefs, foodies and just plain folks who love to clink glasses all head to Nantucket every May for the annual homage to the grape. “This is our 21st year, and as usual we have a world-class group of vintners joining us again,” says festival spokesman Mark Donato. “In spite of our size and the hundreds of visitors who join us every year, the festival is pretty much a home grown event and the winemakers get to congregate together, exchange stories and enjoy each other’s company and that is a huge draw for them.” The festival is also a draw for the hundreds of wine lovers who get to meet the person whose name or face is across their favorite wine bottle. Wine, gourmet nosh on a May weekend in Nantucket— makes one wonder what the simple folks do? B I R D’S E Y E V I E W

Photos: © Cary Hazlegrove/NantucketStock.com

The Nantucket Wine & Food Festival


Valentina Abbona, represents Marchesi di Barolo’s 6th generation of winemakers from Barolo, Italy.

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Rock Stars of the Wine World— MEET SOME OF THE VINTNERS

Former software engineer David Miner is the owner and winemaker at Oakville Ranch Vineyards in Napa Valley, California.

Christopher Howell is a winemaker with Cain Vineyards and Winery in Napa Valley, California

Kinou Cazes Hachemian is a fourth generation owner of Château Lynch-Bages Wineries in Bordeaux, France. Now residing in New York, Hachemian represents the family estates throughout North America.

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Peter Merriam, owner and winemaker of Merriam Vineyards specializing in French grape varieties.

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LET YOUR FINGERS DO THE WALKING Photo: John Bald

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shout out for three outstanding guide books to your favorite Cape Air destinations and all available online, free of charge.

Maine’s Penobscot Bay guide, Discover the Jewel of the Maine Coast covers Rockland, Camden, Rockport and a few of the nearby islands. This year’s cover is Maiden’s Cliff, overlooking Megunticook Lake in Camden, Maine. A thirtyminute hike brings you to an amazing view of Lake Megunticook, the Atlantic Ocean, and the entire countryside but beware of the 800-foot cliff that drops straight down. Look up the origins of Maiden’s Cliff and you will understand.

Hats off to Bird’s Eye View photographer Cary Hazlegrove for her cover image on the 2017 Nantucket Chamber of Commerce guide. Cary captured the rainbow fleet, the annual parade of sails for the Opera Cup race happening in Nantucket on August 20th.

Kelly Thompson has cornered the market with the ONLY comprehensive guide to the Spanish Virgin Island of Vieques. This is essential for your island visit and check out the cover image of Vieques’ greatest natural treasure, the largest Bioluminescent Bay in the world.

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Low fares Low fares have landed. have landed.

79 79

$ $

*

Cape Air’s special fares * to Cape Cod and the islands of NantucketProvincetown-Boston and Martha’s Vineyard Provincetown-Boston are now on. Bundle up and enjoy a little time in the city. Better yet, escape the cold and make vacation connections through Logan. Details at time capeair.com This fareup makes it easy. Bundle and enjoy a little in the city. Better yet, escape the cold and make vacation connections through Logan. and 800.cape.air. This fare makes it easy. from

each way

from

each way

Enjoy the ride.

capeair.com

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800-CAPE-AIR

Enjoy the ride.

*Including all taxes and fees. New reservations only. Subject to availability and other restrictions. Fares may end or change without notice, and are not guaranteed until ticketed. Cannot be combined with other offers.

capeair.com

B I 800-CAPE-AIR R D’S E Y E V I E W

*Including all taxes and fees. New reservations only. Subject to availability and other restrictions. Fares may end or change without notice, and are not guaranteed until ticketed. Cannot be combined with other offers.


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’Sconset, Mother Nature, and Family Photo courtesy of the Nantucket Historical Association

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Nantucket’s Cliff Path, circa 1900

or the past few decades the Nantucket village of ’Sconset has seen the gradual eroding of their iconic sea cliff. Storied waterside neighborhoods like Codfish Park are no more as the land has gradually been claimed by the sea. Homes that have stood for generations are on the brink of disappearing. The dramatic story to save them was chronicled in a feature story in Vanity Fair magazine where it caught the eye and imagination of San Diego author Michelle Gable. “Here in California I have always been fascinated by the east coast, especially New England,” says Gable. “When I read this story about the homes on Baxter Road in ’Sconset literally falling into the sea and the conflict around the struggle to save them I knew I had to write about it.”

Author, Michelle Gable

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Photo: Chuck Anzalone

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Photo: © Greg Hinson/NantucketStock.com

Note the openings in all of the privet hedges. By law, homeowners must maintain the public access to the path, but as the cliffs continue to erode so does the proximity of the path to their homes. Photo: © Kit Noble/NantucketStock.com

The remaining Cliff Path as of 2016.

