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Nº 1-2 | Volume 13 | 2014 | 10.00 € | ISSN 1618-8276 | A 60711 |

European Biotechnology News Science & Industry

Biologic shuttle to the brain

CENTRAL EUROPE

Mirrored compounds without RNA drug downsides NORTHERN EUROPE

Genmab raises capital, partners with Eli Lilly

E E E R F

T P R E XC

Special

Euro Biofairs Compass – Guide to life sciences events WESTERN EUROPE

France greenlights biosimilar substitution for originators SOUTHERN EUROPE

Jazz Pharma bids US$1bn to acquire Gentium’s Defitelio Eastern EUROPE

Gedeon Richter expands into Latin America science & technology

Swedish researchers ease culture of embryonic stem cells


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N –º 1-2 | Volume 13 | 2014

Euro|Biotech|News

Intro

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Editorial

Resistance spurs revival of antibiotics in Europe Janet Hammond, Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Basel

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Janet Hammond is Head of Infectious Diseases at Roche Pharma Research and Early Development. She received her medical training at the University of Cape Town before specialising in internal medicine and pulmonary/critical care medicine. She then moved to the US, where she completed her fellowship in Infectious Disease at Duke University and Infectious Disease and Clinical Pharmacology at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining Roche in 2011, Dr. Hammond was Chief Medical Officer at Valeant Pharmaceuticals.

  hen penicillin was discovered by Dr. Alexander Fleming in 1928, people around the world believed it was one of the greatest medical and scientific advances in the history of mankind – and they were right. Before penicillin, a bacterial infection in a minor cut or injury could easily become fatal. Diseases like scarlet fever, pneumonia, meningitis and diphtheria were essentially untreatable. In the following decades, more antibiotics appeared on the scene, among them tetracy­ clines, isoniazid, macrolides, glycopeptides and cephalosporins. Doctors began to routinely prescribe anti­ biotics – even when they weren’t sure that pa­ tients actually had bacterial infections – and it seemed that this miracle of modern medicine had the potential to eradicate one of mankind’s tiniest but deadliest enemies. Ominous data began to appear, however, sug­ gesting that the miracle wouldn’t last forever. In the early 1980s, Staphylococcus aureus in­ fections appeared that were resistant to mul­ tiple antibiotics. At the same time, mul­tiple drug resistant Streptococcus pneuomoniae in­ fections also surfaced. Each passing year carried more troubling findings and an expanding list of bacteria that challenged even the most powerful antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreaks in hospitals became head­ line news. More than 1.5 million people around the world are now dying each year from bac­ terial infections. What happened to change bacterial infec­ tions from a health problem once considered by many to be nearly “solved” into an implacable foe described by a leading scientist as a “catas­ trophe” equal to bioterrorism? Although pharmaceutical research into anti­biotics continues, a “discovery void” has

emerged. Since 1987, the number of new anti­ biotics reaching the market has stalled. Mean­ while, new resistance mechanisms in bacteria have emerged, making even the most advanced antibiotics virtually ineffective. Fearing that widespread resistance to anti­ biotics could bring “the end of modern medicine as we know it,” the World Health Organization has made finding new, effective antibiotics one of its top three priorities, and regulatory author­ ities now offer incentives related to the research and development of new anti-bacterials. In November 2013, Roche pRED (Pharma Research and Early Development) entered a partnering deal to develop novel anti­biotic POL7080, a Phase II compound targeting Pseu­ domonas aeruginosa (PA), a Gram­-negative bacterial species causing severe infections. PA is responsible for a significant percentage of multi-drug resistant pneumonias in the hos­ pital setting. Encouraged by changes in the regulatory landscape and a better understanding of the under­lying biology, Roche is one of just a few companies that have so far returned to the de­ velopment of antibiotics, determined to take on this threat to global health. Roche was an in­ dustry leader with Bactrim and Rocephin, two groundbreaking antibiotics credited with saving billions of lives, and the new focus on pathogenspecific drugs for multi-drug resistant bacteria plays on our legacy and our strengths. For patients who are under siege by a micro­ scopic enemy that seems to ward off all weap­ ons, there is hope on the horizon.  B

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N –º 1-2 | Volume 13 | 2014

Euro|Biotech|News

CIRCUL ATION

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European Biotechnology News is published in co-operation with the following organisations: European Biotechnology Net work

