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BETA

IMPORTANT PENN STATE UPDATE page 8

T H E B E TA T H E TA P I M A G A Z I N E

SUMMER 2017

STICKS AND STONES

WHEN NAMES AND WORDS CAN HURT YOU


08 CONTENTS 2 THE BETA THETA PI

IMPORTANT PENN STATE UPDATE “At this difficult time, the Fraternity’s thoughts and prayers remain foremost with the Piazza family...”


CONTENTS CONTENTS

FEATURES

3

22

50

In 1966, two men became lifelong fraternal brothers. Fifty years later, one gave medical advice that helped save the other’s life.

Two Texas A&M brothers face tragedy and quickly learn that, in today’s online world, words carry more power than ever before.

With a decade of chapter counseling under his belt, a Fraternity advisor opines about today’s Betas and the fraternity experience.

HEART OF THE FRATERNITY

STICKS AND STONES

A TIME TO REFLECT

DEPARTMENTS Archives ...................................................... 5

Alumni News ...........................................18

Newsworthy .............................................. 6

State of the Fraternity .......................32

Installations ................................................7

Chapter Reports ...................................33

The Inbox ................................................. 10

The Beta House.................................... 48

Campus Life ............................................12

Chapter Eternal .....................................52

Darkening of the Hall...........................15

Bridge Builder ........................................55

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

16


This issue’s “Editor’s Letter” was finalized in late April, just prior to our team’s plan to send files to the printer the first week of May. Having monitored for more than a year a cyber bullying story that resulted in the suicide of David Molak, youngest brother of Texas A&M Betas Cliff ’14, and Chris Molak ’17, it was to focus on the loss of decorum in social media platforms – and how we should all look inward and evaluate how our own online commentary is contributing to the world’s ugliness. And then the grand jury investigation into the death of Penn State’s Tim Piazza came to a conclusion on May 5, resulting in criminal charges against the former Alpha Upsilon Chapter and 18 of its former undergraduate members. In my 20 years on the Beta staff, I can’t recall a more heartbreaking series of days, as gruesome details surfaced of young men not only forcing the consumption of alcohol upon those they invited to join their brotherhood but, in the midst of distress, disregarding the moral call to care for one in need. It is gut-wrenching, disgusting and infuriating that men who would purport to represent Beta Theta Pi did anything but. They are certainly not the Betas I know.

THE BETA THETA PI MARTIN COBB, EASTERN KENTUCKY ’96 MARTIN.COBB@BETA.ORG

EDITOR’S LETTER

EDITOR’S LETTER 4

The Betas I know help others. And they believe that doing what’s right behind closed doors matters even more than when people are watching. It’s called integrity, and it’s not some new concept in the Fraternity we all love. Along with friendship and devotion to one’s intellect, it inspired our founding in 1839, and it remains Beta’s north star to this day. In such times of extreme grief, imagining the depths of loss the Molak and Piazza families must be feeling, I find it hard to resist the urge to call these individuals the only suitable word appropriate for print: cowards. Whether it was hiding behind the keyboard in David Molak’s case, or putting their own self-interests first in Tim Piazza’s, the reality is the same: a mindset of invincibility and entitlement breeds an incredible disregard for others. Tragically, in these two instances, wreckless attitudes proved lethal. I’m sure David Molak’s bullies never thought their actions would influence David to take his own life. Until they did. And I’m sure those who knowingly broke the Fraternity’s rules and laws in State College thought their antics weren’t that big of a deal. Until they were. For true and worthy Betas, we need look no further than the Fraternity’s teachings to be reminded of our vows to humanity:

“In my interactions with mankind, I will be urbane in deportment, courteous in expression and steadfast in friendship.”

“Treat honorably all men. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor those in authority.” — I Peter 2:17

“Thus heart to heart and hand to hand, Each other’s joy and grief to share.”

As we grieve deeply the loss of David Molak and Tim Piazza, may we continually remind ourselves that words and actions matter in life. Certainly, “doing unto others as you’d have them do unto you” has never felt more important.

Sincerely and yours in ___kai___,


ARCHIVES

ARCHIVES 5

THE BETA THETA PI The oldest continuously published college fraternity magazine, The Beta Theta Pi was founded on December 15, 1872, by Charles Duy Walker, VMI 1869.

EDITOR Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE Issue Deadline Winter October 15 Spring January 15 Summer April 15

DIRECTOR OF MEDIA RELATIONS Justin Warren, SMU ’10

Mail Date December 15 March 15 June 15

SEND PICTURES, STORY CONCEPTS AND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: Beta Theta Pi Foundation & Administrative Office Brennan Hall 5134 Bonham Road PO Box 6277 Oxford, Ohio 45056 800.800.BETA or beta@beta.org

MANAGING EDITOR Mike Roupas, Iowa ’10

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Sarah Shepherd DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL MEDIA Mike Rodmaker, Cincinnati ’13 PUBLICATION PRINTER The Watkins Printing Company Columbus, Ohio

WHO GETS THE MAGAZINE? Upon initiation, each Beta is guaranteed a lifetime subscription to The Beta Theta Pi. That commitment by the Fraternity remains, although for a variety of reasons some no longer wish to receive the hard-copy version. So, who automatically receives the Fraternity’s magazine? All undergraduates and parents, current and former Beta volunteers, donors to the Beta Foundation, and any alumnus who documents his preference to receive the hard copy with the Administrative Office in Oxford. One can easily do so at 800.800.BETA, beta@beta.org or my.beta.org. HOW DOES ONE GET PUBLISHED? Content submissions for the magazine are always encouraged and certainly welcomed. While space constraints naturally make it difficult for the editorial staff to include every idea presented, a fair evaluation process is exercised in order to publish the greatest variety of chapters, generations, geographical regions, events and unique member achievements and stories. Pictures should be submitted in high resolution at beta@beta.org.

The Beta Theta Pi, (USPS 052-000) official magazine of Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, is owned by the Fraternity, edited and published under the direction and control of its Board of Trustees, published winter, spring and summer for a $30 one-time pre-paid subscription. Standard non-profit class postage paid at Oxford, Ohio, and additional points of entry. Canada Post International Publications Mail (Canadian Distribution) Sales Agreement No. 0397474. Copyright Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, 2017. Produced in the USA. WANT INSTANT ACCESS TO A PAST BETA MAGAZINE? Every issue of The Beta Theta Pi since its founding on December 15, 1872, can be accessed in Beta’s online, keyword-searchable digital archive: magazine.beta.org.

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

As documented in Beta’s pledge manual, “Son of the Stars,” “On its way to the 1883 Convention in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., at the urging of Charles J. Seaman, Denison 1871, a party of delegates met at Chautauqua Lake in western New York and formulated a plan for a Beta alumni club house and summer resort, which developed into the creation of ‘Wooglin-on-Chautauqua.’” Playing home to eight General Conventions (1884, 1887-93) – fourth in frequency only to Mackinac Island, Michigan (15), Cincinnati (11) and Oxford (9) – it was destroyed by fire due to lightning in 1901. As the 19 acres were eventually divied up and sold for summer cottages, papers were filed on October 21, 1954, in the Mayville Courthouse formally incorporating several of the residents into “Wooglin, Inc.” Today, the area is still known and commonly referred to as “Wooglin.”


NEWSWORTHY

EXPANDING TO SEVEN CAMPUSES IN 2017-18 Contact david.greis@beta.org to learn how you can support next year’s seven campus re/colonizations. NEWSWORTHY 6

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY Delta Tau Colony | Tempe, Arizona BUTLER UNIVERSITY Alpha Psi Colony | Indianapolis, Indiana Visit beta.org/butlerexpansion to learn why Butler selected Beta for its first IFC expansion since 1971, after the chapter’s more than 135-year absence.

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE STAFF CHANGES As Fred Myrtle, John Hubbard and Nick Gummo conclude years of dedicated service with the Administrative Office, the Fraternity is excited to announce that Jack Jajewski, David Greis and Chris Mueller will serve respectively as the new director of chapter operations, director of expansion, and associate director of leadership and education.

THE BETA THETA PI

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE New Colony | Newark, Delaware UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Delta Upsilon Colony | Houston, Texas OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY Gamma Mu Colony | Corvallis, Oregon For more information, visit betasoregonstate.org. SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY New Colony | Fairfield, Connecticut SETON HALL UNIVERSITY New Colony | South Orange, New Jersey

CHARTER PETITIONS Six chapters will petition for their charters in July at Beta’s 178th General Convention in Salt Lake City: Ohio State, Puget Sound, Purdue, Quinnipiac, Texas and Willamette.

CLUB RESULTS

Thanks to 2,142 Beta undergraduates, the 2017 Sons of the Dragon Club raised $45,151 to support the Beta Leadership Fund and help fuel Beta’s Men of Principle initiative.

INTERFRATERNALLY SPEAKING Phi Gamma Delta’s Neil Gorsuch was sworn in as the newest Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court on April 10. Neil is a 1988 graduate of Columbia University.

Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Nu, Alpha Chi Omega and Zeta Tau Alpha partnered with Generation Rx to implement a series of workshops on the dangers of prescription drug misuse.

Alpha Chi Omega women’s fraternity became the latest Greek organization to welcome transgender members at the national level after announcing a policy change in February.


INSTALLATIONS

UPCOMING EVENTS JUNE 2017 17-21 WOODEN INSTITUTE #3 Oxford, Ohio beta.org/wooden 24-28 WOODEN INSTITUTE #4 Oxford, Ohio beta.org/wooden

After their charter petitions were approved by the delegates of the 177th General Convention last summer, chapters at American, High Point, NC State and UC San Diego were officially re/installed this spring with alumni and supporters at their sides to celebrate. (Installations at Illinois and Drexel were held in late spring, so their celebrations will be featured in the next issue of The Beta Theta Pi.) A General Fraternity Officer presided over the Installation Ceremonies and presented each group with official gifts on behalf of the General Fraternity, including the grand charter, a framed portrait of Founder John Reily Knox, a framed coat of arms with the chapter’s heraldic device and chapter motto, and a framed watercolor of “Old Main,” Beta’s founding site at Miami University.

NEWSWORTHY

JULY 2017 27-30 178TH CONVENTION Snowbird Resort Salt Lake City, Utah beta.org/convention 30 WOOGLIN SCRAMBLE Salt Lake City, Utah Join the post-Convention golf tournament. Learn more at utahwooglinscramble.com.

26 OHIO STATE HOUSE DEDICATION Columbus, Ohio dww1945@aol.com

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY

NC STATE UNIVERSITY

HIGH POINT UNIVERSITY

UC SAN DIEGO

Eta Pi was installed on April 8 by Trustee Ben Swartz, Connecticut ’05, with Senator Dick Lugar, Denison ’54, delivering the keynote address. Their new chapter motto? “Sanctified Tradition.”

General Secretary Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73, presided over the installation of Eta Rho on April 1. Given the motto “Queen Rose,” the men were championed by their chapter counselor, Annie Carlson Welch.

SEPTEMBER 2017 15-16 WITTENBERG 150TH ANNIVERSARY Springfield, Ohio kolbd@sbcglobal.net

OCTOBER 2017 19-21 GEORGIA TECH 100TH ANNIVERSARY Atlanta, Georgia dave.mck@att.net *Are you a Beta from Naples, Florida? Contact davidcnordhoff@gmail.com to learn about upcoming gatherings with the Naples Alumni Association.

Eta Xi rolled out the red carpet for their installation on March 31, with General Secretary Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73 presiding. The men were given the motto, “We used to be strangers.”

Originally founded on April 29, 1995, Zeta Gamma was reinstalled by General Secretary Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73 on April 22. Zeta Gamma’s chapter motto is “Hard learning must be leavened with laughter.”

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

AUGUST 2017

7


IMPORTANT PENN STATE UPDATE PENN STATE UPDATE 8

Tragedy struck State College, Pennsylvania, in early February after the untimely death of Tim Piazza, a new member of the Alpha Upsilon Chapter at Penn State. Preliminary investigations into the events revealed enough information to justify the chapter’s closure on February 17. On May 5, the Centre County District Attorney’s Office levied 1,098 total charges against the former chapter and 18 former undergraduate members in relation to Tim’s death — including, among others, involuntary manslaughter, aggravated assault, hazing and furnishing alcohol to minors. General Fraternity leaders released the following message on May 8, just prior to this magazine going to print. Beta Theta Pi will continue to appropriately cover the Penn State tragedy as the story and due process unfold. Dear Brothers, Parents and Friends of Beta Theta Pi:

THE BETA THETA PI

We are writing to express again our tremendous grief regarding the death of Timothy Piazza and our deep disappointment with the conduct that led to this tragedy. At this difficult time, the Fraternity’s thoughts and prayers remain foremost with the Piazza family. We share in their heartbreak and are committed to better understanding how this incident could have occurred. For nearly 178 years, our Fraternity has served to advance the ideals of mutual assistance, intellectual growth, trust, responsible conduct and integrity in the lives of our members and supporters. The Fraternity’s strong, heralded and consistent position against hazing and alcohol abuse are cornerstones of our membership expectations and our annual educational outreach to every chapter. The Fraternity has remained steadfast in upholding those standards when they have been challenged, and we have remained willing to suspend chapters and disband membership wherever it has been necessary. Still, in spite of clear policies and educational programs in place at every level of the organization, the tragic events at Penn State

clearly show that, in the end, the Beta experience we strive for principally hinges on individual members holding themselves and their chapters accountable to these expectations.

As such, we must all pause to reflect on how we are promoting the expectation of safety and well-being of our brothers and new members at every chapter, and at all times. At the Alpha Upsilon Chapter, that included the expectation of a substance-free chapter house, a residential advisor provided by the house corporation, a stateof-the art facility equipped with internal and external video surveillance, consistent education and mentoring from a local advising team, regular education from a leadership consultant, and participation by chapter members in high-quality leadership programs and training experiences. These resources produced a chapter culture that appeared healthy, as the chapter membership had grown to nearly 100, they achieved more than a 3.2 collective GPA and the brothers had been recognized as chapter of the year multiple times by Penn


State – and were in line to be named one of PSU’s three “chapters of excellence” again this spring. Despite these resources designed to promote a true and healthy brotherhood, a young man lost his life. Certainly, in Tim’s memory, and in the wake of such devastating circumstances for his family and so many others, the Fraternity must harness the valuable lessons learned from this experience toward the betterment of our brotherhood.

Sincerely and yours in ___kai___, S. Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73 General Secretary Jeff Rundle, Kansas State ’03 Executive Director

“Horrific tragedy with many destroyed lives. Both my sons are Beta brothers at Virginia Tech. I was always impressed with how Beta emphasized leadership and integrity. I’m heartsick over this.” — Caryn Ruggieri, Beta Parent “I’m sure I speak for all Beta parents when I say we feel extremely disappointed that this incident occurred. We have very high expectations of Beta Theta Pi, both on a local and national level, and we hold Beta to the highest of standards ... That said, we firmly believe our son made the right choice when he chose Beta Theta Pi. Your email helps to confirm that belief. You have obviously taken many steps to prevent such incidents, which makes this incident that much more perplexing. I am confident you will do all you can to ensure no other families have to go through what the Piazza family is going through now.” —Mike Littau, Beta Parent

“State of the art and as beautiful as a house might be, a house is not a home. Slick, cool, snappy appearances are not indicative of moral fibre, character and quality. High scores and 4.0’s indicate potential but not intellectual attainment nor maturity. We have a long and glorious history of wonderful individuals, gallant chapters, amazing contributions to mankind, our nations and the world... but as Bill Berry so tersely, eloquently stated, ‘We must earn our badge every day.’ We have been proud, perhaps far too proud, and pride comes before a fall. Humility and rededication are the order of the day. This is not a PR campaign. This is what we are all about.” —Tom Lipton, Western Reserve ’63

“The members of Beta Theta Pi who I know are good people. They take being men of principle seriously.But this is a wakeup call for hazers.” — Amelious Whyte, FIJI

“That a kid had to die — and that Betas sat there and watched him and were more worried about ‘getting in trouble’ than a human life — is perhaps the greatest tragedy here and against every principle Beta is supposed to stand for.” —Clay Hartmann, Vanderbilt ’91

“You should be embarrassed for allowing such disgusting antics.” — Ryan Nakashima “I know Beta doesn’t sweep stuff under the rug, but I’d sure feel better about the General Fraternity if it devoted substantial time to writing and researching that situation, and proactive ways to prevent it from EVER happening again.” —Frank Tobolsky, Rutgers ’84 “I would like to see fraternities and sororities strictly regulated, if not outright banned, on college campuses where they primarily serve to encourage alcoholism and promiscuity. If your organization survives into the future, I hope you’ll establish adequate oversight with meaningful consequences for those who violate your policies.” —Neil Frey

9 SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

Make no mistake about it, Beta Theta Pi is committed to transparent communication and the consistent support of our members and volunteers during this difficult time. We ask for your prayers for the Piazza family. We ask for your continued patience as the legal process unfolds and as the Fraternity reflects on appropriate next steps. Perhaps most importantly, we ask for your recommitment to living principled lives. Tim Piazza deserved more from the men he sought to join in the name of brotherhood. His spirit cannot be forgotten and must forever guide our way.

FEEDBACK

PENN STATE UPDATE

Indeed, we are at a crucible moment. Our Beta experience extends to 134 campuses, more than 10,000 undergraduate members and more than 130,000 living alumni. Being a Beta must be synonymous with relationships that are rooted in integrity and care for one another, personal growth that instills awareness of one’s actions and how they affect others, and fostering a sense of home at every level of the organization. It is our call to answer and we must do so shoulder to shoulder with our brothers, parents, advisors, supporters and university partners.

