Building Insight May 2020

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building insight


Table of contents

WHO WE ARE The Building Industry Association of Washington is the state’s largest trade association representing thousands of companies in the home building industry. BIAW is dedicated to ensuring and enhancing the vitality of the building industry for the benefit of its members and the housing needs of citizens.

BIAW STAFF Executive Vice President Greg Lane Government Affairs Director Jan Himebaugh General Counsel Jackson Maynard Administrative Services Director Jan Rohila R.O.I.I.® Select Co-Directors Jenn Kavanaugh and Michael Couthran Communications and Public Relations Director Jennifer Spall

B U IL DI NG INSI G H T ED I TO R I A L STA F F Communications and Public Relations Director Jennifer Spall Communications Manager Leah Jaber Writer and Editor Bailee Wicks Layout and Design Brenda Kwieciak

To submit editorial or advertise contact communications@biaw.com.

Tyler, an employee with Olympia Master Builder member John Erwin Remodeling, Inc., preps for a COVID-19 training awareness safety meeting.

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BIAW hosts Phase 1 jobsite safety requirements webinars BIAW breaks down governor’s jobsite requirements

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Phase 1: Risks of non-compliance

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How They Voted

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Builders face potential consequences for failure to follow jobsite requirements

BIAW ranks legislators’ votes on bills that impact the home building industry

Summer board meeting cancelled BIAW moves summer events to fall board meeting scheduled for November may 2020

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President’s message Today is a new way operate in private construction. On April 24, Gov. Inslee reopened previously started work under Phase 1 conditions, as agreed by both union and private representatives. Reopened work must be performed safely by employees with healthy temperatures, wearing eye protection, masks and gloves, staying six feet apart, using sanitized equipment, and employer-supplied handwashing stations at every jobsite. After being shut down since March 25, the reopening was a welcome start, however, purchasing safety supplies, planning work site procedures, writing and posting notices, and the training and daily monitoring of employees has changed. Construction has never been easy, and this transition, although necessary for a safe return to work under the governor’s mandate, does not make it any easier. These changes add costs and job time but are essential for us to return to work while decreasing possible contamination of employees, clients, families, and ourselves. Sherry Schwab President

BIAW senior officers and staff continue to work on Phase 2. BIAW Executive Vice President Greg Lane continues the difficult negotiation process with the governor’s working group. BIAW is aware of your frustration, anger, and financial fears. Since the shutdown, BIAW leadership and staff have been working seven days a week to anticipate and proactively address every possibility to improve the construction industry’s position. We mounted a successful outreach campaign to federal, state, county, and local officials; hosted educational webinars with over 3,000 views; provided templates for signage and jobsite forms; researched and provided resources for required equipment; answered hundreds of emails and phone calls from members and local association staff. These are the benefits of your BIAW membership. Negotiations rarely result in getting everything you want; however, in this situation, BIAW came out better because we were at the governor’s table. Construction is branded as one large unit, and housing is not a separate entity. The governor can shut down construction if he chooses. The other threat of non-compliance is a hefty fine from L&I. Our members have a choice: work and follow all the requirements of the governor’s mandate, or not work. Other industries do not have a choice. As of press time, the construction industry is the only industry that has been allowed to restart. This success is the result of our collective hard work. My thanks to BIAW leadership and staff team members, because that is what we are: a team. We are doing more together than any single person could accomplish alone. We will continue our efforts to get the construction industry wholly reopened. May you stay safe and healthy in your personal life and your business.

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Executive Vice President’s message We’re all running out of terms to use when discussing what the last two months have been like for our lives, our families, and our industry. Unprecedented. Incomparable. Historic. Unimaginable. As this trying period draws out further, no description seems adequate to convey how much daily life has been altered in nearly every way. Here at BIAW, our team has been focused on one primary goal throughout the entire pandemic—supporting you, your business, and your employees. When the pandemic started, BIAW staff quickly gathered and distributed a list of best safety practices for you to utilize on your jobsites to protect your employees, their families, and the public from contracting or spreading the disease. Many BIAW members had implemented those best practices when Gov. Inslee, inexplicably, left construction off the list of essential businesses that could continue operating during his order. At the time, our governor made Washington only the second state in the country to shut down residential construction. Since Mar. 24, when Gov. Inslee “clarified” that he did, indeed, intend in his order to ban all residential construction, BIAW developed and implemented a 4-part advocacy strategy to convince the governor of the necessity of our industry:

Greg Lane

Executive Vice President

1. Recruit elected officials at the federal, state, and local levels to contact the governor directly. 2. Utilize partners in the business community to advocate directly to the governor for construction. 3. Encourage media coverage of consumers left in the lurch by the construction shutdown. 4. Negotiate safety measures for construction with labor, the governor’s office, and the state regulatory agencies. After having achieved success in all four parts of our strategy, on Apr. 24, just one month after the ban was implemented, Gov. Inslee announced that existing construction projects could restart in compliance with temporary additional safety requirements. Would I have liked to have gotten construction resumed earlier? Absolutely. It was also aggravating that the governor insisted on adding the temperature screening requirement at the last minute, an item not recommended by the working group on which BIAW participated. Despite that, however, not only was construction the first industry to be restarted in Washington, but it was also authorized before the governor released the rest of his plan to “reopen Washington’s economy.” This means residential construction will be ahead of most other businesses reopening by five weeks. From the start, our goal at BIAW was to get you back to work as soon as possible. We stayed focused on that goal and, even though the Phase 1 requirements were not exactly what we would have designed, it was the path needed to get our members back to their jobsites and ensure that everyone would be safe. We also know that our work at BIAW has only started. The next goal is to get Phase 2 authorized by the governor to open up all construction activities and start new projects. After that, these temporary safety requirements need to sunset when it is safe for everyone to do so. We will continue to work to protect you, your businesses, and your employees.

may 2020

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Phase 1 Construction Restart

BIAW hosts webinars on jobsite requirements by Bailee Wicks Writer and Editor

On April 24, after receiving nearly 1,300 emails from our members in our call to action campaign, along with BIAW’s representation on the governor’s construction working group, Gov. Inslee authorized the Phase 1 construction restart. Now that construction is authorized to resume work under the Phase 1 Jobsite Safety Requirements, our members must lead the way and demonstrate how our industry can keep employees, jobsites, and the public safe—so to ultimately get our industry wholly reopened and back to work.

