Building Insight June 2020

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building insight


Table of contents

WHO WE ARE The Building Industry Association of Washington is the state’s largest trade association representing thousands of companies in the home building industry. BIAW is dedicated to ensuring and enhancing the vitality of the building industry for the benefit of its members and the housing needs of citizens.

BIAW STAFF Executive Vice President Greg Lane Government Affairs Director Jan Himebaugh General Counsel Jackson Maynard Administrative Services Director Jan Rohila R.O.I.I.® Select Co-Directors Jenn Kavanaugh and Michael Couthran Communications and Public Relations Director Jennifer Spall

B U IL DI NG INSI G H T ED I TO R I A L STA F F Communications and Public Relations Director Jennifer Spall Communications Manager Leah Jaber Writer and Editor Bailee Wicks Layout and Design Brenda Kwieciak

To submit editorial or advertise contact communications@biaw.com.

BIA of Clark County member and a participant of BIAW’s retro program, R.O.I.I.® Select, Justin Graham of Paul Davis Restoration, is all smiles as he proudly shows off his refund check.

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Pro-builder candidates need your vote

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What is a JHA?

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Externship event on tap

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Homebuilders need industry-friendly candidates at all levels of government

Find out Phase 2 construction requirements, including details on what is a job hazard analysis

Event to highlight skilled trades, home building, and other industry-related career paths

Refund checks delivered R.O.I.I.® Select members receive refund checks

june 2020

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President’s message “Life is uncertain. Eat dessert first.” —Ernestine Ulmer I saw this truism enacted at the grocery store early on in our COVID-19 lockdown when two men wanting to make cookies were upset with the lack of sugar. As the lockdown continues, it has been a constant baking marathon on Facebook as people try new recipes, use measurements to home school, and simply indulge. BIAW leadership and staff constantly pivot, adapt, do, redo, and redo again. Even as the governor lays out possible timelines for Phase 2 and 3, there is still uncertainty.

Sherry Schwab President

Uncertainty offers opportunity

The construction industry is more fortunate than most. BIAW negotiated both Phase 1 and Phase 2 with a coalition of labor unions, private stakeholders, and government representatives. We are the leading industry to return to work; however, not all counties are approved for Phase 2, and unless the bar changes, it will be difficult for the most populated counties to qualify. We are not out of the woods yet. Construction clients do not rush in when the “open” sign turns on. Add to that, the unpredictability of our industry getting shut down if the governor so decides, the unsteady financial market, sky-rocketing unemployment, … and the list goes on.

How can you plan during this time of uncertainty? One way is to look at lessons learned from past construction industry upheavals. Determine your core company values and assess changes you may need. Examine your financials Can you trim costs? Can you hold onto your principal funds to last for the duration of the crisis? Evaluate your employees and their roles Can your workers job-share, telecommute, work flexible hours? Analyze your home and field office systems Can office systems be streamlined? Contact trade partners If possible, renegotiate trade agreements, review discounts, and update payment dates. Improve your client relationships, both new and past Market your core values, boast about your safety measures, and celebrate your uniqueness. Strategize short term goals What are my needs today? Work on implementing preparations gradually What are my needs in the future?

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Our industry is still not “business as usual.” Furthermore, there are no guarantees home building operations will return to pre-COVID-19 methods. The construction industry has always had time-seasoned members retire during every downturn. We will lose skilled workers and mentors. The residential construction skilled trades labor shortage will continue; however, as savvy business owners, you must consider all labor options. We chose home building as our life’s vocation because we find satisfaction in what we do. We provide housing, an essential element of life. We are good at what we do. We will not only prevail but will help lead the economic recovery again. Do. Redo. Repeat the cycle. And do not forget to eat dessert.


Government Affairs

Pro-builder candidates need your vote by Jan Himebaugh

PRIMARY ELECTION

Government Affairs Director

The Washington Affordable Housing Council (WAHC) meets at the end of June to endorse and fund candidates. It’s a big year for elections— the entire state House, half the state Senate, all statewide executive offices, four Washington Supreme Court spots, and many more local races will be on the ballot this August. Also included are the presidential and congressional races. Practically the only office not on the 2020 ballot for Washingtonians is a U.S. Senate race. This election cycle will be different, with not much, if any, face-to-face politicking available. Incumbents will likely have an edge, especially in the primary. Gov. Inslee is running for a third term and a whopping 35 additional individuals filed to run for his position as well. Even with such an enormous list of opponents, a failed run for Presidency, an economic shutdown, his administration losing hundreds of millions of unemployment insurance dollars to a Nigerian crime ring, miscounting COVID-19 deaths, and releasing prisoners only to have them immediately reoffend, pollsters and the political elite still assume Inslee will cruise to a third term. As the world seems to shift daily, is there a path for opposition amid a pandemic? The governor has not been willing to share hard data points to support his decisions and has continued to lock down small businesses. Is that enough for Washington voters to choose to go in a different direction?