Europe: european-biotechnology.net

Germany: biodeutschland.org

Switzerland: swissbiotech.org

CMYK

CouncilBlue: of European 100/15/0/35 BioRegions Orange: 0/75/90/0

Belgium: edma-ivd.eu

Europe: cebr.net

Europe: eapb.org

Europe: europabio.org

Europe: ebe-biopharma.org

Ireland: ibec.ie/ibia

Norway: biotekforum.no

Denmark: danskbiotek.dk

Finland: finbio.net

The Netherlands: niaba.nl

Sweden: swedenbio.com

Spain: asebio.com

France: france-biotech.org

Hungary: hungarianbiotech.org

Belgium: bio.be

EuroBiotechNews covers the biotechnology sector of the current 28 EU member states, Norway and Switzerland. If you would like to subscribe, please refer to Portugal: www.apbio.pt

Italy: assobiotec.it

www.eurobiotechnews.eu


N –º 1-2 | Volume 13 | 2014

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Euro|Biotech|News

contents

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Insight

Cover Story

MEPs want stiffer rules for cloned meat and medtech; Heard in Brussels 10

EuroTransBio 

13

Golden rice: Co-founder takes on Greenpeace; IP Flash

14 © F. Hoffmann La-Roche

EU Parliament and Council reach compromise on clinical trails regulation 12

Regulatory Affairs Update on clinical trials

16

Breaking news from the EMA

18

Getting the antibodies across the barrier 

Economic Focus on newsflow and dividends

17

Stock markets

18

Perspectives Interview: Enrico Pesenti, Accelera

44

RNA-Seq: Progress in automated library generation

46

BlueCompetion winners

48

Regional News

6

A Roche study has given fresh impetus an old dream. If researchers could safely and effectively breach the brain-blood barrier (BBB) in humans, it would open up a huge number of options for hard-to-treat neurological diseases. As populations age, developing treatments for neurodegenerative disorders is growing increasingly critical – while the potential market for such therapies grows larger by the day. Scientists have been chipping away at the cellular barrier for over thirty years. Is it finally about to fall?

Services

Special

EuroBioFairs Compass A full spring schedule

31

BIO-Europe Spring

32

DIA EuroMeeting

34

Northern Europe

20

Central Europe

22

Western Europe

24

Swiss Biotech Day

38

Southern Europe

26

Biotech Japan 2014

40

Eastern Europe

28

Analytica 2014

42

Austrian Biomarker Symposium 36

Partners & Associations

4

Biopeople News from Bayer AG, Anergis SA, EuropaBio, Heptares Therapeutics plc, DYsis Medical plc., and Reverdia V.O.F. 43 Company index

48

Events What’s on in Feb. – March 2014

49

Encore

50

Imprint European Biotechnology News is published monthly by: BIOCOM AG, Lützowstr. 33–36, D-10785 Berlin, Germany, Tel.: +49-30-264921-0, Fax: +49-30-264921-11, E-Mail: service@eurobiotechnews.eu; Internet: www.eurobiotechnews.eu, Publisher: Andreas Mietzsch, Editorial Team: Thomas Gabrielczyk (Managing Editor), Derrick Williams (Co-editor), Dr. Patrick Dieckhoff, Dr. Bernd Kaltwaßer, Dr. Martin Laqua, Benjamin Stolzenberg; Advertising: Oliver Schnell, +49-30-2649-2145, Christian Böhm, +49-30-2649-2149; Distribution: Marcus Laschke, +49-30-2649-2148; Printed at: Druckhaus Humburg, Bremen; Graphic Design: Michaela Reblin. European Biotechnology Science & Industry News is only regularly available through subscription at BIOCOM AG. Annual subscription fees: € 100.00, Students € 50.00 (subject to proof of enrolment). Prices include VAT, postage & packaging. Ordered subscriptions can be cancelled within 2 weeks directly at BIOCOM AG. The subscription is initially valid for one year. Subscriptions will be renewed automatically for one more year, respectively, unless they are cancelled at least 6 weeks before the date of expiry. Failures of delivery which BIOCOM AG is not responsible for do not entitle the subscriber to delivery or reimbursement of pre-paid fees. Seat of court is Berlin, Germany. As regards contents: individually named articles are published within the sole responsibility of their respective authors. All material published is protected by copyright. No article or part thereof may be reproduced in any way or processed, copied and proliferated by electronic means without the prior written consent of the publisher. Cover Photo: © F. Hoffmann La-Roche, Supplement: DGPharmed, Swiss Biotech Association/BIOCOM AG ® BIOCOM is a registered trademark of BIOCOM AG, Berlin, Germany.


