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Fall 2018

VIEW BIRD’S EYE

Maine Lobsterman


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BIRD’S EYE

VIEW

Cape Air founder and CEO Dan Wolf ceremonially signing the nose section of the soon-to-be newest member of the Cape Air family, the Tecnam P2012 Traveller.

Cape Air Welcomes the Next Generation Aircraft After years of design, manufacturing, and flight testing, I’m thrilled to announce that the first Tecnam P2012 Traveller joins the Cape Air fleet in early 2019. Partnering closely with Tecnam, our new eleven-seat aircraft is specially designed to meet the needs of Cape Air passengers. Our ongoing commitment to the absolute highest level of safety remains our top priority as an operation, and we accomplish this with the best training and maintenance in the industry. Furthermore, we decide on aircraft type based on what will deliver the safest air transportation possible to our passengers and employees. The Traveller serves our mission perfectly. It is modern, efficient and, most importantly, a multi-engine airplane. While many small communities are now served with single engine aircraft, we believe that because much of our flying is over water, at night and in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (less than ideal weather), our standard of safety mandates that we fly multi-engine aircraft. In this case, redundancy equals the highest level of safety. Schedule frequency, flexibility and outstanding service have been consistent benchmarks for our company over the past 30 years. One of the most frequently asked questions we hear from passengers is “Why not larger aircraft?” The answer is simple. Cape Air is committed to year-round service in all of the communities we serve, and while our busy markets call for hundreds of seats a day during high season, demand falls to just a handful during the slower times of year. In addition to reduced schedules, larger aircraft would fly with empty seats for much of the year and challenge the sustainability of our service. Our new aircraft represents an exciting chapter for the Cape Air team, our passengers, and the communities we serve. Please stay tuned as the Traveller is integrated into our fleet so you know where you can enjoy the new ride! To the many of you I flew this past summer, please know that flying as a Captain for Cape Air is one of the highlights of my job. As always, thanks for flying.

Captain Dan Wolf Founder and CEO Dan.Wolf@capeair.com FAL L

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Photo: Courtesy of the New England Patriots/Keith Nordstrom

Photo: Lisa Densmore Ballard

The time is now for Mother Nature’s show of many colors.

Photo: JOE DONLAVEY

A P’town moment—Michelle and her handsome Halloween “date”

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Foliage, Football and Fishing Fall is on and in this issue we give you plenty of leaf peeping opportunities including atop the Adirondack fire towers and yes, you can climb them. As for fishing we have The Derby in Martha’s Vineyard while outdoor writer Jack Ballard takes us fly fishing in Montana. Then there’s football from former Boston Herald columnist Gayle Fee who chronicled Tom Brady’s conquests from his unheralded start when Drew Bledsoe went down during the second game of the 2001 series to his stunning come-from-behind victory in Super Bowl LI some 16 years later. In other words Fee knew Brady “when” and looks at the buzz over the new book about the Patriots, their coach and their quarterback. The season also means ‘Surfs Up’ and we look at what the swells mean for Nantucket and the Caribbean. Anyone old enough to recognize the name Moondoggie will know Fred Hemmings. The surfing legend returns to Puerto Rico this fall for the 50th anniversary of the World Surfing Championship, a title he won in 1968. Fall also ends with what is akin to a national holiday in the cape tip town of Provincetown where everyone gets in the act. In this issue a preview of the town’s best free show of the year. Curled up with a good book atop a pile of leaves or any form of fall adventure—Enjoy!

Executive Editor, Bird’s Eye View Michelle.Haynes@capeair.com B I RDSEYEV I EWMA GA Z I NE. C OM


FA L L 2018

VIEW PUBLISHER: Dan Wolf EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Michelle Haynes Michelle.Haynes@capeair.com COPY EDITOR: Jim Hanson DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Pam Rogers Design FINANCIAL WIZARD: Laurie Jacobson Laurie.Jacobson@capeair.com ADVERTISING SALES: Rosemary Dooley Bobbi Fawcett Marilyn Johnson Joe Lachimia Sean Randall

Films are just part of the action at Camden, Maine’s film festival.

Ad rates and specs in our 2018 Media Kit available at: birdseyeviewmagazine.com/advertise

CO N TE N TS MA RTHA’ S V I NE YA R D • 8 NA NT UC K E T • 2 4

Bird’s Eye View is published by Cape Air, 660 Barnstable Road Hyannis, MA 02601 © Bird’s Eye View, 2018

NE W H A MP SH I R E & V ermont • 8 2 T h e Adirondacks • 8 6

P ROV INCE T O W N • 4 4

Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

CAPE COD • 54

Mon tana • 9 5

B OSTON • 6 0

T h e Caribbean • 9 8

MA INE • 6 4

BirdsEyeViewMagazine.com

Fall 2018

VIEW BIRD’S EYE

Photo: Courtesy of Camden International Film Festival

BIRD ’ S E Y E

Fall 2018

VIEW BIRD’S EYE

Maine lobsterman

Montana

Northeast and the Midwest: “Tradition”—artist Abe Goodale’s water color homage to the Maine lobsterman

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Montana: Fly fishing in Montana by Jack Ballard Photographer Lisa Densmore Ballard

Caribbean: Puerto Rico’s Gozalandia Waterfall by Caribbean photographer Mick Kollins

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We Love Our Photographers! Meet our photographers and one brand new writer. I thank them for sharing their creativity; from the fire towers of Saranac Lake to the rolling surf in Nantucket and Puerto Rico, to the mermaid along the shore, they do the job.

Lisa Densmore Ballard Montana, LisaBallardOutdoors.com

Mark Kurtz

Saranac Lake, markkurtzphotography.com

Tim Johnson

Martha’s Vineyard, timjohnsonphotos.com 6

janet and Steve Simonsen

United States Virgin Islands, stevesimonsen.com

Cary Hazlegrove

Nantucket, Nantucketstock.com

Elizabeth Cecil

Martha’s Vineyard, elizabethcecil.com B I RDSEYEV I EWMA GA Z I NE. C OM


Photo: Spruce Balkind

Mick Kollins

The Caribbean, virginislandsdesigngroup.com

Vanessa Emery

Meet our newest writer, Nantucket’s Vanessa Emery

Terry Pommett

Nantucket—photo taken with his beloved Boston Celtics at what will always be “The Garden.” pommettphotography.com FAL L

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Dan McKeon

Provincetown, kalel344gmail.com 7


Martha’s Vineyard

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Photo: Josh Robinson White

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

Salud. L’Chaim. Salute. Cheers. Prost.

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d Photos: Josh Robinson White

The Martha’s Vineyard Food & Wine Festival October 17-21, 2018

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he island’s grand event for wine lovers and others draws an annual crowd who come to enjoy a variety of food prepared by star chefs, dance to live music, learn something new at the educational seminars and of course to drink wine, lots of wine. Accompanying everything from the oysters to the chocolates is a vast variety of wines from across the globe. “Martha’s Vineyard has a rich tradition of farming and fishing and our festival showcases the island’s finest

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in over twenty individually designed events over five days,” says festival spokesperson Dawn Curtis. “We are also a festival with a mission as the event raises funds for a number of local island programs including the Agricultural Society’s Farmer’s Program, and the Island Grown Initiative, empowering a new generation to make healthy choices, learn to grow food and connect to local farms.” Open to everyone festival tickets start at $75 per person.

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Photos: Josh Robinson White

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Martha’s Vineyard Brunch 5k or 10k Run or Walk Sunday, October 21, 2018 8:00am – Noon If you are working on those ten thousand steps a little run before brunch may be order. A new addition to the MVY Food & Wine Fest is the 10K or 5K run or walk, your choice, which is my kind of event. The gathering spot is Edgartown’s Katama General Store which is well worth a visit. All finishers will receive a custom commemorative brunch glass followed by a mini brunch party with what is described as “nibbles” and beverages. The Edgartown Clarion Inn Martha’s Vineyard is a perfect location for your next stay. Offering large guest rooms, free breakfast & Wi-Fi, ample free parking and adjacent to the Grill on Main restaurant. A short walk to downtown shops and restaurants. Open all year, we look forward to providing you with outstanding MV Island hospitality.

Beetlebung Corner, Chilmark (508) 645-3533 www.conroymv.com

It’s not just business, it’s personal.

Chilmark Beach Retreat Sail, motor or kayak to your own beach lot on the Atlantic ocean. This private and unique summer house, perched pond side is surrounded by 15 acres of marsh lands which provides a natural habitat for heron, osprey and egrets. Outstanding water views from every window, oversized deck for dining and relaxation, fireplace in living room for those chilly evenings. One of a kind and just reduced for immediate sale. $1,950,000. Exclusive.

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

A portion of the proceeds benefits the Martha’s Vineyard Women’s Association.


M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

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Photos: David Hannon

M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d Yoga on the beach, in the rain, with a goat and now, in the Martha’s Vineyard town of Oak Bluffs, Alpaca Yoga! “Friendly, gentle, and calming, our alpaca will take you to a new level of awareness in your yoga practice,” says Island Alpaca Farm owner Barbara Ronchetti. Open to all levels, including first-timers, the one-hour sessions are offered throughout the fall on Island Alpaca’s pasture in the soothing presence of their alpaca. Classes are $30 and mats are available, or you can bring your own. An added bonus-after class enjoy a meet and greet with your new alpaca friends and see one of the farm’s newborn cria. (baby alpaca) FAL L

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

Photos: Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard FIlm Society

Vineyard Haven’s historic Capawock Theatre—dating back to the turn of the last century the Capawock is now restored to its former glory and plays a big part in the overall theater experience.

The 13th Martha’s Vineyard International Film Festival

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September 4-9, 2018 and Onward through the Winter

he recurring theme of the festival is “Other Places, Other People,” says festival director Richard Paradise. “Our goal is to encourage attendees to think broadly about how huge the world of film is and deeply about the universal concerns and desires that unite all people. About 90% of all film selections are non-US productions, helping to fulfill the festival mission of promoting cross-cultural understanding through film.” Dedicated to providing year-round programming throughout the autumn and winter there will be screenings of newly released 16

independent films and documentaries along with special guests, and live musical performances. “We offer something for everyone all season long,” says Paradise. “We invite filmmakers, educators, and scientists to the Film Center in a continued effort to create more engaging programming. It’s our way of building an enhanced film-watching experience for our community. In addition, you can catch a live performance of the Metropolitan Opera, the Bolshoi Ballet, and a lot more, broadcast via satellite at the MV Film Center in Vineyard Haven.”

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

Festival director Richard Paradise shares a laugh with Sharon Stone. The line-up for this film festival is at mvfilmsociety.com.

Visit

MARTHA’S VINEYARD Chamber of Commerce

MARTHA’S VINEYARD MVY.com

508.693.0085

Middle Road Home with Carriage House Apartment Flooded with light and decorated with contemporary flair, this 4-bedroom home and its one-bedroom apartment are just delightful. Lovely meadow setting & excellent rental history. $1,250,000. Call to inquire.