BALLOTS MUST BE POSTMARKED BY AUGUST 3 REGISTER TO VOTE AT www.SOS.WA.GOV

turnout and in Washington, where President Trump, a Republican, does not perform well, the anti-Trump electorate will likely be out in droves. This will be a crucial point in swing races. Democrats will try to tie all Republicans to Trump, and Republicans will have to balance their base of Trump supporters and appeal to independents wary of the president’s personality. For home builders, 2021 will be important as the state seeks economic recovery from the COVID-19 crisis. We need pro-builder legislators at all levels of government. Look for WAHC’s endorsement list in your email after the June meeting, and make sure you mark your ballot for pro-builder candidates. Look for your local home builder’s association endorsement for local races as well—localities can be even worse for builders than the state. It’s important, we as an industry, support through voting and contributing to candidates who are good for builders.

Any presidential election year also increases voter june 2020

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Executive Vice President’s message I am so proud of the performance of BIAW’s R.O.I.I.® Select program this past year. Under the leadership of Jenn Kavanaugh and Michael Couthran, the R.O.I.I.® Select team delivered outstanding results for our members, once again. As a member of BIAW, if you do not take advantage of participating in the R.O.I.I.® Select retro program, you are truly missing out on one of the amazing benefits of membership in our association. Last month, we distributed $27.2 million to the 1,820 companies that are members of R.O.I.I.® Select. This represents a refund of workers’ compensation premiums paid into the Washington Department of Labor & Industries (L&I). For some companies, the refunds they received represented a return of over 40% of their annual L&I premium. Take a minute and do that math for your company. Greg Lane

Executive Vice President

Not only is R.O.I.I.® Select the oldest and largest construction retro group in Washington, BIAW’s R.O.I.I.® Select program also consistently outperforms every other construction retro program in the industry. For the three years included in the 2020 refund, R.O.I.I.® Select received refunds of 34.5% (2018), 43.1% (2017) and 39.9% (2016). All three of these refund percentages were significantly higher than all our direct competitors, as they have been now for the last six years. This year, knowing that many companies were struggling due to Gov. Inslee shutting down construction for a month, R.O.I.I.® Select also delivered those refund checks a month sooner. Many companies used those refunds to help keep their businesses going until residential construction was authorized to restart. And, the refund isn’t the only benefit of participating in R.O.I.I.® Select. Our safety experts will help you develop and implement effective safety strategies. Our experienced claim representatives will work with you to resolve claims with L&I as quickly and costeffectively as possible. You won’t find any other retro program that offers all the services provided by R.O.I.I.® Select at no additional cost. If your company is in a different construction retro program, as a BIAW member, you should seriously consider making a switch to R.O.I.I.® Select. If your company is not in a retro program, it’s time you took advantage of this outstanding member benefit. Contact the R.O.I.I.® Select team at BIAW at (360) 352-7800 or enroll@biaw.com. They can explain this outstanding safety-incentive program to you, answer all of your questions, and show you how much you could earn if you join R.O.I.I.® Select.

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building insight


Phase 2 Professional Workplaces

Professional spaces reopen by Jackson Maynard General Counsel

While much focus has been spent on criteria for Phase 2 construction requirements, it is important to note many BIAW members have business operations that involve professional spaces, which are open to the public. These spaces have different requirements than construction jobsites. Since Gov. Inslee’s Stay Home, Stay Healthy Proclamation, issued on March 23, 2020, almost all professional offices for nonessential businesses have been shut down-except for limited operations related to essential business functions, such as processing payroll or maintaining inventory.