Jim and Evelyn Piazza stand alongside Centre County District Attorney Stacy Parks Miller at the May 5 news conference where she announced results of the investigation into the death of their son, Timothy Piazza.


THE INBOX

THE INBOX 10 THE BETA THETA PI

AND THEN THERE WERE TWELVE The spring issue’s feature article, “Above the Fold,” recognized 11 Betas who have won the Pulitzer Prize since its inception 100 years ago. Thanks to John Stanton, Centre ’89, Beta’s editorial staff was notified of another brother to add to the list. In 1975, Brother Tom Hardin, Centre ’63, was named director of photography for the Louisville Courier-Journal and Louisville Times where he oversaw a team of 28 photographers. One year later, Tom and the photography staff received the Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of court-ordered school busing in Louisville (above). In Tom’s tenure, the Courier-Journal received two more Pulitzer Prizes in which his team’s photography played a role in published coverage.

MAGAZINEFEEDBACK

BETA

 “The spring 2017 issue of the Beta magazine was one of the best in recent times. Sometimes an issue comes so totally together in all parts of the publication. That was achieved to the greatest heights in the spring issue. I was enthralled with every word.”— Chuck Tatum, Auburn ’75

T H E B E TA T H E TA P I M A G A Z I N E

SPRING 2017

ABOVE THE FOLD

A DIG THROUGH BETA PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE PULITZER’S 100TH YEAR

 “I am the proud Papa of your cover subject, Noah Ohlsen. I was delighted to pull the magazine from the mailbox to find this wonderful picture capturing this poignant moment gracing the full front cover. Our family and friends are familiar with this photo and how well it captured the emotional culmination of an almost complete year of hard and dedicated work on his part. This use of it as your cover is extra special though. We enjoyed the whole Pulitzer Prize focus and the other iconic images you presented in this edition. Well done!” — Bill Ohlsen, father of Noah Olsen, Miami (Fla.) ’13


SADDENED BY

SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY

REACTIONS TO THE FERD EFFECT

 “Ferd is the greatest. And also, his brother Vince.” — David White, Washington & Jefferson ’77  “The Ferd Effect worked on me!” — Clay Anderson, Missouri ’86  “Little disappointed he wasn’t so pleased with us out-of-towners. Yours in -kai-.” — Howard Slivka, Washington in St. Louis ’80  “Nicolas Sambor, this could have been you if you kept your Convention attendance up!” — Nick Palermo, Washington in St. Louis ’15

betathetapi.org/linkedin

In regard to tonight’s post, the Beta Sweetheart of Blynn Shideler, Washington & Jefferson ’18, actually made the original post and tagged us on it today. She even went so far a few minutes ago to comment on our post, ‘Truly an honor!’ Interestingly, of the initial 19 individuals who have already liked it on Facebook, five of them are by women, including an 85-year-old grandmother. So, while I understand your caution, there’s also an authenticity and real-life dynamic that in my mind makes two individuals showing affection acceptable. Especially when they’re dressed in formal attire and it’s shared by the woman central to the image. On your other feedback, again, I appreciate it and will reflect on it going forward. For quite a while I and others have felt the Fraternity has become so milquetoast, purist and out of touch that it has become unapproachable and seemingly holier than thou, which is some of the background of my featuring more real-life human shots that are true reflections of our members. Certainly, I don’t believe I’ve ever crossed a line but, if so, am always receptive of that feedback and objective about reconsidering it. In terms of guys hunting or taking a group pic on the beach with no alcohol in view? I’m not sure I understand how those activities violate our Ritual.” —Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96, Director of Communication/Editor of The Beta Theta Pi

facebook.com/betathetapi

twitter.com/betathetapi

instagram.com/betathetapi

11 SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

 “Thank you for the great article you did on me in the magazine. I have heard from several old Betas who enjoyed it — an old pledge brother from 1954 and an Alpha Iota Beta who is a physician who I hadn’t heard from in 50 years. I think the SLU men in the picture appreciated it, and I sure appreciate them. Nine of them came out last weekend to be with me and talk Beta.” — Ferd Del Pizzo, Washington in St. Louis ’58

 “Hey, Eric. Thanks for the feedback, brother. I’ll certainly take it to heart.

THE INBOX

Visit beta.org/ferd to watch the 10-minute video on Ferd Del Pizzo that complimented “The Ferd Effect” article from the last issue. Here’s what Ferd and his brothers thought about the recent coverage:

“I hate that I have to write this e-mail, but I cannot stay quiet on this one. I have to say I am really saddened to see this on Beta’s Twitter feed. I personally think it objectifies women and does not reflect what Beta Theta Pi stands for. It needs to be taken down. Over the past few years, I have noticed more and more questionable posts on Beta’s social media platforms. From ones around spring break with groups of women in bikinis to ones of a group of brothers on a hunting trip — I don’t think these things belong on our feed because they do not portray the values of our Fraternity as written in our Ritual.” — Eric Eickhoff, Ohio Wesleyan ’00


CAMPUS LIFE 12

Darren Johnson, Bethany '19

CAMPUS LIFE

THE BETA THETA PI

TEN STUDENT BODY PRESIDENTS Sometimes referred to as "The Leadership Fraternity," it's no surprise that 10 brothers of Beta Theta Pi will be filling the top post on college campuses during the next academic year. Congratulations to these brothers across North America who were each recently elected by their peers to serve as 2017-18 student body presidents.

Chris Blakeley New Jersey '19

Ben Childress Kentucky '18

Max Kneis Pittsburgh '18

Mason Grist Washington and Lee '18

Noh Mebrahtu Johns Hopkins '19

Jack Kellerman Wabash '18

David Shirzad SMU '18

Jung Won Kim Cornell '18

Ben Taylor TCU '18


WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES  BETA MOM OF THE YEAR

13 SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

This year, the honor went to Michelle Reid, mother of Andrew O'Connor-Reid '18. "Your devoted heart to your son's beloved fraternity has earned you the award," said the chapter. "Thanks for everything you've done for us!"

 WELCOME HOME, FLORIDA STATE

Nope, you’re not seeing double! The Florida State's new home in Tallahassee is separated into two identical halves, appropriately named “Delta” and “Lambda.”

 CHAPTER OF THE YEAR

Congratulations to the men at Northeastern University in Boston for being named Chapter of the Year, and Chapter Counselor Julie Hershkowitz for being named Advisor of the Year! Founded in 2013, the Eta Zeta Chapter boasts 79 members and a 3.61 GPA, first among all nine fraternities on campus.

CAMPUS LIFE

Named 2016-17 Chapter of the Year, the Eastern Washington Betas know better than to leave their moms out of the loop! The chapter's tightknit Mom's Club is involved with their sons' Beta events and held a Mom's Weekend this spring, complete with crowning the coveted "Beta Mom of the Year" title.

Walking a mile in high heels alongside their peers, the Saint Louis Betas raised more than $4,000 for the Women's Safe House of St. Louis during their philanthropy event.

The house sleeps up to 23 men and has meeting space for the executive board that doubles as a study room. The colony says that the most enjoyable part of the new facility is simply having a centralized location for the 107 men to meet and bond as brothers. Colony leadership was especially moved by the Delta Lambda alumni who worked tirelessly to plan and oversee the construction even though they would never live there themselves. Such efforts are true, reallife examples of Betas building bridges for future generations.


 RUNNING INTO "43"

CAMPUS LIFE

Bryce Bogie, Texas Tech '20, recently had the privilege of running into President George W. Bush and talked with him about his new book "Portraits of Courage" and how ordinary citizens can honor our veterans. Fun fact — Bush's grandfather and uncle were Betas.

GONE TO THE DOGS Chapman Betas pulled out all the stops in their "Beta Theta Paws" philanthropy event, raising money to fight animal cruelty and benefit other important pet-related issues. All proceeds were directed to the Animal Assistance League of Orange County.

14 THE BETA THETA PI

 TRUMAN SCHOLAR

 NINJA WARRIOR

Ryan Oshinsky, Case Western Reserve '16, earned a spot to compete in the preliminiary round of NBC's "American Ninja Warrior" alongside eight athletes from Northeast Ohio. Stay tuned in June to see if he'll move on to the finals!

 ON CAPITOL HILL

Some 230 Greeks lobbied in D.C. for the Collegiate Housing and Infrastructure Act to make college housing safer and more affordable, inlcuding (L-R): Beta Foundation Director of Advancement Matt Brawner, Truman State '07; Baxter Yarbrough, Arkansas '19; Case Knight, Mississippi '17; and Executive Director Jeff Rundle, Kansas State '03.

 LUCKY NUMBER 7

Congrats to the men at Nova Southeastern in Florida for their seventh straight Sports Week championship where they competed in football, soccer, softball and basketball.

Jud Adams, Louisville '18, above, was named one of 62 U.S. Truman Scholars, among 768 candidates nominated by 316 colleges and universities. A third-generation service member in the Air Force ROTC, he serves as the student government director of communications and plans to pursue a JD from Georgetown. As well, his fellow chapter brother Jeremy Ball ’17, was named a Fulbright Scholar for the coming year. A prestigious international scholarship funded through the U.S. State Department, applicants go through two selection rounds, one at the national level and the other at their country of application. Jeremy will spend a year in Malaysia teaching English in secondary schools.


DARKENING

OF THE HALL

In the closing months of the spring term, the Board of Trustees made difficult decisions to close two chapters and one colony, each with significant risk management infractions or a general inability or unwillingness to meet minimum operating expectations. Excerpts from General Secretary Wayne Kay’s closure announcements for each campus are reprinted here.

Texas A&M UniversityCorpus Christi

“The College of Charleston Honor Board voted to revoke the chapter’s recognition in late March, after chapter leadership admitted to 13 very serious violations of the college’s code of conduct.

“Dating back at least five years, members struggled to meet minimum chapter operating expectations, particularly in the areas of recruitment, academics and financial sustainability.

I am confident that this decision creates a better long-term outlook for Beta in the Bay Area, and secures an opportunity for Omega to reclaim its position as a fraternal leader on Berkeley’s campus in the future.”

Given the Fraternity’s belief that long-term success requires strong partnerships between the local chapter, alumni, General Fraternity and host institution, it was decided that the Board would support the college’s decision and disband the chapter.”

When a chapter fails to thrive year after year, the General Fraternity must objectively evaluate the Beta experience being afforded to our young men – and the corresponding burden associated with it.”

Omega Colony Berkeley, California

Eta Lambda Chapter Charleston, South Carolina

Zeta Rho Chapter Corpus Christi, Texas

Founded: March 18, 1879

Founded: February 21, 2015

Founded: April 13, 2002

Disbanded: March 6, 2017

Disbanded: May 2, 2017

Disbanded: May 2, 2017

Lifetime Initiates: 1,740

Lifetime Initiates: 125

Lifetime Initiates: 242

Complete Announcement: beta.org/berkeleyclosure

Complete Announcement: beta.org/charlestonclosure

Complete Announcement: beta.org/tamuccclosure

“The [closure] decision came after a series of missteps, beginning with the colony’s leadership orchestrating a number of social events knowingly in violation of the local housing agreement and the Beta Theta Pi Risk Management Policy.

15 SPRING 2017 SUMMER 2017| |BETA.ORG BETA.ORG

College of Charleston

DARKENING OF THE HALL

University of California, Berkeley


At the

Heart of the

Fraternity Friendships evolve over the years and often take more effort to maintain. But Jim Sharrock, Oklahoma ’70, realized the full value of lifelong friendship when his pledge brother, Emer y Dilling ’70, provided life-saving advice that led to a rare, combination heart and liver transplant.

by James Sharrock, Oklahoma ’70

A

t a young age, one might expect that the main long-term impact of joining Beta Theta Pi is to provide lifelong memories and a few truly deep friendships, but for me it has meant much more. Not only did Beta teach me the importance of nurturing friendships, but it also saved my life.

In 1966, I joined Oklahoma’s Gamma Phi Chapter with a pledge class of 24 men. After graduation, my brothers’ paths led in various directions, some entering the military, some moving on to graduate school, some getting married and starting families. Spread out across the world, many of us lost contact for years. Thankfully, my friendship with pledge brother Emery Dilling ’70, stayed intact. Occasionally traveling to Austin, Texas, for business, I’d reconnect with Emery, who went on to become an open-heart surgeon. Five years after we graduated, I learned that I had a rare and often fatal heart disease that has unexpectedly killed many young athletes without any indication of existing heart problems. I was lucky that my first symptom wasn’t sudden death. My health issues were always addressed by


highly-trained doctors, and while my heart was less effective than normal, I could still participate in athletic and other physical activities. Though Emery never examined me professionally, his medical expertise proved invaluable to my life. When there was a new development with my heart, Emery always took my call to help me understand the problem. Since all of my doctors were cardiologists, I appreciated having Emery’s alternate perspective as a surgeon. When my health issues lurched out of control in July 2015, drugs alone could no longer control the fluid buildup that often occurs when your heart can't pump enough blood. I developed fluid in the abdominal cavity and went in for an abdominal ultrasound, which led to a diagnosis of non-alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver — caused independently from my existing heart issue. According to doctors, the only treatment was to drain the fluid during periodic out-patient procedures, and the only cure was a liver transplant, which likely wouldn't happen since my disease wasn’t severe enough. Two months later, 18 of 21 surviving pledge brothers reunited in Oklahoma to celebrate our chapter’s house dedication and the 49th anniversary of our pledge induction. I mentioned my new diagnosis to Emery and a few other pledge brothers.

Following the procedure, my doctors now say I have a “gorgeous” heart, and the lab numbers on my liver couldn’t be better. They predicted that within a few months I would be healthier than I have ever been, albeit with a 68-year-old body. That prediction has proved to be true, with a bonus. I was back on the golf course six months later and my handicap is five strokes lower than before the transplant! I owe my life to Emery. If not for his insistence, I wouldn’t have pushed further to investigate the problem. If we hadn’t made the decision to pledge Beta Theta Pi and maintain our lifelong friendship, I might not be here today to tell this story. Not ev-  (Above) Emery and Jim reunited in Dallas in eryone will be so fortunate, or so needy, to have a pledge broth- July 2016, just five months after the transplant. (Left) From the 1970 Oklahoma yearbook, Jim and er who has the skill and expertise to provide life-saving advice. Emery — standing, respectively, second from right However, everyone needs friends. And the friends you make in the front and back rows — were named Top 10 during your formative years can prove to be among the best Senior Men, along with three of their pledge brothers. long-term support network. I encourage all Betas, particularly those newest in our Fraternity, to spend the time and energy to maintain contact with your brothers. I will always be thankful for my relationship with my Beta brothers. 

17 SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

After several days of evaluation and testing for heart and liver transplants, Emery’s advice proved true. My doctors confirmed my heart wouldn’t be effective much longer and a heart transplant was the only solution. They added that my liver was an “innocent bystander,” damaged by 40 years of heart problems. After a review by independent heart and liver committees, I was approved for both transplants. To minimize post-surgery complications, both organs had to come from the same donor. Two months later, I received a call that a heart and liver were available and I was admitted for the 12-hour overnight operation.

Since 1992, only 212 heart and liver combination transplants have been performed. Only 16 of these were on patients over age 65.

SPOTLIGHT

A few weeks later, Emery called and asked me to tell him everything about the diagnosis. He immediately told me to get on the heart transplant list because the frequency and severity of my heart symptoms were getting worse — a sign that my heart would soon no longer provide enough blood flow to keep me alive. He added that my liver issue was caused by the elevated pressures in my circulatory system.

About 2,500 heart transplants and 6,000 liver transplants occur in the U.S. each year, but heart and liver combination transplants like the one Jim had are extremely rare.


ALUMNI NEWS

RENOWNED DRUMMER HONORED BY ALMA MATER On December 8, 2016, world-renowned jazz drummer and Beta alumnus Victor Lewis, Nebraska ’72, returned to Lincoln to receive an honorary doctorate from his beloved alma mater. Presented during the “Portraits in Jazz” concert, Lewis also performed with the UNL Jazz Orchestra and UNL Big Band.