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N –º 1-2 | Volume 13 | 2014

Euro|Biotech|News

INSIGHT EUROPE European Parliament

MEPs demand stricter rules A Brussels/Strasbourg – Members of the European Parliament have called on the European Commission to establish stricter rules to protect consumers in the upcoming IVD Regulation and its draft legislation to regulate food from cloned animals.

Update on cloned meat In mid-December, the MEPs urged the Commission to expand the scope of a long-awaited second draft on foodstuffs from cloned animals. While the parliamentarians welcomed the marketing ban and obligatory labelling for all products sourced from cloned animals, they also pressed to include their offspring in the regulation. “It is not economially viable to market meat from cloned animals,” said Peter Liese, rapporteur for the European Parliament’s ENVI committee. “These animals are most often used for breeding. This is why we need at least a labelling obligation for the offspring.” Provisions on animal cloning were included in a draft law on novel foods published in 2008, but had to be withdrawn in 2011 in order to get the rest of the legislation passed. The provisions now come in the form of three amendments to the novel food law – two proposals to ban the use of the cloning technique on farm animals and the import of such animals, and one on the marketing of food from animal clones.

Holding companies liable In other European legislation affecting the biotech industry, MEPs called for the establishment of compulsory insurance and liability in the wake of the breast implant health scare touched off by French company PIP (see EuroBiotechNews 10/2013). Although PIP-CEO Jean-Claude Mas was sentenced to four years in prison for his role in the scandal, the women affected received no compensation from his bankrupt com­pany. B

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Heard in Brussels M

The trinity that’s given me back some faith

Brussels – I am spoiled for choice this month on things that make me happy about biotech. Three things have happened across Europe that confirm the field has great people that work hard, recognise the truth when it is kicking you in the ankle and aren’t afraid to try something different.

Putting your money where your mouth was The first was the news that the late Professor Sir Kenneth Murray, founder of Biogen, left £9m to the Darwin Trust of Edinburgh, and £2m to the Royal Society and various other organisations to support young biologists in doctoral studies. Here is a man who enriched the science and business of biotechnology throughout his career, and is now – even after his death – enabling promising scientists to follow his pathway in the best way … with hard cash. Professor Murray, we salute you and take a good hard stare at all those slightly less-deceased scientists who have made their money from megadeals and exits. We know who you are, so if you are feeling both generous and perhaps slightly unwell, now is the time to reach for the quill and inkpot and make that gesture. Your kids won’t thank you, but we will.

A little ray of Golden sunshine? Next is the great news that there is some positive spin in the press on GM crops, or at least something that moves the argument temporarily into a sphere of reality. It is always welcome, even when both sides are masters of the PR (dark) art. People should think about the impact of crops such as Golden Rice on the health of people in economies far different from their own. Block this, actively denying nutrition to millions that need

Claire Skentelbery, Secretary General of the European Biotechnology Network

it based on your own principles – when you yourself have enough to eat – and what kind of person are you becoming? Someone who pushes over old people when they are indecisive in queues? Oh wait, that last one was me.

Good things come to those that mess about in labs If proven to be replicable, the news that stem cells can be created just by dipping blood cells into acid is a great example of two things: (1) that it is critical to persevere with potentially great science, and (2) that you should always dream that you can have a breakthrough doing something really simple. Sometimes life is good like that. So January was generous with great reports (apart from the being dead bit in the first story) and I have demonstrated all the impetuosity of a genius scientist by jamming them all into one test tube and heating it, rather than spreading them out over three sensibly planned columns. See you next time, and let’s hope that the gods of interesting science are as active in February as they were in January.  B


N –º 1-2 | Volume 13 | 2014

Euro|Biotech|News

Insight Europe

News M

Initiative gets green light

Strasbourg – The European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy has adopted the second funding term of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI 2). From 2007-2013, the PPP between the member companies of the pharma association EFPIA and the European Commission created nearly 1,500 jobs for a budget of a2bn by carrying out 40 projects to improve drug development. IMI 2 will run from 2014-2020 and have a budget of a3bn.

M

New drugs, new approach

Brussels – In mid-December, the IMI launched a a371m call on eight healthcare topics: Alzheimer’s disease, osteo­ arthritis, cancer, diseases transmitted by animals, antimicrobial resistance, drug discovery, and environmental impact of medicines. For the first time its researchers will now try to better select Alzheimer’s candidate drugs by making use of adaptive trial designs – an enrichment method for drug responders from the area of cancer trial design. It includes an interim analysis in which bio­statisticans search for subgroups of patients that benefitted most from a treatment, recruiting them in a second step of the clinical trial.