Phase 2 Professional Services Restart Requirements

On May 13, the governor’s office issued an additional guidance for resuming personal and professional services in the Safe Start Phase 2 recovery plan. These services are broadly defined as an “…office-based occupation that typically serves a client base.” BIAW members that have office space (apart from a construction jobsite) such as a showroom or client conference space will likely fall under this new order.

n Keep your guest occupancy at 50% of maximum or lower, with authorized access to the business be made primarily through the front door, with minimized waiting area.

MORE INFO

Review the entire document carefully to ensure your office space is as safe as your construction site. https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/COVID19Phase2ProfessionalServicesGuidance.pdf The following are some key requirements that focus on facility layout, posting requirements, and employee-service practices. Please note this is a not a complete list.

Facility-Specific Safety Practices

n Maintain a minimum of 6 feet between employees and clients in all interactions at all times, including furniture arrangement. If not feasible for a specific task, other prevention measures are required, such as the use of barriers, minimization of service providers or clients in narrow, enclosed areas and waiting rooms, staggered breaks, and work shift starts.

n Identify and control “choke points” and “high-risk areas” at locations where employees or clients may typically congregate so that social distancing is always maintained. n Make tissues and trash cans available throughout the worksite. n Place face shields or sneeze guards throughout the worksite at all places of potential interaction between service providers and clients. n Cordon off any areas where an employee-service provider with See PROFESSIONAL on page 10 june 2020

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Construction Restart

Phase 2 rolls out On May 15, Gov. Inslee issued additional guidance on Phase 2 construction requirements. Below are some highlights between Phase 1 and Phase 2 requirements. Visit BIAW.com/jobsite_safety to familiarize yourself with the complete list of all Phase 2 construction requirements.

New Requirements and Changes

Counties authorized* for Phase 2 construction

n All construction work is now authorized (new and any work that requires employees to be closer than 6 feet) n A Jobsite Hazard Analysis must be included in the Jobsite Safety Plan (work activities considered medium or high risk transmission levels as defined by L&I, i.e., activities that require employees to be closer than 6 feet for extended periods) n Specific masks are to be worn for work activities considered medium and high risk transmission levels, as defined by L&I n A cleaning schedule must be included in the Jobsite Safety Plan n The site-specific COVID-19 Supervisor name and contact information must be clearly displayed on jobsite postings n If only one person is working on the jobsite—exempt from wearing a facial covering n Temperature and symptom screening can be done at home by employees and reported to the employer n Shared tools must be cleaned before being used by another employee n Training must be done in the language employees will best understand

Adams Asotin Clallam Columbia Cowlitz Ferry Garfield Grant Grays Harbor Island Jefferson Klickitat Kitsap Kittitas Lewis Lincoln Mason Pacific Pend Oreille San Juan Skamania Spokane Stevens Thurston Wahkiakum Walla Walla Whitman

No Longer Required n Jobsite Safety Plan (signed copy) document—no longer required to post n Safety Requirements Working Group Phase 1 document—no longer required to post n Visitor’s Log document—no longer required to keep and archive n Work to be Performed on Jobsite document—no longer required to post n Coronavirus Prevention General Requirements document—no longer required to post n Gloves worn at all times no longer required; If employees are sharing tools—gloves are required n Eye protection worn at all times no longer required ; If employees are less than 6 feet—eye protection is required n Guidance recommending subcontractors be scheduled so that two or more are not on the jobsite simultaneously

*as of June 3, 2020

Please note: The Phase 1 construction requirement to keep and archive a Visitor’s Log is no longer re-

quired. View the governor’s Phase 1 construction working group recommendations document at https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/Phase%201%20Construction%20COVID-19%20Safety%20Requirements%20%28final%29.pdf. 8

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R.O.I.I.ÂŽ Select Safety Services

What is a JHA? by Bob White R.O.I.I.ÂŽ Select Safety Services Director

As Phase 2 construction begins for counties that have been approved, one of the changes between Phase 1 and Phase 2 construction is the added requirement of a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) to the Jobsite Safety Plan. The JHA has always played an important role in helping to manage safety on construction sites. In the Phase 2 requirements, the Jobsite Safety Plan must include a JHA, including a list of engineering controls and proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), for all jobsite activities defined by Washington Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) as medium and high transmission risk. Larger employers with designated safety personnel on staff, may be accustomed to creating a JHA, but smaller residential companies may not, as the JHA has not been a required document in the past. Below are some easy steps on how to fill out a JHA for Phase 2 construction compliance:

Step 1: Determine the transmission risk level

Review tasks employees will perform and determine whether it falls under a medium or high transmission risk level, and if there are any hazards involved with the task.

