The Well of PBC / Oct 2021 Issue

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THE RESOURCE FOR BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS

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OCT 2021

THE EMOTIONAL MAN Reaching beyond the judgement

7 CREATIVE OUTLETS TO LEAN ON Using the arts to your advantage

RENEWING A CULTURE OF COMMUNITY IN THE WORKPLACE Let’s discuss the great disconnect

PLUS PALM BEACH COUNTY'S CORNERS Talking about self-care routines passed on from generation to generation THE WELL OF PBC / OCT ISSUE 2021

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Content

OCTOBER 2021

DO I GO 06 WHERE FROM HERE?

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FROM ME TO WE: RENEWING A CULTURE OF COMMUNITY IN THE WORKPLACE

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SEVEN CREATIVE OUTLETS

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FLEETING TIME

24 TRAIN THE BRAIN

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25 BEWELLPBC

26 THE EMOTIONAL MAN FOR 30 SELF-HELP OLDER ADULTS

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PAST THE PULPIT

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WOMEN HELPING WOMEN

YOUR QUESTIONS 20 GET ANSWERED GENERA22 SELF-CARE TION TO GENERATION

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Letter From The Editor

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t is so exciting to introduce The Well of PBC to you. The vision for the publication is powerful. Created by and for residents, professionals, system change leaders, providers, and other sectors of Palm Beach County through various contributor roles, The Well of PBC is dedicated to making this publication an open line of communication. We are creating a culture of health in our community that is accessible and relatable to everyone. This is where The Well came into play. Literally and metaphorically, wells have been a place of gathering and exchange. A place where the community comes together to draw water, essential to life, and flourish. The first task in setting us apart from the rest of our online publication counterparts was establishing the mission statement. We wanted to make sure we created a space where both providers and residents could give AND receive information about behavioral health, self-care, local expert opinions, share stories, and even be in the know about Palm Beach County events and job offerings. BeWellPBC and community advocates understood that the residents of this great county needed to be talked with, not at. This publication needed to look, sound, and feel like you. We hope everything from the mission statement to each page evokes a sense of peace and belonging, knowing that your voice and feedback play such a huge role in what this issue and issues to come are all about.

To be the primary resource for behavioral health and wellness for Palm Beach County; a safe exchange space for community and an outlet for our neighbors and stakeholders to transform the behavioral health landscape.

The theme of our first issue is self-care. We are so excited to present you with the very first edition of The Well of PBC! So much heart, intention, collaboration, and conversation went into this publication and we hope that as you read through this, you understand the exchange of knowledge that we want The Well of PBC to be. We want to challenge your thinking about behavioral health and wellness.

Julie Khanna Julie Khanna, Editor-in-Chief MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR INVESTED PARTNERS

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The Mission

The Well of PBC is an online publication that serves to be the primary resource for behavioral health and wellness for Palm Beach County, a safe exchange space for the community, and an outlet for our neighbors and stakeholders to transform the behavioral health landscape.

So, what does that mean to you? It means we not only want to be your go-to place for all things behavioral health topics, but we want to tell your stories too! We are looking for freelance photographers (willing to barter) and writers to contribute to our art, ask the experts, students, self-care, cultural, spiritual, and provider columns. Email us for our contributor guidelines, editorial calendar, or if you’d like to share an event or position you’re hiring for. E: thewell@bewellpbc.org | Follow along at @thewellofpbc

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Our Team BeWellPBC Creative Team:

LAUREN ZUCHMAN Publisher

FRESLAINE SAINT LOUIS Associate Publisher

Lauren is the Executive Director for the countywide initiative, BeWellPBC, advancing behavioral health and wellness for all residents in Palm Beach County. The Well of PBC is a passion project for Lauren to increase behavioral health awareness, engage diverse perspectives across the county, and promote solutions to address our county’s most complex challenges.

Freslaine is the Project Coordinator for BeWellPBC and a passionate advocate of behavioral health. She leads and serves alongside a talented group of residents committed to advancing what behavioral health looks like for all in Palm Beach County to feel hopeful, supported, connected, and empowered.

BeWellPBC wants to give a special thank you to additional creative team members: Vanessa Moss, Alexa Lee and Lety Gonzalez who were instrumental in the vision and implementation of this publication. We are here with the help of their desire for tangible solutions for community needs.

Vanessa Moss

Alexa Lee

JULIE KHANNA Editor-in-Chief

SUREJ KALATHIL AKA SUNMAN Creative Director

Julie, CEO of Khanna Connections, enjoys using her creativity to help health and wellness industries communicate with their audiences.

Surej, founder of Photography by Sunman, is the creative visionary that brings life into each page, concept, visual and digital design of The Well of PBC publication.

KATRINA BLACKMON Ad Sales

MELANIE OTERO Contributor

Katrina, founder & CEO of Unity3 Palm Beach, brings her executive advertising background combined with her love of faith, family, and this vibrant multicultural community to The Well of PBC and BeWellPBC.

Melanie, president of Otero Communications, provides consulting services for some of Palm Beach County’s leading nonprofit organizations. With a special interest in behavioral health, she has assisted with the launch of The Well of PBC and serves as a contributing writer.

Lety Gonzalez

The information in this issue of The Well of PBC is for information purposes only. The Well of PBC assumes no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information, nor for any actions taken in reliance thereon. The information contained about each individual, company, product or organization has been provided by such individual, company, product or organization without verification by us. The opinion expressed in each article is the opinion of its author and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Well of PBC. Therefore, The Well of PBC carries no responsibility for the opinion expressed therein. Any form of reproduction of any content on this magazine without the written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. © 2021 The Well of PBC All rights reserved.

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FEATURE STORY

Where Do I Go from Here? Life After Loss BY MELANIE OTERO DAVID AIKENS @SOPHMORZ_PHOTOGRAPHY + JIHOVANY BRETON @JBSHOTTHAT

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FEATURE STORY A SENSE OF ORDER For Boynton Beach resident and Trustbridge bereavement group participant Gerda Klein, nature became both navigator and nurturer when she suffered the loss of her husband, Warren.