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

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or most historic structures, restoration and maintenance is on-going pretty much all the time, and for one of the most recognizable landmarks in Martha’s Vineyard, the Gay Head Lighthouse, preservation presents an even greater challenge. Built in 1796, the sand beneath the lighthouse began to erode and the loss of of the building to the sea was imminent until, in 2015, a determined group of lighthouse supporters raised the funds to move the lighthouse 129 feet away from the edge. The restoration is far from over and helping with the necessary funding is the 6th Annual Gay Head 10K Run for the Light happening on Sunday, October 7th at 10:30 AM at the Aquinnah Circle. Described as “challenging but fun,” registration is $30 but it costs nothing to go and cheer on the runners. The setting is perfect—dunes, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Gay Head Lighthouse. gayheadlight.org

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Photos: Courtesy of Run for the Light 10k race

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

The Gay Head Run for the Light race is certified by USA Track & Field with a number of national and international elite runners.

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

September 9-October 13, 2018 The arrival of Fall in Martha’s Vineyard is marked by the appearance of anglers from across the country and beyond. The Derby, as it is called on the island, is run by fishermen for fishermen, and has been a happening event for the past seventy years. Experienced or newbies are all welcome to join the hunt with special categories for kids. Of course these are fishermen so there is always a party somewhere and

On The Water NEW ENGLA ND

®

T H E A N G L E R’ S GUIDE

SUM ME R

BLUES

MAINE STRIPERS RELEASING TUNA FROGGING FUNDAMENTALS

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in this case it is a lollapalooza, open to fishermen and those who love them. Derby registration is ongoing at any one of the island’s tackle shops with a lot more details at mvderby.com. I found this gem of a Derby story online by Joe Holey. Writing for On the Water magazine, this is a rather sad tale of “the big one that got away” but Holey’s Derby experience captured something special.

“If you’ve never fished the Derby before, please, do yourself a favor and give it a shot. There’s nothing like the beauty and serenity of Wasque at first light, or standing on a beach at 3 a.m. that seems like it’s the closest thing to heaven, or the sight of albies crashing bait and barreling through Cape Pogue Gut, that little 70-yard stretch of water that lights up with white water as these insane fish rip through. It’s a place where Yankee fans and Red Sox fans fish together side by side, and it’s a trip that should be on every striper fisherman’s bucket list.” —By Joe Holey from On the Water Photo: TIm Johnson

• $4.95 2018 PAGE 1 AUGUST 2018 AUGUST

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— Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

and animals raised righT

BreakfasT and lunch The Very BesT crOissanTs and POPOVers gluTen free Baked gOOds TasTy Take OuT dinners daily sPecials minuTes frOm The mV airPOrT We are a Well sTOcked larder fOr all yOur PanTry needs BOne BrOTh, sPices, sauces & sTOcks

Office: 256 Edgartown Road · buymv@mvbuyeragents.com

www.mvbuyeragents.com · 508-627-5177

Office: 256 Edgartown Road · buymv@mvbuyeragents.com

www.mvbuyeragents.com · 508-627-5177

Soaring with L.A.Brown

Photography... discovering a simple truth that leaves a lasting impression.

Exhibiting At Night Heron Gallery & The Vineyard Artisan’S Festivals www.labphoto.com

508-627-1977

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

The Very BesT Take OuT JOinT PrOduce frOm Our lOcal farms

“And, when you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.” — Pauloyou Coelho, The Alchemist “And, when want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.”


M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

Photo: © Nicole Friedler Photography

The Morning Glory Farm is minutes from your Cape Air arrival at the Martha’s Vineyard Airport and a perfect place to pick up fresh picked produce. I dare you to pass up the, to die for, home baked apple pie. 22

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M a r t h a’ s V i n e ya r d

The 17th Annual Located in Oak Bluffs, Sea Smoke Barbecue is bringing slow wood smoked barbecue to Martha’s Vineyard. Sea Smoke Barbecue serves high quality barbecue and delicious sides in a casual family friendly environment. Our barbecue is served counter style with indoor and outdoor seating. Sea Smoke also features a walk-up, takeout window with convenient online ordering. We offer Craft beers and fantastic approachable wines, as well as delicious non-alcoholic drinks.

www. se a sm oke mv.com (508) 338-7404 7 Oakland Avenue, Oak Bluffs, MA 02557 HOurS: 5–10p

Saturday & Sunday • October 6-7 from 12-4PM

The 16th Annual Holiday Gift Show November 17 - December 16 from 12-4pm daily

508.693.1850 • www.featherstoneart.org Barnes Rd • 1/4 mile north of the roundabout

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Photo: Tim Johnson

Vickie Cortez and baby Brielle give us an awww moment in honor of the season.

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Nantucket

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Photo: Cary Hazlegrove | NantucketStock.com

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Photo:© Greg Hinson | NantucketStock.com

Nantucket The Shingles, playing at the Cranberry Festival include Bird’s Eye View photographer and singer Cary Hazlegrove along with Dave Provost, Chris Westerlund and Cary’s husband, Andy Bullington.

Nantucket Cranberry Festival October 6, 2018 11:00 am- 4 pm | Milestone Cranberry Bog

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medicine, a coloring agent, a drink and a food—back in the day, New England’s Native-Americans found dozens of ways to take advantage of the ruby red fruit growing wild across the landscape. Once the Pilgrims caught wind of the cranberry bounty the little red berries, were, as they say, “off to the races.” The Nantucket Conservation Foundation owns and operates the two remaining commercial cranberry bogs on the island and come fall the cranberry harvest is celebrated with a doozy of a party in a spectacular setting. The event features live music, sack races, face painting, a tug-of-war contest, hay rides, a berry bouncing machine, a petting zoo with goats, ducks and other farm animals, and of course food, including the wildly popular pulled pork sandwiches and barbecue chicken. Not forgetting the real star of the show you will also find chocolate covered cranberries, cranberry FAL L

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bread, cranberry cookies, you get the idea. You can also buy a bag of fresh from the bog cranberries. Stick them in your freezer and when the holidays roll around, make a batch of authentic homemade cranberry sauce. (Just Google it—sugar and water and a touch of lemon.) You may never buy a can again. When you are asked to pass the sauce you can regale your guests with your new found cranberry knowledge as the festival also features a self-guided tour out to the bogs with cranberry experts on-hand to answer questions and point out interesting facts about cranberry farming. This is a fun day and the price is right—free admission—with a twenty dollar parking fee which you can skip and opt for The Wave. Nantucket’s public transportation offers a route to Milestone Cranberry Bog at 15 minutes past the hour from downtown Nantucket. A one way ticket is $2 with special rates for children and seniors. 25


Nantucket Consider the cranberry farmer the next time you pass the sauce around the table.

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Nantucket

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Photo: Cary Hazlegrove | NantucketStock.com

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NANTUCKET RETREATS’ GUESTS

We are Nantucket’s only full-service vacation rental management company. Our Guest Services team helps to plan the perfect Nantucket summer vacation for you and your family, while our Property Care staff prepares your vacation rental — down to the smallest detail.

NANTUCKET RETREATS: PARTNERS PROGRAM

Our homeowners are an integral partner in creating exceptional experiences for our guests. Nantucket Retreats’ experienced professionals bring a higher standard to vacation home management, protecting owner investment while generating revenue. Services range from basic rental services to complete turnkey operations management. For information regarding your perfect summer vacation or our partnership program, visit us at NantucketRetreats.com or call us at: 508-228-4089 Nantucket Vacation Rentals

Trusted Hospitality

Quality & Service

Whether you are booking six months in advance or at the last minute, Nantucket Accommodations is the best source for nightly lodging availability and vacation rentals.

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www.nantucketaccommodations.com reservations@nantucketaccommodations.com 1 Macys Lane • Nantucket, MA 02554 A C C O M M O D AT I O N S 508-228-9559 • 866-743-3330 Assisting island visitors since 1972

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Nantucket

The Perfect Summer Vacation on Nantucket


Nantucket

Watching the hurricane action at Nantucket’s Madaket Beach

Nantucket native Clayton Webb gracefully setting a hard rail. Secret spot, Nantucket.

Photos: Spruce Balkind

Surfer’s Paradise

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By Vanessa Emery

all is paradise for many on Nantucket, especially for surfers. The summer crowds fade and the weather is reliably beautiful with bluebird skies, low humidity, and a steady, soft warmth from the sun. This time of year on Nantucket is also hurricane season, with most storms generating worldclass waves capable of disrupting day-to-day activities and bringing friends and surf acquaintances into a subculture in orbit around the ocean. I grew up in the ocean on Nantucket and my dad, Chris Emery, started one of the early surf shops here in 1980. He named it Indian Summer Surf Shop after those flawless fall days that throw you back to August. Having grown up in the waters of Nantucket and having surfed at famous surf breaks around the world with my family, I feel strongly that there really isn’t anything quite like hurricane season on Nantucket for surfing and community. We adjust our schedules accordingly; the amount of work postponed and plans cancelled is proportionate to the quality of the swell. Swell coming up from the south with the wind blowing from the north makes for ideal conditions and it might mean calling in sick for a day or two with surf fever. 30

The hurricane at this point may be hundreds of miles away while sending swells that breaks in clean, long lines, three-to four feet high or larger. This is not the choppy, mushy boogie-board-in-the-shore-break kind of wave that is common to New England for most of the summer. As the hurricane draws closer or intensifies, the waves’ size and power may grow, in some cases reaching up to fourteen feet high and grounding all but the island’s most expert surfers on land. Whatever the size, there’s a thrill to be had in catching a perfectly breaking wave or watching your friends firing down a wave so large that it gives you goosebumps. After a session in the water, most surfers take to the beach or parking lot to watch the people still surfing. We heckle each other and celebrate our rides for the day before moseying down to 167 Raw Fish Market, Raw Bar, and Food Truck for tacos or Mirabai’s Big Hug Dumplings stand at Cisco Brewery to refuel. During these Indian Summer days I get the feeling there is nowhere else in the world I would rather be.

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LIVE NANTUCKET

WATERFRONT

TOWN | $15,950,000

POCOMO | $32,750,000

WATERFRONT

DIONIS | $11,950,000

CLIFF | $10,975,000

CLIFF | $9,875,000

DIONIS | $8,950,000

TOWN | $7,495,000

WAUWINET | $4,995,000

CISCO | $4,695,000

TOWN | $4,395,000

WAUWINET | $4,195,000

TOWN | $2,995,000

WAUWINET | $1,675,000

BRANT POINT | $1,595,000

WATERFRONT

Gary Winn, Broker

gary@maurypeople.com | 508.330.3069 A LStreet, L 2Nantucket 0 1 8 MA, 02554 37FMain

31 Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Nantucket

N

antucket’s Farmers and Artisans Market happens downtown every Saturday through midOctober. In addition to local produce and herbs you will find a number of, made in Nantucket, products including soft as silk shawls, pottery and jewelry. Bring an appetite for there is no shortage of healthy nibbles from a number of vendors.