What is considered Phase 1 construction?

Phase 1 construction, previously started projects, includes activities that can only be performed with six-foot social distancing requirements and follow a COVID-specific jobsite safety plan. Work that can only be conducted with less than six-foot distancing is considered Phase 2 and is not allowed at this time. In the days following the governor’s announcement, BIAW educated over 3,000 viewers via Zoom online town hall meetings. BIAW President Sherry Schwab kicked off the live 90-minute webinar with a welcome and a shout out to all our members who participated in our call to action email campaign. Following Schwab, BIAW Executive Vice President Greg Lane facilitated a step-by-step rundown of the Phase 1 Jobsite Safety Plan. BIAW Treasurer Joseph Irons followed, with a thorough and comprehensive slide presentation on the approaches and techniques his company employs to comply with the requirements (Irons’ company has been engaged in projects that were designated

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essential). Next up, BIAW Legal Counsel Jackson Maynard. Maynard addressed the legal ramifications and potential risks builders face of non-compliance with the requirements. The webinar’s final 30 minutes was dedicated to participants’ questions and concerns about the plan. To view recordings of the webinars, go to BIAW. com/jobsite_safety. BIAW leadership and staff have been working tirelessly to educate Gov. Inslee on how our industry can keep workers safe while continuing to build needed housing, keep people employed, and support the state’s housing and economic needs.

BIAW’s webinars on Phase 1 Jobsite Safety Requirements features BIAW President Sherry Schwab and Treasurer Joseph Irons. View the webinars at BIAW.com/Jobsite_safety.

We know this has been a frustrating and challenging time for everyone. BIAW continues to work on the Phase 2 recommendations with the administration so our industry can fully return to work.


Phase 1 Construction Restart

Phase 1 Requirements Below is a brief summary of the governor’s Phase 1 Construction Restart requirements. Please review the entire Phase 1 Jobsite Safety Plan and familiarize yourself with the requirements for the employer, worker, and jobsite.

Gov. Inslee’s Phase 1 Construction Restart Requirements Find all the required documents at:

Send us your photos

Share your Phase 1 Construction Restart protocols to communications@biaw.com.

MORE INFO

BIAW.com/jobsite_safety Documents to be maintained at each jobsite n Phase 1 Jobsite Safety Plan, signed, site-specific n Jobsite Safety Requirements by the governor’s working group n Governor’s proclamations: 20-05, 20-25, 20-25.1 n DOSH Directive 1.70, dated 4/27/20 n WA Department of Health Workplace and Employer Resources Required documents posted on a safety bulletin board for each jobsite 1. Jobsite Safety Requirements by the governor’s working group 2. Phase 1 Safety Plan, signed, site-specific 3. Coronavirus prevention general requirements 4. Written notice of what Phase 1 work will be performed, site-specific 5. CDC handwashing and hygiene poster

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Maintain a daily visitor log for each jobsite n Visitor log must include the date, name, phone, and email of all workers and visitors; and be kept for at least four weeks COVID-19-specific Training Safety Meetings and Log n COVID-19-specific safety talks (in addition to required weekly safety trainings) are required n Safety meeting attendance should be taken orally and logged with only the trainer writing down names of those in attendance to avoid pen-sharing

03 Photos courtesy of [1] John Erwin Remodeling, Inc., [2] Affinity Homes, [3] New Image Construction, and [4] Soaring Eagle Homes.

04 may 2020

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Phase 1 Construction Restart

Phase I: risks of non-compliance by Jackson Maynard General Counsel

For 30 long days, Gov. Inslee restricted privately-funded residential construction in response to the COVID-19 crisis. A working group that included BIAW made recommendations on safety protocols for construction that would protect workers, owners, and the public from the spread of the virus at jobsites. In response to public pressure from lawmakers and editorial boards around the state, the governor finally relented, and on April 24, 2020, issued an order that allowed Phase 1 construction. If the industry fails to follow the sanitation and social distancing requirements as outlined, there are a number of potential consequences: First, the Phase 1 requirement list notes specifically that the Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) will be responsible for enforcement. The list states that jobsites not complying will be shut down until the contractor can meet the requirements. In addition, L&I could impose fines in the thousands of dollars as a penalty. Because the list indicates that the safety requirements will be “strictly enforced,” L&I will likely not have much in the way of latitude or discretion in making these determinations. Second, because authority for the requirements is tied to the governor’s statutory ability to enter an emergency order, it is possible that those who completely ignore the safety requirements even after warning and action by L&I could be subject to criminal prosecution. Violations of the governor’s order are punishable as a gross misdemeanor, which carries with it a $5,000 fine and or 364 days in jail. Third, even if these legal requirements did not exist, there is a possibility of legal liability for those who violate the safety requirements. Plaintiff’s attorneys are already engaged in discussions as to different theories of legal liability for COVID-19-related cases. Although an individual’s actions may have caused a particular case, any contractor would rather be building homes than in court explaining to a judge, jury, and a sympathetic plaintiff why they failed to comply with safety standards.

FAQ

Phase 1 Requirements BIAW has assembled a list of the most frequently asked questions regarding the governor’s Phase 1 Construction Restart requirements. If you have a specific question not answered below, please email communications@biaw.com and we will do our best to find you the answer. n  What is allowed under Phase 1? Construction previously authorized under Proclamation 20-25 and Gov. Inslee’s March 25, 2020 memo on construction. Construction not previously authorized under Proclamation 20-25 and the March 25, 2020 memo that was in existence on March 23, 2020. For purposes of this memo, “in existence” means construction activity that is a) needed to fulfill an obligation under a contract effective prior to March 23, 2020, or b) authorized by a government-issued permit obtained prior to March 23, 2020. See FAQ on page 9

Finally, non-compliance in the industry could make it more difficult for the working group to negotiate the Phase 2 construction protocols and eventually, the removal of all restrictions to allow for the resumption of normal work on jobsites. This is the ultimate goal for our industry and BIAW. In sum, the industry should seize this opportunity to work and abide by the safety protocols to avoid agency enforcement, as well as potential criminal or civil liability. Even if these risks didn’t exist, contractors should comply to ensure a safe workplace and speed the process when the nation, state, and job site can get back to business as usual.