A muted emotional state is a reaction of the psyche when it is overwhelmed by feelings

MOURNING It has surrounded many of us for the last two years in myriad ways. The loss of a loved one. The loss of a job. Even the loss of our daily routines. With each, comes sorrow and a loss of self.

“Mother Nature isn’t distracted by what else is going on,” said Klein as she spoke about her visits to Wakodahatchee Wetlands in Delray Beach, FL, every January to watch the storks and herons build their nests for the hatchlings that peck their way out of their shells when she returns in March and April. “There is something so renewing and purposeful in watching the birds and their lifecycle,” said Klein. “It shows that there is a sense of order in this world. They know what they have to do.”

of the pandemic’s restrictions, and because we are so overwhelmed in general, many experience what Bang describes as “a muted emotional state.”

“A muted emotional state is a reaction of the psyche when it is overwhelmed by feelings,” she said. “It’s “We are experiencing the loss of numbness. We have too much to the world as we knew it,” said Carla process, so we just shut down. After Bang, LCSW, bereavement mana loved one dies, we need to find ager at Trustbridge. “And if we lost balance, a place to safely reinvent someone during COVID, our grief ourselves—especially now when the is compounded.” Without the tradi- world seems upside down.” tional outlets for our grief because

Bang believes there is much to learn from Klein’s experience, especially the importance of staying present. “When we’re in an unknown situation, our minds go to all the things that could go wrong,” said Bang. “We experience anticipatory grief—anxiety about the future. If we can bring ourselves to the present, the beauty of the moment and what surrounds us, we can have quality of life.” Jacqueline Lopez-Devine, chief clinical officer at Trustbridge, notes the importance of being present and having realistic expectations after someone dies. “Give yourself moments of respite from grief,” she said. “Some people journal. Some pray. Many find healing in the expressive arts of drawing or writing poetry, which can be especially THE WELL OF PBC / OCT ISSUE 2021

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FEATURE STORY all of nature’s symbolic meanings, pausing to write about her reflections and how she felt each day as she took steps toward finding her new path. “It’s what mindfulness does. It makes you sit, take time out and contemplate.” Lopez-Devine looks at Klein’s personal experience as an example of how Trustbridge guides people through the grieving process in their publication, A Healing Jour-

helpful to children. Making your health a priority is also so important. Staying nourished and getting rest and exercise are critical.” While Bang agrees that respite from grief is important, she points out the necessity of accepting moments of sadness. “We mustn’t try not to grieve,” said Bang. “If you avoid it, it will come back later in another way. Sit with grief. Let it come over you like a wave at the beach, and then let it retreat again. Know that it is back and forth and up and down. Grief isn’t a straight line.”

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FINDING A NEW WAY Klein had her own experience along a not-so-straight path that ultimately showed her how to look past her own grief. While taking part in The Stroll for Well-Being Therapeutic Garden Walking Program at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach, FL, that she learned about through Trustbridge, she found herself standing at the beginning of “Zig-Zag Bridge,” contemplating its meaning. “You zig-zag through life,” she said. “There are things you have to overcome.” From that moment, Klein began looking at

Gerda Klein, Boynton Beach resident, walks the Wakodahatchee Wetlands trails.


FEATURE STORY ney. “Gerda accepted reality, she is working through the pain and adjusting to her new environment,” she said. “She’s finding a connection with the person who is gone so that she can go on with her life.” MOVING FORWARD Connections are particularly important to the professionals at Trustbridge for the free bereavement counseling they offer to

anyone in the community. Virtual and phone connections replaced in-person sessions during COVID, but Trustbridge recently re-started in-person adult group sessions and their children’s bereavement camp in outside areas that accommodate social distancing. Bang is grateful to return to offering a place where people can mourn together. She sees it as a step toward normalization that so many crave across our diverse community and a commonality among all who have suffered a loss. “Every ethnicity has mourning rituals,” said Bang. “It’s human, and it’s necessary and important.” Klein’s own experience of finding connections and creating new rituals is one she hopes will help others. “Go to the places that were comforting to you in the past,” she suggests. “Let yourself find renewal. Tell yourself that you will keep this feeling in your heart for what you have to do now. We have to keep doing what we gotta do in the cycle of life and finding our place in it.”

ABOUT TRUSTBRIDGE From hospice care to emotional and spiritual support, we are here for families. You can depend on Trustbridge to find the pathway that enables you and your loved one to live every day to the fullest. Trustbridge Bereavement Centers/Grief Support

Tel: (888) 499-8393 Trustbridge Resources A Healing Journey

How to Help A Grieving Child

To nominate someone for a behavioral health related feature story, send your suggestions to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “Feature Story” in the subject line.

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THE RESERVOIR

From Me to We: Renewing a Culture of Community in the Workplace BY MELANIE OTERO

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he year before COVID-19 struck, the documentary The Great Disconnect told the story of another pandemic impacting our health and wellbeing: loneliness and social isolation. This timely documentary raised the question: Is it possible to overcome our culture of disconnectedness and rediscover how truly essential we are to one other? Fast forward to 2021 and the exponential effect of COVID-19 on loneliness and isolation and the emotional distancing brought on by politics and events in the news, and it’s easy to see that we are increasingly becoming a hyper-individualistic society at great detriment to our own health and community wellbeing.

We asked three professionals on the frontlines of supporting the Palm Beach County community to weigh in:

Nowhere is this more evident than the great disconnect in our workplaces. As employers and employees navigate how they come back together again, there is a deeper recognition of the importance of social connections inside and outside the workplace to support mental health, while balancing the imperative for performance to keep organizations afloat. Employers and employees need to be constantly and honestly communicating with one another to figure out, how do we renew a culture of community?

Tammy Fields: The separation has been difficult for me personally, and our employees. I see and feel the stress they are experiencing. Their stress is compounded by the difficulties their clients are experiencing. It weighs on them because they care. We’re also navigating how we communicate about race relations. Our staff is very diverse, which is one of our greatest qualities and helps us serve our community best. When racial incidents happen in the news, we have to recognize that people are responding in different ways, and we have to develop under-

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• Tammy Fields, Director, Palm Beach County Youth Services

• Ljubica Ciric, PsyD, Vice President Child & Family Mental Health, Community Partners of South Florida

• Tawanna Pollock, Child and Family Therapist, Community Partners of South Florida

The Well: As an employer, what changes have you seen in your workplace culture?