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Photo: Barbara Clarke

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Photo: Barbara Clarke

Nantucket

We've got you covered!

(508) 228-5645 www.nantuckettents.com FAL L

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Nantucket

Make the Brass Lantern your place on Nantucket perfectly located in Nantucket’s Historic Cultural District, a classically elegant setting and contemporary comfort that you expect!

www.BrassLanternNantucket.com 11 North Water Street, Nantucket, MA 02554 reservations@brasslanternnantucket.com 508-228-4064 • 800-377-6609

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Nantucket

soft as a

SEPTEMBER MORN SUSAN LISTER L OC KE G A L L E RY 28 EASY STREET, NANTUCKET ON THE WATERFRONT 508.228.2132 1stdibs.com SUSANLISTERLOCKE.COM

Exhibit 2018

Heirlooms April 27 ~ October 20

18A Sparks Avenue ~ 508.228.1548 lightshipbaskets@gmail.com www.MichaelKanesLightshipBaskets.com

Also available at: Andersons, 29 Main Street, Nantucket, 508-228-4187

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Tuesday ~ Saturday

Legacies

Nantucket Lightship Basket Museum Weaving Nantucket’s past into its future.

49 Union Street • 508-228-1177 • A short walk from downtown nantucketlightshipbasketmuseum.org

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Nantucket

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Photo: Courtesy of Nantucket Culinary

Nantucket

The hottest tickets in Nantucket are the children’s cooking classes which fill up almost immediately. Find them at nantucketculinary.com

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Nantucket

Greg and Joy Margolis

Photo: Cary Hazlegrove | NantucketStock.com

A Culinary Time Out

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By Michelle Haynes

uest chef Sarah Leah Chase chopped, peeled, sprinkled and sautéed, moving at a full tilt in perfect precision between her cutting board and the stove, all the while peppering us with bon mots like, “make sure you chop this way for you do not want to bruise the basil.” Who knew you could bruise basil? Transfixed, we took it all down in our notebooks as we watched and listened and tried not to let our mouths water as the glorious scents filled the air between her and us. Welcome to another sold-out class at the Nantucket Culinary, one of the hottest tickets on the island attracting year-rounders, visitors, men, women, seasoned cooks, newlyweds and one of my favorites, who actually said out loud, “I need this class, I just lost my cook.” In 2014 Joy and Greg Margolis submitted a proposal to ReMain Nantucket, an island based organization and the new owners of the historic building who were seeking lease-holders who would fulfill their mission of a yearround culinary and educational facility on the island. “It has been a lot of hard work but when I look around and see what we created I admit I am amazed,” says Joy Margolis, who handles pretty much everything, but leaves the cooking to her husband Greg. “Everything” in this case includes the popular sold-out classes, catering events and the flourishing café, with lots of help! 38

“Thanks to our benevolent and supportive landlord we have a year-round family-friendly community space where folks can relax in a casual setting and enjoy a healthy meal. Greg is all about local and fresh so almost all of our food comes from the fishermen and farmers right here in Nantucket. We also take great pride in the fact that we are one of the most affordable places to eat on the island.” In addition to the great food and classes the café is a gathering place with a number of features to keep folks engaged including weekly trivia contests and plenty of areas to cozy up with a book or your lap top. “As any year-round business on this island knows, making it through the winter months is a challenge,” says Margolis, “but more and more folks are hearing about us and finding their way to our door in the fall and winter months.” When asked for Greg’s most popular cold weather dish Margolis did not hesitate, green chicken chili. Chef Greg Margolis was kind enough to share the recipe, but do one better and order it in person and enjoy the peace and beauty of Nantucket after the crowds leave.

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– Brewster $3,750,000 Cliff $7,995,000 Cliff –– Washing Washing Pond Pond Road Road $7,395,000 Monomoy Cliff – Lincoln AvenueRoad $10,995,000 House, Pool in very private setting. Grandhome homewith withsweeping sweepingviews viewsofofthe thePond Pondand andNantucket NantucketSound. Sound. Main Legacy livingGuest at its House best in & one of the island’s top neighborhoods! Grand

Polpis – Harborfront private dock $8,250,000 Shimmo – Pippens Way $6,250,000 Miacomet – Pond Viewwith Drive $2,375,000 Town – Union Street $2,095,000 Serenity and privacyhome await at this beautiful 4-bdrm, BrandIn-Town new construction–the for summer enjoyment! Private and peaceful moments to Miacomet Pond4.5-bath & Ocean.home! Super location withcomplete 3-bdrms,package 2.5-baths.

Whether you are booking six months in advance or at the last minute, Nantucket Accommodations is the best source for nightly lodging availability and vacation rentals.

Nantucket Culinary’s Joy Margolis www.nantucketaccommodations.com reservations@nantucketaccommodations.com 1 Macys Lane • Nantucket, MA 02554 A C C O M M O D AT I O N S 508-228-9559 • 866-743-3330 Assisting island visitors since 1972

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Photos: Cary Hazlegrove | NantucketStock.com

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Nantucket

Chicken Green Chili

Photo: Kit Noble

By: Chef Greg Margolis Servings: 6-8 1/4 Garlic Clove 1.5 tsp. Cumin 2 cups Diced Onion 1.5 tsp. Coriander ½ cup Diced Celery 6 tbsp. Butter ½ Green Onion, Diced ¼ cup Masa de Harina 1 ¼ pounds Boneless Skinless Chicken Thighs 1 ¼ cans 4 oz. Can of Green Chilies ¼ pound Tomatillos 1 oz. Lime Juice ¼ bunch Cilantro Lay chicken thighs out on a sheet pan and coat with a neutral oil such as sunflower oil. Season with salt and pepper and roast in a preheated 400 degree oven for approximately 12 minutes. Reserve juices from the pan and allow chicken to cool. Once the chicken is cool, dice and reserve. Remove tomatillos from their husk and coat with neutral oil. Place on a sheet pan and roast in the preheated 400 degree oven for approximately 15 minutes or until tomatillos have taken on some color and broken open. They should be sitting in a pool of their own juices. Make sure the juices do not burn. Transfer the tomatillos and all the juices you can scrape off the pan to a separate container and reserve. Sauté garlic, onion, celery, and green onions in neutral oil with the cumin and coriander. Season to taste with salt as you go. When vegetables are translucent and soft, add butter. When butter is melted, add the masa to create a roux. Allow the roux to cook out at a low heat. 40

Slowly mix the chicken stock and any reserved liquid (from the roasting of the thighs) into the vegetables and roux. Bring this mixture up to a simmer on a medium high flame. You may want to adjust the thickness with a little more chicken stock or water depending on how it turns out. Combine roasted tomatillos, cleaned cilantro with the stems, the green chilis and the lime juice, and blend with a traditional or a submersion blender. Add the tomatillo mixture and 1 can of chilies and mix to incorporate. Then, add the chicken and the remaining chilies. Allow the mixture to simmer until the chicken starts to break down a little and becomes more tender. Pay special attention to the heat level and stir often to prevent the chili from burning and sticking to the bottom of the pan. Check seasoning and adjust to taste with salt and pepper and more lime juice if the balance needs to be adjusted.

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Nantucket

A L U X U R I O U S H I D E AWAY IN THE HEART OF NANTUCKET

508.228.4423 | 24 Washington Street, Nantucket, MA 02554 HARBORVIEWNANTUCKET.COM | @ACKHARBORVIEW

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ne can only imagine what sea Captain Nathaniel Sherman may have to say about the changes to the sumptuous home he built for his bride in 1803. Many of the period pieces remain with a decidedly nautical feel along with high four-poster canopied beds and a number of cozy nooks and crannies. But the Martin House Inn is anything but old-fashioned with features like Ralph Lauren linens, to die for Comphy sheets (the most luxurous bedding imaginable,) and topof-the-line bath products. Located in the heart of Nantucket’s historic district the Martin House Inn

has artfully melded the island’s rich history with modern amenities, including a breakfast of delicious homemade granola and pastries along with a variety of fresh fruit. My favorite spot in the whole house was the roof deck where you can settle into one of the lounge chairs and drink in the most amazing view. Rates right now start at around $110 per night which is a great deal. The inn is open year-round with a cozy fireplace in the living room and in a few of the rooms. Football season is upon us so you will find a large screen TV hidden in the living room to ensure you miss none of the action.

Breakfast on the wrap-around porch at Nantucket’s Martin House Inn 42

Photo: Elizabeth Cecil

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Photo: Courtesy of Martin HOuse

Nantucket

In spite of the old world feel note the remote on table. A large screen TV appears so football lovers do not miss the action.

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Provincetown ... just and equal laws for the good of the colony… —The Mayflower Compact 1620

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he Mayflower Pilgrims may have only spent five weeks off the coast of Provincetown, but it is what they did during that short time that is important, and is in fact the cornerstone of our democracy. Before heading to set up shop in Plymouth, this group of intrepid adventurers drew up the Mayflower Compact, the rule of law for the new land and the foundation of our Constitution. To

honor the Pilgrims’ first landing, President Theodore Roosevelt laid the cornerstone of the 252-foot-high monument. Standing sentry over the town, the monument and museum welcomes millions of visitors from around the world. You can make the climb to the top and yes, there are more ramps than stairs so it is doable, and if the skies are clear the view will take your breath away.

By air, boat, or car this is your first view of the Cape tip town of Provincetown.

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Photo Courtesy of David Cox/Droning Provincetown

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P r o v i nc e t o wn

Photo: Joseph Aberdale

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he Pilgrims’ story taught in the town of Provincetown bears little resemblance to what most of us grew up with beginning with the name of the annual holiday centered around the turkey. “We refer to the day as the First Harvest Feast,” says Dr. Beth Singer, the Superintendent of Schools for the town of Provincetown. “It was a century after the Pilgrims that folks starting calling it Thanksgiving. And yes, that first feast did happen in the town of Plymouth but what is often overlooked in the history books is that the first landing of the Mayflower Pilgrims was right here in Provincetown.” The community is invited to join the students on November 15th for their annual remembrance of the First Harvest Feast at the town’s historic town hall. Representatives from the Wampanoag Tribe are invited to participate which recreates that first meal right down to the clamshell utensils.

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P r o v i nc e t o wn

Graphic: Courtesy of Diana K. Batchelor

There are less than a dozen of these historic shacks left in the Provincetown dunes and the only ride to get you there is with Art’s Dune Tours. Family owned and operated since 1946, they offer a number of dune adventure tours.