The result is Gable’s third novel, The Book of Summer, blending fact, fiction and past and present story lines. “I have to say I did fall in love with Nantucket, especially ’Sconset. The first time I visited the island I was taken with the quiet beauty, the downtown cobblestones, shops and older homes. There are just so many different places to enjoy on the island.” The Bird’s Eye View already loves the book for the brief mention of Cape Air as the mode of travel for one of the characters. E A R LY

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Photos: Elizabeth Cecil

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or those who love to cook or foodies on an endless quest for the new kale replacement there is one thing the internet cannot quite replace, cookbooks. From Fannie to Betty, to Martha, to the queen of them all, Julia, we love our cookbooks. When we find one with easy recipes that family and friends love to eat, it is akin to making a new best friend. A group of women in Martha’s Vineyard brought their love of food and cookbooks together for the Martha’s Vineyard Cookbook Club, easily replicated in any Cape Air destination. “There are so many cool cookbooks to choose from,” says club founder Sarah Waldman. “We find them at the library, share to cut down on the expense, and if we find one we all like, we choose a dish from the same book. We each bring our own drink, dish, silverware and napkin so no clean up and we always make sure to bring Tupperware for the leftovers. It is great fun!” Ages range from 21 to 60 and many of the women did not even know each other but have found friendship and commonality in their love of adventure and good food. 47


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Cookbook author Sarah Waldman

Photos: Elizabeth Cecil

It is probably fair to say that the club will not have to look far for an upcoming cookbook selection as Waldman has her own cookbook, Feeding a Family, coming out in April. “I have always loved to cook and with two kids I knew I wanted to focus on a career centered on food and nutrition. For many families it is a struggle to get a good dinner on the table making for one of the most stressful times of the day. My idea with this book is to empower busy families with fun, easy and nutritious recipes to ease the stress of mealtimes.”

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Photo: Elizabeth Cecil

M ARTHA’ S VI N E YARD

The One-Skillet Wonders CHICKEN THIGHS WITH BARLEY, CHARD, AND MUSHROOMS CINNAMON AND SUGAR CRISPY CHICKPEAS

Who doesn’t love a dinner that involves just tossing everything into one pan? It makes preparing dinner a cinch, and won’t add more pots and pans to the already aggressive pile of sink dishes. Often times one-pot meals (I’m thinking women’s magazine casseroles here) call for too many cans of processed ingredients filled with sodium and additives, to be mixed together into an unidentifiable mush. Not here—in this dish, whole grains, leafy greens, tomatoes, and chicken are layered together and popped into the oven. If you have time in the evening, early morning, or during naptime, this skillet can be assembled in five minutes, covered, and left inthe fridge, waiting for you. • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided • One 28-ounce can diced tomatoes • 1 bunch Swiss chard, leaves removed from stems and torn into small pieces (stems can be saved for soup or stir-fry) • 8 ounces white button mushrooms, stemmed and chopped • 2 garlic cloves, smashed • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more as needed • 1 cup barley • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth 4 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs Freshly ground black pepper 4 sprigs fresh thyme • 1 lemon, sliced

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1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Brush 2 tablespoonsof the olive oil across the bottom of a10-inch cast iron skillet. In a large bowl, toss together the tomatoes, chard, mushrooms, garlic, and 1 teaspoon of the salt. Place half of the vegetable mixture in the bottom of the cast iron skillet, then pour the barley over the top. Add the rest of the vegetable mixture and, finally, the chicken broth. 2. Arrange the chicken thighs on top of the veggie and barley layers, pushing them gently into the vegetable mixture. Sprinkle the chicken with the remaining teaspoon of salt and a few grinds of pepper, then drizzle the skins with the remaining tablespoon of olive oil. Toss in the thyme and sliced lemon. Transfer the skillet to the oven and roast for 35 to 45 minutes until the skin begins to brown and the barley is tender. If you like extra-crisp skin, put the pan under the broiler for the last few minutes. Serve immediately. From Feeding a Family: A Real-Life Plan for Making Dinner Work by Sarah Waldman, © 2016 by Sarah Waldman. Photographs by Elizabeth Cecil. Reprinted by arrangement with Roost Books, an imprint of Shambhala Publications, Inc. Boulder, CO.

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M ARTHA’ S VI N E YARD Photos: Tim Johnson

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So as not to get underfoot in the stampede for eggs there is a special, little kids only, hunt to keep them out of harm’s way.

t started with a small Easter egg hunt at the Harbor View Hotel for guests joining us for our traditional holiday brunch. Today it is a community-wide event with literally thousands of eggs hidden around the property,” says the Harbor View Hotel’s Elizabeth Rothwell, who with her team is in charge of hiding all the eggs. “This is a memorable experience for our guests as well as the community and is our way of giving back with an event that everyone enjoys.” The hunt is on at 10 am at the Harbor View Hotel in Edgartown on April 16th, Easter Sunday and is open to one and all.

The thousands of eggs hidden around Edgartown’s Harbor View Hotel are filled with candy and there is one ‘Golden Egg’ which earns a special surprise to whomever finds it.

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You never know who you will bump into at Edgartown’s Lighthouse.

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An Historical Aquinnah Meander Toad Rock, Ancestral Post Office By Michelle Haynes

Photo: Nancy Woods

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Photo: Tim Johnson

mages of Martha’s Vineyard almost always include the iconic Gay Head Cliffs, probably the most photographed spot on the island, and for good reason. Dating back centuries, the red clay cliffs standing sentry beneath the sky are an ever-changing palette of color offering spectacular shades of red and brown, especially at sunset. The ancestral and present home to the island’s first residents, the Wampanoag Indians, the area offers a number of historical treasures honoring Aquinnah’s rich cultural legacy including a Bird’s Eye View discovery that fits perfectly into our “off the beaten track” hikes. “Toad Rock is a special place and is part of our oral histories of the island,” says Tobias Vanderhoop, vice-president of the Aquinnah Cultural Center. “The Toad was a companion to Moshup, the main figure in a number of our oral traditions. According to the Moshup stories, at the time when Moshup was to leave Aquinnah for the last time he turned his loyal friend Toad to stone to protect him from being hurt by newcomers to our island home. In our modern history it is true that there was a time when outgoing letters were left in one opening and incoming messages in another. It was an easy way to deliver mail in those days. Most recently, the Tribe named our monthly Finding Aquinnah’s Toad Rock newsletter The Toad Rock Times in order to honor that history.” In spite of an easy well-marked trail to Toad Rock, an informal Bird’s Eye View Start at the intersection of the survey of visitors and locals revealed few folks knew of the trail or of Toad Rock. State Road and Moshup Trail. “It is not surprising that many people are not aware of Toad Rock, but it is wonderful Proceed down the Moshup Trail 0.8 miles and that there are opportunities like this one for people to learn more about Wampanoag history and special places on our island home,” says Vanderhoop. turn right at this sign. 52