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FAQ from page 8 n  What happens to my permits under Phase 1? Contact your local city/county planning department. The governor’s proclamation neither extends nor approves permits. n  Do visitors, such as inspectors, suppliers, or property owners, have to have their temperature taken? The temperature screening requirement is only for employees, not visitors to sites, such as inspectors or suppliers. n  Do I have to have designate a COVID-19 supervisor if I have less than seven staff? A COVID-19 supervisor has to be designated for the company (just like a safety staff). But, a COVID-19 supervisor is only required to be on site when there are seven or more people on site. However, a COVID-19 supervisor can change. For example, the supervisor that is designated on site for the day doesn’t necessarily have to be the person designated generally by the company. They can designate for the day. The supervisor can also be one of the seven people on site. Just make sure the site safety plan is adjusted accordingly to identify the site safety supervisor on site when required. n  Can contractors use a client’s bathroom while on a residential project to fulfill the requirement for a handwashing station? Yes, but the bathroom needs to be in close proximity to the work being done and accessible at all times by employees. n  I am confused about the requirements for handwashing stations. How many stations per person, per jobsite/project size? How do we dispose of waste water from the handwashing station? There is to be one handwashing station per job site. The handwashing station has to have water (running when accessible), soap, and a basin. Water needs to be tepid temperature (between 70 and 100 degrees). Greywater can be disposed on site. n  Is there a jobsite safety document specifically for inside staff? Office staff for construction businesses

are authorized to return to work under Phase 1, however the rules they follow are different. They can be found here: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-164-000.pdf n  Are businesses allowed to go out and do quotes for jobs—is this allowed? No. That would be considered new work and is not allowed under Phase 1. n  What about work that incidentally must be performed less than 6-feet apart, for example, lifting beams, installing shower glass doors, installing counters and or fireplaces, all the while using PPE, but not 6-feet apart? If the work cannot be performed maintaining a 6-foot separation, it cannot be done under Phase 1. That work will have to wait until Phase 2 is approved. n  How do businesses handle Phase 1 requirements, such as handwashing stations and the posting of documents, if they are on the jobsite less than a day, i.e., installers, HVAC work? If they are working as a subcontractor, those requirements should be coordinated with the general contractor; however, it is recommend all subcontractors make sure the jobsite is in compliance by the general contractor before doing any work. For stand-alone work being done for a private customer as the only contractor, the business is responsible for all compliance and requirements. n  What if an employee is uncomfortable and wants to wait until the pandemic is over to come back to work? Employees have the option of not returning to work under the new COVID-19 rules. Find the rules at https://www.esd. wa.gov/unemployment/basic-eligibilityrequirements. n  Where can I find the recordings of BIAW’s Phase 1 webinars? You can find them on BIAW’s website at BIAW.com/Jobsite_safety

may 2020

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Safety has its rewards

Drum roll, please… BIAW’s R.O.I.I.® Select program beats its closest competitors yet another year! by Jenn Kavanaugh and Michael Couthran R.O.I.I.® Select Co-Directors

BIAW is proud to announce its retro group, R.O.I.I.® Select, earned a 34% first adjustment refund for the 2018-2019 plan year. In addition, the program finished the 2016-2017 plan year with a final adjustment refund of 40%. BIAW shares its enthusiasm with our participtants —and knows we couldn’t achieve these outstanding and consistent results without your hard work and commitment to safety. BIAW and R.O.I.I.® Select will receive a check for $25,714,990.

Safety has its rewards

R.O.I.I.® Select participant refunds are weighted on performance. This means the better you are at preventing injuries and controlling costs, the more you can earn.

It’s not too late

R.O.I.I.® Select’s enrollment period is still open and accepting applications for the July 2020-2021 plan year. Now is the time to see if your company is a good fit for R.O.I.I.® Select. To find out how you can start earning a refund, go to RoiiSelect.com or contact us at (360) 352-7800 or enroll@biaw.com.

Since 1982, when the program began, R.O.I.I.® Select has returned over $500 million in refunds to participating members. Our participants average a 36% refund of their L&I premiums.

40%

30%

31

%

36%

37% 31

%

42% 34

2016

2015

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Competitors’ Averages

Competitors’ Averages

Competitors’ Averages

10%

COMPLETED PLAN YEARS

10

36%

25%

20%

0

40%

%

2013

Competitors’ Averages

40%

Competitors’ Averages*

REFUND PERCENTAGE

R.O.I.I.® Select Group Refunds, 2012-2016

2012


Commitment and dedication

The R.O.I.I.® Select team is made up of workers’ comp experts who are committed to safety, prevention, controlling costs, and helping participants navigate L&I’s daunting system.

The best claim is no claim at all, but if a claim does happen, we provide support and share ways to prevent future claims from happening.

Transparent and affordable

We’re upfront about our program fees. Your annual fee is 1.5% of total premiums owed to L&I, or $150, whichever is greater.

We do not charge a group administrative fee. Other retro programs bury additional fees to pad profits and aid their bottom line. Our program fee is 10% of the group’s overall refund from L&I, and an additional 10% divided between BIAWaffiliated local associations. These fees support continuing education, government affairs, and the building industry as a whole.

Performance-based

R.O.I.I.® Select’s strict enrollment criteria and innovative approach to workers’ comp ensures maximum group performance.

R.O.I.I.® Select is a lot more than a once a year refund check. The program has your back every step of the way.

—John Erwin, John Erwin Remodeling, Inc., Olympia

All-inclusive in-house services at no additional cost

You won’t find any other retro program that offers all these services at no additional cost.

OUTCOME BASED CLAIMS ASSISTANCE

WHAT IS RETRO?

SAFETY SERVICES

Retro is a safety incentive program with a simple goal: eliminate injuries through improvements in safety and preventive strategies. If an employee is injured, help them get better quicker with a successful return to work experience. Companies that do this can earn a refund.