THE RESERVOIR

Tawanna Pollock: Both of my parents died of COVID one week apart. Community Partners of South Florida gave me as much time as I needed, donated toward the funeral arrangements, and understood I needed mental health support and connected me to a grief therapist. My supervisor consistently called and checked in on me, comforting me to let me know it was OK to not be OK after such a complex loss. I knew I didn’t have to worry about losing my job and I could focus on my mental health and wellness. The Well: As Tawanna’s supervisor, what was most important to supporting her and other employees?

...it’s easy to see that we are increasingly becoming a hyper-individualistic society at great detriment to our own health and community wellbeing.

standing, appreciation and empathy for where employees are. There’s still a lot to be learned. Ljubica Ciric: We amped up to make sure that we stayed connected as a group and one-on-one when we went virtual, but it still hurt the culture. There is so much uncertainty. As an agency, we were supporting employees, but there is still performance you have to measure. How do you push while also supporting employees? We looked at it in the same way we look at therapy. Once we encouraged employees to voice their opinions, their stress decreased. We didn’t make any sudden decisions and we let them know where we were going. They felt heard and involved and we made sure that we were transparent. The Well: You have first-hand experience as an employee who experienced crises during COVID. How did your employer connect in a way that was important to you?

Ljubica Ciric: Communication and constantly checking in with them was critical. We also removed barriers to taking time off whether it was for a death in the family, illness or to take a mental health break. Employees no longer need a doctor’s note for sick time over two days, and we made sure all our supervisors fully understood the Family and Medical Leave Act. We attempted to remove any barrier that would stand in the way of our employees taking care of their physical and emotional health. Even though all our employees kept their jobs, we quickly understood that partners or family members might have been affected by the loss of employment. We made sure that we provided employees with support for rent, utilities, and any other assistance we were able to provide. The Well: What is one change that has positively impacted your workplace culture and wellness? Tammy Fields: We start every meeting with three questions: How are you feeling? What is your goal for the meeting today? Who can you ask for help? These three questions help employees identify and share their feelings with their colleagues, have a goal that gives them focus for the meeting or the day, and lets them know there are people they can count on when they ask for help. It’s a framework to understand connections with one another, especially at a time when people feel isolated and detached. The Well: What can employers learn from your experience? Tawanna Pollock: Understand we are all human. Be supportive. Listen to employees and be there for them without judgment. Let me know you see me. You hear me. You make me feel special just by doing that.

The Reservoir is a space that celebrates our vibrant community’s customs, culture, holidays, rituals, lifestyle, and social behaviors. To contribute, send your article ideas to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “The Reservoir” in the subject line.

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THE DRAW

Seven Creative Outlets to Lean On

BY DEON C. JEFFERSON DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA

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elf-care has been a big focus in America due to the pandemic. To remain safe and healthy, people are leaning more on the arts. Here are seven ways to use the arts to practice self-care.

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Trade your pandemic uniform of oversized t-shirts, sweats, and house shoes, and put on an outfit that reflects your vibrant and infectious personality.


THE DRAW WATCH A MOVIE

Pick anything that matches your mood, is nostalgic, or makes you laugh. There are several streaming sites available for your viewing. I recommend “Respect” starring Jennifer Hudson.

HAVE A PHOTOSHOOT

Do you love taking pics but only do so for occasions, events, or holidays? Trade your pandemic uniform of oversized t-shirts, sweats, and house shoes, and put on an outfit that reflects your vibrant and infectious personality. Find a local photographer, pick a theme, and go.

DO SOME KARAOKE

You don’t have to be a professional singer to make a “joyful noise.” According to a 2018 study by the “Sing Your Heart Out Project” in the UK, singing can improve your mental health, change your mood and sense of well-being. Perform karaoke at home and record a TikTok video.

PAINT FOR FUN

Keep in mind; you are not painting for the masses. When you sit down to paint, you should remember that painting is for fun and that you are using it as a release. Paint as if no one is watching. Forget about technique; let the colors and brush inspire you. Try a “paint-and-sip.”

MAKE A COLLAGE

Mood boards are good projects to do when it comes to finding “inspo.” You can use a mood board to create positive affirmations for yourself. Hang it in a spot where you can often see it as a quick pick-me-up when things are hectic. Or use it as cool wall decor for the home.

VISIT A GALLERY

Galleries allow you space to enter the artist’s world, create your interpretations, and take a curated journey. According to the creator, visual artist, and psychologist Dorian Schwartz of @ letstaketime, “By practicing this type of creative thinking, we learn better ways to come up with our own unique solutions to difficult problems, a key skill required for better mental health.”

READ A BOOK

One book I read recently about self-care was “Checking In” by former Destiny’s Child member and Grammy Award Winner Michelle Williams. The book dives into what happens when you fail to check in with yourself and others. There are several other ways to include art in your self-care. Get creative! Share your journey. The Draw is a space for creatives to share their art, poetry, spoken word, etc. and/or how their art helps themselves and others. To contribute, send your article ideas to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “The Draw” in the subject line.