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Photo: Nancy Woods

Dave Wood’s encounter with the historical Toad Rock

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Photo: David Cox

Photos courtesy of Run to the Top

Firefighters in full gear race to the top of the Pilgrim Monument. The current record is two minutes and 16 seconds. The average climb time for the rest of us is about 15 minutes.

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our New Year’s resolutions may have gone by the wayside but don’t despair. Another surefire belly buster awaits—the climb up the 252-foot Pilgrim Monument in the Cape-tip town of Provincetown. If you need to count, you have 116 steps and 60 ramps and at a leisurely pace the climb can take about fifteen minutes, with the payoff being a magnificent 360 degree view of the world. Firefighters, police officers and emergency medical technicians gather at the Monument every year in a competitive run to the top with all proceeds benefiting a local cancer fund. This is a fun day for the participants, families and others who want to join the festivities. All are welcome to bring a picnic and support your local heroes on May 6 starting at 2 pm.

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Photos: econosmith.com

“So often we throw our young people into an American Idol type of environment where they are forced to compete against each other and with the loss comes a sense of devastation and that is a horrible way to reinforce art. We are all about encouraging one another and allowing art to flow.” —Singer songwriter David Roth

Tapping into your Muse and yes, you do have one by Michelle Haynes, a Provincetown year-rounder

“The reality TV talent shows plunk our young people into competition rather than mutual support. When all but one eventually ‘lose’, many are devastated and disempowered, and in my view this is not how to reinforce artistic expression. We’re all about encouraging one another and allowing creativity to flow.” —Singer songwriter David Roth 56

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he month of March in the cape-tip town of Provincetown is pretty much tumbleweed time with quiet streets populated by a few intrepid visitors and the assorted year-rounders. Fortunately, live music, a first run movie theatre, a handful of restaurants and a variety of weekly pot luck suppers manage to keep us entertained. What never fails to feed our souls is the steel grey of the morning mist across the harbor or a cozy lunch in the car at Herring Cove as we watch the wintry Atlantic pound the shore. A perfect setting to knock your creative juices loose, which is exactly what happens at the annual Cape Cod Songwriters Retreat at Provincetown’s Lands End Inn. “We put aside this time to make beautiful music together by creating an environment that gives people permission to explore their creativity,” says workshop founder and award winning singer/songwriter David Roth. Now in its fourth year, the songwriter’s retreat in January and March attracts a following from across New England and around the world. “We represent the last bastion of the attention span in this country,” says Roth. “We put aside time to make beautiful art together and then see what happens without criticism or judgment. We also gather to help one another reconnect with a hands-on experience of creativity and music that may have been left somewhere along life’s way—due to family, geography, health, vocation, and B I R D’S

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PROVINCETOWN “David and his music will touch you to the very depths of your soul. He’ll make you laugh and cry, inspire you to rise and fly...” —Jack Canfield co-author, Chicken Soup for the Soul everything else that we all have in our busy lives that take us in so many different directions. The word “retreat” is key, so that we can step back to move forward! It’s so joyous to watch that reconnection, and as I like to say, ‘All levels welcomed, no experience preferred.’ We have a coffeehouse each night where everyone gets to play a song for one another; the best concerts I’ve ever seen, witnessing the courage and heart everyone brings because it means to so much.” Cape Cod Songwriters Retreat, March 6-9, 2017, Lands End Inn, Provincetown, MA with David Roth, Sloan Wainwright, Kate Campbell, and Tom Kimmel. $750 covers your three-night stay at the Lands End, all classes and with one exception, all meals. Bring a second person to share your room, and they pay half for the full program. If folks arrange their own housing, the program accepts a few commuters for $375. E A R LY

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“Our location is extremely beautiful with a one-of-a-kind setting unlike any place in the world.” —David Roth referring to the waterfront location of the songwriters’ retreat, Provincetown’s Lands End Inn.

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PROVINCETOWN Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

Katie Holmes making her directorial debut with the film, All We Had.

From Print to Screen in One Step

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By Michelle Haynes

isual artist Annie Weatherwax had never written a book before her debut novel All We Had. Before it was even published actress Katie Holmes bought the rights and in short order went on to produce, direct, and star in the movie, now winning raves on the film festival circuit. How does this happen? “To tell you the truth, the whole thing has rather left me speechless,” says Weatherwax, a Boston-based artist who also spends time in Provincetown. “Usually there is a certain path that gets you to this point. You go to an MFA program, make connections, get a bunch of stories published and try and make more connections, but I never climbed that literary ladder in the normal way.” All We Had is an often heartbreaking tale of a single mother and her teenage daughter caught up in a web of poverty and bare bones survival. The book takes on economic inequality and the mortgage sub-prime crisis, but in spite of the gravity of the subject the book and movie are grounded in humor and the characters’ extraordinary resilience. “I am incredibly grateful to Katie Holmes,” says Weatherwax. “She played the mother with total honesty and on a deep level, understood the relationship between mother and daughter. Being on the set was extraordinary for me, for it gave my book a whole second life and the characters I wrote reached out and touched so many different people. At one point, a production designer patted my book and said, ‘This is my bible.’ That was the icing on the cake for me.” 58