Step 2: Engineering controls

Describe the factors for how you will eliminate or minimize the hazard, such as redesigning the work area, so the transmission risk is reduced or eliminated. (sample: workers will use lift-aid devices to minimize the need for additional assistance)

Step 3: Administrative controls

Describe factors for how you will eliminate or minimize the hazard, such as modifying the way employees work around a hazard, so the transmission risk is reduced or eliminated. (sample: site foreman will ensure installation team members have needed lift-aid devices and required PPE)

Step 4: PPE controls

Describe personal protective equipment (PPE) used to protect employees working in the presence of hazards. (sample: workers must wear safety glasses and dust filter masks) Remember, Phase 2 construction requirements require commerciallyproduced masks for medium and high transmission risk levels. Cloth

Transmission Risk Levels* Medium Transmission Risk Large crews outside where at least 6-foot distance is mostly maintained, but with job tasks that require several minutes of 6-foot distance broken several times a day. Tools are shared and sanitized between different users. High Transmission Risk Tasks in close quarters, such as multiple-occupancy permitrequired confined space or inside a room with 10 or more people where at least 6-foot distance is not maintained, and includes job tasks requiring sustained closetogether (less than 3-feet apart) work for more than 10 minutes in an hour, multiple times a day. *as defined by L&I

masks are not satisfactory to mitigate medium and high transmission risk level work. Get your employees involved If you’re not familiar with creating a JHA, having your employees involved in creating a JHA will help save time, but it is also their job. Using teamwork will make See JHA on page 10 june 2020

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JHA from page 9

PROFESSIONAL from page 7

these newly required forms more efficient, but you’ll also likely get better safety buy-in from your employees.

probable or confirmed COVID-19 illness worked, touched surfaces, etc., until the area and equipment is cleaned and disinfected.

To view and download a JHA, Phase 2 Jobsite Safety Plan template, and all other documents required for Phase 2 construction, go to BIAW.com/ jobsite_safety. Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) Phase 2 Construction Work Site/Project OLD McDONALD'S FARM HOUSE Project Location

123 MAIN STREET, ANYWHERE, ST 12345

Project Number

771

Date

MAY 20,2020

Prepared By

JACK SMITH (SITE FOREMAN)

Reviewed By CHARLEY JONES (GENERAL CONTRACTOR) Risk Task Level Work Task Description Engineering Controls H ✔ M CAR-POOLING WORKERS (+1 OCCUPANT PER VEHICLE) TO AND FROM WORK SITE REQUIRED DUE TO LIMITED PARKING AND SITE ACCESS CONSTRAINTS

Work Task Description

WORK REQUIRES INTERMITTENT ASSISTANCE TO HANG WALL CABINETS.

Risk Task Level H ✔ M

STOCK DRYWALL IN EACH ROOM

WORK REQUIRES INTERMITTENT ASSISTANCE TO CARRY AND POSITION SHEETS IN EACH ROOM.

Work Task Description

Administrative Controls

PPE

DRIVER OF VEHICLE WILL BE REQUIRED TO ENSURE ALL PASSENGERS WEARING SEATBELTS AND REQUIRED PPE

ALL VEHICLE OCCUPANTS MUST WEAR SAFETY GLASSES AND N-95 (MINIMUM) RATED FILTER MASKS

E L P SAM

Risk Task Level H M ✔

INSTALLATION OF CABINETS IN KITCHEN AND BATHROOM.

Work Task Description

VEHICLE OCUPANTS WILL REMAIN IN THEIR SEATS, WITH SEATBELTS SECURED DURING TRANSPORT.

Risk Task Levels High (H): Work consists of close quarters, such as multiple occupancy confined space, and includes job tasks requiring close together (less than 3-ft. apart) work for more than 10 minutes in an hour multiple times a day. Moderate (M): Work where at least 6-ft. distance is mostly maintained, but with job tasks that require several minutes of 6-ft. distance, broken several times a day.