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Photo: Gary Patronek

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P r o v i nc e t o wn

TRADITIONAL TOURS

Daily Tour (1 hr) Spectacular Sunset Tour (2 hr) Race Point Lighthouse Tour (1.5 hr)

NEW ADVENTURE EXCURSIONS LAND ‘N LAKE (Includes Lunch~ 3.5-4 hr) LAND ‘N SEA (Includes Dinner) LAND ‘N SAIL (4.5 hr)

ART W/ART’S (6 hr) SUNRISE AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY TOUR (3 hr)

CELEBRATING OVER 70 YEARS! Family-Owned & Operated Since 1946

508.487.1950 • 1.800.894.1951

VISIT OUR SITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

www.artsdunetours.com Tours based on 4 person minimum/weather permitting

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P r o v i nc e t o wn

Photo: Brenna Geffers

DC Menagerie Collage—from a brand new show coming this September, Menagerie of Angels.

The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival

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September 27-September 30, 2018

Illustration: David Chick

e lived here, worked here, and loved here. Before his recognition as one of America’s greatest playwrights, Tennessee Williams, found his way to the tiny art colony/ fishing village on the edge of the world. Every fall Provincetown pays homage to her adopted son with a festival dedicated to the man and his work. This year’s event features the passionate and romantic love story The Rose Tattoo, starring festival favorite Irene Glezos. Also in the line-up are five other works including the world premiere of Talisman Roses, a poignant one-act play penned early in Williams’ career and never before seen on stage. Directed by popular actress Marsha Mason the story centers around a character who figures prominently in a number of Williams’ works, his older sister Rose who was confined to a psychiatric hospital. A theme with a familiar ring for anyone with a family is the dark comedy, Some Problems for the Moose Lodge described as “skewering family, religion, aging, and madness in a way only Williams can.” Shows, parties and classes happen throughout the four-day celebration. twptown.org

Illustration of author Tennesee Williams, courtesy of the Tennesee Williams Theatre Festival 48

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P r o v i nc e t o wn Artwork: Jason Rohlf

THESCHOOLHOUSEGALLERY www.galleryschoolhouse.com

494 Commercial St. Provincetown, MA | 508.487.4800

PROVI NCETOWN 1620 - 2020 400th Commemoration of Pilgrims First Landing in the New World Signing of the Mayflower Compact Birthplace of American Liberty

2017 ptownchamber.com

Fly Into Fall!

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PtownChamber.com

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Photo: JOE DONLAVEY

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Photo: Dan McKeon

P r o v i nc e t o wn “I love Halloween in Provincetown! There are great parties everywhere in town and Commercial Street is a promenade of people in outrageous and creative costumes. Simply walking down the street is incredible fun, it’s like the icing on the cake going to and from revelries or the Halloween Ball.” —Anthony Fuccillo, Director of Tourism, Town of Provincetown It is unofficially official! Halloween in Provincetown is one of the biggest celebrations of the year. If you are into costumes this is your night to do it up and just walk the walk along Commercial Street, mobbed with some of the most creative and ‘out there’ costumes imaginable.

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A people-watching paradise, folks simply place their chairs along the sidewalk and settle in to enjoy the free and unofficial parade. Although there is nonstop action all day things really liven up after dark so you may want to book a room and re-live your kid days when Halloween was one of the best days of the year. If you waited too long check last minute room availability at ptownchamber.org. 51


P r o v i nc e t o wn

TM

therapeutic massage

Cape Cod Life 2017 Gold for Fine Dining

at its best

Open Friday-Monday • Happy Hour 4-6 • Dinner 5-10 508.487.1777 • 175 Bradford St. Ext. (at West Vine), P-town

8DYER HOTEL DELIGHTS with the historic charm of Provincetown paired with contemporary elegance and an intimate atmosphere created in the spirit of luxury, service and comfort. A unique petit hotel featuring comfort at every turn, a pool and jacuzzi to soothe and refresh, gourmet breakfasts to indulge in, perfectly located to walk to all of the action in town and the ultimate retreat for rejuvenating your soul.

RESERVATIONS ONLINE

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www.8dyer.com

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Cape Cod

“So come to the pond, or the river of your imagination, or the harbor of your longing, and put your lips to the world. And live your life.” —Mary Oliver

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cape cod, massachusetts

Preserving our Ponds By Michelle Haynes

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he stray lily pad, the passing swan, the tangle of reeds poking above the surface, ponds stir up a variety of emotions, especially now as Mother Nature dons her autumnal blanket of color. Protecting and preserving ponds is a major priority of a group known as CARE and although they are based in Cape Cod, their efforts can be duplicated in ponds across the Cape Air universe. “Our ponds are in trouble,” says Jill Talladay, founder and CEO of CARE for the Cape & Islands. “The litter left pondside that finds its way into the water, the well-meaning folks who feed the wildlife, and the waste left by the family are just a few of the reasons our ponds are in jeopardy.” Believing that education is the key Talladay and CARE collaborated with psychologist, author, illustrator and pond lover, Susan Baur on her latest book, A Guide to the Best Ponds on Cape Cod AND the Best Ways of Preserving Them. Stunning art work and the exact locations of many of Cape Cod’s most pristine ponds make this little gem a winner. “I am taking one heck of a gamble by telling you about the best ponds on Cape Cod in hopes you’ll help me preserve them,” says Baur whose five books all center around ponds and what lives both above and beneath the surface. “It is a lifelong fascination somewhat rooted in fear. I have always loved what hides in the deep that you cannot see. I am a psychologist by day and always look for what hides in the dark in people for what happens in your childhood really does carry on in unexpected ways.” The care and protection of Cape Cod’s ponds is her mission and her gentle nudges are aimed at protecting Cape Cod’s waterways. “I was tempted to put this analogy in one of my books. It is like you decide to fly over Boston’s Logan Airport, choose a runway and just land. That is what folks coming to a pond can be like. People do not understand what a complicated system exists beneath the surface of the water and how much damage they can do.” Find the book at careforthecapeandislands.org/shop.

Cape Cod lakes stays warm enough for an early fall dip. FAL L

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129 Main Street, Sandwich sandwichglassmuseum.org Open Daily 9:30 am to 5 pm Glassblowing Demonstrations Daily FEBRUARY 1 – DECEMBER 30 Special Exhibit: Her Place by the Sea – Alice Lucy Ware Armstrong Collection APRIL 2 – NOVEMBER 1 Contemporary Gallery: Christopher Belleau APRIL 2 – JULY 29 Special Exhibit: Lights from the Parlor – The Overlay Lighting Collection of Stuart P. Feld

Christopher Belleau

AUGUST 15 – OCTOBER 21 Special Exhibit: MIT Glass Lab – Science, Engineering, and Art

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OCTOBER 1 – OCTOBER 31 Special Exhibit: Passion for Pumpkins – From the Collection of Annalise and Tom Nelson OCTOBER 20 7th Annual PumpkinFest NOVEMBER 12 – DECEMBER 30 9th Annual Glassblowers’ Christmas Special Exhibit: A Stained Glass Village – From the Collection of Annalise and Tom Nelson

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cape cod, massachusetts

SANDWICH GLASS MUSEUM


cape cod, massachusetts

Susan Baur’s guide to a healthy pond: Do not feed the waterfowl, unhealthy for them and the pond. Mind your dog in all things. Do not disturb the sandy shore. Leave the pond weeds alone. Allow your favorite ponds to remain sparkling and silent.

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cape cod, massachusetts

Come see two new exhibits our museum has to offer.

CAMELOT RETURNS TO CAPE COD.

This photo exhibit from the Newseum showcases public and private moments taken by JFK’s personal photographer, Jacques Lowe. NEWSEUM PHOTO BY ROWLAND SCHERMAN

ROBERT F. KENNEDY: RIPPLE OF HOPE A powerful new exhibit celebrating RFK’s life and legacy. 397 Main Street • Hyannis, MA

Come discover the rich maritime history of Cape Cod and the Islands!

CapeCodMaritimeMuseum.org 135 South Street, Hyannis, MA 02601

Send Your Boat To School YACHT & BOAT DONATION PROGRAM

Donations are tax deductible

Yacht & Boat Donation Program (508) 830.5006 or (508) 830.6423 • www.maritime.edu

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Boston

Photos: Courtesy of the New England Patriots/Keith Nordstrom

Tom Brady hoisting the Lombardi Trophy after the Patriots stunning, come-from-behind victory over the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl LI. Terry Bradshaw, grand marshal for the trophy presentation ceremony, looks on. 60

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By Gayle Fee

ow did a minor equipment infraction turn into the biggest sports scandal since the 1919 Black Sox, tarnishing the legacy of the greatest quarterback of all time and the NFL’s winningest football team? 12: The Inside Story of Tom Brady’s Fight for Redemption, a new book by Boston writers Casey Sherman and Dave Wedge re-examines the Deflategate battle between the New England Patriots, Tom Brady and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. It’s a tale of power, revenge, loyalty and betrayal, a Shakespearean pigskin saga that captivated the country for nearly two years. “This wasn’t a point-shaving scandal, it wasn’t performance enhancing drugs, it wasn’t even Spygate, it was a minor violation that had nothing to to with the outcome of the game that snowballed into a major power struggle,” Wedge said. “It was a perfect storm of intrigue and conflict. That’s why it’s such a compelling story.” The story begins just after the 2015 AFC Championship game against the Colts when Indianapolis writer Bob Kravitz sent out a tweet that launched a million conspiracy theories: That the NFL was reporting that 11 of the 12 footballs used in that game were under-inflated by more that two pounds each. (That would later be proven false; only one ball was under-inflated by two pounds, several others were roughly one pound under-inflated, and several more were either right at, or barely beneath, the correct inflation mark.) It examines the behind-the-scenes machinations and the court battles that led to Brady’s 4-game suspension at the start of the 2016 season and his march to Super Bowl LI where the 39-year-old quarterback engineered the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history, a 34-28 victory over the Atlanta Falcons. “No one had ever checked footballs in a game before,” Sherman said. “This was a jerry-rigged controversy to appease the other NFL owners and Tom Brady was the sacrificial lamb.” The writers surmise that Deflategate actually had its genesis eight years earlier with the Spygate scandal, when the Patriots were disciplined for videotaping the New York Jets’ defensive coaches’ signals. The team and coach Bill Belichick were heavily fined and the team was docked its first-round pick in the 2008 NFL FAL L

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Tom Brady and Deflategate: A New Book (And Movie!) Explores The Gridiron Drama

draft. But many of the other teams felt then-newly appointed commissioner Goodell went too easy on the Pats, especially in light of Goodell’s decision to destroy videotaped evidence of the crime. The belief was that Goodell was indebted to Patriots owner Bob Kraft who had championed his appointment to the $42 million-ayear commissioner’s gig. “Basically the only way Goodell could assert total domination over the league was to metaphorically kill his father, Bob Kraft,” Wedge said. “That was his way to say, ‘I’m not beholden to anyone.’” As for Brady, the NFL poster boy also had to fall in order for Goodell to show that he was in charge. “It was all about power,” Sherman said. “If they can keep the No. 1 player in the business in check what does that say to the 7th-round draft pick barely making the roster? ‘You have no power. The NFL has it all.’” The book is packed with some juicy never-beforereported details including the fact that Brady, sitting at home in front of his TV, was blind-sided when Kraft announced that the team would accept Goodell’s 4-game suspension of their franchise quarterback. It also paints 61


Boston, massachusetts

Tom Brady hurls the football in a 33-13 victory over the Cleveland Browns on Oct 9, 2016 at FirstEnergy Stadium, Brady’s first game back after his 4-game Deflategate suspension.