M

Name and shame

London – Up to now, the European Medicines Agency didn’t name companies that failed to meet GMP standards. In a move to boost quality, the Agency has now included more than 80 non-compliance reports dating back to 2007 in its EudraGMDP database. The Agency is convinced this will help encourage better GMP compliance.

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ENVI Committee

End in sight for trials regulation A Brussels – Shortly before Christmas, the European Council and the European Parliament’s Committee for the Environment and Public Health (ENVI) nailed down the final wording for draft EU Clinical Trials Regulation. The new legislation, which is aimed at increasing the dwindling number of latestage clinical trials in the 28 EU Member States, is expected to receive final approval from the European Parliament on 25 February. The MEPs and EU ministers reached a compromise they say balances industry needs with increased transparency requirements when it comes to the publication of results from clinical trials.

after market approval of new drugs has been diluted after pharma companies sued the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for making study protocols available to competitors. Now the regulation states that study protocols basically need to be disclosed and that they are not confidential in principal. However, this does not automatically mean that they must be made publicly available. In any given case, personal patient and confidential business information also have to be secured from misuse. In other words: where confidentiality is justified, inter alia, due to the protection of personal data or commercially confiden-

Less bureaucracy, more transparency According to the draft text, multinational trials – which are essential for enrollment in huge Phase III trials or for tests involving patients with rare diseases across Europe – will be conducted under the coordination of a single EU Member State. The move is expected to reduce significantly the bureaucratic burden for researchers, biotech and pharma companies. The MEPs and Council have also found a way to report the outcomes of all clinical trials without violating drug developers’ confidentiality needs. According to the legislation, a summary of the results of a clinical study must be made public in the EU Clinical Trials Register within 12 months (Article 34(3). Disclosure even of negative results therefore will in future be unavoidable. “It is vital that we know about negative outcomes,” said MEP Glenis Willmot, who headed the ENVI Committee, “otherwise trials can be conducted repeatedly before it becomes public knowledge they are ineffective, or even dangerous.” However, the MEPs’ initial goal of publishing study protocols and subsequent modifications along with summaries has been excluded from the regulation. What’s more, a plan to make clinical raw data available to experts for review 30 days

© European Parliament

12

Glenis Willmot from the European Labour Party was named EP rapporteur on the Clinical Trials Regulation in October 2012.

tial information – however this is defined – the database shall not be publicly accessible (Article 78(3). To ensure compliance with the new rules, the regulation foresees fines to be imposed by Member States for non­compliance with the transparency requirements. Additionally, clinical trials master files have to be retained for at least 25 years. Depending on the European Court of Justice decision in a lawsuit filed against the EMA by Abb­vie and Intermune, it’s probable that the wording of the regulation will be revised.  B


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N –º 1-2 | Volume 13 | 2014

Euro|Biotech|News

Company And Advertiser Inde x BlueSens Award

Better control of bioprocesses A Herten – A team of US researchers has won the BlueCompetition 2013, an international science award dedicated to innovations in the gas analysis of bioprocesses. The winners from Clemson University (Matthew Pepper, Li Wang, Ajay Padmakumar, Asst. Prof. Timothy C. Burg, Asst. Prof. Sarah W. Harcum and Asst. Prof. Richard E. Groff) developed a real-time bioprocess control for monitoring aerobic metabolism. Jury member Dr. Frank Eiden said

First place went to Ajay Padmakumar, Li Wang, and Matthew Pepper

the team under Richard Groff had “impressively demonstrated how to gain real-time mass transfer data in biological systems required for direct optimisation of complex metabolic processes using BlueSens’ offgas analysis technology.” Clemson University received the a5,000 in first prize money from BlueSens for the research group’s contribution, which was entitled “Real-­time adaptive oxy­gen transfer rate estimator for metabolism tracking in E. coli cultures“. a2,500 went to the West­Chester University team of John M. Pisciotta, Joe Mossman, Zehra Zaybak and William Schultz for their project “Enhanced waste to fuel conversion with a bioelectrochemically controlled auto­trophic bioreactor.” A group made up of Martina Schedler, Nneka Maryrose Enwena, Ana Gabriela Valladares Juárez and Prof. Dr. Rudolf Müller from the Technical University Hamburg Harburg placed third, receiving a1,500 for their research into the microbiological degradation of mineral oil after the Deepwater Horizon accident. B