RISK MANAGEMENT RETURN TO WORK L&I AUDIT ASSISTANCE INVESTIGATIONS AND LITIGATION may 2020

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Biennial Scorecard

How They Voted

Each biennium, BIAW grades legislators based on their floor votes–while these votes are not the whole picture of legislative activity, they provide a snapshot of where legislators stand on issues important to the home building industry.

2019 BILLS ESHB 1109: Operating Budget, 2019-2020 Opposed | Passed | Signed State operating budget relied heavily on 11 tax increases amounting to $2.6 billion in tax increases over the biennium. Also, included a task force on environmental justice and siphoned workers’ compensation funds from injured workers to pay for implementation for a new clean energy program.

E2SHB 1110: Low Carbon Fuel Standard Opposed | Passed House only, 2019 & 2020 Required all fuel to meet a low carbon fuel standard, raising the cost per gallon significantly without increasing any road capacity.

E2SHB 1923: Urban Housing BIAW-supported | Passed | Signed Encourages cities to get to “yes” for development by offering a menu of pro-growth options for cities to choose from, limiting SEPA transportation appeals, and providing additional dollars for those cities that took action.

ESHB 1379: PAC to PAC Disclosure Opposed | Passed | Signed SB 5221: PAC to PAC Disclosure Opposed | Passed Senate only Complicated reporting requirement for political action committee’s disclosure, creating an onerous, hard to manage system that increased disclosure liability for those engaging in political speech.

E2SHB 2158: B&O Tax Increase Opposed | Passed | Signed A 20% increase on B&O taxes for services, including architecture, engineering, insurance (and agents), interior/industrial design, legal, and accounting.

ESB 5334: Condo Reform BIAW-supported | Passed | Signed Revised the condo warranty act limiting some warranty claims.

2SHB 1579: Residential Bulkheads Opposed | Passed | Signed Removed the requirement for Dept. of Fish & Wildlife (DFW) to approve residential bulkheads and grossly expanded DFW’s fining authority. 12

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2SSB 5489: Environmental Justice Opposed | Passed Senate only Created a task force to implement a health disparities map created by special interests and missing significant data points and required state agency permitting and regulations to incorporate the precautionary principle into all decisions.

SHB 2167: Bank Tax Increase Opposed | Passed | Signed A last minute bill introduced in the final days of session that massively increased taxes on large national banks. All banks are an important part of the lending ladder for mortgages and construction loans. Taxing any of them higher means less money in the lending pipeline.

ESSB 5998: Graduated Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) Opposed | Passed | Signed Restructured REET to a graduated structure, not considering greenfield acquisition.


2020 BILLS E2SHB 2311: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Opposed | Passed | Signed Increased the state’s greenhouse gas emissions goals to beyond international agreements and are not aligned with the state’s population growth. Setting goals like these often turns into new regulations with little reference to economic impacts, costing builders more to build. E2SHB 1110: Low Carbon Fuel Standard Opposed | Passed House only Required all fuel to meet a low carbon fuel standard, raising the cost per gallon significantly without increasing any road capacity. SHB 2343: Urban Housing BIAW-supported | Passed | Signed The follow up bill to HB 1923 from 2019, it expanded the list of options for cities, allowing more time for action and enabling more cities to say “yes” to growth. SHB 2409: Workers’ Comp Opposed | Passed | Signed Before this bill was improved in the Senate—it got to ‘neutral-ish’—it passed the House adding significant costs and liability to the workers’ compensation system by tripling penalties, requiring employer neutrality in claims management, and adding additional burdensome requirements for claims administration.

SHB 2673: SEPA Exemptions BIAW-supported | Passed | Signed Added a local government categorical exemption option so local governments can exempt growth from SEPA if it roughly meets the underlying comprehensive plan.

ESSB 6147: Residential Bulkheads Opposed | Passed Senate only Created a complicated scheme for residential bulkheads, where Department of Fish and Wildlife determines, with no practical or cost test, how or if a property can repair, replace, or install a bulkhead.

ESHB 2427: Climate Change/GMA Opposed | Passed House only Added climate change as new goal to the Growth Management Act. ESSB 6168: Supplemental Budget Opposed | Passed | Signed The supplemental budget spent all additional revenue: an additional $1.5 billion the state was anticipating, taxes from the 2019 session, and an additional tax. The budget contains a host of items that are detrimental to housing. One such item: a budget proviso for a study to create a system to require net ecological gain for all permits, which means in order to get approval for land use the requirements would mean mitigation above what the project caused. ESSB 6492: B&O Tax Increase Opposed | Passed | Signed This was a fix for the same bill passed in 2019, which was so complicated the Department of Revenue could not implement. So, the Legislature took the opportunity and gave large tech companies a tax break and added the tax burden to nearly everyone else—by expanding a 20% B&O surcharge to all services. may 2020

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Grad. Real Estate Tax

Bank Tax Increase

Environmental Justice

Condo Reform

PAC to PAC Disclosure

B&O Tax Increase

N NO vote

Urban Residential Building

OPPOSED BIAW’s Position Y YES vote

Residential Bulkheads HPA

NO vote

E = Excused

Residential Bulkheads HPA

N

Operating Budget

SUPPORTED BIAW’s position Y YES vote

PAC to PAC Disclosure

2019 BILLS Low Carbon Fuel Standard

VOTE KEY

ESHB E2SHB ESHB 2SHB 2SHB E2SHB E2SHB SB ESB 2SSB SHB ESSB BILL # 1109 1110 1379 1579 1579 1923 2158 5221 5334 5489 2167 5998

HOUSE (Y-N-E)

SENATE (Y-N-E) 27-27-1 27-21-1 26-20-3 33-12-4 25-22-2 33-14-2 49-0 27-21-1 25-24 26-22-1

57-41 53-43-2

59-39

57-37-4 66-30-2 52-45-1

93-0-5

53-43-2

56-42

BIAW’s POSITION N N N N N Y N N Y N N N Y Y N N N N N N N N N N 1

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Sen. Guy Palumbo (D)1 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Sen. Derek Stanford (D)1 N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Rep. Davina Duerr (D)1 Y Y Rep. Shelley Kloba (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