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THE FOUNTAIN

Fleeting Time and the Fleeting Time and the

Summer of ‘21 Summer of ‘21 BY SATVIKI SINGH

H PHOTO CREDITS : DAVID AIKENS @ SOPHMORZ_PHOTOGRAPHY JIHOVANY BRETON@JBSHOTTHAT

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eaded into my senior year - my last year of high school - I want to savor every experience I have this next year before graduation. I find it odd how almost a year and a half has gone by since I last lived what I once considered a ‘normal’ life. Aside from changes in taste of fashion and music, the one thing that has truly changed is my outlook on the passage of time. The flow of time that I once knew and lived by has been severely altered. It is simply different and devolvable. Much of my lockdown was spent during my Junior year of high school. The year was planned to be full of changes even before the pandemic, as I was changing campuses of my school,


THE FOUNTAIN joining a new research lab, and serving new positions in clubs. The changes I experienced with the pandemic on top were far greater. During this year, I signed up for too many extracurriculars, courses, and long commutes and felt like I was drowning. Each week, I would already think about the week following it, marking down each day and each week in a desperate attempt to make summer come closer and closer. Once the Spring semester ended and summer started in May, I was finally able to breathe and take a look at myself. Of course, I wanted to savor this summer as I knew it would be my last official high school summer, but it felt like time was fleeting. Each day I would wake up and blink only to find that the entire day was over and it was time for me to sleep again. First, I found that this was largely due to my usage of social media and my phone; to fight this, I deleted Tiktok and Instagram, forcing myself to work on my summer classes and read more. Despite this, I felt the same, only slightly more productive, so I tried a series of other activities in hopes that it would stretch out my day. I would feel anxious all the time. I started journaling more, and it slowly became a daily routine until I was writing between 5-15 pages every day. This practice stuck with me. I finally had a place to share my thoughts. I realized that a lot of my problems were coming from a place of anxiousness and dependency on instant validation, which made me think about how and what I was prioritizing in my life. I noticed that I made almost no time for things that brought me joy - like meeting with friends, running, and watching a long movie without worrying about work; instead, I had prioritized attending clubs that I did not

enjoy and working on projects that I did not care for. Learning this, I made a vow to cut out things that do not make me happy. Of course, I could not cut out classes or certain people I had to see, but I did cut out many things by the end of summer and pick up more health-conscious habits, like exercising more and sleeping early. As summer ends and the Fall semester starts again, time still feels to be ticking by too fast, but I am better equipped to deal with the fleetingness and the anxious feeling it gives me. At the beginning of this article, I mentioned that my perception of time had changed completely during the lockdown. While I want to blame the pandemic, I truly cannot. My perception of time was since I had become so anxious with millions of thoughts firing through my brain. In my Junior year, I gave myself no time to sit down and breathe to the point that I had not even noticed obvious physical changes in myself. Unlike before, when time flowed slowly and carefully all the time, I am now living in a world where I have to actively slow it down and take my time curating my thoughts and daily activities by my own will. As school opens, I hope to continue practicing the self-care habits I picked up over the summer, like sleeping early, journaling, reading books, and exercising to ensure that I can enjoy my last year of high school to the fullest extent.

The Fountain is a space for youth to share their point of view on things that matter to them. To contribute, send your article ideas to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “The Fountain” in the subject line.

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THE DEPTH

Jeanette Brown, Lake Worth

Past the Pulpit BY JULIE KHANNA

@KHANNACONNECTIONS @JEANETTEANDHERSTAGES @1201BAKESHOPANDCOFFEE PHOTO CREDIT : @JSPHOTO_OFFICIAL AND @VICTOR__JZ

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t’s not your parent’s church anymore. In the day of hype priests- the term coined for skinny jean-adorned megachurch pastors, barbershop sermons, and the juxtaposition of pop culture and praise, faith has evolved into whoever, and wherever, you are. Even though the look and feel of church may have changed, the mental health benefits haven’t. A 2020 Gallup poll showed 46% of Americans who attend religious services on a weekly basis rated their mental health as excellent compared to 29% of Americans who document their attendance as seldom/never. 35% of Americans reporting nearly weekly/monthly attendance rate their mental health as excellent, demonstrating an improvement over those that report seldom/never.

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I’ve had individuals divulge that these shows saved their life. Artists struggling in recovery finding an outlet to express. Victims of abuse braving the stage to share their story. Loneliness being lifted. Moments of tragedy and victory mourned and celebrated together.


THE DEPTH

With the data supporting the positive impact of religion on mental health, the need for healthy congregation is apparent. But the emphasis has to be on healthy. Common complaints of dated religious models include harsh judgment, unrealistic expectations, rigid conformity, and excluding humans based on sexual orientation and lifestyle. The consequence? People stopped attending church. In a 2020 study, fewer than 50% of American households report having a house of worship membership. It’s the lowest percentage in an eight-decade decline. To reap the positive mental health benefits of religion, the church needs to feel safe, welcoming, and inclusive. It should be a place to receive, share and grow- and that place just might be upon the stage at your local coffee shop.

Here, you’re welcome as you are. Jeanette curates a level of intimacy that provides a sense of safety, vulnerability, and fellowship, allowing people to share some of their rawest experiences at her shows.

Dubbed The Hostess With The Mostess, devout Christian Jeanette Hickman Brown is known for the powerful platforms she creates for people of all backgrounds, religions, and walks of life.

“That’s an aspect I love about the stages I get to create and the community I foster. I’ve seen so much impact. I’ve had individuals divulge that these shows saved their life. Artists struggling in recovery finding an outlet to express. Victims of abuse braving the stage to share their story. Loneliness being lifted. Moments of tragedy and victory mourned and celebrated together.”

“One thing Scripture explains is that we are all broken, each of us in need of the Savior. This fundamental truth has guided me in how I interact with the world around me, treating others as equals. No one is perfect, all of us struggle, and all of us sin.”

Gatherers certainly don’t have to take the stage to be transformed or feel embraced. The words spilled from the souls sharing on stage travel into the hearts of the audience and then spread out into the community. “At my shows you are seen. You are respected. You are encouraged. In a world that wants to divide and destroy, my intention for these events is to bridge and build,” said Jeanette. “The love and welcoming environment they feel is created as a way to express my faith. It isn’t walking through the doors of a church, but it’s a start to open the doors of their heart to a love that wants to redeem and to sanctify.” While the definition of church might remain up for grabs, the benefits are undeniable. Your church might not be within a traditional house of worship, or maybe it is. Maybe you get your hymns to the beat of a rock band or through a lyrically gifted rapper. Maybe your fellowship consists of yoga mats and deep stretches first. The moral of the story is- your church doesn’t need to look the way you remembered it to be an effective and powerful tool for your mental health as long as it’s a safe space, or stage, for trusted conversations and compassion.

The Depth is a space for faith-based leaders and individuals to share their thoughts, guidance, encouragement, what they’re witnessing, and more. To contribute, send your article ideas to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “The Depth” in the subject line.