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“What is most important to me as an artist and a writer is authenticity of voice. If I had to classify my own voice, I’d call it comic realism. It is a heightened, stylized wryness that often plunges into darkness. It permeates everything I do. Like my visual work, my fiction is bold and colorful with an undercurrent of darkness.” — Artist and author Annie Weatherwax

Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

Author, Annie Weatherwax

Katie Holmes and Stefania LaVie Owen, stars of All We Had

Photo: Provincetown Office of Tourism

“The quality of light shifts, and the dunes take on a lunar quality —

a quality that is probably always there but more awe-inspiring without the bright summer sun. The pace of Cape Cod slows in the off season and you can appreciate the raw beauty of the landscape more. There a zen like quality to the sweeping views of the ocean, there is time and space for contemplation. Also, I love the fact that you can find parking!”

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APRIL 28–30 @ SAGE INN & LOUNGE

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ther than photos of the late great Patsy Cline, the countrywestern star is not a huge factor in the Gays for Patsy weekend. “When we first began 25 years ago calling ourselves Gays for Patsy was somewhat of a joke,” says event organizer Bob Sweeney. “Patsy Cline is somewhat of an icon in the gay community so we were paying tribute to her, but our event is more about celebrating

Photo: Samantha McDuffy The Spring Stomp at the Provincetown Town Hall.

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country-western music with a lot of dancing.” And dance they do with dance workshops for the newbies, and a variety of events featuring line dancing, the east and west coast swing, the waltz and—how is this for a throw back?—the cha cha. Gays for Patsy attracts about one hundred people from all over New England and beyond and do not worry about finding a partner to dance with. “This is an everyone dances with everyone event,” says Sweeney. “Gay men dance with gay women, straight women and men join in and dance with gays, trans and bi. This is truly an, everyone dances with everyone weekend.” Expect to pay about $100 for a weekend of lessons and dance events and keep in mind the Provincetown inns and hotels are offering off-season rates at this time of year making for an affordable weekend that will have you line dancing your way into spring. B I R D’S

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Patriot’s Day, Monday, April 17, 2017 Official commemoration of the battles of Lexington and Concord and since 1897 marks the running of the Boston Marathon.

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ape Cod journalist Casey Sherman admits he is drawn to heroes. First it was his book and later a film, The Finest Hours, recounting the heroic and somewhat harrowing Coast Guard rescue off the coast of Cape Cod during a blizzard in 1952. Sherman followed that up with Boston Strong: A City’s Triumph over Tragedy co-written with former Boston Herald reporter David Wedge. The duo’s efforts form the basis for the recently released Patriot’s Day starring Boston’s, not-so-new kid on the block, Mark Wahlberg. “I have been lucky,” says the understated Sherman. “At first I was simply not interested in writing a book about something as horrific as the Boston Marathon bombing, but after a time we realized our primary focus had to center around the strength and resiliency of the survivors and Boston Strong is their story. So many of them have turned their tragedy into a way to help others like Heather Abbott who lost her leg but has established a foundation to raise funds for folks needing to purchase prosthetic limbs. 62

I want to remind everyone that for these survivors everyday is Marathon Monday, and let us never forget what they went through. This book could not have been written without their support. They opened up their lives to me and I knew we had to get the story right. They are now my friends and to tell the truth I find strength in all of them.” B I R D’S

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C HATHA M , C APE CO D

DUXBURY, MA. $1,595,000 • NEW 5BR/4+Bath, 48” Thermador, FR/kitchen open to large patio • 1st floor in-law bedroom/full bath, near schools, Old Cove Landing _______________ LIZ BONE _______________ 459 Washington Street I 781.325.8079 I Duxbury, MA 02332 Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated

Photos: Chuck Anzalone

CHATHAM

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ut out your arm and flex a muscle. The elbow of your arm is the affectionate name for the town of Chatham, nestled in the elbow of Cape Cod. From the bandstand on the Village Green to the one-of-a-kind shops lining Main Street and to the number one visitor destination, the Chatham Lighthouse, this is the Cape Cod Patti used to croon about. For the origin of the town’s most famous landmark you have to go back to the year 1808 and the first lighthouse keeper appointed by Thomas Jefferson. It goes back awhile but the lighthouse still stands and is an active Coast Guard station. Although not open to the public, you can go and visit the outside and there are specific open house dates when you can actually see the interior. For lighthouse lovers this is a “keeper.”