Risk Task Level H M ✔

FRAME PARTITION WALLS ON SECOND FLOOR WORK REQUIRES INTERMITTENT ASSISTANCE TO LIFT/POSITION WALL ASSEMBLIES INTO POSITION

Engineering Controls

Administrative Controls

PPE

WORKERS WILL USE LIFT-AID DEVISES TO MINIMIZE NEED FOR ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE

SITE FOREMAN WILL ENSURE INSTALLATION TEAM MEMBERS HAVE NEEDED LIFT-AID EQUIPMMENT AND REQUIRED PPE

WORKERS MUST WEAR SAFETY GLASSES AND DUST FILTER MASKS

Engineering Controls

Administrative Controls

PPE

USE CARRY CARTS AND LIFT-AID DEVICES TO MINIMIZE NEED FOR ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE

SITE FOREMAN WILL ENSURE INSTALLERS HAVE NEEDED LIFT-AID EQUIPMMENT AND REQUIRED PPE

WORKERS MUST WEAR SAFETY GLASSES AND N-95 (MINIMUM) RATED FILTER MASKS

Engineering Controls

WORKERS WILL FRAME WALLS (AS FEASIBLE) IN SECTIONS THAT ONLY REQUIRE SINGLE PERSON TO LIFT INTO PLACE.

Administrative Controls

SITE FOREMAN WILL REVIEW FRAMING LAY-OUT WITH WORKERS AND DEVISE ASSEMBLY STRATEGY TO MINIMIZE NEED FOR ASSISTANCE IN LIFTING/POSITIONING ASSEMBLIES

PPE WORKERS MUST WEAR SAFETY GLASSES AND DUST FILTER MASKS

Phase 2 construction requires a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) to be included in the Jobsite Safety Plan. Above is a sample JHA for guidance.

BIAW scholarship window still open

BIAW’s 2020 education scholarships deadline is right around the corner but it’s not too late to apply. This year BIAW will award $30,000 in continuing education scholarships to students who are pursuing careers in construction-related fields. Scholarship Requirements n Must be a Washington resident n Must be applying to or currently enrolled in a Washington state accredited community, vocational/technical college, or university The deadline to apply is June 19, 2020. To download an application go to BIAW.com/education. For questions or for more information, please contact BIAW Certification and Education Manager Hillary Vanatta at (360) 352-7800, ext. 100 or hillarv@biaw.com.

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Posting Requirements

n Post at each location a comprehensive COVID-19 exposure control, mitigation and recovery plan along with COVID-19 safety requirements. n Post a notice with a phone number guests should call to determine the availability of services.

Employee-Service Practices n Designate a site-specific COVID-19 Supervisor.

n Require employees to have PPE, such as gloves, gowns, caps, goggles, face shields, and face masks as appropriate or required for the activity being performed. n Cloth facial coverings must be worn by every individual not working alone at the location unless their exposure dictates a higher level of protection under L&I safety and health rules and guidance. n Ensure frequent and adequate handwashing with adequate maintenance of supplies. n Use single-use disposable gloves, where safe and applicable, to prevent transmission on tools and items that are shared, and discard after a single-use. n Establish a housekeeping schedule that includes frequent cleaning and sanitizing with a particular emphasis on commonly touched surfaces. n Screen employee-service providers for signs/symptoms of COVID-19 at start of shift.


Strategic Plan Update

Externship event on tap by Bailee Wicks Writer and Editor

BIAW’s board of directors approved a strategic plan that focuses on five priorities: Government and Legal Affairs, Communications, Workforce Development, Continuing Education, and a Thriving Association. Although school systems are currently closed statewide, BIAW’s workforce development efforts continue, working behind the scenes with educators, non-profit organizations, and state agencies. BIAW is working with the Washington state Department of Corrections to offer a preapprenticeship program to those who demonstrate appropriate behavior and have under a year to serve before they are released. The program will help curb recidivism and allow the home building industry access to a new labor pool. Giving offenders a second chance will help ease our industry’s skilled labor shortage, but also reduce the burden placed on communities and correction facilities—offering them a hopeful future where they can make an honest living and provide for their families. BIAW Workforce Development Manager Al Audette and the Workforce Development Taskforce has been working with Peninsula