Photo: Courtesy of the New England Patriots/Jim Mahoney

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Wedge argued. “They won that Super Bowl and that was the ultimate vindication. That game was redemption for Brady for Deflategate. He was dead and buried all the way into the third quarter and he came back and torched that defense to win the greatest game ever played in Super Bowl history. And then Goodell had to hand him the trophy. It could not have played out better for the Patriots.” With all that gridiron drama, 12 is ripe for bigscreen treatment and Hollywood writers Paul Tamasy and Eric Johnson, who wrote the screenplay for Sherman’s “The Finest Hours” and the Mark Wahlberg flick, “The Fighter” are readying a script to go out to the studios. And although the tale is told on a football field, the writers believe it is a story that will appeal to everyone—even the Brady haters. “We think it speaks to a few different audiences,” Sherman said. “Obviously Patriots fans and sport fans, but it’s also a legal thriller. Business readers will like it because it examines what corporate America is like through the eyes of the NFL. If tearing down the face of the league is how you hold onto power, they will do it. Nobody is safe. Allegiances only last so long and the people in power make all the rules.” And that’s the way it goes, even if you’re Tom Brady. Which may be the ultimate lesson of Deflategate.

Head of the Charles Regatta October 20-21

Charles River | Boston and Cambridge | www.hocr.org

Photo: Courtesy of The Head of the Charles Regatta

“There’s an undeniable collegiate energy, with youthful supporters screaming themselves hoarse as the boats whiz by.” — Patricia Schultz, 1000 Places to See Before You Die

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a picture of a Nixonian Goodell desperate to hold onto all the trappings of power. That included a directive that NFL staffers were to avert their eyes when encountering the commissioner in the hallway and a mandate that no one should reach for a slice of pizza at lunchtime strategy sessions until Goodell first had served himself. The writers, who don’t believe that Brady was complicit in a scheme to deflate footballs, received some exclusive access to the quarterback for the book. But Brady was more interested in talking about the Patriots’ stunning 25-point comeback in Super Bowl LI than he was in taking a trip down the Deflategate rabbit hole. “He’s moved past Deflategate,” Wedge said. “The quotes in the book are pretty strong but he’s just not the kind of guy go down path of negativity at all. He’d never be one to say, ‘Ha, I told you so!’” But while Brady, Belichick and the team may insist they have put Deflategate in the rear-view mirror and it’s on to the 2018 season, the book argues that the reverberations are still being felt in Foxboro. The scandal, the book says, caused a major schism between Brady and Belichick and Kraft that will have implications for many seasons of Patriots football to come. “But at the end of the day, however how the organization feels about Deflategate doesn’t matter,”


Maine Sunset from Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park

Photo: Dobbs Productions and Bar Harbor Chamber of Commerce

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Maine Homage to the Maine Lobsterman Artist Abe Goodale’s work is now showing at Rockland’s Island Institute at Archipelago By Michelle Haynes

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be Goodale, the name sounded vaguely familiar. His email was an invitation to his art opening in Rockland and when I scrolled down to see his lobsterman I remembered and could not get to the phone fast enough. I had discovered Goodale’s work last year on a series of note cards in the postcard perfect fishing village of Port Clyde. A short drive from Rockland, Port Clyde is the must visit town on your way to Monhegan Island. Goodale’s evocative portraits quite simply took my breath away and he now has his formal showing in a Rockland gallery. Do not miss it. A native Mainer, Goodale’s work pays homage to the old time lobstermen of Penobscot Bay. “This is my tribute to their hard work and

I am truly proud of this series of paintings” says Goodale. It is all in the family for Goodale, who is following in the footsteps of his great-greatgrandfather Charles Dana Gibson who created one of the most familiar images of the 20th century, the Gibson Girl. “I also chose to focus on portraiture and the representation of an era, which in this case is centered around Maine’s hardworking lobstermen,” says Goodale. “I see the arts as a platform to instigate change, to preserve culture, and provide visually enticing images that may document a way of living in an ever-changing world.” You can see more of Abe Goodale’s work at abegoodale.com and the note cards are there for sale. Honestly they were the hit gift last year for many on my holiday list.

Long Days Watercolor on Paper

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Maine Pause Watercolor on Paper

To capture the feeling for his subjects artist Abe Goodale actually spent some time on board the boats working alongside the lobstermen. 68

You could say it is in his genes—artist Abe Goodale is the great-great grandson of Maine artist Charles Dana Gibson whose ‘Gibson Girl,’ circa 1899, was the most recognizable image in the world.

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Bar Harbor, Maine

Ride the Trolley! OlisTrolley.com

The Best Way to See Acadia National Park!

Acadia’s Only Trolley Tour!

1 West Street • Bar Harbor

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166 Main Street, Bar Harbor 207 288 9550 OPEN YEAR ROUND windowpanesmdi.com

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Maine

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Maine’s Family Fun Maker

chool may be back in session but that does not have to mean the end of family getaways. Awardwinning blogger Jennifer Hazard is author of The Maine Play Book, described as the ultimate family guide to Maine seen through a mother’s eyes. “I want to appeal to parents by giving them ideas of things they can enjoy with their kids,” says Hazard, whose singular job title with the Maine Department of Tourism is Family Fun Maker. “I tried to include kid-related adventures that are not always found in the guide books or, if it’s a popular place like Bar Harbor’s Abbe Museum, I look for activities that the whole family can enjoy.” Also included are hiking trails and nature preserves that may be a bit off the beaten path but easy enough for kids. The Maine Play Book is available at your local bookstore. Please support them as they can order for you.

Finding family fun with author Jennifer Hazard and her children, Lauren and William.

Bass Harbor Head Light, Acadia National Park

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Photos: Courtesy of jennifer Hazard

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Maine

Bar Harbor/Acadia COTTAGE RENTALS, Inc.

WEEKLY VACATION PROPERTIES oceanfront • lakefront • village • wooded cottages • cabins • apartments

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Maine

Imagine Telluride. Except in Maine. In the fall. With foliage. And documentaries only. —John Anderson, indieWIRE

Camden International Film Festival September 13 – 16, 2018 “This is the golden age of documentaries,” says one in a position to know, Ben Fowlie, the executive director of the Camden International Film Festival (CIFF). “Documentaries have always been our niche and now with all of the programming available to audiences, including Showtime, HBO, Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon, the form is limitless in the ways filmmakers can tell their story.” This is year fourteen for a festival that draws an international audience of filmmakers and

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those that love them, turning the little town of Camden into one giant movie set helped in great part by the setting and time of year, midcoast Maine’s fall coat of many colors. “There is no question that the town of Camden and the surrounding countryside plays a big role in the success of the festival,” says Fowlie. “Folks love to come here at this time of year and having the opportunity to enjoy the work of some pretty amazing filmmakers is an added bonus.”

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Maine

“We are working to build a community around documentaries that serve as a catalyst for conversation. A good story has two sides and a really good story embraces the subject and allows you to reach your own conclusions.” —Ben Fowlie, artistic director, Camden International Film Festival

After the film screening the filmmakers join in a Q and A session with the audience.

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Photos: Courtesy of Camden International Film Festival

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Photos: Cait Bourgault

Maine

Lobsters and Lighthouses The fall colors bordering the coastline of Camden Harbor and Penobscot Bay can last well into October and one of the best ways to enjoy it is on the water with Camden Harbor Cruises. They offer a variety of adventures including an interactive lobster fishing excursion where passengers can haul, bait and re-set the lobster pots. Another tour takes you along the coast for a close-up view of Maine’s historic lighthouses.

Plan your stay in the Camden-Rockland Region Visit our website to request a copy of our 160-page Jewel regional guide, or view it online!

OLIVE OIL AND VINEGAR

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Maine

a wide open welcome There’s something about being on a mountain.

CHOOSE FROM A VARIETY OF TOURS! CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR DETAILS

Authentically Maine. RESERVATIONS 207-789-2000 VISITPOINTLOOKOUT.COM

THE MIDCOAST’S MOUNTAIN RETREAT WEDDINGS | CONFERENCES | CORPORATE RETREATS OVERNIGHT STAYS | FARM-TO-TABLE OHTM_CapeAir.25_040318_Layout 1 4/3/18 4:28 PM Page 1

CAMDEN HARBOR CRUISES D EPARTING C AMDEN A BOARD LIVELY LADY

RESERVE BY PHONE 207.236.6672 BOOK ONLINE www.CamdenHarborCruises.com OR VISIT OUR TICKET BOOTH ON THE PUBLIC LANDING, CAMDEN, ME 04843

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Explore our 2018 Events owlshead.org Open daily, year-round. More than a dozen annual events featuring antique aeroplane performances, ground vehicle demonstrations and more! 117 Museum Street, Owls Head, ME (207)594-4418

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Maine One of your first views of Monhegan Island is the historic Island Inn sitting atop the hill welcoming visitors for a stay, an amazing meal or both. Fall rates start at $160 per night and include a sumptuous breakfast.

Photo: Courtesy of The Island Inn

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By Michelle Haynes

fishing village, an artist colony and to liven things up, a brewery where it is true, everyone knows your name or will before you leave. Welcome to what I consider Maine’s magical island, Monhegan, about an hour ferry ride from picturesque Port Clyde, which follows a quick ride from your Cape Air arrival at the Owls Head Airport, just outside of Rockland. The transition from Boston’s Logan Airport to this little (less than five square miles) island is somewhat of a shock. No cars, other than the few trucks to carry your luggage, and no paved roads, just miles of hiking trails leading to some pretty spectacular scenery including the requisite granite cliffs dropping into the

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Atlantic. Around every corner is an easel and artist along with a dozen-plus galleries tucked in and around the woods. Another Bird’s Eye View favorite for a place to stay is the Trailing Yew with simple but spotless rooms offering the basic necessities. The communal breakfast features home-baked pastries and made-toorder oatmeal and eggs anyway you like. Prices start at around $100 per night. If you are looking to stop the world for a moment in time Monhegan Island is the place. Note: For convenient transfer from the airport to the Port Clyde ferry call on Jeremy at 207-701-1715. At $40 round trip it is a total deal.

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Maine Monhegan Brewing Company’s brewer and general manager Matt Weber runs the most happening place in Monhegan Island. The beer enjoys a huge fan base including one visitor who told me he literally makes the trip to Monhegan for the brew called Rusticator Doppelbock.

Monhegan’s afternoon gathering place, the Brewery. FAL L

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Maine

Lobster pots line one of Monhegan’s main “thoroughfares.”