18

By Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96

ALUMNI NEWS

THE BETA THETA PI

Born into a family of Omaha musicians, Lewis started his musical passion by taking lessons in cello and piano before moving on to the drums. By the age of 15, he was already playing professionally and eventually matriculated to the University of Nebraska to pursue studies in music. In anticipation of the presentation to Lewis, Nebraska’s Director of Jazz Studies Paul Haar remarked, “Simply put, Victor is a legend all over the world, but he is an Omaha kid and a Nebraska native who [came] home. In the jazz world, his stature is equal to other great Nebraskans like Johnny Carson, Dick Cavett, Ted Kooser, Fred Astaire, Henry Fonda and others.” As reported by his university, Lewis moved to New York City in 1974, where he started performing with top jazz artists like Woody Shaw, Carla Bley, David Sanborn and Dexter Gordon. A member of the Stan Getz Quartet from 1980 to 1991, by the late 1980s he was engaged as a freelance artist, touring and recording with top artists in the industry. Aside from performing, Lewis also serves as a composer and educator. In 2003, he joined Rutgers University’s jazz faculty, where he still teaches drums and coaches chamber jazz groups. (Photos: Robert Wagner Film Project and C. Andrew Hovan)


LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT

Dr. Joseph Lane, HampdenSydney ’90, has been appointed provost at Bethany College. A graduate with honors at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, Lane completed his Ph.D. at Boston College and taught political theory and American government at Hampden-Sydney and Bowdoin before joining the faculty at Emory & Henry College. He begins his tenure at Bethany on July 1. jhlane2@me.com

Recruited into Beta as a Founding Father, Trey Yingst, American ’16, received critical acclaim as a journalism student for periodically foregoing classes in pursuit of high-profile stories — both domestic and international. Believing education occurs just as much beyond the classroom walls as it does within them, Yingst was tapped by his alma mater to deliver 2016 keynote remarks during American’s commencement exercises for the School of Communication. A rising star in the world of journalism, namely as a correspondent for One America Network, Trey has secured a spot among the White House press corps and is regularly seen posing questions to Press Secretary Sean Spicer. In February, he was even featured as one of the non-mainstream media personalities who is regularly called upon during the daily White House briefings. treybird93@aol.com

REMEMBERING CAL CHICO’S BOBBY DEAN Bobby Dean, Cal State Chico ’91, may have passed as a sophomore in 1988 following a valiant fight against Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and subsequently leukemia, but his Beta brothers haven’t forgotten his passion for life and the brotherhood they enjoyed together. Having initiated his father onto the Epsilon Iota Chapter Roll shortly after his passing, and following support of the now 20-year gala Bobby’s dad chaired in Sacramento that raised more than $2.8 million for the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society to combat blood cancers, Bobby’s chapter brothers remain loyal to the scholarships in his name — and the family that brought him to Beta. (From Left: Bobby Dean Sr., Perry Clifton ’88, Clay Covington ’91.) perry.clifton@comcast.net

19 SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

LANE NAMED BETHANY PROVOST

RISING STAR

ALUMNI NEWS

This March, former General Fraternity President and past Beta Foundation Chairman Doug Houser, Willamette ’57, was recognized with the Federation of Defense & Corporate Counsel’s first Lifetime Achievement Award. Considered a “legal giant in his own community,” the purpose of the award is to recognize those in law who go above and beyond in terms of leadership, “and whose reputations transcend their legal career.” doug.houser@bullivant.com


BETA DOPPELGANGER? He may have been known as ESPN’s “Buster Brackets” to most during March Madness, but Betas know him as brother Darren Brown, Dayton ’09. Who says theatre degrees don’t pay off? udbrown@gmail.com

YOUNG PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR ALUMNI NEWS 20

MORE THAN JUST CHEESECAKE

THE BETA THETA PI

Marc Schulman, Denver ’76, and the nearly 40-year-old business his father started in 1980, may have a cult following in Chicago, and rightly so, but in January Eli’s Cheesecake was recognized for more than just the 300,000 dessert servings it cranks out each day. This time it was the make-up of its 220-person labor force that grabbed the attention of National Public Radio.

The Fox Cities Chamber of Commerce recently named Nathan Litt, Lawrence ’08, as its 2017 Young Professional of the Year. A board member of the Friends of Appleton Fire Department, as well as Creative Downtown Appleton, Inc., Litt serves as an account director for Quill Creative, a brand development and advertising agency in Oshkosh. nathan.p.litt@gmail.com

Estimated at 15-percent of his total workforce, refugees settling in the Chicago area are actively recruited by brother Schulman. “Refugees tend to make long-term commitments to work at a time when there is a talent shortage for highly skilled jobs,” Schulman said. “They are highly motivated. They have to be motivated just to get to the U.S. It can take years of interviews and security screenings. Then there are the hurdles of a new country, a new language and culture. These are great performers, great people.” With a roster of employees from “war-torn countries like Iraq, Bhutan, Kosovo, Congo and Myanmar,” Schulman is preparing hiring processes for Syrian refugees in the wake of that country’s devastating civil war. mschulman@elicheesecake.com (Photo: Elias Kasongo, left, settled in Chicago in 1994. Schulman originally hired him to wash cake pans. Having earned his business degree at Northeastern Illinois University, Kasongo now serves as the company’s purchasing manager.)

CARIBBEAN LIFE On March 19, HGTVfeatured former District Chief and Leadership Consultant Wayne Huddleston, Texas at Arlington ’98, and his wife, Jessie, on the show, “Caribbean Life,” as they decided to leave Fort Worth, Texas, behind and “start a new chapter of their lives in paradise.” Looking for an island home in which to raise their newborn son, Wyatt, Wayne and Jessie were relocated given a new position he was assigned with the U.S. Small Business Administration. wayne.huddleston@gmail.com


DUARTE NAMED COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER

REMEMBERING KYLE ARNOLD Due to debilitating depression, suicide claimed the life of Kyle Arnold, Case Western Reserve ’09, in January 2014. But his Beta experience and the outpouring of support from his chapter brothers always left a big impression on his family — especially his mother, Tammy. As they approached his 30th birthday on March 31, she recalled his trips to Oxford each semester for Initiation. “I could see it in his face and hear it in his voice,” she said. “Being a Beta meant a lot to him.” Maybe that’s why it’s not surprising when she rallied his Beta brothers to make symbolic $30 gifts to the Beta Leadership Fund in his memory, and join the family at 7:00 a.m. on his birthday morning to enjoy his favorite: chocolate-covered long johns. “He loved chocolate.”

HALL OF FAMERS

OMICRON’S GILLIAM HONORED BY UVA

The 1982 Willamette men’s soccer team was inducted into the university’s Sports Hall of Fame late last fall. Finishing with a 15-4 record, including 11-consecutive wins and the NAIA District II championship, the team included four brothers of the Gamma Sigma Chapter: John Hitchman ’84, George Wells ’85, Brian Clearman ’86, and Alan VonDerMehden ’86.

On Founder’s Day, April 13, officials and friends gathered to plant a Tupelo Gum Tree next to the Rotunda in honor of University Protocol and History Officer Sandy Gilliam, Virginia ’55. Recognized for his 42 years of service and contributions to UVA, Sandy was praised by President Sullivan and then presented with a ceremonial watering can from the Seven Society. Gilliam family lineage at UVA dates back to 1829.

21 SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

Certainly, Kyle’s mental health and passing cannot be forgotten. Fortunately, his memory and the Fraternity that brought him so much joy live on in the lives of his Beta brothers and that of good ol’ Mom. (Photo: Kyle’s brother, sister and mother are joined by his chapter at the memorial service.)

ALUMNI NEWS

International business leader Andres Duarte, Ohio Wesleyan ’65, served as his alma mater’s commencement speaker during its 173rd ceremonies on May 13. Dubbed by the chapter during his college days as “the most outstanding goof off,” Duarte’s recognition by Queen Elizabeth II as an “Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire” underscores the notion that one can’t always judge a book by its cover. aduarte@dvaccs.com


sticks and stones w h e n n a mes and w or ds can hur t you By Justin Warren, SMU '10


“In today’s age, bullies don’t push you into lockers, nor do they tell their victims to meet them behind the school’s dumpster after class. They cower behind user names and fake profiles from miles away — constantly berating and abusing good, innocent people. The only way to end the suffering in this nation, whether it be from bullying or discrimination, is not to highlight differences between groups of people, but to focus on the importance of accountability and, ultimately, character. It is our dream for the healing of this nation to be David’s legacy.” — Cliff Molak, Texas A&M ’14 and Chris Molak, Texas A&M ’17

a family’s darkest day

F

or a year beginning in 2014, bullies tormented David Molak, a 16-year-old sophomore from San Antonio, Texas — yet there wasn’t a single visible scar to prove it. David grew up in a family of five with his parents, Matt and Maurine, and two older brothers, Cliff and Chris. He was a happy, outgoing child who had recently achieved the distinguished rank of Eagle Scout. The most avid outdoorsman of the Molak children, David was passionate about the San Antonio Spurs and could instantly recall player and team statistics from across the NBA and NFL. Like most kids his age, David was glued to his phone and the deluge of apps and information at his

fingertips. A technology meant to bring people together, however, soon began tearing him apart. Little did his family know, the Alamo Heights student had become a victim of relentless cyberbullying and was quickly retreating into the darkest corners of himself with every passing text message and social media notification. Maurine Molak recalls the night they learned about David’s abuse. He ran to their bedroom, visibly distraught, and showed his parents an Instagram post where his aggressors had humiliated him in front of what appeared to be hundreds of people. The derogatory comments ridiculing his personal appearance and littered with despicable names went on for pages.

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abuse “Molak’s an ape.” “David Molak has AIDS.” “Put him in a body bag.”

“How would you feel if hundreds of people you went to school with said they wanted to see you dead or hurt?” David’s oldest brother, Cliff, asked. “That would be hard for anyone to handle, but an especially large burden for a young teenager.” His parents soon learned that David had been regularly abused through photos and videos, Instagram, Facebook, text messages

24

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and other anonymous communication apps for quite some time. His classmates were editing his photos with the face of a monkey and berated him through group message threads. As soon as David could block them, his aggressors quickly created new account names and immediately resumed their torment. David’s school understood the seriousness of the situation and


"It's like our world had been broken to pieces, and we had to decide how we were going to put it all back together." — Chris Molak, Texas A&M ’17

feared for his safety, but insisted there was little they could do since the bullying happened away from campus and after school hours. Administrators moved David to an alternative school while his parents searched for a more permanent solution.

After continuous online abuse, David's self-image was warped beyond repair. He told his brothers that he hated looking in the mirror, and told his mom he hated her for making him. To the family, it felt like a tornado that they couldn’t stop.

All the while, David was changing. Before the bullying, he embraced his role as the annoying kid sibling, and eagerly teamed up with Cliff to prank his middle brother, Chris. “He was always the goofy guy going out to family dinners wearing kneehigh socks and flat bill hats,” Cliff said. “All that stopped when the bullying started.”

By Thanksgiving of 2015, David had made two attempts on his own life. After hospitalizations and extensive counseling, the family was able to enjoy Christmas together — David’s favorite holiday. On the inside, however, David was a shell of his former self, and tragedy struck the family less than two weeks later.

David's mother described his downward spiral as hell on earth. "It was like a light switch turned off," Maurine said. "David was a completely different child. He lashed out at me with verbal assault, was extremely disrespectful, manipulative, slept a lot, lost both his appetite and his interest in all things he used to enjoy, and was engaging in behaviors alarming to any responsible and loving mother."

Preparing to begin his second semester of medical school the next day, Cliff returned to his apartment. As Chris said goodnight to David, he noticed his brother dressed in pajama pants — and a pair of shoes. Curious, he thought. Then, in the early hours of January 4, panic set in and a frantic search ensued … David was missing. At 2:04 a.m., Cliff received a call from Chris. They found David. The lights of an ambulance guided Cliff to the family home like a runway, dancing across the house where they had enjoyed a fam-

The night of January 3, 2016, began with the three brothers joining their mother for dinner at home while their father, Matt, recovered from knee surgery in San Francisco. Cliff vividly remembers seeing the pain in David’s eyes soon after as he was added to a group text only to be made fun of and kicked out two minutes later. “I spoke to him right after to comfort him and he didn’t even hear me,” Cliff said. “He stared off into the distance for what seemed like an hour. I could feel his pain. It was a tangible pain.”

"He did not do anything to them besides having an attractive girlfriend," Cliff Molak said. It is believed David's cyber abuse began when classmates became jealous of his relationship.

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ily dinner only hours earlier. He peeked inside the truck, but David wasn’t there. As he opened the front door of the family home, the quiet air was interrupted by the howling cries of his mother as she lied in his grandfather’s lap. Chris sat at the living room table with his head buried in his arms. Cliff walked to the window — this all just felt like a bad dream, he thought. Looking out to the backyard through the blackness of a dark night sky, he saw a pair of shoes dangling from a tree.

david's legacy

A

n array of monuments blanket the grounds of the Texas State Capitol in Austin. There, near statues celebrating the spirit of the Texas cowboy, the triumphs of Terry’s Texas Rangers and the legacy of the Alamo, stands the Tribute to Texas Schoolchildren. The small, bronze statues depicting Texas kids keep watch over the building, presumably reminding lawmakers of their duty to protect them. According to a nearby plaque, there were six statues when the monument was dedicated in 1998. Today, only four remain, with two of the children removed and in need of repair after years of wear and abuse left them fractured. An ironic twist given the outcome of David’s story. The Molak family never expected to walk the halls of the State Capitol convincing lawmakers to protect children against cyber abuse. However, the generally private family was thrust into the limelight in the wake of David’s death. “The story became a public spectacle because of the abuse that he was enduring,” Cliff said. “There were physical reminders of his torment — the pictures, the online insults.”

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Following a viral Facebook post by the Molak brothers calling for human kindness and decency, media requests began rolling in from all corners of the state. The family answered the calls, publicly reliving the events that led to David’s death and giving voice to cyberbullying and the demonstrated effects that it could have on a youthful mind. They can’t recall exactly when or how, but they had acquired a platform. Chris described his family’s world as being broken in pieces after his brother’s death. “We had to decide how to put it back together,” he said. In the ensuing weeks, the brothers formed a non-profit organization in David’s name — David’s Legacy Foundation — dedicated to ending cyber-assisted bullying by educating the community on the effects of cyber abuse, providing legal assistance for bullying victims, promoting kindness and supporting legislation that prohibits the cyberbullying of minors. Since its creation, the foundation has established the Don’t Bully Me Project, a group of volunteer attorneys that provide legal services to children experiencing severe physical, social and/or verbal abuse. Additionally, the family found allies in Texas State Senator José Menéndez and State Representative Ina Minjarez, who had coincidentally been drafting cyber abuse legislation at the time of David’s death. The family soon connected with the legislators and helped create two

stones]


"I can say with certainty that lives have been saved because of the awareness created by David's death." — Cliff Molak, Texas A&M ’14

awareness comprehensive bills, Senate Bill 179 and House Bill 306 — more commonly known as David’s Law.

parents who could have intervened and stopped their child’s abusive behaviors, but didn’t.

David’s Law attempts to modernize the state’s existing bullying laws by classifying cyberbullying as a misdemeanor, allowing courts to issue subpoenas to unmask anonymous online aggressors, and requiring public schools to report and intervene in any suspected cyberbullying cases. The bill also opens the door for victims to file lawsuits against

The family says that the legislation is not intended to inundate the legal system with frivolous lawsuits stemming from minor instances of abuse; instead, it is meant to discourage repetitive, almost sociopathic abuse. They acknowledge that the long-term solution to this crisis involves not only a change in the law but a change in people’s hearts.

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impact “Maybe [cyberbullies] don’t understand that their words, those little black and white characters, can really impact someone’s life,” State Senator Menéndez said. “Never have I worked on something that feels as important as David’s Law because I don’t want any parent, brother, sister, aunt, uncle or grandparent to ever have to suffer the pain that so many families have endured because their children took their lives.” In May, Senate Bill 179 made significant progress toward becoming law, passing unanimously in the State Senate and re-

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ceiving overwhelming bipartisan approval in the State House. Following the House vote, one representative called David's Law "one of the most important pieces of legislation" his committee had ever approved. At the time of writing, with a mere two weeks left in the legislative session, the bill has returned to the Senate for consideration of House changes. Cliff and Chris acknowledge that, given their academic commitments, their parents have become the real work horses for David’s Legacy Foundation; but Matt Molak, David’s father, isn’t so quick to

stones]


deep in the hearts of texans

T take credit. “Without the kids, I don’t know that we would have done anything,” he said. “We might have thought about it. Maybe we would have made an annual contribution to an anti-bullying organization, but it was really them that got this thing going.” Regardless of what happens to the law, the family is satisfied with the progress they have made in the last year. “It’s amazing when you step back and look at how far we’ve come, how many people have gotten involved, and how many lives have been touched by David,” Chris said.

Above left: David Molak's headstone located in San Antonio, Texas, complete with Eagle Scout insignia in the bottom corner. Above right: David with his parents, Matt and Maurine, in 2015, after achieving the rank of Eagle Scout with Troop 809.

he Molak family’s tragic loss created a ripple effect throughout the state of Texas, felt from San Antonio to Austin and all the way to College Station — the home of Texas A&M University and the Epsilon Eta Chapter of Beta Theta Pi. Cliff joined the chapter in 2012, with Chris being initiated one year later. If the circumstances had been different, it’s likely a third Molak name would have graced the Epsilon Eta Chapter Roll. “David was a huge Texas A&M fan, and actually wanted to be a Beta,” his mother, Maurine, said. “He talked about it all the time.” Chris says that Beta didn’t only bring him closer to his fraternity brothers, it strengthened his relationship with his biological brother as well. “I really got to know Cliff throughout the summer and fall of my freshman year,” he said. “I found that the friendships he had within the Fraternity were genuine — not only to one another, but to the younger guys as well.” Those friendships were tested when David passed away, although not surprisingly their brothers helped to pull them through. Cliff remembers a number of Betas driving to San Antonio and essentially living with him for two weeks while he grieved David’s passing. Chris recalls the overwhelming number of condolences he received from his Fraternity brothers after the incident, and one special call from Blake Wampler ’19, in particular, when he was told that the chapter wanted to redirect their philanthropy event to benefit the family. The chapter immediately began planning DBM Fest when they returned for the spring semester. “It wasn’t a question of if we would support the Molak family, but

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how” Wampler said. “Cliff and Chris are two integral members of our Fraternity and our brotherhood, and DBM Fest was the least we could do.” The event was a country music festival for the entire College Station community. Above admission costs, the men sold food and drinks, conducted an hourly raffle and held a silent auction to raise funds. DBM Fest was an instant hit, attracting hundreds of attendees and raising nearly $25,000 for the David’s Legacy Foundation — far and away the largest philanthropy event in the chapter’s history. Recognized as Beta’s Advisor of the Year in 2011, Mary Elizabeth Herring has served as the Epsilon Eta Chapter Counselor for 17 years. According to her, the event was in perfect alignment with the values of the Fraternity and Texas A&M University — namely the desire to put service above self. “DBM Fest brought all of the brothers together,” she said. “It reinstated what we value about this Fraternity and what their relationships with each other as brothers really means.”