2 Sen. Randi Becker (R) Rep. Andrew Barkis (R) Rep. J.T. Wilcox (R)

Y N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

3 Sen. Andy Billig (D) Rep. Timm Ormsby (D) Rep. Marcus Riccelli (D)

N Y Y N Y Y Y YY Y Y Y Y YY Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

4 Sen. Mike Padden (R) Rep. Bob McCaslin (R) Rep. Matt Shea (R)

Y N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N E

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N E

N N N N N N

5 Sen. Mark Mullet (D) Rep. Lisa Callan (D) Rep. Bill Ramos (D)

N Y Y N Y Y Y YY Y N Y YY Y N

E Y Y Y Y

E Y Y Y Y

E Y Y Y Y N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N Y Y Y Y

6 Sen. Jeff Holy (R) Rep. Jenny Graham (R) Rep. Mike Volz (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N E N N

N N N N N N

N Y Y N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

7 Sen. Shelly Short (R) Rep. Joel Kretz (R) Rep. Jacquelin Maycumber (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N N N N N N N

Y Y N N E E

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

8 Sen. Sharon Brown (R) Rep. Matt Boehnke (R) Rep. Brad Klippert (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N N N

Y Y N N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

9 Sen. Mark Schoesler (R) Rep. Mary Dye (R) Rep. Joe Schmick (R)

Y N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

Y Y N N N N

N N N N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

0 1

Y Sen. Barbara Bailey (R)2 N N E N N Y N N N N N N N N N N Y Sen. Ron Muzzall (R)2 Y YY Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Rep. Dave Paul (D) N Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Rep. Norma Smith (R) N N Y Y N N Y N N Y N N N N N

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B&O Tax Increase

Supplemental Budget

Bulkheads

VOTING RECORD with BIAW SEPA Exemptions

Climate Change in GMA

Workers’ Comp

Urban Housing

Low Carbon Fuel Standard

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

2020 BILLS

E2SHB E2SHB SHB SHB ESHB SHB ESSB ESSB ESSB 2311 1110 2343 2409 2427 2673 6147 6168 6492 55-41-2 52-44-2

93-2-3 52-44-2 59-37-2

98-0

Votes for BIAW bills are weighted in percentage totals.

56-41-1 52-45-1

28-21-0 36-11-2 43-4-2 32-16-1 28-21 28-21 2019-2020 2017-2018

SCORE SCORE N N Y N N Y N N N Y Y N N N N N N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

2

32% 19% 26% 13% 21% 21% 13%

26% 20% 21% 17%

N N N N N N N N N N

N N Y N N Y N N Y Y N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

88% 100% 100%

96% 100% 77%

92% 100% 89%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 32% 21%

20% 43% 43%

23% 38% 32%

N N N N N N N N N N

N N Y N N Y N N Y N N Y N N

Y Y N N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

88% 100% 100%

94% 96% 95%

91% 98% 98%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y N N

61% 69% 29% 39%

65% 29% 39%

N N N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y Y N N N N Y N N N N Y

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

88% 100% 91% 92% 96%

94% 91% 94%

N N N N N N N N N N

N N Y N N Y N N Y N N N N Y

Y N N Y Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

88% 92% 92%

96% 100% 100%

92% 96% 96%

N N N N N N N N N N

N N Y N N Y N N Y N N N N Y

Y Y N N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N E N N

88% 94% 100% 100% 100%

91% 100% 100%

N N N E N N N N N

N N Y Y N N N N Y N N Y N N

Y N N Y Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

97% 92% 92%

94% 100% 100%

95% 96% 96%

100% 86% 100% 32% 65% 90%

93% 100% 32% 78%

Y Y N N N N N Y Y N N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y E N N N N Y E Y Y N N Y Y Y N N N N 1

4-YEAR CUMULATIVE SCORE

Sen. Palumbo resigned after the 2019 session; replaced by Rep. Stanford whose house seat was then filled by Duerr Sen. Bailey resigned after the 2019 session; replaced by Muzall may 2020

15


Grad. Real Estate Tax

Bank Tax Increase

Environmental Justice

Condo Reform

PAC to PAC Disclosure

B&O Tax Increase

Urban Residential Building

N NO vote

Residential Bulkheads HPA

OPPOSED BIAW’s Position Y YES vote

Residential Bulkheads HPA

N NO vote E = Excused

Operating Budget

SUPPORTED BIAW’s position Y YES vote

PAC to PAC Disclosure

2019 BILLS Low Carbon Fuel Standard

VOTE KEY

ESHB E2SHB ESHB 2SHB 2SHB E2SHB E2SHB SB ESB 2SSB SHB ESSB BILL # 1109 1110 1379 1579 1579 1923 2158 5221 5334 5489 2167 5998

HOUSE (Y-N-E)

SENATE (Y-N-E) 27-27-1 27-21-1 26-20-3 33-12-4 25-22-2 33-14-2 49-0 27-21-1 25-24 26-22-1

57-41 53-43-2

59-39

57-37-4 66-30-2 52-45-1

93-0-5

53-43-2

56-42

BIAW’s POSITION N N N N N Y N N Y N N N Y Y N N N N N N N N N N 1 Sen. Bob Hasegawa (D) 1 Rep. Steve Bergquist (D) Rep. Zack Hudgins (D)

N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

2 Sen. Brad Hawkins (R) 1 Rep. Keith Goehner (R) Rep. Mike Steele (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N E

Y Y Y Y N N

N Y Y N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

3 Sen. Judy Warnick (R) 1 Rep. Tom Dent (R) Rep. Alex Ybarra (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

Y Y N N Y Y

N N N N N N N N

Y N Y N E Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

4 Sen. Curtis King (R) 1 Rep. Chris Corry (R) Rep. Gina Mosbrucker (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N N N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

5 Sen. Jim Honeyford (R) 1 Rep. Bruce Chandler (R) Rep. Jeremie Dufault (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N N N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