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MASSACHUSETTS

DUXBURY, MA. $2,199,000 • Restored c.1834 6BR/5Bath, separate entrance au-pair suite/bath • Sleep porch, sun porch, Wolfe 6 burner, radiant heat floor, gas fpl


MAINE

At 1,530 feet Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park is the highest point along the North Atlantic seaboard and the first place to view sunrise in the United States from October through early March. Photos courtesy of the Maine Office of Tourism

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Jordan Pond, Acadia National Park

n many parts of New England the not so enticing moniker for early spring is Mud Season, but don’t let this deter you, especially for a Bar Harbor getaway where the thaw is on at Acadia National Park. In the Cape Air destination of Bar Harbor shops are beginning to open their doors to early visitors and this early in the season you have plenty of room to explore Acadia National Park without the rush of summer visitors. Depending on the vagaries of Mother Nature, traversing across any one of the park’s 45 miles of carriage roads calls for a good pair of hiking sneakers, snow shoes or perhaps cross-country skis. If the snow is lingering you are invited to bring your snowmobile for a ride around 27 miles of the Park’s Loop Road system including a ride up to the top of Cadillac Mountain. B I R D’S E Y E V I E W


MAINE

Monhegan Towel Warmer…

207.596.0371 www.islandinnmonhegan.com

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MAINE

Get Out of the Cold in Camden, Maine with BODYTRAFFIC Photos courtesy of the Camden Opera House

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“...one of the most talked-about young companies nationwide... embodies the joy of dancing.” — Los Angeles Times

he Los Angeles Dance company is bringing an inventive program to the Camden Opera House this spring. BODYTRAFFIC is a young dance company who appear throughout North America including at the famed Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival. “I am so happy to announce this stop on this incredible troupe’s Northeast Tour” said Kerry Hadley, manager of the Camden Opera House Manager. “I saw them when I attended a presenters’ conference in New York City last year, and a group of us applied for and received a touring grant from the New England Foundation for the Arts. I know how much dance is appreciated and performed in our area, and knew this would be a special treat for all. This residency is a first for the Opera House —we are really growing up into a fullfledged arts presenter with this event.” B I R D’S

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Photo courtesy of the Owls Head Transportation Museum

Minutes from your Cape Air arrival into Rockland, Maine is the popular Owls Head Transportation Museum, home to a world class collection of pre-1940 ground vehicles, engines, aircraft and a lot more. This is not one of those, stand by and don’t touch museums, for many of the vehicles are shared with visitors during a number of events throughout the year. Coming this spring on April 8 and 9 is the Midcoast Model Festival.This indoor event features models of all kinds including trains, aircraft, boats and automobiles. A number of special kid themed activities also highlight the weekend.

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CRITERION THEATER, BAR HARBOR, MAINE

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Photo courtesy of the Criterion Theatre

Photo: Django Crosby David Crosby

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ounded in 1932 by an infamous bootlegger, George McKay, the historic Criterion Theatre has been bringing live entertainment to Bar Harbor audiences for decades. Now completely renovated to its former glory, the theatre is a downtown showcase for first run movies and live entertainment. Two different ends of the spectrum come this Spring with Shrek the Musical, live and on stage for the kids on April 14 and 15. Presented by the Acadia Community Theater, the show is based on the film Shrek which follows the story of a reclusive ogre who, after hearing word that the Kingdom of Duloc is taking over his swamp, reluctantly joins a band of fairy tale creatures on their quest to reclaim their property. Also this spring is Woodstock’s famous singer, songwriter and activist, David Crosby. A two-time Rock & Roll Hall of Famer, Crosby was inducted as part of The Byrds and then again for his time with Crosby, Stills and Nash. Crosby brings his new band to Bar Harbor for one show only on May 26th. B I R D’S

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Pa r t ne r s in t he Sk y — C a pe Air a nd Jet Blue

CLICK AND GO

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njoy one stop booking for your Cape Air/JetBlue flight. Log on to jetblue.com to book your entire itinerary including the Cape Air portion of your trip.

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VERMONT

Photos courtesy of the Woodstock Chamber of Commerce.

TIS THE SEASON FOR VERMONT’S MAPLE MADNESS

During Vermont’s Maple Madness area artists lend their talents to maple sap buckets later auctioned on the Woodstock Village Green.

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here is syrup and then there is real Vermontmade syrup, and as every pancake lover knows, there is nothing like the real thing. The next two months are high season for extracting the sap from the trees and there is a maple festival around every corner including the town of Woodstock, Vermont, minutes from your Cape Air arrival in Lebanon, New Hampshire. E A R LY S PR I N G 2017

“What we call our Maple Madness weekend happens on our village green and features a variety of maple treats including maple butter popcorn, sugar on snow, maple cookies and candies, and to cut all the sweetness, a dill pickle for everyone,” says Beth Finlayson, Executive Director of the Woodstock Chamber of Commerce. “We also have a maple taste-a-round with about twenty restaurants offering maple inspired dishes. Also included in the activities is a visit to an authentic maple house where you can watch the actual syrup being made.” Maple Madness March 25 & 26—Woodstock, Vermont 71


VERMONT

Vermont’s Maple Madness bike ride ends at a local sugar house where bikers and friends enjoy a variety of maple treats including maple chocolate, with locally-grown bacon dipped in maple syrup. Photos: Peter Vollers

V “Brutal terrain in a foot of snow covering a sheet of ice or an easy trail of hard-packed dirt; when it comes to our Maple Madness cyclocross event you never know what you are going to get.” — Peter Vollers, Maple Madness race founder 72

ermont’s annual Maple Madness event brings all kind of folks together including some 200 bikers ready to master the 25-mile course in what could be challenging terrain. “With 70 percent of Vermont’s roads made up of dirt we have the perfect setting for off-road biking,” says race founder Peter Vollers. “Cyclocross, a specific type of road biking, used to be a fringe sport but here in New England it has become huge and is something everyone can do together making for an adventure ride and a lot of camaraderie among the bikers.” B I R D’S

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Around the Corner & Around the World

WOODSTOCK • Benjamin Swan House built in 1801 and lovingly restored in 2014 preserving a treasure of original architectural features both inside and out. Surrounded by wealth of beautiful period homes in the heart of Woodstock’s Historic District. $2,250,000.