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the importance of character

D

avid Molak possessed a keen sense of injustice in the world. Yet at age 16, it was a series of injustices that drove David to take his own life.

resolve

Contrary to the old children’s adage, it was neither sticks nor stones that broke his bones, it was the names and words that hurt him. He left behind a family whose lives and relationships are forever changed. Matt Molak recently testified to a committee: “There are many mornings when I wake up and, for just a few moments, I don’t remember what has happened ... The last memory that I have of my son is before closing his coffin, seeing him there holding the ashes of his favorite dog, his David Robinson jersey, his favorite shirt that his girlfriend had given him, and pictures of his brothers pinned to his chest.” The Molak family’s story is about more than cyberbullying. It's a story about accountability, kindness, character, civility and making the conscious choice between hurting people or helping them. Through the David’s Legacy Foundation, Cliff and Chris Molak are challenging children and adults alike to be urbane in deportment, courteous in expression and steadfast in friendship. These traits, which every Beta ascribes to at the time of his initiation, stand to set an example for those we encounter in and out of the chapter house: the Beta way is the way of human decency and high moral character in person, online or otherwise.  Interested in seeing how the Molak’s efforts have impacted the Lone Star State? Watch more at beta.org/davidmolak

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THE STATE OF THE FRATERNITY BETA THETA PI AT-A-GLANCE

STATE OF THE FRATERNITY 32

Beta Theta Pi is a vast organization, with likely as many measures of success — and challenge — as there are members. Recognizing beauty is certainly “in the eye of the beholder,” key performance indicators still provide a good indication of the general health and trajectory of a Great and Good Fraternity.  Self-Governance

1997 All-Chapter GPA

 Education

2016 All-Chapter GPA

2.820 3.226

THE BETA THETA PI

Average Number of Advisors Per Chapter

8 (Average of 2 in 1997)

86

General Fraternity Officers

House Corporation Volunteers

704

Alumni Relations Committee Volunteers (129 alumni; 127 undergrads)

256

1,010

7

 Volunteers

1996-97 Leadership Program Graduates 0.1% of Undergraduates

2016-17 Leadership Program Graduates 18.3% of Undergraduates

1,909

Total Leadership Program Graduates Since 1998 Inception of Men of Principle Initiative

21,409 ▼ 1997

▼ 2017

6,842 10,441

Undergraduates Undergraduates

140 133

Chapters/Colonies Chapters/Colonies

48.9 78.5

Chapter Advisors (95% Core Advisor Positions Filled for All Chapters: 5/Chapter)

 Recruitment

Total Beta Volunteers

2,056

Average Chapter Size

Average Chapter Size

206,144 131,542 2017 – Lifetime Initiates

2017 – Living Alumni


CHAPTER

REPORTS ALABAMA

NA: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. NR: Data that is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of 4/30/17.

S

E

14 | 15

R

51/140 | 44

V

3.06

14

R 15

29/78

V 29

8

8

2 Poi 016 G nt A rad 201 ver e 6C age Gra amp u de Poi s Allnt A Ma ver le 20 age Pro 16 -17 Lea gra m A de tte rship Avg nda nce Du . Annu rin a l Att gP rev end 201 i ous a & T 6 -1 3 Ye nce ota 7 To ars lC hap tal M e ter n Siz Pled Avg e (4 g /30 ed .A /17) Du nnua rin l g P Recr rev iou uitme s 3 Y nt ear 201 s 6 -1 7N Act u ive mber Ad viso of Du Avg. A rs rin g P ctive A rev iou dviso s 3 Y rs ear s

Self-Governance Education Recruitment Volunteers

3.23

E

CHAPTER REPORTS

Performance Average of All Beta Chapters

We've had a great semester here at Delta Theta. The chapter has steadily improved campus involvement, with brothers being elected to Capstone Men and Women, SGA and many other campus organizations. We are also excited about sending brothers to the Wooden Institute and Convention this summer. 3.24 | 3.05

S

LEGEND: State of the Chapters

∆Θ | Tuscaloosa, Ala. Thomas Wiygul '18 tjwiygul@crimson.ua.edu

9|9

33 AMERICAN

ARKANSAS

ΗΜ | Fayetteville, Ark. Zachary Spero '19 zvspero@email.uark.edu

Several of our alumni have continued to do fantastic things throughout the world. One alumnus, Bradley Kratzer ’16, is currently working for the Peace Corps in Panama while another fellow alumnus, Trey Yingst ’16, is the White House Correspondent for One America News Network. Proud to be a Beta! S

3.37 | NR

E

10 | NA

R

20/52 | 33

V

8 | 12

E

11 | 10

R 54/160 | 55 V

S

3.18 | 2.83

E

16 | 31

R 24/105 | 66 V

9 | 10

This semester, the Delta Psi Chapter participated in All-University Sing, a Broadway-style show in which many Greek Life organizations participate. Our theme this year was “Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Act.” We had fun performing and look forward to starting our homecoming float for next semester. S 3.34 | NR E

6|9

14 | 12

R

22/46 | 18

V

7|7

BETHANY

∆Ζ | Auburn, Ala. AJ Forchette '18 ajforchette@me.com

Our chapter is proud to report that our annual spring philanthropy and volleyball tournament, "Beta Ace," raised more than $13,000 for the National Breast Cancer Foundation. We are looking forward to improving our chapter's GPA throughout 2017, as well as recruiting another outstanding group of individuals during fall rush. 2.88 | 2.87

The Eta Mu Chapter visited the Walmart Museum to see Sam Walton's Oxford Cup in our home state of Arkansas. The Eta Mu Chapter earned a cumulative 3.18 GPA this fall, higher than the all-fraternity and all-men's averages. Eta Mu welcomed 25 new members from spring rush this semester.

AUBURN

ARIZONA

∆Β | Tucson, Ariz. John Riley '18 johnriley95@gmail.com

S

∆Ψ | Waco, Texas Mehir Srinivasan '19 Mehir_Srinivasan@baylor.edu

Ψ | Bethany, W. Va. Ryan Senka '19 rsenka@bethanywv.edu

As a chapter, we have significantly increased our on-campus involvement and community service. Every brother has completed service this semester, and many have taken leadership roles in organizations outside of the Fraternity. This is all in an effort to give back to the community that serves us so well!

The Psi Chapter was able to recruit five new members in the spring, 13 for the whole year. Psi Chapter also started its first-ever "Community Cleanup Day" for the town of Bethany where we covered every house in the town and did a variety chores for town residents.

S 2.99 | NR E

S

11 | 10

R

57/169 | 51

V

7|7

2.75 | 2.69

E

11 | 18

R

13/28 | 13

V

10 | 8

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

ΗΠ | Washington, D.C. Charlie Veraza '19 cv4257a@student.american.edu

BAYLOR


S

LEGEND: State of the Chapters

Self-Governance Education Recruitment Volunteers NA: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. NR: Data that is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of 4/30/17.

3.23

3.06

14

R 15

29/78

CENTRE

V 29

8

Ε | Danville, Ky. Jared Thompson ’17 jared.thompson@centre.edu

8

2 Poi 016 G nt A rad 201 ver e 6 a ge Gra Camp us A de Poi l l nt A Ma ver le 20 a ge Pro 16 -17 Lea gr a m A de r s tte Avg nda hip nce Du . Annu rin g P al Att re v e 2 iou ndan & T 016 -1 s 3 Y ce ota 7 To ear lC s hap tal M ter en P S l e i ze ( dge Avg 4 /30 d .A /17) Du nnua rin g P l Recr re v u iou itme s 3 Y nt ear 201 s 6 -1 7N Act um ive b Ad er of viso Du Avg. A rs rin g P ctive A re v iou dviso s 3 Y rs ear s

Performance Average of All Beta Chapters

E

After successfully completing a revitalized new member education program, Epsilon sought to ensure sustained operational excellence by reorganizing its advisory team and bringing in new alumni to assist with chapter operations. In addition, our spring philanthropy event, “Bacon Theta Pi,” is poised to be successful once again. S

BRITISH COLUMBIA

CHAPTER REPORTS

3.22 | NR

E

10 | 6

R

33/79 | 25

V

9|6

17 | 18

R

13/58 | 16

V

12 | 11

ΗΘ | Orange, Calif. Wyatt Giampa ’18 giamp101@mail.chapman.edu

ΛΚ−Β | Cleveland, Ohio Abhe Murthy ’19 axm919@case.edu

It was another successful semester for the Gamma Omicron Chapter, winning the UBC Sports Trophy, hosting our inaugural charity event to raise money for autism research through the Callum Frost Professorship, and continuing to excel with a full house of Betas.

E

CHAPMAN

CASE WESTERN RESERVE

ΓΟ | Vancouver, B.C. Levi de la Giroday '18 levigiroday@gmail.com

S

3.25 | 3.01

In this past term, our chapter celebrated its 175th anniversary, and with that an increase in alumni and advisor involvement. We also successfully ran our first-ever Super Bowl philanthropy event, “Tub-off,” and donated all proceeds to the Greater Cleveland Diabetes Partnership.

Eta Theta at Chapman University is excited about the future! We've revamped our recruitment process, taking in 12 top-notch men as new members of the Eta Theta Chapter. At close to a 3.3 GPA, we're well above the university average, and second highest among fraternities on campus.

S 3.46 | 3.33 E

S

14 | 17

R

15/50 | 17

V

9 | 11

3.28 | 3.21

E

14 | 19

R

22/76 | 38

V

5|7

34 CAL POLY

CENTRAL FLORIDA

THE BETA THETA PI

Ε∆ | San Luis Obispo, Calif. Shane Russell ’18 sprussell23@gmail.com

We held our second annual philanthropy event, "Beta Bowtie," and helped raise money for wounded veterans and their families through the Fisher House Foundation. We held our largest alumni weekend to date to celebrate the 30th anniversary of our local founding, with members of our Alpha pledge class attending. S

2.89 | 2.99

E

12 | 12

R

32/82 | 33

V

4|3

The Beta Nu Chapter had another successful recruitment season with 13 men accepting bids in the spring semester, pushing our overall membership to 119. We have also worked to increase our alumni relations, improve our participation in leadership development programs and become more involved in the Greek community.

S 2.96 | NR E

S

8|6

R

15/36 | 18

V

R

30/91 | 38

V

4|6

7|6

3.01 | 2.86

E

18 | 20

R

36/82 | 26

V

E

26 | 26

R

44/117 | 32

V

7|7

∆Ν | Clemson, S.C. Jordan Byrne ’18 jabyrne@g.clemson.edu

This term, we raised more than $3,000 for the JED Foundation, won the fraternity intramural league championship in volleyball and held a very successful "Febroaury." We've all been on top of balancing our lives and mutually assisting each other to stay on the right path.

S

3.27 | 2.99

CLEMSON

ΕΓ | Mount Pleasant, Mich. Thomas Wagner ’18 wagne1tf@cmich.edu

The highlight of the year for Epsilon Upsilon was definitely the fact that we celebrated our 25th anniversary on campus and were able to host an incredible banquet for our alumni members that weekend. We also initiated 13 new brothers – eight in the fall and five in the winter. E

18 | 19

CENTRAL MICHIGAN

ΕΥ | Ottawa, Ont. Keaton Cribbey ’18 kcribbey.bcss@gmail.com

3.10 | NR

ΒΝ | Cincinnati, Ohio Dean Hayes ’18 hayesdp@mail.uc.edu

This term, we raised more than $19,000 during our philanthropy event, “Beta's Best Dance Crew,” which raises money for a foundation that helps kids with cancer. This was the most money we have ever raised and were able to write a check to the Ian Supra Foundation for more than $7,000.

CARLETON

S

CINCINNATI

ΖΨ | Orlando, Fla. Justin Fucci ’18 justinfucci@knights.ucf.edu

10 | 9

Spring 2017 has been a productive term. We've continued to develop our relationship with the university, and more than 700 invitations were distributed to alumni encouraging their membership in our newly formed alumni association. Of course, we're still riding the high of that National Championship back in January... Roll Deshaun. S 3.06 | 3.01 E

9|9

R

30/99 | 30

V

7|7


COLGATE

DAYTON

CONNECTICUT

BΘ | Hamilton, N.Y. Matt Cutcliffe ’18 mcutcliffe@colgate.edu

ΖΧ | Storrs, Conn. Patrick Coley ’18 patrick.coley@uconn.edu

We obtained a chapter GPA of 3.25 and sent our entire executive team to Keystone in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. We have hosted a philanthropy event for the One Love Foundation that raised around $2,000 for the organization while raising awareness against relationship violence.

This semester, the Zeta Chi Chapter excelled in programming, developing stronger brotherhood and furthering our intellect. Events such as debate night, poker and paintball gave the chapter opportunities to get together outside of the normal grind to develop better relationships and challenge us in meaningful ways.

This spring, the chapter initiated the largest pledge class in chapter history: 21 members. The chapter also upheld its record of highest GPA for University of Dayton fraternities. The chapter also participated in a program where our chapter alumni mentored and consulted undergraduates on professional development.

S 3.43 | 3.06 E

S

S

3.24 | 3.23

E

10 | 3

R

18/56 | 25

V

10 | 8

ΒΦ | Golden, Colo. Aditya Malkan ’18 amalkan@mymail.mines.edu

14 | 18

R

17/81 | 29

V

V

9|8

10 | 9

3.33 | 3.14

E

23 | 19

R

30/59 | 23

V

7|8

DENISON

ΑΗ | Granville, Ohio Sam Demaree ’18 demare_s1@denison.edu

Our chapter GPA was top 10 among fraternities at Cornell. Four of our brothers of Beta Delta were elected to the student assembly, and Jung Won Kim '18 was elected president. We recruited a strong pledge class filled with leaders and men of principle.

This spring, we gained nine new members into our fraternity. We are working to raise our GPA and be the highest on campus for IFC like we were last spring. Finally, we hosted our annual philanthropy, “King of Wing,” in April.

S 3.43 | NR E

S

15 | 17

R

18/74 | 22

V

12 | 10

3.18 | 3.03

E

14 | 4

R

9/43 | 16

V

CHAPTER REPORTS

E

38/81 | 26

Β∆ | Ithaca, N.Y. George Ayob ’18 gka22@cornell.edu

While the chapter set the tone for supporting a new philanthropy last semester with raising awareness for suicide prevention, the ideas continue to grow and improve. The chapter is also working with CSM and Alpha Phi to host "Walk a Mile In Her Shoes," a nationwide sexual assault prevention cause. 3.23 | 3.11

R

CORNELL

COLORADO MINES

S

11 | 16

Η∆ | Dayton, Ohio Spencer Weller ’18 wellers2@udayton.edu

5|7

35 COLUMBIA

CREIGHTON

ΗΙ | Omaha, Neb. Christian Hannah ’19 cmh70348@creighton.edu

This semester, our brotherhood has focused on making much needed improvements to our house. We specifically have focused on making the first floor and chapter room more appealing, establishing them as hangout spots for brothers and pledges alike. We hope to continue these improvements in the coming months. S

3.72 | NR

E

12 | 13

R

21/69 | 26

V

8|7

A COLGATE TRADITION Colgate Custodian Linda Kaiser was recognized with a "Torch Medal" from Spencer Barbieri, Colgate '17, for her impact on his life since his sophomore year. An honor given by any graduating senior to a member of the Colgate community, Linda says, "I've worked here for 13 years and this is the first time I've ever received it."

ΑΖ | Denver, Colo. Thomas Enck ’18 thomas.enck@du.edu

Our chapter has changed our philanthropy from Completely Kids to the Wounded Warrior Project. We have also improved sorority relations through co-sponsored date parties and philanthropic efforts. Finally, we have maintained our standing as the fraternity with the highest GPA on campus. S

3.53 | 3.33

E

16 | 26

R

18/67 | 25

V

8|6

Alpha Zeta remains true to its chapter motto – "We seek the height." With extensive campus involvement, an average GPA of 3.52, more than $10,000 raised for philanthropy, and a pledge class of more than 30 men in the fall, the future of Beta is indeed bright in the Mile High City. S 3.50 | 3.22 E

13 | 15

R

34/98 | 26

V

7|7

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

ΑΑ | New York, N.Y. Justin Borczuk ’18 jnb2135@columbia.edu

DENVER


S

LEGEND: State of the Chapters

Self-Governance Education Recruitment Volunteers NA: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. NR: Data that is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of 4/30/17.