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BEYOND THE COUCH

Women Helping Women BY ANA KAREN GONZALEZ WWW.LAKEWORTHWEST.ORG

They provide essential information on issues of motherhood, education, and family. They also offer excellent support to women; they motivate and show us that we can be great leaders in our community and learn to inspire other women. But how do they make all this possible? Every month they give us an activity calendar. On the fourth Friday of each month, we have a club called “Women Helping Women.” I began attending and am happy to have committed to set aside dedicated time to listen and share with other women. It has helped me emotionally. In sharing our stories, we know that we are not alone or the only ones going through challenges.

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y name is Ana Karen Gonzalez. I am the mother of two children, two and eleven. I like to find community places where my children can learn, do educational activities, and interact with other children in a healthy environment. In my search to find a place, I came across Lake Worth Resident Planning Group/BRIDGES at Lake Worth West. This non-profit center aims to help children of different ages and provides workshops for families to support themselves.

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I like that they always consider our opinions on the topics we want to share for our physical and mental well-being. Some of the classes we participate in are Zumba, yoga, cooking, and English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL). I have facilitated workshops on mental health and participated in classes provided to our children. Thanks to the girls who helped us publish it on the official Facebook page, families have access to this information and are motivated to participate. Currently, I am one of the Ambassador Leaders who meet to find out what is happening in the community. As a group of women, we hear about different programs and engage, participate, and learn more together.


BEYOND THE COUCH It is very encouraging to me to do these activities as it inspires my children to build confidence in themselves. I have learned that it is crucial to be active in our community. It is vital to make our voices heard as we are all essential to creating positive change as leaders.

It is very encouraging to me to do these activities as it inspires my children to build confidence in themselves. I have learned that it is crucial to be active in our community. It is vital to make our voices heard as we are all essential to creating positive change as leaders.

M

i nombre es Ana Karen Gonzalez, soy madre de dos niños de 11 años y de 2 años. Me gusta mucho buscar lugares donde mis hijos puedan aprender y realizar actividades para estimular su aprendizaje y también a interactuar en su comunidad con otros niños en un ambiente saludable. En mi búsqueda por encontrar un lugar que me brindara oportunidades para mis hijos me encontré Lake Worth Resident Planning Group/BRIDGES at Lake Worth West un centro sin fines de lucro que tiene como objetivo ayudar a los niños de diferentes edades , brindar talleres a las familias para mantenerse informadas en temas importantes de maternidad , educación y familia. También brindan un gran apoyo a las mujeres que acuden al centro, porque nos motivan que tenemos la capacidad de ser grandes líderes de nuestra comunidad qué podemos aprender y motivar a otras mujeres. Pero como hacen todo esto posible?, todos los meses nos dan un calendario con las actividades que tienen preparadas. Cada ultimo viernes del mes hay un club de mujeres que se llama “Women Helping Women “. Yo comencé a asistir cada viernes a las reuniones y estoy muy contenta de haber hecho ese compromiso conmigo misma de dedicar ese tiempo para escuchar y compartir con otras mujeres, me ha ayuda mucho emocionalmente, ya que al compartir nuestra historias sabemos que no somos la únicas. Me agrada mucho que siempre toman encuenta nuestras opiniones en los temas que queremos compartir para nuestro bienestar físico o mental , lgunas de las clases en las que participamos son Yoga, Zumba, Clases de Cocina y también Inglés. Yo he podido facilitar talleres como Salud Mental, también he participado en clases que dan para los niños, donde las familias tienen acceso, gracias a las chicas que nos ayudan a publicarlo en la pagina oficial de Facebook. Nuestro objetivo es motivar a otras familias para que participen. Actualmente soy una de las Lideres de Embajadoras, es un grupo de mujeres que nos reunimos para saber lo que pasa en la comunidad, nos enteramos de diferentes programas y como podemos participar. Es muy agradable para mí hacer estos tipos de actividades, ya que inspira a mis hijos también crear confianza en ellos mismos . He aprendido que es importante ser activos en nuestra comunidad, que somos clave esencial para crear un cambio positivo como líderes y la importancia de hacer que escuchen nuestras voces. Resources: Free Women’s Self-Esteem and Self-Improvement Group https://www.eventbrite.com/e/156992277127

Beyond The Couch highlights non-traditional mental health outlets and resources in Palm Beach County. To contribute, send your article ideas to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “Beyond the Couch” in the subject line.

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THE SOURCE

Get your questions answered here The Source is a place for Palm Beach County residents and experts to connect and exchange information.

Q The stress of the past year has

times. Getting to know their names, and what they do will help them feel seen when loneliness creeps in. Being proximate and willing to listen is the first and most important thing we can do to be of service to others.

A Move from a place where you look

Jordan A. Smith Director of Outreach and Soul Care

been overwhelming and people need mental health support. How can we help people/our neighbors who are struggling? Anonymous, PBC Resident for Work-Life Balance to creating Work-Life Negotiations. Many of us find ourselves working from home and blending our personal home-life with our work-life, therefore we have to negotiate how we spend time at home and find balance with creating boundaries for ourselves so that we don’t lose our personal family time while remaining gainfully employed from our homes. Andres Torrens, LCSW Clinical Director-Behavioral Health Services

A Small everyday interactions can

make big differences, waves and smiles can go a long way in trying

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Q My 15-year-old son seems un-

motivated, spending less time with friends and more time in his room. He says he’s fine, that the pandemic is weighing on him. He is keeping up with schoolwork and has mentioned he wants to play soccer when the season starts. My fear is last winter, he was hospitalized for 3 days on a Baker Act. Now I worry - will I know if his suffering is normal or I need to get him more help? M., Boynton Beach

If he were my child, I would keep him in counseling. Suicides are too common to allow him to go the course alone. My advice is to keep a close watch on him without suffocating him along with doing your best to steer him clear of anything that might be causing him to be anxious or depressed. Dianne Maddox Lake Worth Resident