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WOODSTOCK • Woodstocker Inn is a 9 room bed and breakfast conveniently situated within walking distance of downtown Woodstock. Own a multi-award-winning and internationally renowned B&B in America’s most beautiful village. $1,295,000.

Willamson-Group.com • 802.457.2000 Successfully Selling Real Estate For Over 40 Years 24 Elm • Woodstock VT • Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated

Cape Air’s Art in Flight Cape Air’s Cessna 402s by famed airbrush artist Jürek

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OGDENSBURG, NEW YORK

FREDERIC REMINGTON, EAST AND WEST Photos Courtesy of Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Cody, Wyoming, USA

Gift of The Coe Foundation, 53.67, Untitled Ghost Riders

By Lisa Ballard

F Frederic Remington in his New Rochelle studio, 1905

Frederic Remington (1861-1909) is among a handful of artists who captured life in the Old West through his illustrations, paintings and sculptures. His talent for portraying the adventures of the cowboys, American Indians and military men gave Easterners a taste of western life which persists today.

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rederic Remington produced over 3,000 drawings and paintings and 22 bronze sculptures. The two museums in Ogdensburg, NY and Cody, WY preserve the largest bodies of his work and are worth a visit, and you can do it whether you’re in the East or the West. Only 100 miles from Cape Air’s hub at Billings Logan International Airport, The Buffalo Bill Center of the West has one of the two largest collections of Remington art in the United States. The other, the Frederic Remington Art Museum, in Ogdensburg, New York, is only 1½ miles from the Cape Air terminal at the Ogdensburg airport. Why Ogdensburg? Remington grew up there, and he returned to the upstate New York town every summer to visit his childhood friends. After his untimely death at age 48 from an appendectomy, his wife Eva moved to Ogdensburg due to the couple’s social ties there. Her home is now the museum. “You can see more Remington art in Ogdensburg than anywhere else in the world, not only original sculptures but also masterpiece oils on canvas and a broad collection of his illustrations in pen-and-ink, ink-wash and watercolor,” says Laura Foster, Director and Curator of the Remington Museum, “Though he’s known for his western art, he was also a stunning impressionist who painted landscapes of Canada, the St. Lawrence and the Thousand Islands, as well as water and landscapes which are not specific to a location but show dramatic action. We also have plein air landscapes by Remington of the North Country on loan from Cody. The Center of the West is our best institutional friend.” Remington was an Easterner himself, born in Canton, New York. In 1881, he traveled to what was then the Montana Territory. Upon his return, he sold B I R D’S

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The Bronco Buster, 1895—Bronze

returned from Montana and Canada with native Blackfoot clothing. He drew the legendary Mohawk chief wearing the Blackfoot apparel. Remington’s studio is no longer in New Rochelle. It is a cornerstone exhibit in the Whitney Gallery of Western Art at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, WY. And yes, Remington was friends with Buffalo Bill Cody, for whom both the town and the museum are named. The Remington studio affords an intimate peek into the artist’s creative process, as the relationship between the artifacts and the artwork comes to life around you. For example, you can see the buckskin shirt worn by The Mountain Man hanging on the wall The End of the Day in the studio, then spin 180 degrees a sketch of some cowboys to Harper’s Weekly. By the mid-1880s, his to see it on the original sculpture. western-themed illustrations filled the pages of many popular magazines “Remington’s studio is a highlight of of the day, including Harper’s, Colliers, Century and Scribner’s, which also most people’s visit to the museum,” says gave him the ability to pursue painting and sculpture. Karen McWhorter, Scarlett Curator of Remington and Eva settled in New Rochelle, New York, where he was Western American Art at the Whitney close to the large New York City-based publishers, but to gain inspiration Western Art Museum, “It’s a jewel box for his art, he traveled west annually, collecting chaps, lariats, firearms that captures the color and atmosphere (he’s a cousin of the founder of the Remington gun and ammunition he applied to his western subjects.” company), buffalo skulls, cookpots and other pioneer paraphernalia. Back at home, he surrounded himself in his studio with these Western souvenirs, which often appeared, sometimes inaccurately on purpose, in his paintings. For example, when Remington was commissioned to illustrate for Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s, Hiawatha, he had just E A R LY

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OGDENSBURG, NEW YORK

River Drivers in the Spring Break Up


THE ADIRONDACKS

ICE FI SH I NG I N SAR ANAC L AKE “We do have a shanty we can use but we really enjoy just bringing a couple of folding chairs and sitting on the ice. We are usually out here from sun up to sun down.” —Bethany Valenze, Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce

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he glacier-fed watering holes dotting the landscape of the mighty Adirondacks provide the perfect conditions for cutting thru the ice and dropping a line. In fact, a hand line, a few minnows and a battery powered auger (cuts thru the ice) are pretty much all you need to get started. “I love the thrill of ice fishing,” says Bethany Valenze of the Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce. “It is so different from fishing with a pole. With ice fishing so much depends on watching the direction of the fish and knowing how much line to let out. I really enjoy it.” When it comes to where to go and where the ice is safest, the always helpful folks at the Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce can point you in the right direction. A minimum of three to four inches of solid ice is usually safe. Coming up is the Colby Classic, on Lake Colby at the edge of Saranac Lake, traditionally held the on first weekend in March. Ice fishing season runs until April 30, but for bigger fish like northern pike, pickerel, tiger muskellunge and walleye, the season shortens to March 15. Patience pays off for Bethany Valenze who loves ice fishing for the thrill of it. She returns all of her fish to the water including this Northern Pike and admits she does not even like to eat fish. For tips on where to go for the best ice fishing in the Adirondacks, reach out to Bethany at the Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce.