3.23

3.06

14

R 15

29/78

EMORY

V 29

8

ΓΥ | Atlanta, Ga. Oliver Hart '20 oliver.hart@emory.edu

8

2 Poi 016 G nt A rad 201 ver e 6 a ge Gra Camp us A de Poi l l nt A Ma ver le 20 a ge Pro 16 -17 Lea gr a m A de r s tte Avg nda hip nce Du . Annu rin g P al Att re v e 2 iou ndan & T 016 -1 s 3 Y ce ota 7 To ear lC s hap tal M ter en P S l e i ze ( dge Avg 4 /30 d .A /17) Du nnua rin g P l Recr re v u iou itme s 3 Y nt ear 201 s 6 -1 7N Act um ive b Ad er of viso Du Avg. A rs rin g P ctive A re v iou dviso s 3 Y rs ear s

Performance Average of All Beta Chapters

E

With 28 Refounding Fathers of the Gamma Upsilon Chapter, we are redefining what it means to be Greek at Emory. We are having critical conversations and are being thoughtful about why we exist as a fraternity. We are looking to do things the right way for the right reasons. S

DEPAUW

CHAPTER REPORTS

3.32 | 3.11

E

13 | 12

R 28/105 | 30 V

7|8

Here at the Delta Xi Chapter of Beta Theta Pi, we recently attended the Greek Awards ceremony hosted by the Interfraternity Council. As a chapter, we took home the Outstanding Scholarship Award. We pride ourselves on brotherhood and intellectual growth! Homecoming is October 20-21! S

3.01 | 2.94

E

13 | 8

R

28/56 | 28

V

7|7

32/23 | 20

V

7|5

ΓΞ | Gainesville, Fla. Sean Murtha ’18 smurtha@ufl.edu

∆Ξ | Richmond, Ky. Andrew Jones ’18 andrew_jones234@mymail.eku.edu

In this previous semester, the Delta Chapter has initiated 22 new members. We've also started the “Father Scholar Program” so our new members have an upperclassman member of the house to go to when they need help academically.

E NA | 11 R FLORIDA

EASTERN KENTUCKY

∆ | Greencastle, Ind. Daniel Rice ’18 danielrice_2018@depauw.edu

S

NA | 3.36

This semester, our annual philanthropy, “Beta Bring It On,” has garnered involvement from every sorority on campus and is poised to break our fundraising record from the prior year. We are aiming to raise about $50,000 for the Alzheimer's Association.

S

3.24 | 3.19

E

13 | 17

R 42/136 | 43 V

6|6

36 DREXEL

EASTERN WASHINGTON

THE BETA THETA PI

ΗΟ | Philadelphia, Pa. Jake McNamara '20 president.beta.drexel@gmail.com

FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL

ΕΩ | Cheney, Wash. Hunter Lovely ’19 hunterlovely@eagles.ewu.edu

ΗΓ | Miami, Fla. Alexander Castillo ’18 acast394@fiu.edu

Installed on May 27, the newly chartered chapter at Drexel had an outstanding 2016. Moving into the year with a new executive team, we wanted to turn our focus outward. Some accomplishments included increasing our community service hours, creating a new philanthropy, and fostering relationships with both FSL and other organizations.

Epsilon Omega celebrated its third homecoming championship in a row this year and saw exponential growth in chapter GPA and membership. With a 12-man pledge class in the winter, Epsilon Omega has grown to its largest size in chapter history.

The Eta Gamma Chapter had its largest spring rush class in chapter history. We also recently attended our long-awaited brotherhood retreat, which boosted the morale of the chapter. Along with changes to chapter operations, we are excited for fall semester.

S 3.34 | 3.17 E

S 3.08 | 3.00 E

S

23 | 14

R

10/37 | 27

V

4|7

EAST CAROLINA

E

8 | 17

R

10/43 | 25

V

35/56 | 27

V

8|7

1 | 11

3.35 | 3.12

E

18 | NA

R

28/91 | NA

E

11 | 21

R 45/106 | 35 V

6|7

∆Λ | Tallahassee, Fla. Cody Rochford ’17 ctr12f@my.fsu.edu

The Elon Colony continued its strong momentum into this spring, including the completion of more than 1,100 community service hours in one month. This push to plant our roots at Elon and in the greater community earned us the Elon University McBride Community Involvement Award for 2016-17. S

2.81 | 2.88

FLORIDA STATE

Colony | Elon, N.C. Dan Ford ’18 dford9@elon.edu

We held a charity concert for our alumnus, Nick Nosbisch ’11, who has stage four liver cancer. Through ticket sales and donations, we were able to raise more than $700 for Nick and his family to help cover his medical costs. We also held a blood drive and reached well beyond our goal. 2.58 | 2.76

R

ELON

ΕΑ | Greenville, N.C. John Winstead ’18 winsteadj13@students.ecu.edu

S

4 | 10

V

7 | NA

Beta Theta Pi at Florida State has been busy this semester improving our colony and growing together in many ways. We are building a closer brotherhood in our new house, and a major accomplishment has been working together on our philanthropy to raise over $10,000 for the FSU Victim Advocate Program. S 2.94 | 2.94 E

14 | 21

R

64/111 | 67

V

6|8


FURMAN

GEORGIA

ΖΛ | Greenville, S. C. Everett Haugh ’18 everett.haugh@furman.edu

IDAHO

ΕΕ | Athens, Ga. Christian Baum ’19 cdbaum2@gmail.com

ΓΓ | Moscow, Idaho Charles Dolar ’18 dola2836@vandals.uidaho.edu

Our spring 2017 pledge class is perhaps the finest in Zeta Lambda history, boasting the highest GPA of any other pledge class on campus. The young men are equally involved on campus outside the classroom, participating in mock trial, the cycling team and various other organizations.

Our chapter organized a school-wide clothing drive that resulted in a donation of 485 pounds of clothes to a local homeless shelter. We have 87 active brothers above a 3.0 GPA and raised more than $3,000 for Children's Health Care of Atlanta. We also initiated 26 new members, including a Beta from Ole Miss.

The Gamma Gamma Chapter achieved first in grades of all fraternities this term. We have been top two in grades for 13 out of the past 14 semesters. Going into our 103rd year, we have surpassed 2,000 initiated members. Between philanthropic events and community service, we have logged more than 1,000 hours this year.

S 3.05 | 3.08 E

S 3.40 | 3.18 E

S

8 | 12

R

14/35 | 11

5|4

V

16 | 16

R

29/96 | 33

V

8|8

3.24 | 2.93

E

16 | 13

R

25/95 | 26

V

5|5

GEORGE MASON

GEORGIA TECH

We had an amazing showing in two events during our first year on campus. We had a brother win two of three categories for a philanthropy event. We also had 10 brothers help us get a third-place finish for homecoming.

This spring, the Gamma Eta Chapter achieved the number one GPA of chartered fraternities on campus. We also have brothers who have joined the FASET Program, SGA, Executive Round Table and other organizations on campus. The brothers also helped out at the annual Dogwood Festival in Atlanta.

Re-installed on April 29 by the Board of Trustees, Sigma Rho ranked seventh of 49 fraternities last fall, boasting a 3.23 GPA. We also initiated our Chapter Counselor Jeremy Canales, a true man of principle for whom we are so grateful for his support and dedication. House renovations begin soon thanks to the house corporation's partnership with the General Fraternity!

S 3.08 | 2.89 E

S 3.43 | 3.19 E

S

R

71/48 | NA

V

12 | NA

14 | 14

R

16/59 | 19

ΣΡ | Champaign, Ill. Kyle Tebelman ’18 kyletebelman@gmail.com

V

11 | 9

3.23 | 3.08

E

17 | 14

R 38/104 | 57 V

CHAPTER REPORTS

14 | NA

ILLINOIS

ΓΗ | Atlanta, Ga. John Proctor ’18 john.proctor@gtbeta.org

ΕΜ | Fairfax, Va. Elvis Montoya ’18 emontoy3@gmu.edu

7|6

37 HIGH POINT

GEORGE WASHINGTON

Zeta Nu is proud to announce we will be moving into a larger townhouse in May, increasing our bed-space from six to 24. We recruited the largest pledge class in IFC spring recruitment, with 16 young men in the Alpha Sigma Class.

3.32 | 3.28

E

14 | 15

R

37/108 | 35

V

9|7

GOIN' BALD The men at Indiana University shaved their heads this term, raising $22,000 for the St. Baldrick's Foundation to fund childhood cancer research.

Π | Bloomington, Ind. Adam Burnam ’18 aburnam1995@gmail.com

This term, we have two members on the IFC executive council, including IFC president. We raised $1,500 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation and we won Zeta Tau Alpha's "Big Man on Campus" for the second year in a row. We were also the only fraternity on campus to not be sanctioned by IFC this term.

The Pi Chapter is proud to announce more than $80,000 in funds raised from its philanthropic efforts this year (see below). With more than 170 brothers, the Pi Chapter is a large group of men who are devoted to giving back to IU and the Bloomington community.

S 3.08 | 2.76 E

S

26 | 13

R

32/73 | 22

V

7|7

3.18 | 3.10

E

12 | 12

R

47/178 | 56

V

6|7

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

ΗΞ | High Point, N.C. Drew McInturff ’18 mcinta14@highpoint.edu

ΖΝ | Washington, D.C. Ali Akbar ’19 amakbar19@gwu.edu

S

INDIANA


S

LEGEND: State of the Chapters

Self-Governance Education Recruitment Volunteers NA: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. NR: Data that is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of 4/30/17.

3.23

3.06

14

R 15

29/78

KENTUCKY

V 29

8

ΕΟ | Lexington, Ky. Riley Grant ’19 andrew.grant@uky.edu

8

2 Poi 016 G nt A rad 201 ver e 6 a ge Gra Camp us A de Poi l l nt A Ma ver le 20 a ge Pro 16 -17 Lea gr a m A de r s tte Avg nda hip nce Du . Annu rin g P al Att re v e 2 iou ndan & T 016 -1 s 3 Y ce ota 7 To ear lC s hap tal M ter en P S l e i ze ( dge Avg 4 /30 d .A /17) Du nnua rin g P l Recr re v u iou itme s 3 Y nt ear 201 s 6 -1 7N Act um ive b Ad er of viso Du Avg. A rs rin g P ctive A re v iou dviso s 3 Y rs ear s

Performance Average of All Beta Chapters

E

EO has seen huge growth the last two years. With 160 members, we are the largest chapter on campus, and we swept all three academic awards at UK's Greek Awards Ceremony. Ben Childress '18, was also elected student body president, our first! In the midst of our capital campaign toward the new chapter house, we look forward to alumni returning for the groundbreaking this fall! S 3.48 | 3.08 E 20 | 34 R 52/160 | 50 V

CHAPTER REPORTS

We initiated 21 men early this term and recruited 10 spring pledges – the most ever. The chapter hosted a Super Bowl brotherhood event and alumni/parents golf outing. Our brothers have also been active on campus, supporting the women’s gymnastics team and holding a “Tacos for the Troops” philanthropy event to support the military. 2.93 | 2.88

E

25 | 15

R

45/67 | 22

V

ΒΑ | Gambier, Ohio Lewis Smoot III ’18 smootl@kenyon.edu

ΑΧ | Baltimore, Md. Vishaan Nursey ’18 vnicks07@gmail.com

ΑΒ | Iowa City, Iowa Jonathan Smith ’18 jonathan-w-smith@uiowa.edu

S

KENYON

JOHNS HOPKINS

IOWA

1|8

Our chapter is doing very well! We are excited about our new member class of 18 principled young men. We are also very proud to say that our chapter attained a 3.61 GPA last semester, the highest among all the fraternities on campus, and Noh Mebrahtu '19, was elected student body president! S

3.55 | 3.43

E

8 | 15

R

19/72 | 21

5|7

V

8|9

The Beta Alpha Chapter is excited to announce our donation of 20 brass and wind instruments to a local high school after a successful fundraiser for their music program. These instruments will be a cornerstone for the school to start an after-school jazz program. S

3.22 | 3.32

E

9 | 12

R

14/50 | 21

V

5|6

38 KANSAS

IOWA STATE THE BETA THETA PI

This year, we initiated 19 of 22 pledges and had a 3.09 spring GPA and 3.04 fall GPA. We are proud that our members are involved on campus, including this year’s student body president and the IFC VP of recruitment. We had 10 members attend Beta’s Keystone Conference and expect 10 members will attend Convention. S

3.07 | 2.95

E

19 | 35

R

35/73 | 34

V

10 | 9

Last summer, the Delta Eta A Chapter helped raise more than $800 toward cancer research during Relay for Life, helped clean up our community through Adopt-a-Highway, passed an amendment to our constitution updating our officer structure and had a brotherhood camping retreat on Lake Michigan.

S 3.45 | 2.96 E

S 3.40 | 3.07 E

3.13 | 2.94

E

8 | 21

R

15/39 | 15

V

10 | 12

14 | 10

R

24/94 | 25

V

9 | 10

KANSAS STATE

ΗΕ | University Heights, Ohio Matthew Bocketti ’19 mbocketti19@jcu.edu

This semester, the Eta Epsilon Chapter has been dedicated to reviving our philanthropic efforts. With our new philanthropy, “Dream Days,” we strive to positively impact the participants of the event while spreading our core values to the surrounding community. Additionally, our chapter continues to dominate in intramural sports.

∆Η | Flint, Mich. Josh Tol ’19 tol0305@kettering.edu

The Alpha Nu Chapter had an outstanding fall term. We tied for first place on the hill with a GPA of 3.41. We initiated 24 pledges in February, and we have a strong incoming class with 12 bids already accepted for next fall.

JOHN CARROLL

S

KETTERING A

ΑΝ | Lawrence, Kan. David O’Hara ’18 dlohara@ku.edu

ΤΣ | Ames, Iowa Carter Mehls ’18 cpmehls@iastate.edu

E

17 | 14

R 25/100 | 26 V

7/28 | 8

V

12 | 12

∆Η | Flint, Mich. Christian McAllister ’18 mcal0973@kettering.edu

At Gamma Epsilon, we have a long heritage of success in grades, philanthropy and intramurals. Regarding the latter two, we had a spring philanthropy where we had Coach Bill Snyder come and give a speech at the Beta house, and we also have 13 consecutive intramural championships. 3.31 | 2.88

R

KETTERING B

ΓΕ | Manhattan, Kan. Jack Copher ’19 jcopher@ksu.edu

S

17 | 12

7|6

This term, we celebrated the 10-year anniversary of our refounding. To celebrate this event, we hosted alumni at Kettering for a special dinner during our school's homecoming weekend. We have also worked to strengthen the bonds of brotherhood in the chapter.

S

3.55 | 3.09

E

18 | 26

R

8/35 | 11

V

11 | 12


KNOX

2.88 | 3.10

E

12 | 10

8/28 | 13

R

V

12 | 10

The Loyola Chicago Colony is growing and thriving in its second semester. With a successful philanthropy week completed benefiting Misericordia, a robust class of spring Founding Fathers and an exciting semester ahead, we're excited to continue growing as a brotherhood.

S

3.25 | 3.10

9 | 12

10/39 | 17

R

R

60/56 | NA

V

12 | NA

V

6|5

3.38 | 3.12

E

17 | 10

R

25/92 | 32

V

S

3.07 | 2.84

E

15 | 13

R

17/55 | 19

V

10 | 6

MARYLAND

∆Ω | College Park, Md. Yonathan Daniel ’18 ydaniel@umd.edu

This year has been great for the Eta Alpha Chapter. Once again, we held our annual philanthropy, “Beta Boat Races,” which was a huge success. We also recruited one of our best and largest pledge classes, Psi Class, with 25 new Beta initiates.

S

This term, we raised $7,000 and spread awareness for Bangor Rape Response Services during our 24th annual “Beta Sleepout.” We are continuing to renovate and update our 112-year-old house, and we had another very large homecoming where brothers and alumni celebrated 137 years of Beta Eta.

6|8

This term, we vastly improved alumni connections as older Betas have reached out to brothers offering jobs, internships and general career development tips. This is something Delta Omega never really had and our new alumni chair deserves major kudos.

S 3.34 | 3.12 E

11 | 12

R

23/73 | 25

V

CHAPTER REPORTS

E

13 | NA

ΗΑ | Los Angeles, Calif. Riley Dawson ’18 rileydawson123@gmail.com

This year, Gamma Pi took home Lawrence's Scholarship Cup for the third-consecutive year, having the highest GPA of all fraternities on campus. Our new house chef has vastly improved our meal plan, and we're excited for our upcoming philanthropy event in partnership with a local non-profit on suicide awareness. 3.26 | 3.13

E

LOYOLA MARYMOUNT

LAWRENCE

ΓΠ | Appleton, Wis. Elias Hubbard ’19 ebhubba@gmail.com

S

ΒΗ | Orono, Maine Dan Galante ’17 dgalante1995@gmail.com

Colony | Chicago, Ill. Adam Roberts ’18 aroberts9@luc.edu

This term, we won Greek Week and increased our GPA over the all-Greek average on campus. We have also increased the number of brotherhood events in our chapter and started to create a stronger alumni relations chair for communication.

S

MAINE

LOYOLA CHICAGO

Ξ | Galesburg, Ill. Kyle Heller ’17 kjheller@knox.edu

7|7

39 LOUISVILLE

LSU

Colony | Baton Rouge, La. Drew Ballard ’18 betapresidentlsu@gmail.com

Α | Oxford, Ohio Chad Lance ’18 lancecg@miamioh.edu

Currently, we rank in the top five of IFC GPAs and are working to be number one in service hours per member. Individually, Jud Adams '18, was named a Truman Scholar, and Jeremy Ball ’17, was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to Malaysia. We are looking forward to growing the size of our brotherhood during fall recruitment.

Brotherhood has sparked tremendously. Our executive board is coming together as a cohesive group, and we are constantly planning for the future. We are also working on getting more involved on campus, as well as gaining ground on our assessment evaluations through LSU.

S 3.05 | 2.96 E 20 | 16 R

S

34/84 | 36

V

8|9

DOUBLING DOWN Not only did the Alpha Betas at Iowa cheer on the Hawkeye women's gymnastics team at nearly every match this year, but they also recruited 45 new members, more than doubling their active chapter size and three-year average.