360 Capital Partners (LU)… …………………………………… 27 AbbVie Inc. (USA)………………………………………………… 12 Ablynx NV (B)… ………………………………………………… 17 AC Immune SA (CH)………………………………………… 15, 22 Accelera Srl (I)… ………………………………………… CP2, 44 Actelion AG (CH)… ……………………………………………… 17 Adiuvo Investment S.A. (PL)… ………………………………… 28 Advanced Analytica Technologies (USA)… …………………… 47 Agilent Technologies (USA)……………………………………… 47 AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH… ………………… 36 Alfred Wieder AG (GER)… ……………………………………… 22 Algeta ASA (N)… …………………………………………… 17, 21 Almirall S.A. (E)…………………………………………………… 27 Alnylam Pharmaceuticals Inc. (USA)… ………………………… 24 Ambienta (I)… …………………………………………………… 27 Amgen Inc. (USA)…………………………………………… 17, 27 Anergis SA (CH)…………………………………………………… 43 Apogenix AG (GER)… …………………………………………… 15 Armagen Inc.……………………………………………………… 8 Astellas Pharma GmbH (GER)…………………………………… 40 Astra Zeneca (UK)……………………………………………… 8, 25 Audi AG (GER)… ………………………………………………… 25 Basilea Pharmaceutica (CH)… ………………………………… 17 Bayer AG (GER)……………………………………… 17, 21, 23, 43 Beckman Coulter (UK)…………………………………………… 46 Beckman Coulter GmbH (GER)… …………………………… 7, 46 Beta Renawables S.p.A. (I)… …………………………………… 27 BIOCOM AG (GER)… ……………………………………… 27, 39 BioJapan (JP) … ………………………………………………… 37 Biolamina AB (S)… ……………………………………………… 21 Biotmetra GmbH (GER)… ……………………………………… 46 BioTOP Berlin-Brandenburg (GER)……………………………… 13 BioWin - The Health Cluster of Wallonia (B)…………………… 11 BlueSens gas sensor GmbH (GER)……………………………… 48 Boehringer Ingelheim (GER)… …………………………… 19, 22 Bristol Myers Squibb Company (USA)… ……………………… 43 Cardio3 Biosciences (B)… ……………………………………… 18 Cellular Dynamics International (USA)… ……………………… 23 CFG Capital LLC (USA)…………………………………………… 43 Chiesi Farmaceutici S.p.A. (I)… ………………………………… 28 Cosmo Pharmaceuticals (I)……………………………………… 17 Curevac GmbH (GER)… ………………………………………… 15 Dezima Pharma (NL)… ………………………………………… 15 DGPharMed (GER)… …………………………… 30, Supplement DIA Europe (CH)… ………………………………………… 34, 35 DNA Pharmaceuticals (MX)……………………………………… 28 Dompé Farmaceutici S.p.A. (I)………………………………… 27 DOW Europe GmbH (CH)… …………………………………… 38 DSM Pharma Chemicals (GER)… ……………………………… 43 Dynavax Technologies Corp. (USA)…………………………… 43 DySIS Medical (UK)… …………………………………………… 43 EBD Group (CH)… ………………………………………… 32, 33 Eisai Ltd. (JP)…………………………………………………… 8, 28 Elan Corp. (IRL)…………………………………………… 8, 17, 23 Eli Lilly (USA)…………………………………………………… 8, 20 Enel (I)… ………………………………………………………… 27 Erdmann Technologies GmbH (GER)…………………………… 23 Eupharmed s.r.l (I)… …………………………………………… 27 European Biotechnology Network (B)… ……………………… 45 Evotec AG (GER)… ……………………………………………… 43 F-star GmbH (A)… ……………………………………………… 22 Farmitalia Carlo Erba (I)… ……………………………………… 44 Galapagos NV (B)………………………………………………… 25 Gedeon Richter Ltd. (HUN)……………………………………… 28 Genentech Inc. (USA)… ………………………………………… 22 Genmab A/S (DK)…………………………………………… 17, 20 Gentium S.p.A. (I)………………………………………………… 26 GlaxoSmithKline (UK)… ………………………………………… 43 Global Bioenergies SA (F)… …………………………………… 25 GW Pharmaceuticals (UK)… …………………………………… 17 H. Lundbeck A/S (DK)…………………………………………… 21 Heptares Therapeutics (UK)… ………………………………… 43 High-Tech Gründerfonds Management (GER)… ……………… 17 Hologic Inc. (USA)………………………………………………… 43 Hospira One 2 One Global Pharma (USA)…………………… CP4 Idenix Pharmaceuticals Inc. (USA)… …………………………… 15 Illumina Inc. (USA)… …………………………………………… 47