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Maine

FALL 2018

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Maine

”…Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.” —Robert Frost

Photos: Courtesy of Blue Hill Peninsula Chamber of Commerce

Maine’s Blue Hill Peninsula All food is local at the annual Blue Hill Peninsula Harvest Fair on October 13th.

M Brooksville: Harborside family retreat with quintessential Maine 3-season cottage totally updated with beautiful Cherry interior, 6 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Full guest house, studio, play house, deep water granite pier and boathouse $2,900,000

www.saltmeadowproperties.com Main street, Castine, Maine 207-326-9116 – castine@saltmeadowproperties.com Main street, Blue Hill, Maine 207-374-5010 – bluehill@saltmeadowproperties.com

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any, if not most Cape Air passengers on the Boston to Bar Harbor route depart the airport and take a left to Bar Harbor, Acadia National Park and the neighboring towns of Northeast and Southwest Harbor. Then there is the other direction. “No question, we are the road less traveled,” says Lori Sitzabee, executive director of the Blue Hill Peninsula Chamber of Commerce. “The Blue Hill area is far more serene and a lot less crowded but we also have much to offer visitors looking for a little more peaceful Maine experience.” Miles of hiking trails and conservation land dot the landscape and always nearby is the Atlantic along with a number of small bays and channels for kayaks and canoes. One of the biggest fall events is the annual Peninsula Harvest Festival happening on October 13th. “This is a chance for folks to showcase their food and wares,” says Sitzabee. “We will be offering our seafood chowder and there will also be a few food trucks, all local from the Blue Hill area including our musical entertainment. The price is right—free to one and all.

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Maine

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New Hampshire & Vermont

Photos: Lisa Densmore Ballard

LOVING THE LYME INN

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By Lisa Ballard

yme, New Hampshire is the quintessential New England hamlet, with its historic church, white cape-style homes and cluttered general store. This little village, just north of Hanover, dates back to the early 1800s where it served as stagestop along the Connecticut River. Though other inns have come and gone, The Lyme Inn remains an anchor, crowning one end of the green. The Garden. The Lyme Inn charms both inside and out. Guests can borrow books from the Little Lyme Library, a self-serve cabinet on the green, and then relax in the inn’s lovely garden. Screened from the outside world by thick hedges, the garden bursts with flowers in the spring, cools with its silky grass in summer and lights up with reds, oranges and yellows in the fall. The Innkeeper. Don’t be surprised if innkeeper Jack Elliott checks you in and offers you a homemade cookie. Jack is part of the fabric of the place. If he’s not manning the front desk, he might be in the bar, pouring a glass of fine wine or explaining the difference between 82

two favorite bourbons. He’ll gladly set up a visit to a local farm or show you a wooden bowl he crafted. And if you’re lucky, he’ll take into the barn to see his antique MG sports car. The Amenities. The Lyme Inn was born an inn and tavern in 1809, but also served as a millinery, tinsmith’s forge and Grange with a dance hall over the last two centuries. Today, this country-contemporary mansion has nine guest rooms and five suites, each uniquely and elegantly appointed. (Jack’s wife, Judy, is an interior designer.) Locals come to The Lyme Inn to dine at Ariana’s Restaurant, which relocated here last winter. Chef Martin’s culinary creations are renowned throughout the Upper Connecticut River Valley. The Lyme Inn is a perfect base camp for hiking, skiing, college reunions, business meetings and other activities in the area. And if you stay the night, you get to have it all—a hint of history, a touch of class and a delicious dinner!

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New Hampshire & Vermont

No librarian needed at the self-serve Little Lyme Library

Lyme’s village green

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New Hampshire & Vermont Photo: Lisa Densmore Ballard

Prince Charming awaits in Vermont.

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THETFORD, VT Long range views, open floorplan, pond, new heated barn. 3 BR, 3.5 BA. 26+/-acres. Great for entertaining. $675,000

ORFORD, NH Beautifully restored and with 3 BR, 3 BA, 4 fireplaces and an in-law rental apartment. Separate studio/commercial rental. $535,000

Service. LYME, NH Early antique cape, beautifully restored. Frontage on Trout Brook. Views. 11.4 acres horse property. Run in shed. $575,000

NORWICH, VT Impeccable 4 BR home has 9' ceilings, crown moldings, gorgeous hardwood floors and radiant heat. Screened porch. $837,500

STRAFFORD, VT Sensational 180 degree views! Spacious 3 BR, 3.5 BA home includes guest suite. Comfortable. Luxurious. $725,000

LYME, NH Close to Skiway, 4 BR, 2.5 BA, huge great room, super kitchen, near the AT. 4 acres, fruit trees, views. $549,000

It’s what we do. On The Green Lyme, NH 03768 603-795-4816 •

LYME, NH Contemporary post & beam colonial on 10.73+/-acres. 3 car garage. F Asetting. L L Energy 2 0 1 efficient. 8 Private $449,000

Allen Street Hanover, NH 03755 603-643-4200 •

www.marthadiebold.com

HANOVER, NH – 3 BR, 2 BA cape home with 20+/- acres close to the Appalachian 85 Trail. 1st floor master suite. Quiet, private. $589,000


Saranac lake

Who doesn’t love a hike to a waterfall? Gleasmans Falls Trail in the Adirondack Park is a 6.6 mile hike described as “easy to moderate,” and right now is prime time to enjoy. 86

Photo: Lisa Densmore Ballard

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T E L S A R A N A C—

WHERE BOUNDLESS ADVENTURE MEETS TIMELESS STYLE.

100 MAIN STREET, SARANAC LAKE, NY 12983 | (518) 891-6900 | hotelsaranac.com

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AT HOTEL SARANAC

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Saranac lake

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Photos: Mark Kurtz Photography

The Adirondacks

Which mountain is that? Photographer Mark Kurtz took away the guess work with his panorama for the “Friends of St Regis Mountain Fire Tower” which will be mounted in the fire tower for visitors to identify the mountains and lakes.

Hiking the Adirondack Fire Towers

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ire towers topping the Adirondack treetops were built following the devastating fires of 1903 and for decades were used as fire and safety lookouts. Technology eventually rendered them obsolete and they soon fell into disrepair and were slated for demolition, but a number of local groups recognized the uniqueness of the towers as well as their historical significance and a Save the Fire Towers movement was on. Today the fire towers are landmarks for hikers and play a role in the Adirondack experience, and yes, you can climb to the top of most of them. The Azure Mountain Fire Tower is the favorite for local artist and hiker Sandra Hildreth. “It is an amazing hike to the top and takes about forty minutes, but oh the 360 degree view lets you see all the way to Canada. In the fall the reds and oranges mixed with the green conifers is truly amazing.” The Adirondack Mountain Club has created the Fire Tower Challenge for hikers with details at adk.org.

Hiking the trail to St. Regis Mountain 88

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Saranac lake

St. Regis Mountain Fire Tower

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The Adirondacks

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he mighty Adirondacks is home to literally hundreds of hiking trails making for a bit of a challenge to figure out the right trail for your skill level. Lisa Ballard’s handy guidebooks not only remove the guess work but are also fun to read, even for the armchair hiker. “I wrote the first editions of Hiking the Adirondacks and Best Easy Day Hikes Adirondacks because I love to hike and it was a great excuse to explore beyond the High Peaks regions where I grew up,” says Ballard. “Though standing on top of a

4,000-footer still gives me a sense of accomplishment, working on the books, I’ve found so many other places in the park that make me feel on top of the world. While I’m both a writer and photographer, I do love taking pictures the most! It’s my favorite part of all of my books. I was so happy for the opportunity to do the second edition of Hiking the Adirondacks in color with new images. Maybe people will enjoy the book for the eye-candy even if they never hike the routes.”

Book signing with travel writer Lisa Ballard

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Photos: Courtesy of Lisa Densmore Ballard

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Saranac lake

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The Adirondacks

Photo: Courtesy Jack Drury

Samuel Clemons circa 1901, on the porch of the cabin that now bears his name in Saranac Lake. (Yes, you can rent it)

Mark Twain Slept here. Yes, he really did.

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By Michelle Haynes

merica’s greatest story teller once spent a summer in a lakeside cabin in what is now called The Mark Twain Camp and owners Jack and Phyliss Drury have the picture to

prove it. How they came to find the photo is another story that actually involves the Russians. The year is 1980 and it is Americans vs the Russians at the Lake Placid Winter Olympics. To jog your memory, it was the Miracle on Ice and the USA team, the underdogs, beat the Russians and the whole country went a little crazy. Covering the sporting event of the century is Sports Illustrated and when the article appears, there is Jack Drury’s front porch with none other than Mark Twain. “I could not believe it,” says Drury. “We had always heard that there were photos of when he stayed here and people frequently gave me Mark Twain memorabilia but I never saw an actual photo of him here until the magazine appeared.” 92

Built in 1900 and steps from Lower Saranac Lake, the “Camp,” (as they are called in the Adirondacks) is a welcome respite for visitors looking for the ultimate in a Saranac Lake experience. “Some folks come for the history while others just want what we offer which is a total recreational experience, and although we are less than two miles from the village you do feel like you are in the middle of nowhere,” says Drury. The fully equipped cabin can sleep up to eight and also features a wood stove for those chilly fall nights. Guests also have access to kayaks and canoes. Fall rates hover around $800 for two nights. If you are curious, Drury found the bill of sale for Twain’s stay in 1901—$650 June thru October. Reportedly the author’s parting words were, …“it has been a paradise to us all summer and if we live another year, I hope we shall spend its summer in this house.” The Hannibal, Missouri native never returned.

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Saranac lake Photo: Craig Richter Photo: Jack Drury

Photo: Courtesy Jack Drury

Jack and Phyliss Drury—what is now known as The Mark Twain camp has been in their family for almost a century.

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Actor Hal Holbrook, who channels the author in the award-winning Mark Twain Tonight!, visits The Mark Twain Camp. Of his role in his highly-acclaimed role in the one-man show Holbrook says, “Mark Twain is something precious to me. It’s my side arm through life.” 93


The Adirondacks

Adirondack chairs where they are supposed to be—in the Adirondacks in the heart of Saranac Lake You never know who you will meet on a fall canoe trip in the Adirondacks

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Montana ...”as fantastically beautiful a place as I’ve ever seen.” Theodore Roosevelt

Montana’s Medicine Rocks State Park, 90 miles south of the Cape Air town of Glendive was a sacred place for Sioux, Northern Cheyenne and other tribes of the Great Plains. This 330-acre park sculpted by the relentless prairie winds is peppered with otherworldly sandstone formations up to 80 feet high and 200 feet across. You can see many of the rock formations from the car, but it’s worth exploring the easy hiking trails where you might see fossils of ancient turtles and palm trees or ancient Indian tools or tipi rings.