A We are all experiencing some level of

suffering just now, but suffering is not normal – it may be part of life but it is not normal for it to be as sustained and as multifaceted as it has been in recent years. You will know your son better than anyone and I would encourage you to reach out for help to have people in his corner to talk to and to process what is going on. Everyone needs a little more care and love and these times are not ‘normal’ so as you help care for him, please don’t forget to look after


THE SOURCE yourself too. There are some great local non-profits such as Providencia Counseling collective who offer great therapy and have lots of scholarships available if finances are an issue. Jordan A. Smith Director of Outreach and Soul Care

Q I keep hearing in the news that

drinking and substance abuse have gone up to dangerous levels. I have been drinking more, and I have a history of alcohol abuse in my family. How do I know when too much is too much? J., West Palm Beach

A According to the “C.A.G.E.”, a

four-question assessment created by J. Ewing in 1984, if you answer “yes” to one or more of these questions, it may be indicative of a possible problem and you may need to have a formal assessment conducted to confirm if you have an alcohol problem. The four questions are: 1. Have you ever felt you ought to Cut down on your drinking or drug use? 2. Have people Annoyed you by criticizing your drinking or drug use? 3. Have you felt bad or Guilty about your drinking or drug use?

4. Have you ever had a drink or

used drugs first thing in the morning to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover (Eye-opener)? If you answered “yes” to one or more of these questions, it might be indicative of a problem. Two resources to reach out to would be 211 or www.myfloridamyfamily.com for a resource to a substance abuse professional who can conduct an indepth assessment. Andres Torrens, LCSW Clinical Director-Behavioral Health Services

A I too have a history of alcoholism

in my family, along with having my own addictive personality, so for me, one drink is too much. I recommend that you find another outlet to relieve your emotions. It may be spending more time with friends and family, if they are a good influence, pick up or start a new hobby, and believe in a higher power. This life is hard to go at alone. Don’t let the drink in your hand be your friend. It’s a pleasure that can harm you and those around you. Dianne Maddox Lake Worth Resident

Jordan A. Smith Jordan A. Smith is originally from Edinburgh, Scotland, and has lived in West Palm Beach since 2015. He is a pastor at Memorial Presbyterian Church and is involved in racial equity projects, multi-faith dialogues, and community building. In his spare time, he loves to golf and find new taco trucks. Connect further on Instagram at @tartan_unicorn Dianne Maddox Dianne Maddox is a retired advertising executive who resides in Lake Worth Florida with her husband Chuck. Dianne and Chuck raised their three children in Miamisburg, Ohio. Dianne is active in The Church of Jesus Christ where she serves on the marketing committee. Andres Torrens Andres Torrens is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Chief Program Officer at Families First of Palm Beach County with more than 30 years of experience in the field of Child Welfare and Mental and Behavioral Health. www.familiesfirstpbc.org

The Source asks YOUR questions to 3 experts: one professional, one community expert (i.e. spiritual leader), and one with lived experience. To ask a question, or to contribute as an expert, email thewell@bewellpbc.org with “The Source” in the subject line.

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CORNER TALK

What are self-care routines passed from generation to generation in your community?

Growing up in a Hispanic community surrounded by women, self-care was considered selfish. If we decided to get a babysitter to take care of the kids and take a day for ourselves, that would be frowned upon. Self-care went out the window when children came into the picture. I never saw my mom take care of herself. It wasn’t until I started therapy and I had kids that I realized the benefits in taking care of myself and my self-care.

The first thing that comes to mind regarding self-care passed on generationally is the observance of Shabbat, a dedicated time to rest, reflect, take a break from work and technology, spend time with family, pray, meditate, enjoy nature, and focus on wellbeing.

LUZ TORRES PAHOKEE @ILOVELUC3 MICHELE SCHER BOCA RATON

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CORNER TALK

Generationally speaking, Cubans tend to practice self-care in community and social based settings. Non-traditional therapy takes place over coffee with neighbors, a game of Dominos with friends, or with lots of food and family over on weekend night. Here, in the north end of Palm Beach County, we tend to experience that sense of community outlet through the various outdoor activities, events, gatherings and fitness meetups.

NOEL MARTINEZ NORTH PALM BEACH @NOEL_M13

We know that it’s important to give back to our community, my grandfather was a medicine man in his village, my mother a community activist and I am a community liaison. When I think about self-care routines passed from my grandfather to my mother and myself, what comes to mind is to do whatever makes you happy, whether it is art, gardening or any other hobby, and most importantly to have alone time to reflect, and to refuel that cup of love.

In general, some self-care tips would be spending some time doing what you love, going for a walk or a car ride, going a couple of days without social media, eating right, exercising, and drinking plenty of water.

MEEK WILLY WEST PALM BEACH @MEEKWILLY

JOSE R. MENDEZ LAKE WORTH @R_DOT_CREATIVEAGENCY

To have your voice heard from your corner of the county, send an email to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “Corner Talk” and your city in the subject line.

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THE REAL

T

October October is is Train Train the the Brain Brain

Connecting Brain Science, Community & Care

rain the Brain is one of Palm Health Foundation’s annual community health campaigns and takes place from October 1 - 31. The goal of Train the Brain is to help Palm Beach County residents understand that taking care of the brain is just as important as taking care of the body. With information and resources provided, participants are encouraged to make changes in their thinking about mental health conditions, adopt brain health habits that integrate self-care behaviors into their daily routines and show compassion to individuals with acute and persistent mental health conditions. Follow Palm Health Foundation on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn for weekly brain health tips in October!

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BEWELLPBC

BeWellPBC is a countywide initiative to advance behavioral health and wellness for all residents. We envision a community in which every person in Palm Beach County feels hopeful, supported, connected, and empowered. By working collectively with residents, providers, and systems, we are taking action to change the status quo and positively impact Palm Beach County’s behavioral health outcomes. BEWELLPBC IS AFFECTING CHANGE IN THREE AREAS: Stewardship Coordination and Alignment

BeWellPBC is challenging Palm Beach County— residents, leaders, providers, businesses, faith-based organizations, neighborhood groups, youth, and parents — to see themselves as stewards of change with shared responsibility for building a culture of health.

We envision a community in which every person in Palm Beach County feels hopeful, supported, connected, and empowered.