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Immudyne Inc. (PL)… …………………………………………… 28 Immunocore Ltd. (USA)… ……………………………………… 25 Ingenuity Systems (USA)………………………………………… 22 INHECO Industrial Heating & Cooling (GER)…………………… 46 Innovacell Biotechnologie GmbH (A)…………………………… 23 InterMune Inc. (USA)… ………………………………………… 12 InternA Technologies B.V. (NL)… ……………………………… 25 Intesa San Paolo (I)… …………………………………………… 27 Ipadlab (I)… ……………………………………………………… 27 Isis Innovation (UK)… …………………………………………… 25 J.P. Morgan Asset Management (USA)… ……………………… 18 Janssen R&D Irland… ………………………………………… 8, 15 Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc (IRL)…………………………………… 26 JSC Grindeks (LV)………………………………………………… 28 Julius Bär & Co. KG (CH)… ……………………………………… 38 LF Investment (DK)… …………………………………………… 20 Life Science Austria LISA (A)… ……………………………… CP3 Medivir AB (S)… ………………………………………………… 15 Merck KGaA (GER)… …………………………………………… 27 Messe München GmbH (GER)… ………………………… 31, 42 Mimetas BV (NL)… ……………………………………………… 25 Minerva Biolabs (DK)… ………………………………………… 20 Molmed Spa (I)…………………………………………………… 17 MorphoSys AG (GER)… ………………………………………… 17 NeoVision Corp. (USA)…………………………………………… 43 Neste Oil (FIN)… ………………………………………………… 21 Nestle Health Science SA (CH)… ……………………………… 23 Newron Pharmaceuticals S.p.A. (I)……………………………… 18 Next Pharma (BR)………………………………………………… 28 Nicox S.A. (F)……………………………………………………… 27 Nightstarx Ltd. (UK)… …………………………………………… 25 Norgine B.V. (NL)… ……………………………………………… 23 Novamedica LLC (USA)… ……………………………………… 26 Novartis AG (CH)… ……………………………………………… 21 Novo Nordisk A/S (DK)… ……………………………………… 20 Novozymes A/S (DK)… ………………………………………… 27 Noxxon Pharma AG (GER)… …………………………………… 23 Nuevolutin A/S (DK)……………………………………………… 21 Octapharma AG (GER)…………………………………………… 15 Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc. (USA)… …………………………… 17 Orphan Biovitrum (S)… ………………………………………… 17 Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. (JP)… ……………………… 8, 21 Perrigo (IL)…………………………………………………… 17, 23 Pfizer (USA)… …………………………………………………… 44 Pharmacell BV (NL)… …………………………………………… 24 Pharmacia SpA Italia……………………………………………… 44 PharmaMar (E)… ………………………………………………… 27 Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. (USA)… …………………… 14 Poly Implant Prothése PIP (F)…………………………………… 10 PolyGene AG (CH)… …………………………………………… 22 Prosensa BV (NL)… ……………………………………………… 17 Prosonix plc (UK)… ……………………………………………… 15 Prothena Corp. plc (IRL)… ……………………………………… 23 Qiagen GmbH (GER)… ………………………………………… 22 Reed Exhibitions Japan Ltd… ……………………………… 40, 41 Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. (USA)………………………… 23 Reverdia (NL)……………………………………………………… 43 Roche AG (CH)………………………………………… 3, 6, 20, 23 Roquette Group (F)… …………………………………………… 43 Sanofi SA (F)………………………………………………… 19, 24 Santaris Pharma A/S (DK)… …………………………………… 20 Santhera Pharmaceuticals (CH)… ……………………………… 19 Selvita S.A. (PL)…………………………………………………… 28 Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox (USA)… …………………… 9, 14 Sunstone Capital (DK)…………………………………………… 20 Swiss Biotech Association (SBA)…………… 38, 39, Supplement Syncona Partners LLP (UK)……………………………………… 25 Thrombogenics Ltd. (B)… ……………………………………… 17 TiGenix BV (B)… ………………………………………………… 24 TMC Pharma Services Ltd. (UK)… ……………………………… 16 to-BBB N.V. (NL)… ……………………………………………… 8 UCB S.A. (B)… …………………………………………………… 25 uniQure BV (NL)… ……………………………………………… 25 Venter Pharma S.L. (E)…………………………………………… 26 Wilex AG (GER)…………………………………………………… 23 Zealand Pharmaceuticals A/S (DK)……………………………… 19


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