2.81 | 2.80

E

19 | NA

R

32/72 | NA

V

10 | NA

The Alpha Colony is proud to announce that we have initiated 43 members into the Refounding Father Class. This semester, we thoroughly enjoyed the new member education process as well as re-establishing ourselves in the Greek community and elsewhere on campus. S 3.40 | 3.01 E

9 | NA

R

51/43 | NA

V

9 | NA

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

∆Π | Louisville, Ky. Kyle D. Bilyeu ’19 kyle.bilyeu@louisville.edu

MIAMI


S

LEGEND: State of the Chapters

Self-Governance Education Recruitment Volunteers NA: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. NR: Data that is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of 4/30/17.

3.23

3.06

14

R 15

29

29/78

MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY

V 8

ΕΛ | Kansas City, Mo. Grant Oehler ’18 go972@mail.umkc.edu

8

2 Poi 016 G nt A rad 201 ver e 6 a ge Gra Camp us A de Poi l l nt A Ma ver le 20 a ge Pro 16 -17 Lea gr a m A de r s tte Avg nda hip nce Du . Annu rin g P al Att re v e 2 iou ndan & T 016 -1 s 3 Y ce ota 7 To ear lC s hap tal M ter en P S l e i ze ( dge Avg 4 /30 d .A /17) Du nnua rin g P l Recr re v u iou itme s 3 Y nt ear 201 s 6 -1 7N Act um ive b Ad er of viso Du Avg. A rs rin g P ctive A re v iou dviso s 3 Y rs ear s

Performance Average of All Beta Chapters

E

The Epsilon Lambda Chapter had another great semester achieving the highest GPA among all other chapters on campus and initiating 15 new members into the chapter. Our executive board enjoyed our trip to the Keystone Conference, and came away with good ideas and knowledge. S

MIAMI (Fla.)

CHAPTER REPORTS

3.38 | 3.15

E

7|8

R 44/108 | 34 V

7|6

Our chapter placed first in grades out of 28 fraternities with a cumulative 3.43 GPA. We initiated 17 new members at the beginning of the semester, and we currently have 10 new members for the spring semester. Beta Pi took over the top spot for the most-ever Wooden graduates at 121. S

3.39 | 3.13

E

24 | 25

28/77 | 26

R

10 | 12

R

20/74 | 26

V

6|6

ΒΥ | Boston, Mass. Kevin Shum ’19 kshum@mit.edu

ΒΠ | Minneapolis, Minn. Evan Jobin ’18 evan.jobin16@gmail.com

The spring began with the recruitment of 29 exemplary young men into the chapter. We have recently risen to the third-highest fraternity GPA on campus with a 3.46. We are excited to keep climbing the ranks as we strive for highest GPA on campus!

E

MIT

MINNESOTA

ΗΒ | Coral Gables, Fla. Neal Guaglianone ’18 nealguag@gmail.com

S

NR | NR

V

8|9

Our brotherhood is stronger than ever. With a younger and active executive team, we've hosted more internal and external events, including a “Brotherhood Olympics.” We've began moving into our newly renovated annex, and we are looking forward to hosting our first philanthropy event to support the Greater Boston Food Bank. S

3.32 | NR

E

12 | 7

R

6/26 | 9

V

4|8

40 MISSISSIPPI

MICHIGAN THE BETA THETA PI

Λ | Ann Arbor, Mich. Sebastian Capp ’19 sebcapp@umich.edu

The brothers of the Lambda Chapter are striving to have a greater impact on campus and with those closest to us. With our new philanthropic events, service efforts and continual guidance from our alumni, it has been quite an adventure. We are excited for the new direction our chapter is heading. S

3.41 | 3.33

E

8 | 13

R

19/49 | 18

V

11 | 13

S

2.77 | 2.67

11 | 8

R

73/170 | 68

V

7|8

ΖΦ | Columbia, Mo. Jack Schimpf ’18 jack.schimpf@missouribeta.com

We have consistently been in the top two chapters for highest GPA for five years in a row. Our motivation is driven by a close and connected community of brothers who are building a bridge for the next pledge class that comes to MSU.

E 20 | 18 R 36/100 | 30 V

E

MISSOURI

ΓΨ | East Lansing, Mich. Daniel Moltz ’18 moltzdan@msu.edu

3.27 | 3.04

ΗΡ | Raleigh, N.C. Jason McCormick ’18 jdmccorm@ncsu.edu

We recently initiated 44 new members into our chapter. Our marketing and alumni chairmen recently put together our first monthly electronic newsletter that was sent to alumni, brothers, parents and Friends of Beta. We held a blanket drive to provide relief for those affected by tornados in Louisiana and Mississippi.

MICHIGAN STATE

S

NC STATE

ΒΒ | Oxford, Miss. Nick Jacobson ’18 najacob1@go.olemiss.edu

11 | 11

Our tradition of excellence continues here at Mizzou. We won campus grades with a chapter GPA of 3.417. We also finished intramurals two-fold above second place at the end of the fall 2016 semester, and various members were elected to leadership positions across campus.

S

3.39 | 2.94

E

9 | 11

R 40/149 | 40 V

7|7

Eta Rho was officially installed on April 1, thanks to our Chapter Counselor and new mom Annie Carlson Welch! Brother Chris Cooper ’17, was also awarded a prestigious 2017 Churchill Scholarship, which covers all fees, travel and living expenses to pursue a one-year master's degree in chemical engineering and biotechnology at the University of Cambridge. S 3.40 | 3.07 E

16 | NA

R

28/72 | NA

V

12 | 11

NEBRASKA

ΑΤ | Lincoln, Neb. Sam Brower ’18 samjbrower@gmail.com

We achieved a 3.41 chapter GPA, which ranked us second for fraternities at UNL. We had eight of our executive members attend the North Central Keystone Conference. Nearly 10 members of our chapter received positions within student government, and we have initiatives in the works for sexual assault awareness month. S 3.40 | 2.94 E

12 | 20

R 33/107 | 33 V

7|7


Colony | Ewing, N.J. Alec Paterno ’18 paterna4@tcnj.edu

3.28 | 3.03

E

14 | NA

R

54/48 | NA

ΒΚ | Athens, Ohio Nick Snook ’18 ns894213@ohio.edu

ΗΖ | Boston, Mass. Scott Louis '20 louis.s@husky.neu.edu

The New Jersey Colony's executive board attended Keystone for the first time. It provided brothers with great insight from our advisory board and other Beta chapters, leaving us eager to continue leading the colony through its foundation phase. Chris Blakely '19, was also elected student body president! S

OHIO

NORTHEASTERN

NEW JERSEY

V

13 | NA

Our chapter is making improvements to our alumni relations and philanthropy chair positions to ensure their continued success in the future. We recently lost our brother, Neil Fachon ’19, to a rare form of cancer. In his honor, we raised $10,000 for Relay for Life.

Beta Kappa started off the 2017 school year by recruiting a class of 15 quality men, increasing our chapter size to 110 brothers. We recently raised more than $15,000 toward the Wounded Warrior Family Foundation. We are on our way to becoming the model fraternity at Ohio University.

S 3.60 | 3.28 E

S 3.06 | 2.79 E

NORTH CAROLINA

15 | 14

R

22/78 | 21

V

8|9

NORTHWESTERN

Η | Chapel Hill, N.C. Reece Williams ’18 reece24@lie.unc.edu

12 | 19

R

37/110 | 39

V

8|8

OHIO STATE

Ρ | Evanston, Ill. Beresford Clarke ’19 bereclarke@gmail.com

Θ∆ | Columbus, Ohio Michael Mosholder ’18 mosholder.11@osu.edu

Rho recruited an outstanding class of more than 20 men of principle, our most diverse class ever. We raised $1,000 for GiGi's Playhouse, a national network of down syndrome achievement centers, and helped host a hockey tournament that raised $10,000 for the fight against brain cancer.

With 37 newly initiated members, we are a 98-man chapter, which exceeds the campus average. We are also planning on having our most successful philanthropy to date with the first “Beta Talent Show,” which we hope will allow us to meet our goal of raising $10,000.

S 3.30 | 3.18 E

S 3.42 | 3.48 E

S 3.34 | 3.11 E

9 | 16

R

17/78 | 20

V

9|7

12 | 12

R

26/82 | 27

V

9 | 10

17 | NA

R

50/98 | 29

V

CHAPTER REPORTS

We participated in a campus-wide mental health awareness week, during which we aimed to spark dialogue and help reduce the stigmatization of an issue to which we can all find ties. Eight brothers were also admitted into the Kenan-Flagler School of Business, and two brothers were admitted into the Gillings School of Global Public Health.

8 | NA

41 NORTH DAKOTA

The chapter recruited 20 men in the fall and eight men in the spring. In previous years, we averaged two recruits in the spring, so we are proud to have quadrupled that record in one year. We are making a good impact and stressing the importance of grades.

2.63 | 2.95

E

10 | 8

R

29/51 | 17

ΓΦ | Norman, Okla. Will Wade ’18 wbwade28@gmail.com

ΖΜ | Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Brandon Chan ’18 chanbrandon6@gmail.com

V

5|7

REVERENCE Ole Miss Betas interlocked hands and memorialized the passing of chapter alumnus Ken Reid ’70, and Travis Hightower, Auburn ’19, a Beta undergraduate who recently died in a car accident. Always remembering "each other's joy and grief to share," may they both rest in peace.

This year, the Zeta Mu Chapter of Beta Theta Pi won its seventh-consecutive IFC Cup during Sports Week. With brothers competing in football, softball, soccer and basketball, we were successful in both softball and soccer, sweeping both events. It was a great group effort all around (see page 14). S

3.22 | 2.95

E

9 | 12

R

9/25 | 13

V

4|6

We initiated 42 pledges, increasing membership to 200. We got second place in the Miracle Cup, which goes to the organization with the most fundraising for OU's Dance Marathon benefiting the Children's Hospital Foundation. We also hosted a basketball tournament benefitting Relay for Life, which raises money for cancer research. S

3.28 | NR

E

26 | 24

R 52/201 | 59 V

11 | 10

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

ΓΚ | Grand Forks, N. D. Kane Perrin ’19 kane.perrin@und.edu

S

OKLAHOMA

NOVA SOUTHEASTERN


S

LEGEND: State of the Chapters

Self-Governance Education Recruitment Volunteers NA: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. NR: Data that is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of 4/30/17.

3.23

3.06

14

R 15

29/78

QUINNIPIAC

V 29

8

Colony | Hamden, Conn. Matthew Coughlin ’18 matthew.coughlin@quinnipiac.edu

8

2 Poi 016 G nt A rad 201 ver e 6 a ge Gra Camp us A de Poi l l nt A Ma ver le 20 a ge Pro 16 -17 Lea gr a m A de r s tte Avg nda hip nce Du . Annu rin g P al Att re v e 2 iou ndan & T 016 -1 s 3 Y ce ota 7 To ear lC s hap tal M ter en P S l e i ze ( dge Avg 4 /30 d .A /17) Du nnua rin g P l Recr re v u iou itme s 3 Y nt ear 201 s 6 -1 7N Act um ive b Ad er of viso Du Avg. A rs rin g P ctive A re v iou dviso s 3 Y rs ear s

Performance Average of All Beta Chapters

E

For the first time in our colony's history, we have two brothers on our university’s Interfraternity Council. Brother James Burnham ’19, is IFC president and Brother Kyle Lopez ’19, is in charge of new member development. This is a huge accomplishment for us at Quinnipiac. We'll be making a run for the charter at the 178th in Salt Lake City! S 3.06 | 3.12 E

OKLAHOMA STATE

CHAPTER REPORTS

S

3.39 | 2.82

E

24 | 14

R

62/161 | 51

V

13 | 10

Eta Nu has set unifying strategic goals with the objective of rallying the brotherhood, while continuing to give back to the community. A highlight of this is the sponsorship of local house renovations with our community partner, Rebuilding Together Pittsburgh. Max Kneis '18, was also elected student body president, our third in four years! S

3.55 | 3.10

E

14 | 19

R

30/80 | 34

22/59 | 28

V

7|7

Colony | Rochester, N.Y. Zachary Marshall-Carter ’18 zmarsha3@u.rochester.edu

HN | Pittsburgh, Pa. Joe Roesinger ’17 Joe.Roesinger@pitt.edu

At Convention, we received the Knox, Sisson, and awards for leadership development, academic excellence, and outstanding recruitment. On campus, we placed first for best vocals in the Freshman Follies show, along with every male award (three total). We also placed second in Varsity Review for best vocals, most entertaining and most philanthropic.

R

ROCHESTER

PITTSBURGH

ΓΛ | Stillwater, Okla. Kevin Quinn ’18 kevinjq@okstate.edu

22 | 9

V

7|8

This semester, we recruited a pledge class of 12 new members, a large improvement from last semester's two. We maintained a colony GPA above the all-campus average, and we threw an event for local alumni to invite them to become more involved with the Fraternity.

S 3.34 | 3.26 E

12 | NA

R

14/48 | NA

V

9 | NA

42 PACIFIC THE BETA THETA PI

3.10 | 2.88

E

13 | 19

R

14/51 | 21

Colony | Kansas City, Mo. Carter Halil ’19 halilc@hawks.rockhurst.edu

ΔΕ | Tacoma, Wash. Ivin Yu ’19 iyu@pugetsound.edu

Our chapter has seen an increase in our on-campus presence, creating more events that we can share with the student body as a whole. We established a weekly event on our balcony, and set the precedent for a dance to put on each year for our philanthropy efforts.

S

ROCKHURST

PUGET SOUND

HK | Stockton, Calif. Jeremy Parlin ’18 j_parlin2@u.pacific.edu

V

5|5

The Delta Epsilon Colony has been working on financing for the General Convention as we hope to recharter this summer in Salt Lake City. We are working hard with our philanthropy, the Sexual Assault Center of Pierce County, as well as hosting a panel with them on campus about consent and sexual assault advocacy. S

3.11 | 3.05

E

9 | 12

R

22/41 | 21

V

5 | 10

PURDUE

PENNSYLVANIA

In the short time that Beta Mu has been back on campus, we have made pivotal advances to improving the Greek culture at Purdue. Five of the 20 IFC officer positions are held by Betas. With 42 fraternities on campus, we have been able to truly make an impact.

S 3.42 | 3.40 E

S

R

17/54 | 16

V

6|4

3.23 | 2.93

E

24 | NA

R

34/119 | NA

3.39 | 3.28

E

15 | NA

R

16/36 | NA

V

8 | NA

ZT | Saint Louis, Mo. Niall O’Brien ’18 obriennp@slu.edu

In the past semester, we excelled with recruitment, gaining 15 new brothers in our chapter. We have had success with our philanthropy events, which have benefited numerous charities in the Philadelphia area and are continuing to work to maintain our relationship with our numerous alumni. 9 | 10

S

SAINT LOUIS

BM | West Lafayette, Ind. Cameron Murray ’19 murra125@purdue.edu

Φ | Philadelphia, Pa. George Avdellas ’19 georgie_avdellas@comcast.net

Our colony has made many strides this semester, including a 13-man pledge class, securing a philanthropy and solidifying events that will be recurrent in the years to come. We have developed more of a presence on campus, which was a major goal as we just hit the one year mark.

V

9 | 11

The Zeta Tau Chapter developed a new philanthropy event called “The Beta 500.” Sorority women formulate teams based on their chapter and construct carts, paint them and eventually race them. Additionally, the chapter hosts our annual "Camp Kai" retreat in order to facilitate pledge class bonding. S 3.50 | 3.11 E

15 | 13

R 42/132 | 39 V

9|9


Our chapter is extremely proud to have been awarded USD's Dean's Trophy for the seventh year in a row, along with one of our sophomores winning New Member of the Year. It has also been a great semester for fostering brotherhood with very successful paintball and camping trips. 3.47 | 3.03

E

29 | 28

R

29/91 | 30

V

3|6

I am proud that the Upsilon Chapter is the only major fraternal chapter at USC to not be suspended or put on probation in the past five years. We represent, as a fraternity, the ability to be socially relevant while maintaining proper standing.

S

3.28 | 3.02

13 | 11

R

22/50 | 24

R 36/144 | 52 V

11 | 8

S 2.69 | 2.83 E

V

8|8

The Gamma Alpha Chapter met much success after winning both the co-ed and men's dodgeball intramural championships along with hosting our second annual “Beta Burritos” event to support the local food pantry. Additionally, we welcomed some needed renovations to the chapter facility to keep it looking great. S

3.25 | 2.97

E

18 | 16

R

24/58 | 28

V

11 | 9

13 | 10

R

11/14 | 12

V

9|9

ST. LAWRENCE ΒΖ | Canton, N.Y. Ben Wheeler ’18 bwwhee15@stlawu.edu

On the philanthropy front, we have been very active. We have gone to Bittersweet Farm many times to help them with various projects, which donates food for poverty alleviation. We've raised and will continue raising money for the Campus Kitchens project as well as the farm. S

NR | 3.09

E

11 | 6

R

27/77 | 29

V

CHAPTER REPORTS

We are proud to have two brothers on the IFC board and more than 60 percent of the chapter involved in other student organizations, with more than 20 percent holding officer positions. We are also proud to endorse our brother, Ricky Maldonado ’18, in his campaign for Associate Students president. E

16 | 18

ΓΑ | Vermillion, S.D. Matthew Preszler ’18 Matthew.S.Preszler@coyotes.usd.edu

ΖΗ | San Jose, Calif. Eric Huynh ’17 eric.huynh01@sjsu.edu

2.77 | 2.85

E

This semester, we have taken great strides to improve our overall GPA as a chapter. We have also been holding brothers more accountable as the semester goes on. As a chapter, we are ready for the fall semester to push forward and get better as a chapter in every aspect.