MEMBERS: We need your help The externship event is a critical link in the educational chain, needed to inform students about careers in the home building industry and related fields. The externship requires four or five participants to sit on a panel and field questions from educators in attendance. Participants will need to provide a brief summary: n  How you came about your career in the industry n  Any influences that guided your decision n  Why residential construction was a good career match for you n  Any interesting facts about your career/job experiences educators wouldn’t necessarily know about The event is also looking for volunteers and two jobsites for educators to tour different phases of construction work: foundation building, framing, finishing work, and more. The location of the jobsites need to be near Renton Vocational Tech, the site of the event. The event will take place July 20-23. College to supplement their summer construction curriculum; sadly, due to COVID-19, all classes were canceled. The North Peninsula Building Association (NPBA), however, will receive funds to sponsor OSHA training and certification for (eight to ten) workers in Clallam County. The training and certification are possible due to the efforts of Kaye Gagnon, Kaye Gagnon Consulting and Richard Jones, Habitat for Humanity. Gagnon and Jones helped secure a facility and Jones, a certified OSHA instructor, will teach the NPBA-sponsored class. Another goal of Workforce Development is to communicate with students, educators, and the

public about opportunities for a successful career in the skilled trades. BIAW has partnered with Associated General Contractors to host a free, week-long summer externship that will introduce educators to career opportunities in the home building and construction-related fields; and provide them the opportunity to learn more about rewarding construction career pathways. For more information on how to volunteer for the externship event contact Workforce Development Manager Al Audette, at (360) 3527800, ext. 105, or ala@biaw.com.

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Safety has its rewards

Refund checks delivered by Jenn Kavanaugh and Michael Couthran R.O.I.I.® Select Co-Directors

01 A bright spot among recent world events, BIAW’s retro group, R.O.I.I.® Select, for the three years included in our 2020 refund, received refunds of 34.5% (2018), 43.1% (2017), and 39.9% (2016). Our R.O.I.I.® Select participants are always eager to share their refund smiles with us, and this year is no exception. Pictured above with their R.O.I.I.® Select refund checks are BIA of 12

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02 Clark County members [1] Shelly Johnson, H&H Wood Recyclers, Inc., [2] Justin Graham, Paul Davis Restoration, and [3] Derek Huegel, Wolf Industries. BIAW shares its enthusiasm with our participants —and knows we couldn’t achieve these outstanding and consistent results without your hard work and commitment to safety.

03 Since 1982, when the program began, R.O.I.I.® Select has returned over $500 million in refunds to participating members. Our participants average a 36% refund of their L&I premiums. To find out more about the allinclusive benefits you receive when you join R.O.I.I.® Select, see p.13.


Quarterly enrollment is open by Jenn Kavanaugh and Michael Couthran R.O.I.I.® Select Co-Directors

Although you may have missed the July enrollment period, R.O.I.I.® Select’s quarterly enrollment period is now open for the October 2020-June 2021 plan year. To get started and find out if R.O.I.I.® Select is a good fit for your company, go to RoiiSelect.com or contact us at (360) 352-7800 or enroll@biaw.com.

Commitment and dedication

The R.O.I.I.® Select team is made up of workers’ comp experts who are committed to safety, prevention, controlling costs, and helping participants navigate L&I’s daunting system. The best claim is no claim at all, but if a claim does happen, we provide support and share ways to prevent future claims from happening.

Transparent and affordable

We’re upfront about our program fees. Your annual fee is 1.5% of total premiums owed to L&I, or $150, whichever is greater.

We do not charge a group administrative fee. Other retro programs bury additional fees to pad profits and aid their bottom line. Our program fee is 10% of the group’s overall refund from L&I, and an additional 10% divided between BIAWaffiliated local associations. These fees support continuing education, government affairs, and the building industry as a whole.

Performance-based

WHAT IS RETRO?

Retro is a safety incentive program with a simple goal: eliminate injuries through improvements in safety and preventive strategies. If an employee is injured, help them get better quicker with a successful return to work experience. Companies that do this can earn a refund.

All-inclusive in-house services at no additional cost

You won’t find any other retro program that offers all these services at no additional cost.

OUTCOME BASED CLAIMS ASSISTANCE SAFETY SERVICES RISK MANAGEMENT RETURN TO WORK

®

R.O.I.I. Select’s strict enrollment criteria and innovative approach to workers’ comp ensures maximum group performance.

L&I AUDIT ASSISTANCE INVESTIGATIONS AND LITIGATION june 2020

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Human Resources

Fraud ring targets unemployment claims by Pam Hines Finance and Human Resources Director

Across the state, BIAW is hearing more and more about fraudulent unemployment claims being filed by individuals posing as out-of-work employees. Currently, it is unknown how these criminals have gained access to individual personal information. It appears to be pointing to a West African fraud ring using identities stolen in prior large scale data breaches you may have read about in the news in the recent past. You or your employees may learn of fraudulent unemployment claims either by an employee informing you that they have received communications from the Washington State Employment Security Department (ESD) for a claim they didn’t file; or by receiving a claim notice from ESD for an active employee. The fraudulent claimants use your personal identifying information, such as your home address and or social security number to file a benefit claim.