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THE ADIRONDACKS, NEW YORK

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WE HAVE CONNECTIONS • Book any Cape Air flight

capeair.com 800.CAPE.AIR

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with United Airlines

united.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with JetBlue

jetblue.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with American Airlines (note — select “advanced options” then “all carriers”)

aa.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with Delta

expedia.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with Seaborne Airlines

expedia.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with Alaska Airlines

expedia.com

G E T TI NG F ROM H E RE TO TH E RE AN D B E YO N D

I

By Peter Kokoszka f you are traveling beyond a Cape Air destination, one of our partner airlines can get you onward and beyond to almost anywhere in the world. Visit one of Cape Air’s travel partner websites, shown above, or call upon a professional travel agent to book convenient connections. Booking your entire trip together on a single ticket is the best way to ensure a seamless journey from start to finish. When you book all of your flights together on one of our partner airline websites, you are automatically booked with the appropriate connecting time between your flights, eliminating the need for a mad dash across the airport. With a single itinerary and ticket, you can generally receive connecting boarding passes and check your bags through to your final destination. Also, in the event of a flight delay, Cape Air has access to your entire itinerary to assist you with rebooking your connecting flight as well as your Cape Air flight. If you choose to book separate tickets for different portions of your trip, be sure to allow enough time between your flights to claim and recheck your baggage and to meet each airline’s check-in time requirements. Most airlines no longer provide through check-in of baggage and boarding passes when you are booked on separate tickets, and you may also be charged separate baggage fees. Another downside to booking your flight on separate tickets is, in the event of a flight delay, Cape Air may not have the ability to access your other airline ticket, and it may be necessary to pay rebooking fees to make a flight change. Save yourself time, effort, and money by booking your complete itinerary together on one ticket. You’ll be glad that you did. Questions? There is never a charge to talk to a Cape Air agent at 1.800.Cape.Air. 78

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Photo: John DeSousa

Photos: Tim Johnson

NEWS & VIEWS

MOCHA HAGoTDI* from a few long time Cape Air team members in Tortola—Sharon Richards, Garon Dixon, and Donar Motilall *Make our Customers Happy and Have a Good Time Doing It.

Hailing from Albuquerque, NM, Captain Brendan Baldonado grew up in Haverhill, MA and at press time passengers can find him flying between Boston and Rutland, VT and Massena NY.

Captain Okke van Oudgaarden

Born in Rotterdam, Cape Air Captain Okke van Oudgaarden can be seen flying across the Cape Air route map. Often called the hardest working pilot at Cape Air he is in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri one day and the Caribbean island of Vieques the next week. When this Netherlands native is not flying he is enjoying his other passion, dancing and teaching the tango. E A R LY

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Norwegian native Elin Heggland is celebrating her 25th year as a Cape Air pilot and is usually found flying the island run between New Bedford, Massachusetts and Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard.

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CAPE AIR EVERYWHERE

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Everyone loves a bargain, especially when it comes to airfares. Do not miss the latest and greatest when it come to Cape The best way to hear about special airfares andAir/Nantucket promotions isAirlines to join fare Capesales. Air’sLog on to capeair.com and click on ...check out details at capeair.com E A R LY

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EarthView By Jim Wolf, Director of Sustainability

PARTNERSHIPS FOR THE PLANET

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Senator Edmund Muskie (D) Maine addresses the first Earth Day 1970, Belmont Plateau, Philadelphia.

For us, For us, nothing but nothing green skies. but

and light our buildings; we’ve cut pril 22 marks the 48th celebration of Earth Day. An estimated the fuel consumption in our Cessna 20 million people took to the streets and parks around the U.S. 402 Fleet by 4%; we have helped our on that spring day in 1970. It was the culmination of a decade of employees to do similar types of historically large public gatherings focused on issues from civil improvements at their homes! And rights to foreign policy. During those years the size of the “demonstration” we’ve partnered with our communiwas essential to driving home the issues and pressuring our government ties on many environmental projects. officials to change “business as usual.” No single day in the decade brought We are currently working in the out larger crowds than that first Earth Day. The awareness that the survival testing phase with the FAA on the and good health of our planet was something we might agree and act upon very important Piston Aviation Fuel united people across the political spectrum. Initiative (PAFI) which will lead to I was 14, and looking back now I can see that on that day in 1970 I acted a lead free fuel replacement for Low as an adult citizen for the first time. Along with three of my ninth grade Lead Avgas. friends, I cut school and we rode our bikes from northwest Philadelphia Here’s the thing to remember: to Belmont Plateau in Fairmount Park to make our voices heard. Children, we do not make this kind of parents and grandparents were there. Speakers told truths and musicians sang poetry. There was a sweet vibe in the air mingling with the omnipresent progress on our own. Every one of these Cape Air projects has been Philadelphia smog. accomplished in conjunction with I am amazed at the impact of our public demonstrations that day. our governmental partners and By December of 1970 Congress enacted the Environmental Protection programs. The next time someone Agency (EPA). The Clean Air Act was born in 1970, and the Clean Water fuel-efficient Cessna 402 proclaims our commitment to sustainability. tells you we should get rid of “big Act became law in 1972. Industry had aA new partnership with Government tell them this: we concerning our environment, and scientific research helped to establish solid government” 12 EPA RENEWING 20 should all continue working goals leading to logical regulations which would balance economic growth together for the benefit of all. and sound environmental protections. REDUCING A fuel-efficient proclaims our commitment to sustainability. The partnerships between industries and the agencies bornCessna from402that Happy Earth Day! legislation have worked for the good of us all. We are safer and healthier than 12 EPA PARTNERING RENEWING we were before. As an example let’s look at Cape Air; in these most recent 20 eight years we’ve made significant progress in the area of environmental sustainability. We’ve made nearly 3 million kilowattCONSERVING hours of clean electricity REDUCING ta Committed to Sustainability. l M e ri t A w from our solar PV systems; we’ve cut by 25% the energy used to heat and cool v ir o n m e

net-zero electricity usage.