SOUTH DAKOTA

SAN JOSE STATE

S

ΖΟ | Carbondale, Ill. Jacob Schafer ’19 jjschafer20@siu.edu

Y | Columbia, S.C. Joshua Szabo ’18 scbetapresident@gmail.com

ΖΩ | San Diego, Calif. Benjamin White ’18 benjaminwhite@sandiego.edu

S

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS

SOUTH CAROLINA

SAN DIEGO

5|6

43 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

SMU

We moved into a new house that sleeps 34 brothers compared to 10 brothers at our old house. Thanks to our loyal alumni, a capital campaign was launched over the summer that allowed us to quickly furnish and renovate the house to meet the needs of our now 135-man chapter. Read more on page 48. David Shirzad '18, was also elected student body president! 3.39 | 3.15

E

19 | 12

R

47/135 | 37

V

6|5

HOW DO I LOOK? Thanks to the success of the Stevens Beta's philanthropy, "Cuts for Kids," Leadership Consultant Charlie Ruff, TCU '15, shaved his head as a challenge to the men for raising $500 for the St. Baldrick's Foundation to combat childhood cancers.

The Gamma Tau Chapter has striven to achieve excellence both inside and outside of the classroom. We currently hold the second-highest GPA of the 20 fraternities recognized by our Interfraternity Council – a small gap from first. We also ranked among the highest-raising undergraduate organizations for the Movember Foundation. S

3.38 | 3.22

E

9 | 11

R 39/102 | 33 V

7|7

Σ | Hoboken, N.J. Tristan Hollenbaugh ’18 thollenb@stevens.edu

The Sigma Chapter has continued to have a positive impact on campus and in the community. The brotherhood completed our big spring philanthropy event that raises money for the St. Baldrick's Foundation (see below). Also, the Beta hockey team remains the intramural champions for the second year in a row! S

3.31 | 3.37

E

15 | 17

R

9/50 | 13

V

8|8

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

ΓΤ | Los Angeles, Calif. Cameron Flagel ’19 cflagel@usc.edu

ΓΩ | Dallas, Texas William Durr ’18 wdurr@smu.edu

S

STEVENS


S

LEGEND: State of the Chapters Performance Average of All Beta Chapters

3.06

14

R 15

29/78

TORONTO

V 29

8

NA: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. NR: Data that is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of 4/30/17.

ΘΖ | Toronto, Ont. Royal Bai ’17 royalbai@hotmail.com

8

2 Poi 016 G nt A rad 201 ver e 6 a ge Gra Camp us A de Poi l l nt A Ma ver le 20 a ge Pro 16 -17 Lea gr a m A de r s tte Avg nda hip nce Du . Annu rin g P al Att re v e 2 iou ndan & T 016 -1 s 3 Y ce ota 7 To ear lC s hap tal M ter en P S l e i ze ( dge Avg 4 /30 d .A /17) Du nnua rin g P l Recr re v u iou itme s 3 Y nt ear 201 s 6 -1 7N Act um ive b Ad er of viso Du Avg. A rs rin g P ctive A re v iou dviso s 3 Y rs ear s

Self-Governance Education Recruitment Volunteers

3.23

E

The chapter is happy to announce that we've initiated a gay member to join our merry band. Such progress breaks so many barriers and stereotypical thinking about fraternities. There was overwhelming joy in our new member when he was initiated.

S

ΗΗ | Fort Worth, Texas Michael Drake ’18 michael.j.drake@tcu.edu

CHAPTER REPORTS

E

16 | 16

R

47/140 | 37

V

10 | 7

3.12 | 2.96

E

14 | 14

R

8/35 | 16

V

8|6

ΖΞ | Kirksville, Mo. Giuseppe Cedillo ’18 gpc5446@truman.edu

This semester, we look to continue our streak of eight semesters above the all-campus and all-Greek GPA benchmarks. We had two separate local service projects on the agenda, including one benefiting our local humane society, where we donated $10,000 to help with vaccinations, medical needs and animal care. S

4|3

TRUMAN STATE

ΕΗ | College Station, Texas Blake Wampler ’19 blakedwampler@gmail.com

We raised $21,000 through our “Giving HeART” philanthropy. We also achieved first in intramural points, first in IFC GPA for the past eight semesters and our new members achieved a 3.64 GPA. The chapter had two Frog Camp directors last year, one this summer, as well as the treasurer and speaker of the house. Ben Taylor '18 was also elected student body president! 3.53 | 3.04

E

TEXAS A&M

TCU

S

3.12 | NR

R 43/129 | 39 V

7|8

Zeta Xi finished first in grades among all fraternities in fall 2016 for the 17th consecutive semester. Further, Zeta Xi is striving to have a bigger impact on the community and has recently partnered with a local restaurant to volunteer with every week.

S

3.31 | 3.17

E 20 | 23 R

25/84 | 29

V

5|5

44 TEXAS AT ARLINGTON

TENNESSEE THE BETA THETA PI

∆Κ | Knoxville, Tenn. Heath Shelton ’19 bshelt10@vols.utk.edu

Recruiting the right people has been a focus for our chapter, and we are excited to report that we recruited five spring pledges. The recently initiated fall pledge class ranked third in IFC grades with a 3.12 average, and the chapter also did well with a 2.96 GPA – currently above the all-men’s average.

Our chapter has continued our long tradition of running our philanthropy, “Heroes for Hope,” over spring break. We not only improved our grades, but we also made it back to the number one spot in IFC. Finally, we partnered with our alumni, advisors and GFOs to run a successful “Reflection Workshop.”

S 3.03 | 2.88 E

S

17 | 15

R

25/52 | 27

V

5|6

TEXAS

E

19 | NA

R

37/90 | NA

V

E

24 | 17

R

19/32 | 22

V

6|8

This past quarter, we hosted our second annual “Beta Beats” acapella concert. We raised more than $700 for the George Mark Children's House, helping the families of children with life-threatening or terminal diseases. With one new gentleman added to our numbers, we are keeping our heads high for a strong recruitment next quarter. S

11 | NA

3.17 | 2.74

E

10 | NA

R

5/20 | NA

V

6 | NA

UC IRVINE

∆Μ | Lubbock, Texas Jake Sellers ’18 jake.sellers@ttu.edu

The colony has maintained its continued growth in the establishment of systems and traditions. Our men have earned a great reputation and have gotten involved in many leadership positions on campus. Showing no signs of slowing down, we look forward to applying for our charter this upcoming summer in Utah! 3.37 | 3.19

2.97 | 2.76

Colony | Davis, Calif. Nick Lee ’18 sfnlee@ucdavis.edu

TEXAS TECH

ΒΟ | Austin, Texas Jacob Villarreal ’18 jacobavillarreal@gmail.com

S

UC DAVIS

∆Ρ | Arlington, Texas Tristan Grecu ’19 tristan.grecu@mavs.uta.edu

∆Σ | Irvine, Calif. Bernard Bagorio ’18 bbagorio@uci.edu

We achieved a 42-man fall pledge class and five-man spring pledge class. In different homecoming events, we placed first, second and third. On campus, we had six men elected to student government, two men became IFC executive members and one was elected as a judicial board member. Finally, two men were named Mortar Board top 50 seniors.

Over this past winter quarter, the Delta Sigma Chapter's significant highlight was being able to win Sigma Kappa's annual “Ultraviolet” philanthropy for the second year in a row. All funds raised go toward helping find the cure to Alzheimer's disease.

S 3.00 | 2.75 E

S

21 | NA

R

48/96 | NA

V

6 | NA

2.95 | 3.00

E

10 | 14

R

24/46 | 31

V

5|5


VILLANOVA

UC SAN DIEGO

ΖΓ | La Jolla, Calif. Jason Patrick Grimm ’18 jasonpatrickgrimm@gmail.com

Our second annual philanthropy, “Beta's All Star Weekend,” raised more than twice last year's fundraising goals, resulting in more than $7,600 being donated to the Challenged Athletes Foundation, a San Diego non-profit dedicated to assisting disabled athletes in living active and competitive lifestyles. S

3.31 | 3.14

E

19 | 13

R

34/88 | 45

V

6|6

S

3.35 | 3.33

R 36/104 | 36 V

R

27/88 | 26

V

5|5

S

7|6

3.53 | 3.25

E

8|8

R

24/81 | 22

E

16 | 17

R

15/67 | 24

V

8|9

WASHINGTON

ΒΩ | Seattle, Wash. Nolan Bernard ’19 nolan.bernard12@gmail.com

The Omicron Chapter is enjoying another spring semester! Our formal recruitment resulted in a pledge class of 24 men who are enjoying member education and are on their way to initiation. We are also excited for our upcoming philanthropy and parents’ formal. It is an exciting time to be a Beta at UVA! S

3.21 | 3.14

V

7|7

The Beta Omega Chapter was placed back to good standing by the General Fraternity this past summer at Beta’s 177th General Convention in Oklahoma City. Furthermore, Beta Omega recently achieved a 3.38 GPA this past fall quarter with 59 out of 116 members on the Dean's List. S 3.43 | 3.24 E

23 | 16

R

30/116 | 32

V

CHAPTER REPORTS

13 | 20

16 | 13

Ο | Charlottesville, Va. Chase Ciotti ’18 cjc5kt@virginia.edu

Over the past year, the Gamma Nu Chapter has been running as smoothly as ever with the transition of our new executive team. Through this, the chapter has grown to be 100 members strong. Also, the chapter house has gone under continued renovations, focused mostly on the downstairs study room. E

E

In addition to moving from seventh to second in fraternity and freshmen GPA, the Tau Chapter continues to lead at Wabash. We have 10 club presidents on campus, in addition to president of the student body, Jack Kellerman '18, and vice president of the IFC.

VIRGINIA

ΓΝ | Los Angeles, Calif. John Storch ’18 jstorch33@gmail.com

NR | 3.31

Τ | Crawfordsville, Ind. Zack Patton ’18 zrpatton18@wabash.edu

The Zeta Epsilon Chapter continues to be a flagship organization for Greek Life on campus, headlining a strategic planning initiative that will serve to map out the future of Greek Life for the next five years. The chapter is continuing to see five-year highs in recruitment and philanthropy.

UCLA

S

WABASH

ΖΕ | Villanova, Pa. Samuel Beecher ’18 sbeecher@villanova.edu

8|9

45 UTAH

VIRGINIA TECH

ΑΦ | Blacksburg, Va. John Mark Mastakas ’18 jmm12@vt.edu

The Gamma Beta Chapter raised a record-breaking $8,000 for the Rape Recovery Center, which will go toward hundreds of hours of therapy for victims of assault. The chapter has minimal attrition, currently consisting of 111 total collegiate members which are active in philanthropy and other internal and external events. S

3.41 | 3.03

E

22 | 25

R 48/124 | 43 V

8|9

SHOOTING HOOPS You know your philanthropy event is a success when not only do you raise more than $7,600 for disabled athletes, but even the unversity's chancellor and vice chancellor show up to support the cause. Congratulations on a successful baseketball tournament, UC San Diego brothers!

Γ | Washington, Pa. Jared Rebman ’18 rebmanj@jay.washjeff.edu

We have 22 new members who have been representing our chapter well across campus. Furthermore, the Alpha Phi Chapter has been volunteering every week with the local food bank, Micah's Backpack, as we continue to try and make a positive impact in southwest Virginia. S

3.18 | 3.08

E

10 | 12

R

51/136 | 39

V

7|8

This spring we gained 16 pledges, which is the largest we have seen in a while. Also, we have moved from the fourth-highest semester GPA from last spring, to second from the top this past fall. Finally, we are finalizing plans for a 175th anniversary celebration after the summer. S

3.13 | 3.04

E

10 | 10

R

17/46 | 13

V

7|7

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

ΓΒ | Salt Lake City, Utah Jan Otrusinik ’19 jtootrusinik@gmail.com

WASHINGTON & JEFFERSON


S

LEGEND: State of the Chapters Performance Average of All Beta Chapters

3.06

14

R 15

29/78

WHITMAN

V 29

8

NA: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. NR: Data that is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of 4/30/17.

ΓΖ | Walla Walla, Wash. Jules Choquart ’19 choquaja@whitman.edu

8

2 Poi 016 G nt A rad 201 ver e 6 a ge Gra Camp us A de Poi l l nt A Ma ver le 20 a ge Pro 16 -17 Lea gr a m A de r s tte Avg nda hip nce Du . Annu rin g P al Att re v e 2 iou ndan & T 016 -1 s 3 Y ce ota 7 To ear lC s hap tal M ter en P S l e i ze ( dge Avg 4 /30 d .A /17) Du nnua rin g P l Recr re v u iou itme s 3 Y nt ear 201 s 6 -1 7N Act um ive b Ad er of viso Du Avg. A rs rin g P ctive A re v iou dviso s 3 Y rs ear s

Self-Governance Education Recruitment Volunteers

3.23

E

Over the course of the fall 2016 semester, the Gamma Zeta Chapter has increased its GPA from a 2.96 to a 3.29. We're striving to improve on that metric this semester. Our executive team has also been working with our house corporation to upgrade our facilities.

S WASHINGTON AND LEE

CHAPTER REPORTS

3.39 | 3.37

E

0|2

R

17/73 | 19

V

9|9

2|7

R

15/29 | 15

V

5 | 11

∆Γ | Wichita, Kan. Michael Schultz ’17 mike.schultz12@gmail.com

ΓΘ | Pullman, Wash. Parker Ruehl ’18 parker.ruehl@wsu.edu

The Alpha Ro Chapter climbed up the rank for overall GPA. We are now within the top 10 for all fraternities, and our average GPA is greater than the all-men’s average. We have a healthy number of members and are continuing to add good guys to the chapter. Mason Grist '18, was also re-elected student body president!

E

WICHITA STATE

WASHINGTON STATE

ΑΡ | Lexington, Va. Peter Keith Feldstein ’18 feldsteinp18@mail.wlu.edu

S

3.13 | 3.38

On January 7, we lost an amazing brother, Dashiell Mortell ’19. We were thankful to be able to travel to his memorial service as a brotherhood. This experience has strengthened our brotherhood incredibly as we continue to work toward improving on our Sisson Award from last Convention.

Our chapter has been busy working with the General Fraternity in efforts to continue the improvements we have seen in recent years. We are on track to raise more than $3,000 for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at “Beta Bash,” which will be one of our largest philanthropic efforts to date.

S 3.08 | NR E

S

4 | 19

R

35/83 | 34

V

10 | 10

3.26 | 2.82

E 44 | 33 R

36/72 | 31

V

5|7

46 WASHINGTON IN ST. LOUIS THE BETA THETA PI

ΑΙ | St. Louis, Mo. Max Thompson ’18 ai.wubeta@gmail.com

Our chapter is excited to launch a new philanthropy initiative with North Side Community School. We will be raising funds for an update to their technology center, which will expand learning opportunities for North Side students. The school serves primarily low-income elementary students in North St. Louis City. S

3.57 | 3.48

E

8 | 11

R 30/104 | 33 V

7|7

WESTMINSTER

WILLAMETTE

Α∆ | Fulton, Mo. Ben Davis ’18 bdavis.18@westminster-mo.edu

ΓΣ | Salem, Ore. Michael Sterbenc ’19 mpsterbenc@willamette.edu

Alpha Delta is thriving! On April 8, we showed the value of mutual assistance to our brothers at the Rockhurst Colony by helping them with their newest member class initiation. Also, on April 21, we held the first "Three Stars Philanthropy Gala" raising money for Chad's Coalition.

The Gamma Sigma Chapter has spent the past spring term adjusting to governance without the direct presence and oversight of our chapter advisor, and has adjusted well to the change. Gamma Sigma looks to continue growing as a successful colony in the fall.

S 3.08 | 2.97 E

S

25 | 25

R

14/48 | 15

V

8|6

3.18 | 3.16

13 | NA

R

9/31 | NA

V

12 | NA

WILLIAM & MARY

TIMELESS As our men at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, celebrate their 150th anniversary throughout 2017, they decided to do this year's composite in black and white in a nod to their alumni and the classic composites of the past. (The 150th anniversary celebration is set for Sept. 15-16. Contact kolbd@ sbcglobal.net for more details.)

E

ΖΥ | Williamsburg, Va. Andrew McLaughlin ’18 atmclaughlin@email.wm.edu

The Zeta Upsilon Chapter has had a great year so far. We took a great fall and spring pledge class and they are contributing well to our chapter and the greater campus community. Additionally, our chapter had the highest number of Dean’s List students – a testament to our academic pursuits. S

3.35 | 3.28

E

9|7

R

23/73 | 23

V

3|5


WISCONSIN

ΑΠ | Madison, Wis. Derek Campbell ’19 dcampbell5@wisc.edu

With more than 50 of our 62-member chapter coming from the last four pledge classes, the youth and energy of our members has built significant momentum for the future with no sign of slowing down. Beta Theta Pi at Wisconsin is back.