16 Sen. Maureen Walsh (R) Rep. Bill Jenkin (R) Rep. Skyler Rude (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

Y Y N N N N

N N N N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

E N N N N

17 Sen. Lynda Wilson (R) Rep. Paul Harris (R) Rep. Vicki Kraft (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

E N N N N

N N Y Y N N

N N N N N N N N

Y Y E Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

18 Sen. Ann Rivers (R) Rep. Larry Hoff (R) Rep. Brandon Vick (R)

N Y N Y N N N N N N E N N N N

N N N N N N

Y Y N N N N

N N Y Y N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

19 Sen. Dean Takko (D) Rep. Brian Blake (D) Rep. Jim Walsh (R)

Y N Y N N N Y Y N N Y Y N N N N

Y Y Y Y N N

Y Y Y Y N N

Y N Y N Y Y N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y N N

Y Y Y Y N N

20 Sen. John Braun (R) Rep. Richard DeBolt (R) Rep. Ed Orcutt (R)

Y N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

N N N N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N E N N

N N N N N N

16

building insight


B&O Tax Increase

Supplemental Budget

Bulkheads

VOTING RECORD with BIAW SEPA Exemptions

Climate Change in GMA

Workers’ Comp

Urban Housing

Low Carbon Fuel Standard

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

2020 BILLS

E2SHB E2SHB SHB SHB ESHB SHB ESSB ESSB ESSB 2311 1110 2343 2409 2427 2673 6147 6168 6492 55-41-2 52-44-2

93-2-3 52-44-2 59-37-2

98-0

Votes for BIAW bills are weighted in percentage totals.

56-41-1 52-45-1

28-21-0 36-11-2 43-4-2 32-16-1 28-21 28-21 2019-2020 2017-2018

SCORE SCORE N N Y N N Y N N N Y Y N N N N N N N

4-YEAR CUMULATIVE SCORE

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY YY YY

22% 21% 21%

8% 13% 22%

15% 17% 22%

N N N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y N Y Y Y N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

97% 92% 92% 83% 96%

94% 92% 90%

N N N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y N N Y N N Y N N Y N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

97% 94% 92% 100% 100%

95% 96% 100%

N N N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y N N Y N N Y N N Y N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

91% 94% 92% 92%

93% 92% 92%

N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N N N Y N N Y N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

88% 96% 89% 100% 92%

92% 95% 92%

N N N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y Y N N N N Y N N Y N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

100% 93% 92% 100% 92%

97% 96% 92%

N N N N N N N N N N

N N Y Y N N N N N N N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

85% 100% 89%

96% 96% 96%

91% 98% 92%

N N N N N N N N N N

N N Y N N Y N N Y N N N N Y

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

93% 98% 92% 92% 100%

96% 92% 96%

Y Y N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Y N N Y N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y N N

YY YY N N

34% 37% 92%

69% 43% 96%

52% 40% 94%

N N N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y Y Y E Y Y N N Y N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

88% 81% 92%

92% 95% 96%

90% 88% 94%

may 2020

17


Grad. Real Estate Tax

Bank Tax Increase

Environmental Justice

Condo Reform

PAC to PAC Disclosure

B&O Tax Increase

N NO vote

Urban Residential Building

OPPOSED BIAW’s Position Y YES vote

Residential Bulkheads HPA

E = Excused

Residential Bulkheads HPA

N NO vote

Operating Budget

SUPPORTED BIAW’s position Y YES vote

PAC to PAC Disclosure

2019 BILLS Low Carbon Fuel Standard

VOTE KEY

ESHB E2SHB ESHB 2SHB 2SHB E2SHB E2SHB SB ESB 2SSB SHB ESSB BILL # 1109 1110 1379 1579 1579 1923 2158 5221 5334 5489 2167 5998

HOUSE (Y-N-E)

SENATE (Y-N-E) 27-27-1 27-21-1 26-20-3 33-12-4 25-22-2 33-14-2 49-0 27-21-1 25-24 26-22-1

57-41 53-43-2

59-39

57-37-4 66-30-2 52-45-1

93-0-5

53-43-2

56-42

N BIAW’s POSITION N N N N N Y N N Y N N N Y Y N N N N N N N N N Y Y Y 1 Sen. Marko Liias (D) 2 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Rep. Strom Peterson (D) Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

22 Sen. Sam Hunt (D) Rep. Beth Doglio (D) Rep. Laurie Dolan (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

23 Sen. Christine Rolfes (D) Rep. Sherry Appleton (D) Rep. Drew Hansen (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y E Y Y

N N Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y E Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

24 Sen. Kevin Van De Wage (D) Rep. Mike Chapman (D) Rep. Steve Tharinger (D)

Y N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y E Y Y Y Y

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25 Sen. Hans Zeiger (R) Rep. Kelly Chambers (R) Rep. Chris Gildon (R)

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

Y Y N N N N

Y N N Y N N N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

26 Sen. Emily Randall (D) Rep. Michelle Caldier (R) Rep. Jesse Young (R)

Y Y Y Y N N N N N N Y E N Y N

Y Y N N N N

Y Y Y Y E

Y Y E N N N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y N N N N

Y Y N N N N

27 Sen. Jeannie Darneille (D) Rep. Jake Fey (D) Rep. Laurie Jinkins (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

28 Sen. Steve O’Ban (R) Rep. Christine Kilduff (D) Rep. Mari Leavitt (D)

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y N

N N Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y N N Y Y Y N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N Y Y N N

N N Y Y N N

Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

29 Sen. Steve Conway (D) Rep. Steve Kirby (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Rep. Melanie Morgan (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y 30

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Sen. Claire Wilson (D) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Rep. Jesse Johnson (D)3 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Rep. Mike Pellicciotti (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Rep. Kristine Reeves (D)3 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

18

building insight


B&O Tax Increase

Supplemental Budget

Bulkheads

VOTING RECORD with BIAW SEPA Exemptions

Climate Change in GMA

Workers’ Comp

Urban Housing

Low Carbon Fuel Standard

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

2020 BILLS

E2SHB E2SHB SHB SHB ESHB SHB ESSB ESSB ESSB 2311 1110 2343 2409 2427 2673 6147 6168 6492 98-0

Votes for BIAW bills are weighted in percentage totals.