Community Solutions

BeWellPBC amplifies the voices of residents to promote change. We know our neighbors hold the key to creating greater belonging and civic muscle by connecting people who have not been represented in the past, leading conversations to change, and co-designing behavioral health solutions. Workforce Pipeline

BeWellPBC is growing the behavioral health field to reflect our community needs. We want to attract, develop, and retain a skilled and diverse labor force to support community health and prosperity in the long run. As stewards, we are passionate to foster inclusion, diversity, community strength, and resilience as we work together to expand the workforce pipeline and promote better health and wellness among them.

JOIN US! We welcome you to join our Palm Beach County-wide movement towards health. Check out our website, social media, and YouTube channel for podcasts, resource videos, events, and ways to get involved.

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THE PROVIDERS

The Emotional Man BY CARLOS EDWARDS, CLINICAL THERAPIST IN RIVIERA BEACH MR.CARLOSJEDWARDS@GMAIL.COM

T

he hardest part about working with men is learning how to gain their trust. Unfortunately, most men have trust issues. We want to be able to find a safe space where men can be vulnerable without feeling judged. Because men hold so much in and keep many issues private, they can become overwhelmed, agitated, insecure, and anxious. This causes a shutdown in communication and damages relationships with loved ones.I’ve learned that when you gain the trust of a man, you will be able to receive whatever you need from him. In response, he will open more freely and be willing to accept whatever help he needs from you.

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men hold so much “ Because in and keep many issues private, they can become overwhelmed, agitated, insecure, and anxious. This causes a shutdown in communication and damages relationships with loved ones.


THE PROVIDERS

It is unfortunate that when men can identify areas of concern, they feel judged. Men often feel others tell them what to do and how to change. They may think others do not understand the whole scope of what has affected their lives. Men need an outlet to express themselves authentically and safely to be their healthiest selves for their families. Despite their essential role in family dynamics, very few outlets and resources have been able to help men understand how important it is for them to free themselves of the baggage they have been carrying for so long. To fully affect how men feel, respond, and engage with one another, we must learn from the older and younger generations. It is crucial to minimize the number of young men who grow emotionally deficient and help older men understand the toxicity of their upbringing.

The Providers is a space for providers, practitioners, thought leaders, and systems change leaders to share. To contribute, send your article ideas to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “The Providers” in the subject line.

THEWELL WELLOF OFPBC PBC //OCT OCTISSUE ISSUE2021 2021 THE

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THE WORD

Self-Help For Older Adults BY TIFFANY E. DIPANNI WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SOCIALSAVVYSENIORS @TIFDIP

J U P I T E R – PA L M B E A C H C O U N T Y R E S I D E N T & B U S I N E S S O W N E R F O U N D E R O F S O C I A L S AV V Y S E N I O R S & D I PA N N I DY N A M I X

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THE WORD

he last 18 months have been a whirlwind – especially for older adults. Long periods of isolation and interrupted daily activities have stifled their independence and affected their overall health. We learned over the past year how important it is for parents, business owners, and professionals to focus on health – body, mind, and spirit. We must also recognize the importance of self-care in our older adults, retirees, and senior citizens. Communities depend on the wisdom, knowledge, and experience of older adults. The World Healthcare Organization (WHO) defines self-care as “what people do for themselves to establish and maintain health and prevent and deal with illness.” The WHO recognizes selfcare as a broad concept encompassing hygiene, nutrition, lifestyle, environmental factors, socio-economic factors, and more. Assure older adults that self-care is not selfish! To perform at their best, they need to feel their best. We rely on our Palm Beach County seniors to give their best while working, volunteering, caring for loved ones, or babysitting grandchildren. Let’s remind them they are worthwhile, important, valued, and needed.

We must also recognize the importance of selfcare in our older adults, retirees, and senior citizens. Communities depend on the wisdom, knowledge, and experience of older adults.

Tiffany DiPanni assists older adults with self-help routines.

TIPS FOR OLDER ADULTS One of the simplest ways to start a self-care routine is participating in a safe recreational activity connected to nature. Take a beach walk, enjoy coffee outside at sunrise, or find a local park with peaceful sounds and sights. Regular exercise is essential and will increase your physical health and provide peace of mind. Join a local gym or virtual workout group specifically geared towards your age group to keep your mind and body stimulated. The physically better you feel, the better you will feel emotionally and mentally! Proper nutrition is also part of self-care. The food you consume will be the fuel to keep your body going every day and can substantially impact whether you feel sluggish or energetic.

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THE WORD HERE ARE A FEW MORE IDEAS

Empower Your Mind – Follow your curiosity and learn a new skill, read a book, or sign up for a local continuing education class.

Reminisce With a Smile – Remember the good times with old photo albums and videos. Go through them by yourself or with others to warm your heart and bring you joy.

Connect With Others - Stay connected with friends and family – virtually or in person. It’s the best medicine for the soul.

Write a Book - You have a story to tell. Why not start by writing it? Your family will appreciate your insights, thoughts, and past tales.

The only person who can take the best care of you is YOU!

Practice Mindfulness and Gratitude -Evidence shows gratitude, mindfulness, and meditation promote peacefulness and tranquility.

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The Word is a broad topic space for contributing writers (a.k.a the community) to share your stories of behavioral health or anything self-care related i.e. fitness, health, educational, parenting, hobbies, wellness, etc. To contribute, send your article ideas to thewell@bewellpbc.org with “The Word” in the subject line.


ADVERTISEMENTS

Birth to 22: United For Brighter Futures is a Palm Beach County alliance with over 300 contributing community partners – all focused on improving the lives of children and youth from birth to 22. The Alliance originated from a symposium held in 2013 where County Commissioners, board members from Children’s Services Council and the School District, judges and other community leaders came together to discuss the complex issues of youth violence and disengagement. Today, our mission is to support the healthy growth, development and education of Palm Beach County children and youth, prenatal through adulthood, so that they can graduate from high school and succeed in life: our own local cradle-to-career alliance. All the work of Birth to 22 is done with a collective impact approach, bringing people together in a structured way to achieve social change. After more than 750 residents participated in 11 community conversations, the Alliance developed a Youth Master Plan for Palm Beach County, focusing on the following six action areas identified by youth and community members:

• Economics • Social/Emotional Challenges and Supports • Health and Wellness • Parenting, Home Environment, Mentors & Role Models • Educational Supports • Community Stressors, System Barriers & Media Birth to 22 aims to ensure that all youth have the opportunity to succeed. Special attention must be paid to ensure equity for youth facing systemic barriers because they are LBGTQ , Black/ African American, Hispanic/Latino, English Language Learners, caregiving, homeless, court-involved, in foster care, have special needs or are presenting with behavioral health concerns.