Photo: Lisa Densmore Ballard

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M o n ta n a

Photo: Jack Ballard

Fort Peck Pike Fly Fishing, Eastern Montana Style

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By Jack Ballard

he mouth of an adult wolf has 42 teeth, 20 on its upper jaw and 22 affixed to its lower, crushing mandible. Leaning over the side of a boat, handling a wolf of another kind, I’m wondering how many teeth are in its gaping maw just a few inches from my outstretched hand. “Northern pike” is the fish’s official name but it has more than a few colloquial monikers among which are: slough shark, gator and water wolf. Its nicknames accentuate its ferocity, but there’s a veiled reference to the species’ aggressive nature in its formal title as well. A “pike” was a spear with an exceptionally long handle and head used in medevial warfare, referenced in the fish’s name on account of its streamlined shape. Western Montana is a quintessential destination for fly anglers from around the United States and the rest of the world who come in search of the state’s several species of trout. Possessed of a soul in ceaseless search of variety, I’m casting a fly rod toward a different species on the opposite end of the state where trout waters are scarce. My fishing pal, Kai, and I are planted on a boat toward the eastern end of Fort Peck Lake, some 30 miles south of Glasgow. The boat purportedly came with a loaner net that is absent or hidden. Kai manages to scrounge a single decrepit but heavy rubber glove from a forward 96

compartment. My gloved hand grasps the pike on its underside just behind its pectoral fins. The other clasps the leader, attached to the fly line, wound on the reel, affixed to the rod clutched in Kai’s right hand. The fish’s mouth is large enough to engulf several of my fingers. It’s rapier-like teeth appear more numerous than a wolf ’s 42, but who’s counting? With trepidation I quickly move my unprotected hand from the leader to grab the pike’s tail and with a concerted heave bring it on board. Both experienced trout anglers, it’s our first fly fishing adventure on Fort Peck. Neither of us have before targeted northern pike with a fly rod. We’ve been told we need steel leaders to foil pike’s teeth but in two days of angling and some 40 fish we’ve lost only a few to “biteoffs.” Pike prove an exhiliarating adversary. They take the flies, pulled in short strips above weedbeds, savagely. Those of size exert a mighty pull on the nine-foot whips of graphite used to cast our flies. The largest of the outing is a brutish creature, 39 inches long and weighing 18 pounds. Is the northern pike experience superior to fly fishing for trout? I can conclude with confidence that it is delightful and different, in relation to both its quarry and environment. Fort Peck Reservoir, Montana’s largest lake, is doubtlessly a perfect destination to give it a try.

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M o n ta n a Photo: Lisa Densmore Ballard

Jack Ballard has written hundreds of articles for outdoor recreation magazines and 13 books. His newest book, “Large Mammals of the Rocky Mountains,” was released earlier this year. See more of his fishing articles at jackballard.com.​

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Puerto Rico Circa 1968—Hawaii’s Fred Hemmings, one of the most successful competitive surfers of all time

Surfer Photos: © Barry Church Photography

Photo: Mick Kollins

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R i nc o n

Candy Chase was a finalist from Puerto Rico 1968 World Surfing Championships Rincón PR.

“Let’s go surfin’ now Everybody’s learning how Come on and safari with me …” —Brian Wilson, Mike Love, 1962

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“Rincón 50 Surf Fest” Rincón, Puerto Rico | Nov. 12-18 2018

n old time surfing safari is happening in Puerto Rico this fall and there on the beach you will find a true surfing pioneer, Fred Hemmings. The legendary champion and former state senator from Hawaii will be joined by hundreds of surfers, young and old, for the 50th anniversary of the 1968 World Surfing Championships held in Rincón, Puerto Rico, about a two-hour drive from San Juan. Along with Hemmings, who won the event in 1968, other surfing luminaries include Australia’s legendary ambassador of the sport, Nat Young and Puerto Rico’s Candy Chase, a trailblazer in FAL L

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women’s surfing and a finalist in the 1968 World Surfing Championships. “We will see competitors from around the globe flying in for this event that in 1968 was huge for Rincón as it launched this small beautiful town onto what would become one of the most sought after surf destinations in the world, with incredible natural beauty like the waterfalls, lush tropical forests and of course the amazing surf,” says Peter Aviles, executive producer of the Rincón 50 Surf Fest.

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U.S. Virgin Islands

A Girlfriend Getaway in St. Thomas Girlfriends, boyfriends, couples and families of all stripes—the United States Virgin Islands awaits. Joining this happy group is Lisa Hamilton, president

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Photo: Mick Kollins

of the United States Virgin Islands Hotel and Tourism Association (center, yellow shorts) who not only works and lives in the islands, but plays there as well.

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U.S. Virgin Islands “If you’re not quite ready to lose that summer tan and want a luxurious vacation on a budget, now is the time to book a fall trip to the U.S. Virgin Islands! (USVI) Visiting the USVI is a treat regardless of the season, but autumn travelers can experience a fun and relaxing vacation with substantial savings! Many of the properties damaged during last year’s hurricanes are up and running and ready to welcome back visitors at an excellent rate,” says Lisa Hamilton.

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s t. T h o m a s

Renée Groeneveld and her Dutch team celebrate a champagne finish after winning the WIM Series at the 2016 CAMR.

Photo: Dean Barnes

The Women are Back! The 2018 Women’s International Match Racing Series November 29 – December 2, 2018

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he Caribbean’s back to back hurricanes last season forced the cancellation of the prestigious finale of the 2018 Women’s International Match Racing Series, (WIM Series) but this season they are back in St. Thomas and feature a dozen of the finest women’s match racers and WIM Series competitors from around the globe. “It is a pleasure for the Carlos Aguilar Match Race (CAMR) to again host the female sailors competing in the WIM Series for a second year,” says CAMR organizer, Bill Canfield. “Despite extensive hurricane damage in 2017, our harbor remains one of the world’s premier venues for sailing and spectating. St. Thomas is coming back, and we are proud to show off the island and welcome sailors and visitors alike to this great regatta.”

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Teams competing this year hail from New Zealand, France, Great Britain, Ireland, and the Netherlands. “We are really looking forward to the event,” says 2016 Netherlands champion Renee Groeneveld, whose team finished second overall in the 2017 WIM Series. “St. Thomas and the Charlotte Amalie harbor are one of the most beautiful places we have ever sailed. It’s great racing just in front of the waterfront, where tactics can get challenging since it’s close to shore. We were pretty lucky with the conditions in 2016; since it was consistent and not too windy. This year, it will definitely be a special event after the hurricane and because Annemieke (Bes) will be back on our team after sailing in the Volvo Ocean Race.” Match racing is sailed in two identical boats around a short course, providing fast action close to the crowds on shore. The intense racing is just as exciting for the spectators as it is strategically, tactically and physically challenging for the competing crews. B I RDSEYEV I EWMA GA Z I NE. C OM


U.S. Virgin Islands

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s t. J o h n

Virgin Islands lovers take note: Steve Simonsen’s calendars sold out last year so do not linger. Details at stevesimonsen.net. If you have any questions about the posthurricane state of the United States Virgin Islands, check out the cover of Steve Simonsen’s new 2019 calendar. This is St. John’s Hawksnest Bay as it looks right now, today. Powder white sand and crystal water, this is the perfect getaway beach, for other than a little changing facility and a picnic table or two there is only you and this pristine stretch of beach. Located about four miles from downtown Cruz Bay, it is mostly uphill so unless you are up for a vigorous work-out opt for a quick taxi ride. Just remember to arrange a pick up at the other end of your day. Bring snorkeling gear, lunch and plenty of water and settle in to enjoy one of the most perfect of beaches. 104

Photos: Steve Simonsen

Mermaids are in! Fin Fun Mermaid teams with Steve Simonsen Photography to show off their newest mermaid products. The online company specializes in fabric mermaid tails that are 100 percent swimmable. B I RDSEYEV I EWMA GA Z I NE. C OM


U.S. Virgin Islands

OCEAN Jb2 ___

OCEAN 362... Dining with a view at Gallows Point Resort This exceptional restaurant is the perfect place to enjoy the bounty of the Virgin Islands with the backdrop of beautiful sunsets and twinkling night views of the St Thomas.

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Ocean 362 aims for a laidback atmosphere coupled with professional table service amid a rustic chic atmosphere. Start your evening upstairs at the bar with a signature libation, and one of the best sunsets on St John.

340,776.0001

www.ocean362,com info@ocean362.com The bar at Ocean362 opens at 5:00PM with dinner service starting at 5:30 PM Open 6 nights a week.

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s t. J o h n

An Intimate Tropical Inn Surrounded by History & Beauty Overlooking Cruz Bay, located among early 18th century Dutch plantation ruins, Estate Lindholm is the perfect island getaway. Relax in the freshwater pool with harbor views, and in a brand new, serene garden spa. Enjoy a wide range of water activities and boat rentals close by. Explore the adjacent National Park and ruins. Walk to downtown shopping and restaurants. Estate Lindholm is the perfect point from which to enjoy all the beauty and activities that St. John has to offer.

1-800-322-6335 • Estate Caneel Bay, Saint John, U.S. Virgin Islands • www.estatelindholm.com

VIDA DE MAR | $2,199,000 RECENTLY REDUCED! ‘’Vida De Mar’’ is an exceptional beachfront villa located on the water’s edge in Deaver’s Bay. This 5 bedroom, 5 bathroom villa has what it takes to ensure a memorable, tropical vacation or the perfect family retreat.

INFO@ISLANDIAREALESTATE.COM 340.776.6666

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Photo: Steve Simonsen

U.S. Virgin Islands

Bird’s Eye View Faves for St. Croix

Photo: Courtesy of Sand Castle on the Beach

Your move—The spectacular award-winning Buccaneer Resort is offering rates this fall that are at least 50 percent less than the winter time. Enjoy golf, tennis, beach chess and miles of stunningly beautiful beach.

Adults Only at the renovated Sand Castle on the Beach and like the name says, you are steps from the sea with no shortage of things to do including scuba, snorkeling or just lazing. FAL L

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s t. C r o i x Riding with St. Croix’s Cane Bay Cowboy

On the beach, in the water or through the ruins, Equus Rides is one of St. Croix’s most unique attractions. “The chance to ride atop a swimming horse is truly awesome,” says Wendy Solomon, of gotostcroix.com. “It is an amazing experience and then to follow up with a ride in and around the ruins makes for a perfect day.” Owned by Irish born Stephen O’Dea, the former Texas rancher is the only person in St. Croix with permission to take visitors to the historic sugar mill ruins known as the Rust-Op-Twist estate. “This is ecotourism all around,” says Solomon. “Equus Rides has no barn or stable as all of his horses are free roaming in a huge pasture. And for kids who may be a bit nervous on a big horse Equus saddles up a local St. Croix character, ‘Eeyore,’ a tame and friendly donkey.” The costs of the rides vary but figure on an average of about $100 for a two-hour ride.