56-41-1 52-45-1

4-YEAR CUMULATIVE SCORE

55-41-2 52-44-2

93-2-3 52-44-2 59-37-2

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 21%

20% 22% 43%

23% 22% 32%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 21%

11% 13% 43%

18% 17% 32%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N Y N Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

9% 18% 21%

20% 13% 22%

15% 16% 22%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

35% 32% 21%

24% 43% 43%

30% 38% 32%

N N N E N N N N N

Y Y N E N E Y N N Y N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

94% 94% 91% 92%

94% 91% 92%

Y Y N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y Y N N N N Y N N Y N N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y N N N N

Y Y N N N N

26% 100% 87% 100% 70%

26% 94% 85%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 19% 21%

22% 17% 35%

24% 18% 28%

N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N N Y Y Y Y

N N Y Y N N

94% 94% 21% 43% 47%

94% 32% 47%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N Y N Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

6% 24% 23% 43% 21%

15% 33% 21%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 21% 39% 21% 39%

25% 21% 30% 30%

2019-2020 2017-2018 28-21-0 36-11-2 43-4-2 32-16-1 28-21 28-21 SCORE SCORE Y Y N N N N N N N N N Y N N Y N N N

3

Rep. Reeves resigned after the 2019 session; replaced by Johnson

may 2020

19


Grad. Real Estate Tax

Bank Tax Increase

Environmental Justice

Condo Reform

PAC to PAC Disclosure

B&O Tax Increase

N NO vote

Urban Residential Building

OPPOSED BIAW’s Position Y YES vote

Residential Bulkheads HPA

E = Excused

Residential Bulkheads HPA

N NO vote

Operating Budget

SUPPORTED BIAW’s position Y YES vote

PAC to PAC Disclosure

2019 BILLS Low Carbon Fuel Standard

VOTE KEY

ESHB E2SHB ESHB 2SHB 2SHB E2SHB E2SHB SB ESB 2SSB SHB ESSB BILL # 1109 1110 1379 1579 1579 1923 2158 5221 5334 5489 2167 5998

HOUSE (Y-N-E)

SENATE (Y-N-E) 27-27-1 27-21-1 26-20-3 33-12-4 25-22-2 33-14-2 49-0 27-21-1 25-24 26-22-1

57-41 53-43-2

59-39

57-37-4 66-30-2 52-45-1

93-0-5

53-43-2

56-42

N Y Y BIAW’s POSITION N N N N N Y N N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N 31 Sen. Phil Fortunato (R) Rep. Morgan Irwin (R) Rep. Drew Stokesbary (R)

Y N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

YY N N YY

N N N N N N N N

YY N N YY YY

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

32 Sen. Jesse Salomon (D) Rep. Lauren Davis (D) Rep. Cindy Ryu (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

33 Sen. Karen Keiser (D) Rep. Mia Gregerson (D) Rep. Tina Orwall (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y YY YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

34 Sen. Joe Nguyen (D) Rep. Eileen Cody (D) Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon (D)

Y N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

35 Sen. Tim Sheldon (D) Rep. Dan Griffey (R) Rep. Drew MacEwen (R)

Y N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

YY N N YY

Y E Y N N N N

YY N N YY YY

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

36 Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D) Rep. Noel Frame (D) Rep. Gael Tarleton (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

37 Sen. Rebecca Saldaña (D) Rep. Eric Pettigrew (D) Rep. Sharon Tomiko Santos (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y YY YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

38 Sen. John McCoy (D) Rep. June Robinson (D) Rep. Mike Sells (D)

N E N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

E Y Y Y Y

E Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

39 Sen. Keith Wagoner (R) Rep. Carolyn Eslick (R) Rep. Robert Sutherland (R)

Y N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N

YY N N N N

N N N N N N N N

YY N N YY YY

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

40

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY YY Sen. Liz Lovelett (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY Rep. Debra Lekanoff (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Rep. Jeff Morris (D)4 E Y Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY Y Rep. Alex Ramel (D)4 Y

20

building insight


B&O Tax Increase

Supplemental Budget

Bulkheads

VOTING RECORD with BIAW SEPA Exemptions

Climate Change in GMA

Workers’ Comp

Urban Housing

Low Carbon Fuel Standard

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

2020 BILLS

E2SHB E2SHB SHB SHB ESHB SHB ESSB ESSB ESSB 2311 1110 2343 2409 2427 2673 6147 6168 6492 55-41-2 52-44-2

93-2-3 52-44-2 59-37-2

98-0

Votes for BIAW bills are weighted in percentage totals.

56-41-1 52-45-1

2019-2020 2017-2018 28-21-0 36-11-2 43-4-2 32-16-1 28-21 28-21 SCORE SCORE Y Y N N N N N N N N N Y N N Y N N N

4-YEAR CUMULATIVE SCORE

N N N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y N N Y N N Y N N Y N N

N N E Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

94% 92% 100%

96% 74% 74%

95% 83% 87%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 21% 13%

25% 21% 17%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 21%

22% 22% 22%

24% 22% 22%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 43% 21% 43%

25% 32% 32%

N N N N N N N E N

E Y N N Y N N Y N N Y N N

N E N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

96% 92% 100%

84% 96% 96%

90% 94% 98%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 21%

20% 22% 17%

23% 22% 19%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 43% 21% 22%

25% 32% 22%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY E Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

9% 21% 21%

13% 43% 22%

11% 32% 22%

N N N N N N N N N

Y Y Y N N Y N N Y N N Y N N

Y N Y N Y Y Y Y

N N N N N N

N N N N N N

100% 61% 92% 63% 92%

81% 78% 92%

Y YY Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 10% 14% 21%

25% 21% 12% 21%

4

Rep. Morris resigned after the 2019 session; replaced by Ramel

may 2020

21


Grad. Real Estate Tax

Bank Tax Increase

Environmental Justice

Condo Reform

PAC to PAC Disclosure

B&O Tax Increase

N NO vote

Urban Residential Building

OPPOSED BIAW’s Position Y YES vote

Residential Bulkheads HPA

E = Excused

Residential Bulkheads HPA

N NO vote

Operating Budget

SUPPORTED BIAW’s position Y YES vote

PAC to PAC Disclosure

2019 BILLS Low Carbon Fuel Standard

VOTE KEY

ESHB E2SHB ESHB 2SHB 2SHB E2SHB E2SHB SB ESB 2SSB SHB ESSB BILL # 1109 1110 1379 1579 1579 1923 2158 5221 5334 5489 2167 5998