Steps to take with a fraudulent claim

If you receive an unemployment claim notice from ESD for an employee who is currently working, respond and note the employee is actively employed. You should also flag the claim as fraudulent and notify the impacted employee as soon as possible. Unfortunately, even though you may respond with this information, ESD will not close the claim based on your company’s (or human resources department) response alone. ESD will continue to pay out weekly claims until they are informed by the individual claimant that the 14

building insight

How to report benefit fraud The best option to report a fraudulent unemployment claim filed is via online at esd.wa.gov/unemployment-benefits-fraud. You can also contact ESD by phone at (800) 246-9763 or fax at (360) 902-9771, and provide the following information:

n Your full name n Last 4 numbers of your Social Security Number (never list your full SSN in correspondence) n Your date of birth n Your address n A brief description of how you found out an imposter-fraud claim was filed using your information n Confirm you give ESD permission to deny and cancel your fraudulent claim claim is fraudulent and asked to cancel the claim. The employer cannot stop fraudulent payments. Furthermore, ESD representatives will not discuss individual cases with anyone other than the claimant of record. With thousands of fraudulent claims filed in the last few months, you can imagine ESD phone lines are very busy. Be patient but persistent until you get through. It is also encouraged to file a police report for identify theft in your jurisdiction, which in most counties can be done online.


Parkside Building update Renovation of BIAW’s new headquarters continues with a move in target date set for July.

This January, BIAW closed the sale on our current office building, the McCleary Mansion, and began renovations on our new headquarters, the Parkside Building in Tumwater. In March, in response to COVID-19 and the governor’s state-wide shutdown of construction, improvements and renovations were put on hold indefinitely.

Fast forward to May, the governor reopens construction under Phase 1 requirements, and renovations restart. Installation of framing, plumbing, electrical, HVAC, and drywall are currently underway. If all goes according to schedule, BIAW will move into the Parkside Building in July. june 2020

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BIAW EIR Awards Call for Entries July 1 - Aug. 31

Building Industry Association of Washington 111 21st Avenue SW | Olympia, WA 98501 (360) 352-7800 | BIAW.com |

Quality. Craftsmanship. Design. Innovation. Recognition. For more than two decades, BIAW’s Excellence in Remodeling (EIR) awards program has celebrated innovation in residential and commercial design. Awards are based on criteria including quality, craftsmanship, design excellence, innovation, use of materials, and land use challenges. A jury of professionals in building and design industries painstakingly blind-judge the projects submitted from throughout the state. Projects completed after Jan. 1, 2019 are eligible for consideration. The EIR awards entry process is completely digital this year. You may read the complete details of the program, register, submit entry forms, and upload images to the digital portal at EIRAwards.com. The awards reception will take place Wednesday, Nov. 11, in conjunction with the fall board meeting. The fall board meeting is scheduled for Nov. 11-13, at the Hilton Vancouver. Projects that have been currently entered online, whether in-process (saved) or paid, will be transferred to the new schedule. You will not be able to access/complete your entry until the process reopens July 1.

EIR Important Dates

Call for Entries..................................July 1 - Aug. 31 Judging Process..........................Sept. 11 - Sept. 20 Winners Announced (via email)..................... Oct. 1 EIR Awards Reception...................................Nov. 11

If you have any questions, please contact Brenda Kwieciak at (360) 352-7800, ext. 113 or brendak@biaw.com.

Hall of Fame Call for Entries BIAW is now accepting nominees for its Hall of Fame. The purpose of BIAW’s Hall of Fame is to honor men and women who have made significant and lasting contributions to BIAW. The Hall of Fame acknowledges lifetime achievement in the building industry. If you’d like to submit a nominee for a BIAW member, industry leader, or legislator you believe is worthy of entry into the Revered Hall, go to BIAW.com and download an entry application. Questions? Contact Brenda Kwieciak at BIAW at (360) 352-7800, ext. 113 or brendak@biaw.com. Submission deadline is September 1.