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Photos: ©GoToStCroix.com

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U.S. Virgin Islands

Photo: Steve Simonsen

Saint Croix, USVI

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British Virgin Islands

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Photo: Steve Simonsen

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negada, Jost Van Dyke, Virgin Gorda and the center of it all, the Cape Air destination of Tortola—welcome to what is considered one of the prime sailing destinations in the world, the British Virgin Islands (BVI). With most of the islands offering line-of-sight sailing, and no shortage of inlets, coves and tucked away watering holes, the BVI is a total sailor’s delight. As for land lubbers, there is no shortage of ways to pass the time including some pretty spectacular beaches. Tortola’s bustling Cane Garden Bay offers beach side hotels, live music and miles of powdery white sand, while an island hop away is little Virgin Gorda, home to a watery labyrinth of trails known worldwide as The Baths, something not to be missed on your BVI escape. A little less known to non-boaters but certainly worth a visit are the islands of Jost Van Dyke and Anegada. The latter is a tiny strip of an island which is a regular stop for an international fan base heading to Foxy’s Bar where it is always party central. The other end of that spectrum is Anegada, miles and miles of beach, a couple of hotels and a family of pink flamingos, that is it. Castaway and Swept Away could easily have been filmed here. You want quiet with few people, Anegada is the perfect choice. The island’s other major claim to fame is the assertion that Anegada is home to the sweetest lobster in all of the Caribbean. Although I have yet to find anyone who can tell me why. Since last year’s hurricanes changed so much of the BVI geography your best bet on places to stay is the BVI tourism office. If you are planning an escape this fall check out the off-season specials happening across all of the islands. bvitourism.com

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By Michelle Haynes

14 0,000 + GR A DUAT E S PRO

Stop the World and go tropical in the British Virgin Islands

F IC A T I O

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Fast Track to Cruising Cours

“Life was getting a little drab, and this was the perfect way to put some color and sparkle back in. Learning a new skill was rewarding on many levels.” — Paul Sheldon, Whitecourt, Canada

OffshoreSailing.com 888-852-2127 Sailing Lessons and Courses for Beginner and Advanced Sailors Team Building Sailing Activities | Group Regattas BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS: Scrub Island, Tortola FLORIDA: Captiva Island, Fort Myers Beach, St. Petersburg, Cape Coral

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British virgin islands

Ropes, ladders and watery tunnels take you through the most popular natural attraction in Virgin Gorda, The Baths.

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Photo: Todd VanSickle

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British virgin islands

BVI FOOD FETE NOVEMBER 3–25, 2018 Cow Wreck Beach, Anegada.

Savor the culinary creativity of the British Virgin Islands in a month-long adventure of food, fun and flavour at BVI Food Fete. Our series of signature events on the beautiful white-sand shores and lush landscapes of the BVI is curated for epicureans, tastemakers and culinary explorers. No matter which event you choose, you’ll be treated to vibrant local flavours and warm hospitality, in the scenic beauty of the British Virgin Islands. Gourmet for a Cause | October 27th

Anegada Lobster Festival | November 24th & 25th

Taste of Tortola | November 3rd

BVI Food Fete Bar Crawls Jost Crawl | November 11th

Jost Pork Festival | November 10th-11th Taste of Virgin Gorda | November 17th

On the Rocks Crawl | November 17th

Cooper Island Rum Festival | November 18th

Lobster Crawl | November 23rd

BVIFOODFETE.COM | 1-284-494-3134 Tortola | Virgin Gorda | Jost Van Dyke | Anegada | Cooper Island | Guana Island Little Thatch | Necker Island | Norman Island | Peter Island | Saba Rock | Scrub Island

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British virgin islands A mountain of conch shells on the island of Anegada

Photo: Melville lettsome

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Photo: Courtesy of BVI Tourism BOard

Captain your own or hire a crew, the British Virgin islands are close enough to navigate by sight, making for a sailor’s paradise.


British virgin islands

284.542.2118

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N e w s An d V i e w s Take Our Daughters And Sons To WorK Day On ‘Bring your Kid to Work’ day, the TSA team at Billings Logan International Airport brought 23 children to tour the Cape Air ramp. The children received Cape Air beach balls, airplanes and of course pilot wings. Pictured here are Cape Air Captains Matt Holmes-Phippen and Sam Deary.

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Photo: Station Manager Lynn Wagner

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An Island Discovery By Michelle Haynes

A

s any regular reader knows, I am obsessed with islands, both tropical and otherwise. Coastal Maine is home to dozens of watery outposts and my latest discovery is North Haven, a true “off the grid” getaway about twelve miles from the town of Rockland. North Haven’s year-round population is less than 400 and the primary occupation is fishing and some tourism. A gift shop, a market, and the historic and

award-winning Nebo Lodge, a landmark destination for foodies, that is about it. What you will find is a quintessential New England fishing village with miles of hiking trails and well-tended farms surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean. Looking for a fall escape far from the maddening crowd—this is the island for you. Getting there is easy and quick with Penobscot Island Air, located minutes from your Cape Air arrival at the Knox County Regional Airport.

“I would say a third of our passengers are connecting to us from their Cape Air flight from Boston,” says Penobscot Island Air owner, Captain Kevin Waters. Not a lot of signage in North Haven. The directions to our hike up Ames Knob consisted of: “Enter the clearing after the red mailbox.”

Should fog happen, Captain Kevin Waters, owner and chief pilot for Penobscot Island Air dons his other hat and picks you up by boat for the fifty-five minute crossing to Rockland.

Friends made on the hike up to the top of Ames Knob, one of the highest points in North Haven and offering a spectacular view. Bruce, Jim, Karen, Rick, and Pam celebrate their hike to the top of North Haven’s Ames Knob. FAL L

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In d e x WHERE TO STAY, EAT, SHOP OR PLAY? Meet our advertisers who make the Bird’s Eye View possible. A shout-out of pride to Provincetown’s Victor’s restaurant, just named one of the “best places to eat in Cape Cod” and a welcome to our newest family member, St. Croix’s Sand Castle on the Beach. Our sincere thanks to all of them for their support and you can find a live link to their businesses at birdseyeviewmagazine.com. —Michelle Haynes

CARIBBEAN BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS BVI Tourist Board......................... 113 Offshore Sailing School................ 111 Sol Y Sombra............................... 115

St. Croix, U.S.V.I. The Buccaneer............................. 109 Sand Castle on the Beach............ 109

ST. JOHN, U.S.V.I. 340 Real Estate Co...................... 106 Estate Lindholm........................... 106 Gallows Point Resort ................... 105 Islandia Real Estate...................... 106 Ocean 362.................................. 105

ST. THOMAS, U.S.V.I. Calypso Realty............................. 103 Emerald Beach Resort.................. 103

CAPE COD Cape Cod Maritime Museum ........ 59 Chatham Sign Shop....................... 57 John F. Kennedy Museum.............. 59 Macdonald & Wood Sotheby’s...... 59 Massachusetts Maritime Academy.................................. 59 Robert Paul Properties......... back cover Sandwich Glass Museum............... 57 Yellow Umbrella Books.................. 57

MAINE

Montana

Bar Harbor Acadia Cottage Rentals..................................... 71 Camden Harbor Cruises................. 75 The East Wind Inn......................... 79. Fiore Olive Oils & Vinegars............ 74 House Wine................................... 69 The Kimball Shop .......................... 71 Lisa Hall Jewelry............................ 71 The Manor Inn.............................. 81 Monhegan Boat Line..................... 79 Monhegan Brewing Company....... 79 Oli’s Trolley.................................... 69 Owls Head Transportation Museum .................................. 75 Penobscot Bay Regional Chamber of Commerce............ 74 Point Lookout Resort..................... 75 Red Sky Restaurant........................ 71 Rockport Market Place.................. 75 Rooster Brother............................. 81 Salt Meadow Properties ................ 80 The Trailing Yew............................ 79 Trenton Bridge Lobster Pound ...... 81 Window Panes.............................. 69 WoodenBoat Publications.............. 81

Montana Office of Tourism........... 97

Martha’s Vineyard The Back Porch.............................. 21 Clarion Inn Martha’s Vineyard....... 13 Conroy & Co................................. 13 Eisenhauer Gallery........................... 1 Featherstone Center for the Arts.... 23 Karen M. Overtoom Real Estate.... 17 L.A. Brown Photography............... 21 Martha’s Vineyard Buyer Agents.... 21 Martha’s Vineyard Chamber of Commerce............................... 17 Martha’s Vineyard Museum........... 21 Santoro Hospitality Group............. 19 Sea Smoke Barbecue...................... 23 Viewpoints Real Estate.....................inside front cover

Chicago

IL

Kirksville Decatur

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Marion Owensboro

KY Art: Natasha Rethke

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Bobbi Fawcett Kimberly Corkran Marilyn Johnson Rosemary Dooley Joe Lachimia Bobbi Fawcett Sean Randall Marilyn Johnson

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Sean 410.829.1101 Randall upon request. Vermont

Barrett’s Tours................................41 Berkshire Hathaway Island Properties.......................39 Brass Lantern Inn...........................34 Compass Rose Real Estate.............41 Dreamland.....................................34 Faregrounds Restaurant / Pudleys Pub.............................41 Harborview Nantucket...................41 Maury People Sotheby’s Realty......31 Michael Kane Lightship Baskets.....35 Nantucket Accomodations.............29 Nantucket Bake Shop....................28 Nantucket Chamber of Commerce...............................28 Nantucket Lightship Basket Museum ..................................35 Nantucket Pearl Company.............28 Nantucket Retreats........................29 Nantucket Tents............................33 Nantucket Windmill Auto..............43 The Nobby Clothing Shop.............34 The Sea Grille................................28 Susan Lister Locke Gallery..............35 Thai House....................................34

The Lyme Inn ................................83 Martha Diebold Real Estate...........85

Advertising rates are available Bird’s Eye View is published by Sugar and Spice.............................84 upon request. 410.829.1101 Cape Air, 660 Barnstable Road Hyannis, MAis 02601 Vermont Bird’s Horse Store EyeCountry View published by © Bird’s Eye Barnstable View, 2018Road Cape Air, 660 and Equine Gallery/ Hyannis, MA 02601 Reproduction in whole or in part ©Country/Real Bird’s Eye View, 2018 without permission is prohibited. Vermont Estate....84

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Reproduction in whole or in part BirdsEyeViewMagazine.com without permission is prohibited.

Adirondack Paintings.....................91 Guide Boat Realty..........................91 Hotel Saranac................................87 Paul Smith’s College......................91

BirdsEyeViewMagazine.com Fall 2018

VIEW BIRD’S EYE

PROVINCETOWN Art’s Dune Tours............................47 Bubala’s by the Bay........................53 Cape Cod Wood Carving...............46 Eight Dyer Hotel............................52 Hilda Neily Fine Art........................47 The Inn at Cook Street...................52 Provincetown Massage..................52 Provincetown Chamber of Commerce...............................49 Provincetown Tourism Office.........53 The Red Inn...................................53 The Schoolhouse Gallery................49 Snip Salon......................................49 Stewart Clifford Gallery.................49 Victor’s..........................................52

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Fall 2018  

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