How To Use 211 HelpLine 211 is your local Community Helpline & Crisis Hotline Help.Starts.Here. 211 HelpLine’s caring staff provide crisis interven�on, informa�on, assessment and referral to available community resources and services. Calls to 211 are free, conden�al and available 24/7 with mul�lingual capabili�es. People of all ages can call for themselves or for others. 211 HelpLine serves Palm Beach, Mar�n, St. Lucie, Indian River and Okeechobee coun�es. Also visit www.211palmbeach.org. Ways To Reach 211:

Types Of Services Provided By 211: 

Suicide Preven�on, Crisis Interven�on

Dial 2‐1‐1 or (561) 383‐1112 (24/7)

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Text your ques�ons/concerns & zip code to 898211 (24/7)

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Email your ques�ons/concerns to help@211pbtc.org (which will be answered within one business day)

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Someone to Listen!

Out of area can dial (561) 383‐1112 or (866) 882‐2991 Se Habla Español & Nou Pale Kreyòle

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Some�mes life can be overwhelming!

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Whether you prefer Text, Online Chat, or the telephone– we’re here to listen!

Phone prompt for language/type of service/ brief hold �me

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Caring person at the other end of the line who will listen as you describe your concerns or situa�on

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Our Resource Specialist will direct you to the appropriate service providers– with referrals given

Some�mes having someone who is not going to judge you or set condi�ons– some‐ one who simply wants to listen to what you have to say– can make all of the difference!

“We are here for you!”

211 HelpLine is a service of 211 Palm Beach/Treasure Coast, a 501 (c)(3) within the State of Florida. Major funders include: Board of County Commissioners‐Palm Beach County; Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County; Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office; Na�onal Suicide Preven�on Lifeline; The Southeast Florida Behavioral Health Network and Help Me Grow Florida; Town of Palm Beach United Way ; United Way of Palm Beach County. Other 211 systems are available throughout the state of Florida and na�onally as well. #HelpStartsHere Twi�er & Instagram 211_HelpLine and Facebook /211HelpLine  

211 also responds to the 24‐hour Na�onal Suicide Preven�on Lifeline 1‐ (800) 273 ‐TALK (8255) Veterans are prompted to press #1 for the Veterans Crisis Line

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Twi�er & Instagram 211_HelpLine and Facebook /211HelpLine

To learn more about the Alliance and how to become involved, please visit our website at http://pbcbirthto22.com/ [pbcbirthto22.com]. Contact thewell@bewellpbc.org to learn more about advertising opportunities.

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Events & Careers CALLING ALL GLADES RESIDENTS Belle Glade

Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021 #NAMIWalksPBC

Wednesday, October 20, 2021 9:30 am - 11:30 am

*Location: Zoom Remote Video Conference*

Once registration is confirmed, link to access the training will be provided

Registration Fee: There is no cost associated with this presentation Continuing Education: 2 CE credits will be offered

South Bay

SECURING OUR FUTURE

Palm Beach County Youth Services Department Residential Treatment and Family Counseling Division Education and Training Center

Presented by: Essence O. Rivers, Psy.D.

Pahokee

MINI GRANTS

Palm Beach County Join us at namiwalks.org/palmbeachcounty

Co p i n g w i t h A d v e r s i t y Using Self Compassion

Canal Point

Securing Our Future Initiative Presents

Poverty Awareness Week 2021 October 18 - 29, 2021

CALENDAR OF EVENTS CareerSource PBC Career Fair

October 19, 10am - 1pm

Poverty Awareness Week Proclamation Live Stream on Community Services Department Facebook Page October 25, 9am - 10am ɖ CSD Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/pbccsd

United Way PBC Poverty Simulation

October 26, 12pm - 1pm

ɖ Event Registration: https://bit.ly/2VHURDB

Racial Wealth Gap Simulation ɖ

October 27, 6pm - 8pm Event Registration: https://bit.ly/3D5O86L

Palm Beach County Library Book Club - Automating Inequality by Virginia Eubanks October 28, 7pm - 8pm ɖ Event Registration: https://bit.ly/3khKzna

Webinar - Process, Policy and Poverty: A Systematic, Integrated Approach Towards Breaking the Cycle of Poverty October 29, 1pm - 3pm ɖ

Event Registration: https://bit.ly/2Z0eEQ5

Contact Jodie Boisvert for more in formation: JBoisver@pbcgov.org

Registration Link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CD9P98P

If you have trouble accessing the survey, please copy the link and paste it directly into your browser.

Registration closes at 3:00 pm on October 19, 2021

Boys Town South Florida – West Palm Beach - Behavioral Health Case Manager - Care Coordination Community Partners of South Florida - Adult Mental Health Therapist – The Village - Child and Family Therapist - Therapist, Mental Health-School Based Center for Child Counseling - School-based mental health therapist - Child and family therapist - Infant mental health therapist - Child trauma therapist

United For Brighter Futures

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Dave Kerner, Mayor, Robert S. Weinroth, Vice Mayor Maria G. Marino, Gregg K. Weiss, Maria Sachs Melissa McKinlay, Mack Bernard

Center for Family Services of Palm Beach County - Intake Coordinator/Bilingual - Licensed Therapist – Counseling Program Chrysalis Health - Targeted Case Manager-Palm Beach - Licensed Mental Health Counselor ChildNet - Behavioral Health Services Specialist - Palm Beach HomeSafe - Child Development Consultant - Youth development professional

To add your event or behavioral health-related career opportunities, please email thewell@bewellpbc.org with “careers” or “events” in the subject line.

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