S

2.95 | 3.23

E

14 | 11

R

31/66 | 19

V

SUMMER SALE

5|4

WISCONSIN-OSHKOSH ΖΖ | Oshkosh, Wis. Kyle Lange ’17 langek74@uwosh.edu

S 3.02 | 2.86 E

21 | 13

R

17/37 | 16

V

Beta Branded Polo (more colors available, price may vary) starting at $23.74

CHAPTER REPORTS

During Greek awards this semester, we received Fraternity Chapter of the Year, Chapter of Excellence, Advisor of the Year and Philanthropist of the Year. Also, our former president was awarded Greek Man of the Year. We are excited to move forward and continue to strive for excellence! 7|5

47 WITTENBERG

This January, we officially turned a significant milestone. The Alpha Gamma Chapter has been on Wittenberg's campus for 150 consecutive years to date. It is an impressive accomplishment of tradition by brothers, both past and present. We look forward to September 15-16 when we will hold the official celebration. S

3.19 | 2.64

E

12 | 12

R

16/52 | 15

V

Nike Hyperflight Black Golf Balls 12/pkg $46.46

Flip Flops $17.76

Navy/White Umbrella $35.50

Heavyweight Twill Pro-Style Hat $14.82

7|7

WPI

Colony | Worcester, Mass. Ethan Gouveia ’18 egouveia@wpi.edu

The WPI Colony is happy to welcome our largest class of new brothers yet. We're planning new events to expand our recognition on campus and help us grow even more in the years to come, including a very successful philanthropy event benefiting the education of African refugee children. S 3.43 | NR E

17 | 19

R

20/45 | 16

V

6|7

VISIT BETASPIRIT.COM AND BUY YOUR NEW BETA GEAR TODAY!

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

ΑΓ | Springfield, Ohio Sutton Jacobs ’19 jacobss4@wittenberg.edu


THE BETA HOUSE 48 THE BETA THETA PI

THE

BETA HOUSE INSIDE SMU

by Justin Warren, SMU ’10

HIGH ATOP THE HILLTOP The Gamma Omega Chapter at Southern Methodist University returned to Dallas after the 177th General Convention riding high, earning a chapter-record seven awards — including the John Reily Knox Award. Little did they know the banner year that was ahead for them. In the ensuing eight months, the men would go on to initiate their largest pledge class since the chapter’s 2009 recolonization, eclipsing the 130-member mark and becoming one of the largest fraternities on campus. They would witness the election of David Shirzad ’18, as the first Gamma Omega to serve as student body president in 40 years. And they would rally the support of generations of Gamma Omega Betas (and their most faithful Sweethearts) as they left their quaint chapter house behind for the most-prized fraternity home on the Hilltop.


support. In the end, it wasn’t only the alumni who were willing to put skin in the game. The $75,000 initially donated to furnish the common areas came from alumni, parents and the undergraduates themselves. SETTLING IN, DRIVING FORWARD Procuring a new house is a crowning accomplishment in a chapter’s evolution, but for Gamma Omega it was one of many achievements in the 2016-2017 school year that elevated their status within the SMU Greek community.

Almost immediately, the alumni association sprang into action, furiously working the phones and writing emails asking for financial

Indeed, Gamma Omega has earned the right to a period of rest and relaxation, but they refuse to rest on their laurels. They continue to fundraise for trophy cases, a video security system and exterior accents. The difference is they’re doing so now with the wind at their backs, 135men strong in a three-story home that proves that everything really is bigger in Texas. 

49 SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

The team they corralled spanned several generations, from Roll No. 136, John Graml ’62, to No. 1739, Alec Pavone ’19. Once the men secured the facility, however, it became immediately clear that the hardest work was still ahead of them. Their house had more than tripled in size overnight, from a 5,100 square foot home that slept 10 to a 18,200 square foot facility that sleeps 34. How would they furnish it?

— Mike Casson, SMU ’67 House Corporation President

The chapter says two groups deserve a majority of the credit for ensuring a smooth housing process: the university, which made the opportunity possible, and chapter alumni, headed by House Corporation President Mike Casson ’67, and his Beta Sweetheart, Connie, who managed the furnishings and decorations of the brand new library and dining, game, and media rooms.

THE BETA HOUSE

MUSTANG ROUNDUP When the university began accepting applications for the vacant Lambda Chi Alpha house on Dyer Court, the Gamma Omega Chapter expected to face stiff competition. The undergraduates and advisors knew they couldn’t do it alone — it would need to be all hands on deck if they stood a chance to make this dream a reality.

“When SMU awarded us this house, it was a big day for our chapter — one that the men have seized and taken full advantage of.”

Chapter Counselor Sami Hage ’12, says that the growing chapter no longer fit in the old house, and they needed to rent campus space for ritual ceremonies and chapter gatherings in recent years. “The new house allows the entire chapter to be in one spot for meals and has large common areas for congregating, which has encouraged many brothers, especially upperclassmen, to come around the house more often.”


Time to Reflect By Dan Hasler, DePauw ’80

DePauw Chapter Advisor and House Corporation Member

VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT 50

As I watch a country try to find its feet again after the most difficult election of my time, I am reminded of the first and only time I was forced to live 24/7 with people whose views were often foreign, if not bewildering, to me. I lived with 72 guys at 415 Anderson Street and often found myself in heated debate. I learned to listen. I learned to respect. I learned to constructively assert … and maybe, most importantly, learned to be swayed.

THE BETA THETA PI

I wasn’t learning this in my university classes, but rather at the dinner and study tables and the late-night bull sessions. Our Fraternity is one of the last great laboratories for close-quarter living, conflict management and selfgovernance. As I reflect, the university largely failed at this lesson. Some would argue that it is failing even more dismally today. Oh my, should I have issued a trigger alert? As I argued and debated and extolled everything from the meaning of life to politics to next week’s menu, I fell in love. I fell in love with this band of brothers, especially my pledge brothers.

"After over 10 years of chapter counseling, a terrible election year and a glass of wine, I had a bit of an epiphany and turned it into my advisor column for the chapter’s alumni newsletter. It is what gives me the energy to continue my role . . . "


I learned to first seek to understand. These guys were smart! Often misguided in my elitist opinion but, I learned, worthy of my best attempts at understanding. Are our actives perfect? Absolutely not. Will they make mistakes? I hope so (not big ones). Maybe they will rectify the mistakes themselves rather than instantaneously cell phoning mother. My brothers, the fraternity experience molded many of us. Our best friends in our later years continue to be adjacent roll numbers. This continues today at Delta Beta.

President and chief entrepreneurial officer of the Purdue Research Foundation since February 2013, Dan Hasler previously served as the Secretary of Commerce for the State of Indiana following more than 30 years of employment with Eli Lilly and Company, serving most recently as VP of global marketing.

51 SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

I think most would agree, the path to adulthood — no, manhood — is certainly no easier now than it was in our day. I watch them struggle in different ways with different issues than we might have had. It’s easy to pretend that we can easily answer all of their questions and critique all of their actions based on decades-old experience. Trust me, our 1960s solutions don’t always work today. The best we can do is to help them process their own solutions. They struggle, but struggle they must, and we will continue to offer as best a safety net as can be appropriately constructed. We might not understand the conflict of young men in this time, but we can support and love unconditionally. We build this section of the future for them. 

OPINION

The largest fraternity at DePauw continues to deliver the highest campus cumulative GPA semester after semester. The men continue to learn the lessons of mutual respect and cultivation of the intellect. They continue to understand what it means to be a man of principle and what a purposeful life looks like. For 10 years now, I have had the privilege of watching

them become our doctors, attorneys, ministers and employers. I’m not exactly sure when this metamorphosis takes place; maybe a late night before graduation? But it happens, over and over … and we are proud.


CHAPTER ETERNAL IN LOVING MEMORY

Flags indicate those who have served in the United States or Canadian armed forces.

Forever remembering these men and the love they had for Beta Theta Pi and their fellow brothers, notices of their passing were reported to the Administrative Office between February 17, 2017, and April 17. For assistance locating an obituary or to report a brother’s death, please contact Phyllis Bowie at 800.800.BETA or phyllis.bowie@beta.org. Asking loved ones to donate your Beta badge and important Beta artifacts to the Fraternity’s archives and museum in Oxford is always welcomed and appreciated.

CHAPTER ETERNAL

Alabama

Cornell

Mitchell R. Gray ’70, June 1, 2016

Richard W. Shrontz ’81, Feb. 4 Kenneth Stringfield ’52, March 30, 2016

Amherst

Dartmouth

Indiana

Frank N. Aldrich ’50, March 16 C

Trent M. Patterson ’63, March 13

Auburn

Denison

Iowa

Jake Minor ’20, March 6 Rudolf W. Bauer ’52, June 11, 2016 Travis Hightower ’19, April 2

Bethany

Peter W. LaReau ’84, March 12 52

Case

Edward M. Petrushka ’55, July 29, 2016 THE BETA THETA PI

Cincinnati

David S. Ecker ’49, March 4 Richard M. Willis ’60, July 31, 2016

Edward J. McManus ’40, March 20 C

Denver

Donald L. Arends ’52, Oct. 29, 2016

Harold E. Moore Jr. ’58, March 29 C William B. Fischer ’43, Feb. 28 C

Colgate

George Washington

Calvin H. Bendixen ’65, Feb. 25

JAKE MINOR Alabama ’20 A 19-year-old freshman who died unexpectedly in his on-campus residence hall on March 6, Jake is survived by his parents, brother and sister. He is remembered as “A stranger to none. A hero to many. A sincere friend to all.”

Kansas

Payne H. Ratner Jr. ’46, Feb. 11 C

Dickinson

Colorado Mines

Johns Hopkins

B. H. Griffith MD ’47, Oct. 30, 2016

DePauw

Elmer H. Ruehlmann ’49, Feb. 25 C James M. Stevens ’60, March 2 Robert J. Irwin Jr. ’49, Jan. 9 Richard G. Walker ’57, July 17, 2015

Iowa State

James E. Abraham ’73, Jan. 16 Beau G. Terle ’04, March 30

Idaho

Arthur L. Becher ’50, Sept. 8, 2015 Morgan C. Moore ’56, April 7 C

TRAVIS HIGHTOWER Auburn ’19 A sophomore who succumbed to injuries from an automobile accident on April 2, Travis was 20. Survived by his parents and an older brother and younger sister, Beta Brothers Brennan O’Donnell ’19, and Atticus Bolling ’18, served as pallbearers.

Kansas State

Robert A. Boyd ’57, April 7 C

Kenyon

E. J. McCoy ’45, March 1 C Charles M. Vogt Jr. ’55, Feb. 20

BILL PARKER Middle Tennessee State ’96 Bill died unexpectedly on Sunday, March 12 at the age of 44. A former chapter counselor and chapter president, Bill was a married father of two.

The Foundation is often asked how one can memorialize a dearly departed Beta while also supporting the goals of the Fraternity. In lieu of flowers, consider naming the Beta Leadership Fund in your own obituary. Memorial gifts can be made online at beta.org/gift or by phone at 800.800.BETA.


Lawrence

Oklahoma

Utah

Oklahoma State

Virginia

Oregon

Virginia Tech

Michigan

Rutgers

Washington

Middle Tennessee State

SMU

Minnesota

Stanford

Timothy I. Pruett ’76, Feb. 19

Maine

George M. Lord Jr. ’58, March 4

Miami

Charles A. Ault III ’55, Feb. 17 C Donald B. Heslop ’48, April 5 C William K. Wallace ’47, Feb. 18 C James R. Mosby Jr. ’59, Feb. 12 William T. Parker ’96, March 12

Kenneth H. Reid ’70, April 3

Missouri

William M. Schreiber ’42, Feb. 22 C

Missouri-Kansas City

Robert “Turner” Goodson ’13, April

Nebraska

David W. Brown ’59, Feb. 24 C John P. Cullen ’50, Feb. 12 C

Northeastern

Neil Fachon ’19, Feb. 19

Ohio

Richard D. Maxwell ’56, Dec. 6, 2016 C J. B. Mayes MD ’39, Jan. 17

David H. Rees Jr. ’62, Feb. 22 C Richard Williams ’50, Feb. 26 C Walter R. Davis Jr. ’58, March 7 C William C. Edwards ’51, Feb. 19

Syracuse

Milton P. Clampitt ’57, April 9 C Kit C. Klinker ’70, March 10

Washington in St. Louis

Constantine G. Pulos ’54, Feb. 11, 2016

Washington State

Philip R. Millard MD ’59, Dec. 10, 2016

Wesleyan

Toronto

Western Ontario

53

John M. Lowndes ’49, Feb. 24

William A. Andrews ’54, March 17

Tulane

Westminster

C. T. Alpaugh Jr. ’49, Feb. 18 C

Lee M. Fowler ’53, March 11 C

UC Berkeley

Wichita State

John P. Gorsuch ’53, Feb. 14 John F. Snow ’46, Feb. 23 C

West Virginia

Bruce E. Davis ’56, March 16 C John H. Gallagher ’50, Feb. 21 C John D. Harrah ’61, Jan. 2 C

Paul T. Curry Jr. ’74, March 22 C Clarke R. Astle ’63, March 1 John T. Boyle ’52, Feb. 22 Willamette Christopher B. Woodward ’71, July 30, 2015 Jackson R. Hazelett ’49, June 18, 2016 Frank Foellmer ’48, Feb. 27, 2016 James R. Stimmel ’47, March 1 C

Northeastern ’19 Diagnosed with a rare brain stem cancer just weeks into pledging, Neil put up a valiant year-long fight before passing in hospice care on February 19 at age 20. Son of Emil E. Fachon III, Colgate ’80, the Northeastern chapter initiated Neil posthumously as Roll No. 177.

Bryan L. Griffith ’07, Feb. 22

Peter J. Conlon Jr. ’73, Oct. 28, 2016 Leslie E. Daniels ’47, July 6, 2015 Peter E. Downs ’53, Aug. 15, 2016 Warren A. Hall ’50, Sept. 2, 2015 Arthur E. Judd ’49, May 27, 2016 Raymond M. Palmer ’49, Jan. 14 Lee J. Short ’51, Sept. 8, 2015 Richard W. Wessels ’58, April 3, 2015

UCLA

NEIL FACHON

Frank A. Dusch Jr. ’49, Aug. 25, 2015

SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG

Mississippi

Thomas W. McBride ’60, Dec. 13, 2015

W. L. Cottrell ’65, March 23 Paul D. Peery ’57, March 28 C John W. Ward ’82, Feb. 22

CHAPTER ETERNAL

John K. Avery ’63, March 30 Richard A. Tickle ’48, Feb. 4

Travis A. Curd II ’67, April 2 C Philip D. Hart ’58, April 12 Byron H. Schaff Jr. ’53, Feb. 14

ROBERT “TURNER” GOODSON UMKC ’13 Completing his second year in the Anesthesiology Residency Program at UT Southwestern, Turner passed from unknown causes in late April. A passionate, beloved Beta and former recruitment chairman, he was 26.

Wisconsin

David C. Hansen ’53, March 24, 2016 Roger W. Priem ’55, May 28, 2015

REV. JOHN “JACK” P. GORSUCH Wesleyan ’53 Jack was the uncle of recently appointed U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, Phi Gamma Delta. Pending his nephew’s confirmation hearings and Senate vote, Jack was scheduled to provide the prayer at the official swearing-in ceremony.


JOIN OUR

JOLLY CREW. help a young man START his beta journey. beta.org/recommend


KEN BRYAN, MIT ’88

I’m an engineer, so I like numbers. We encounter so many numbers each day, yet we will only remember a select few, including those that awaken cherished memories and help us recall our favorite stories. Some numbers you will simply never forget, such as your graduation year, your sports jersey number, or the date of your Beta initiation. For me, there’s another important number: 119. The MIT Beta house is located at 119 Bay State Road in Boston. There, five blocks from Fenway Park, I joined a brotherhood whose camaraderie (and moments of mischief) made a lasting impression on my life. Almost three decades later, 25-30 of my brothers and best friends reunite every fall for a long weekend of fellowship and cards, complete with traveling trophies. I’m very happy that today’s Beta Upsilon undergraduates are creating their own memories at our address. Fraternity is firstly a local experience centered on friendships, those you sustain and that make you a better person. My Beta experience in Boston inspired me to begin giving to our Fraternity soon after my graduation so others could have the chance to develop great friendships as I did. Thirty years later, I continue to give because our Fraternity has proven that it can provide an experience beyond those friendships for today’s undergraduates.

Fraternity is firstly a local experience centered on friendships, those you sustain and that make you a better person.

Ken Bryan, MIT ’88, received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering and worked in the chemical and aerospace industries. A member of the Beta Theta Pi Foundation Board of Directors, he lives in Seattle, Washington.

Today, our General Fraternity is much more than an annual Convention and a magazine. Beta offers world-class leadership programs, generous undergraduate scholarships and unrivaled chapter support in daily operations and risk management. I know that my estate gift will benefit the future members of our Great and Good Fraternity — at 119 Bay State Road and beyond. THE BETA THETA PI | SUMMER 2017 | BETA.ORG/BBS


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

Beta Theta Pi Foundation & Administrative Office

PAID

Permit No. 1534 Bolingbrook, IL

Brennan Hall PO Box 6277 5134 Bonham Road Oxford, Ohio 45056 beta.org

“Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.” – John Wooden, Purdue ’32

More than 10,000 young Betas like Marco Fuentes, Texas ’18, have benefited from gifts to the Beta Foundation in 2016. How can we support men of principle in 2017? It all starts with you.

BETA LEADERSHIP FUND DEVELOPING MEN OF PRINCIPLE FOR A PRINCIPLED LIFE B E TA .O R G /G I F T

The Beta Theta Pi - Summer 2017  
The Beta Theta Pi - Summer 2017  
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