HOUSE (Y-N-E)

SENATE (Y-N-E) 27-27-1 27-21-1 26-20-3 33-12-4 25-22-2 33-14-2 49-0 27-21-1 25-24 26-22-1

57-41 53-43-2

59-39

57-37-4 66-30-2 52-45-1

93-0-5

53-43-2

56-42

N Y Y BIAW’s POSITION N N N N N Y N N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N 41 Sen. Lisa Wellman (D) Rep. Tana Senn (D) Rep. My-Linh Thai (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y N N Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

42 Sen. Doug Ericksen (R) Rep. Sharon Shewmaker (D) Rep. Luanne Van Werven (R)

Y N Y N N N Y Y N N N N Y Y N N

N N Y Y Y Y

N N Y Y N N

Y N N Y N Y N Y

YY N N YY YY

N N N Y N Y

N N Y Y N Y

43 Sen. Jamie Pedersen (D) Rep. Frank Chopp (D) Rep. Nicole Macri (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

44 Sen. Steve Hobbs (D) Rep. John Lovick (D) Rep. Jared Mead (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

E Y Y Y Y

Y N N Y Y Y N N

Y YY Y YY YY

Y N Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

45 Sen. Manka Dhingra (D) Rep. Roger Goodman (D) Rep. Larry Springer (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y E YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y N Y Y Y Y

46 Sen. David Frockt (D) Rep. Gerry Pollet (D) Rep. Javier Valdez (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y N N Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

47 Sen. Mona Das (D) Rep. Debra Entenman (D) Rep. Pat Sullivan (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

48 Sen. Patty Kuderer (D) Rep. Vandana Slatter (D) Rep. Amy Walen (D)

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y 49 Sen. Annette Cleveland (D) Y Y Y Y Rep. Monica Jurado Stonier (D) Y Y Y Rep. Sharon Wylie (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y YY YY

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

22

building insight


B&O Tax Increase

Supplemental Budget

Bulkheads

VOTING RECORD with BIAW SEPA Exemptions

Climate Change in GMA

Workers’ Comp

Urban Housing

Low Carbon Fuel Standard

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

2020 BILLS

E2SHB E2SHB SHB SHB ESHB SHB ESSB ESSB ESSB 2311 1110 2343 2409 2427 2673 6147 6168 6492 55-41-2 52-44-2

93-2-3 52-44-2 59-37-2

98-0

Votes for BIAW bills are weighted in percentage totals.

56-41-1 52-45-1

28-21-0 36-11-2 43-4-2 32-16-1 28-21 28-21 2019-2020 2017-2018

SCORE SCORE N N Y N N Y N N N Y Y N N N N N N N

4-YEAR CUMULATIVE SCORE

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 11% 13% 35% 21%

18% 24% 21%

N N Y N Y N N N N N

N N Y Y N Y N Y Y N N Y N N

N N N N Y Y Y Y

N N Y N N

N N N N N N

78% 55% 76%

92% 55% 100%

85% 88%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 21%

10% 43% 13%

18% 32% 17%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y N Y

38% 67% 21% 43% 32%

53% 32% 32%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

34% 17% 37%

22% 13% 43%

28% 15% 40%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 13% 21%

20% 17% 17%

23% 15% 19%

Y Y E Y Y Y N Y N

Y Y E Y E Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 24% 43%

25% 21% 34%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N

YY Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 20% 21% 43% 34%

23% 32% 34%

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y YY Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y

25% 21% 21%

18% 19% 22%

10% 17% 22%

may 2020

23


2020 EIR Awards Call for Entries July 1 - Aug. 31

Building Industry Association of Washington 111 21st Avenue SW | Olympia, WA 98501 (360) 352-7800 | BIAW.com |

Due to the disruption of the governor’s shutdown of residential construction, the BIAW Remodelers Council unanimously voted to reschedule the Excellence in Remodeling Awards. The rescheduled dates are as follows:

Call for Entries..................................July 1 - Aug. 31

Judging Process..........................Sept. 11 - Sept. 20

Winners Announced (via email)..................... Oct. 1

EIR Awards Reception...................................Nov. 11

The awards reception, traditionally held during the summer board meeting, will now take place Wednesday, Nov. 11, in conjunction with the fall board meeting. The fall board meeting is scheduled for Nov. 11-13, at the Hilton Vancouver. Projects currently entered online, whether in-process (saved) or paid, will be transferred to the new schedule. You will not be able to access/complete your entry until the process reopens July 1. If you have any questions, please contact Brenda Kwieciak at (360) 352-7800, ext. 113 or brendak@biaw. com. Thank you for your patience.

Western-themed Spike Party moves to fall board meeting The Spike Party, BIAW’s annual event in which we honor our remarkable recruiters, is rescheduled for the fall board meeting. The invitation-only, western-themed event is now set for Wednesday, Nov. 11. More details will follow as the date draws near.

June summer board meeting cancelled Fall board meeting dates unchanged: Hilton Vancouver, Nov. 11-13

On April 6, BIAW senior officers authorized the cancellation of the summer board meeting scheduled for June 22-24 at Skamania Lodge. Although this was not an easy decision, it was necessary due to current conditions facing our members and industry. BIAW is planning to hold an abbreviated version of the summer board meeting, with several options and locations currently being discussed. Once a final decision has been made, BIAW directors and meeting attendees will be notified. The fall board meeting schedule remains unchanged and is scheduled for Nov. 11-13 at the Hilton Vancouver. The Hilton Vancouver is the site of BIAW’s fall board meeting scheduled for Nov. 11-13, 2020.

One good bit of news, however, BIAW was able to secure Skamania Lodge for our 2021 summer board meeting. We look forward to that venue hosting next year’s summer board meeting.


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