En

Creative partnerships are part of what make approach in to sustainability Our our investment solar energyunique. to power our corporate headquarters, along with We work with airports, communities, and our employees on a wide range of local other efficiencies in roofing, insulation and lighting controls, bring us ever closer to goals, from Farm to School agriculture programs to electric vehicle initiatives.

n

We support it at work and at home through recycling, waste reduction, sustainable product sourcing, and various green initiatives designedconsume to excite fuel. and inspire our committed to reducing the burn—both in Sure, airlines But we’re equally committed employees. the skies and on the ground. Combined new technology and flight procedures

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significantly reduce the fuel consumed in our super-efficient fleet of Cessna 402s.

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We fly to some beautiful places and want to help keep them that way. To “green” our planet and have a good time doing it. That’s our commitment. Because we recognize Creative are part of what make our approach to sustainability unique. that our own ability to thrive hinges on the health ofpartnerships our natural environment.

We work with airports, communities, and our employees on a wide range of local goals, from Farm to School agriculture programs to electric vehicle initiatives.

We’re investing in tomorrow,

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l M e ri t A w

ar

v ir o n m e

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Sure, airlines consume fuel. But we’re committed to reducing the burn—both in the skies and on the ground. Combined new technology and flight procedures significantly reduce the fuel consumed in our super-efficient fleet of Cessna 402s.

ar

En

Our investment in solar energy to power our corporate headquarters, along with other efficiencies in roofing, insulation and lighting controls, bring us ever closer to net-zero electricity usage.

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INDEX

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rom a boat charter in the Caribbean to the skinny on where to eat, shop and stay, please call upon our Bird’s Eye View family of advertisers who make this issue possible. We thank them and all of you for your support.

Sincerely, Publisher Dan Wolf, Chuck, Nancy, Kim, Laurie, Rosemary, Bobbi, Jim and Michelle

CARIBBEAN:

BOSTON

THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS ST. CROIX

Boston Harbor Hotel ....................... 61

Nantucket Stock .............................. 36

Macdonald & Wood Sotheby’s ....... 63

Nantucket Windmill Auto Rental.......................................... 42

CAPE COD

Nobby Clothes Shop .................... 36

Arawak Bay Inn at Salt River ........ 27 The Buccaneer ............................. 27 Cane Bay Dive Shop .................... 25 Palms at Pelican Cove ..................... 27

Chatham Sign Shop......................... 63

MAINE

ST. JOHN

The Country Inn .......................... 67

340 Real Estate Co. ..................... 23

FIORE Olive Oils & Vinegars........ 65

Islandia Real Estate ...................... 23

The Island Inn Monhegan ............ 65

Miss Lucy’s Bar & Restaurant ....... 23

Lisa Hall Jewelry .......................... 65

Seaview Vacation Homes ............. 23

Packard Partners Rentals.............. 67

Wish Upon A Star Charters .......... 21

Point Lookout .............................. 67

ST. THOMAS Calypso Realty ............................. 28 Coki Dive Center ......................... 28

VIEQUES

Red Sky Restaurant...................... 65

MARTHA’S VINEYARD Breakwater Real Estate ................ 51 The Collection ............................. 46 Harbor View Hotel....................... 53

Black Beard Sports ....................... 33

Hob Knob .................................... 51

Vieques Flowers & Gifts ............... 33

Kelley House................................ 53

THE BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

Martha’s Vineyard Buyer Agents........................... 51

BVI Tourism Board ......................... 3

Martha’s Vineyard Museum ......... 46

Dolphin Discovery ......................... 8

MV Broker.com ........................... 46

Dream Yacht Charters .................. 13 Fort Burt Hotel & Marina ............. 13

NANTUCKET

Four Diamonds Park Villas ........... 15

Capt. Toms’ Charter .................... 43

Inter Island Boat Sevices ................ 8

Fareground & Pudley’s Pub .......... 36

Quito’s Gazebo.............................. 8

Harborview Nantucket................. 36

Sol Y Sombra Villa ......................... 2

J. Pepper Frazier Real Estate......... 37

Speedy’s Ferry ............................. 13

Luxruy Nantucket Rentals ............ 43 Maury People Sotheby’s Realty.... 41 Michael Kane Lightship Baskets ........................................ 42 Nantucket Inns ................................ 42

NEW HAMPSHIRE Martha Diebold Real Estate ......... 70

NEW YORK Guide Boat Realty ........................ 77 Hotel Saranac .............................. 84 Paul Smith’s College .................... 77 Visit Adirondacks ......................... 77

PROVINCETOWN Crown & Anchor ............................. 54 Provincetown Tourism Board........... 54 The Red Inn ................................. 54

VERMONT Hill Farm Inn .................................... 73 Williamson Group Sotheby’s Realty. ..................... 73



Early Spring 2017