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S U M M E R 2014 THE BETA THETA PI MAGA ZINE

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things You (probably) didn’t know about Beta.

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| ISSUE NO. 3


EDITOR’S MESSAGE

Did You Know? For all who wear the badge and bear the name, Beta Theta Pi’s general history is well known. Explored during pledgeship and reinforced in Beta publications, personal accounts and speeches, it is a remarkable story filled with triumph and celebration. Our Fraternity has a rich heritage that is deep with meaning and inspiration. But did you know... 1) Later in life a subtle but pointed rift arose between Knox and Marshall as to who really came up with the idea to found Beta Theta Pi. Knox tends to garner most of the credit, but strong evidence suggests Marshall was the brains behind the impetus. 2) Maj. George M. Chandler, Michigan 1898, the single individual most responsible for Beta’s visual heraldry, despised the official colors of the Fraternity, and lobbied hard to change them from “delicate shades of pink and blue” to red and white. 3) “Gemma Nostra”, one of the Fraternity’s most popular songs, actually translates into “Let Our Jewel (Brightly) Shine”. In October 1942, John Dolibois, Miami ’42, asked Chairman of the Miami University Classics Department (and member of Phi Delta Theta) Professor Henry C. Montgomery, to interpret it for the Fraternity as the studying of Latin and Greek were no longer requirements of the day as they were in the 1870s when it was written by Joseph H. Tunison, Denison 1873. Of course, storytelling is as old as mankind itself, and it is one of the most effective forms of education and teaching ever conceived. That’s probably why this Fraternity values documenting and handing down to each generation the many historical accounts, organizational decisions and, yes, legends of luck and coincidence that have made Beta Theta Pi one of the greatest of all college fraternities. The Beta story must always be told. As we rapidly approach Beta’s 175th anniversary, take a moment with this issue to brush up on your Beta lore. You may be surprised just how much there’s still to discover. Sincerely and yours in ___kai___,

The Beta Theta Pi

The oldest continuously-published college fraternity magazine, The Beta Theta Pi was founded on December 15, 1872, by Charles Duy Walker, V.M.I. 1869. Editor L. Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96 Managing Editor Mike Roupas, Iowa ’10 Associate Director of Communication Kyle Grand, Wabash ’11 Contributors Phil Fernandez, Miami ’06; Zac Haines, Miami ’05; Erv Johnson, Idaho ’53; B. Hume Morris, Centre ’68; Ken Stephen, Toronto ’77 Creative Director Sarah Shepherd Graphic Designer Jenna Noah Director of Digital Media Robert Umstadter, San Jose State ’05

The Beta Theta Pi, (USPS 052-000) official magazine of Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, is owned by the Fraternity, edited and published under the direction and control of its Board of Trustees, published Winter, Spring and Summer for $30 onetime pre-paid subscription. Standard non-profit class postage paid at Oxford, Ohio, and additional points of entry. Canada Post International Publications Mail (Canadian Distribution) Sales Agreement No. 0397474. Copyright Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, 2012. Produced in the USA.

Publication Schedule Issue Deadline Winter 2015 October 15 Spring 2015 January 15 Summer 2015 April 15

Mail Date December 15 March 15 June 15

Send address changes to: Foundation and Administrative Office Brennan Hall 5134 Bonham Road PO Box 6277 Oxford, Ohio 45056 800.800.BETA or beta@beta.org

L. Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96 Editor martin.cobb@beta.org

Beta Brotherhood A 175th Anniversary Tribute One of the most comprehensive collections ever assembled of inspiring quotes, fascinating lore and captivating images, the 175th coffee table book is a must-have for any Beta eager to boast his membership – at home, or in the office. www.beta.org

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THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

WHO GETS THE MAGAZINE? Upon initiation, each Beta is guaranteed a lifetime subscription to The Beta Theta Pi. That commitment by the Fraternity remains, although for a variety of reasons, some no longer wish to receive the hard-copy version. So, who receives the Fraternity’s magazine? Anyone who requests it, as well as all active Beta volunteers, donors to the Beta Foundation, undergraduates and parents. Make your preference official at 800.800.BETA, beta@beta.org or go online at my.beta.org.


CONTENTS

The Beta Theta Pi Magazine | Vol. 141 | No. 3

12 22

Darkening of the Hall

33

State of the Fraternity and Chapter Reports

SUMMER FEATURES

A Disappointing Closure of the Alpha Chapter

22

64 Things You (Probably) Didn’t Know about Beta

The Founders share a slew of little-known Beta facts

A Look at the Fraternity’s 2013-14 Performance

8 DEPARTMENTS

4 Beta Inbox 7 News and Notes

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Mission To develop men of principle for a principled life.

Vision Every member will live Beta Theta Pi’s values.

8 Marching Along 15 Campus Life 18 From the Archives

Core Values To build lasting bonds of friendship and brotherhood, Beta calls for:

20 Promises to Keep

MUTUAL ASSISTANCE Betas believe that men are mutually obligated to help others in the honorable labors and aspirations of life.

INTELLECTUAL GROWTH Betas are devoted to continually cultivating their minds, including high standards of academic achievement.

TRUST Betas develop absolute faith and confidence in one another by being true to themselves and others.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT Betas choose to act responsibly, weighing the consequences of their actions on themselves and those around them.

No Chapter, No Problem

INTEGRITY Betas preserve their character by doing what is morally right and demanding the same from their brothers.

48 Mystic Shrine

19 51

Volunteer

Bridge Builder

Pete Barnhart, Miami ’66

www.beta.org

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BETA INBOX

Judged by its cover “WE ONCE HAD A DEBATE IN THE CHAPTER ROOM over a Beta member (we had just learned he had a Jewish parent) and whether he should remain a member. Your cover promotes such bigotry. Disgraceful.” — Frederick Patrick, Oklahoma ’64 “IF IT WAS YOUR INTENT TO SHOCK, THAT’S GREAT, YOU’VE DONE YOUR JOB, and if there’s an article inside that refutes the seven words on the outside, that’s fine, but there are people who will be offended enough that they won’t even read the article. I can’t even begin to express my unhappiness with the cover. It’s a new low.” — Bob Ramstad, MIT ’90 “WHEN I SAW THE COVER AND READ the editorial, it made sense to me. But I can see how it wouldn’t for others.” — Aubrey Harris, Toronto ’01

“I thought the cover was effective. It immediately engaged the reader with the matter of diversity in Beta Theta Pi. It made one want to read the story, and that’s what a cover design should do.” — John Drescher, North Carolina ’83, Executive Editor of The News & Observer

“IF THE POINT OF THE ARTICLE WAS TO HELP dispel those preconceived notions [of what a fraternity is], the cover does just the opposite.” — Ed Coburn Cornell ’84

Voice Yourself beta@beta.org

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The spring issue of The Beta Theta Pi magazine explored the demographical makeup of today’s Beta undergraduates in the feature article, “This is About Brotherhood.” Readers expressed a variety of reactions to how the article was presented on the cover:

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

“IT CAUGHT MY ATTENTION, BUT I am quite certain that a lot of other covers and approaches could have as well and not been as ‘in my face’ as that one.” — Dave McMurray, Illinois ’81

facebook.com/betathetapi

“I AM EMBARRASSED TO BE ASSOCIATED WITH BETA if this is the kind of material that gets released.” — Peter Ahlstrand, Oregon ’88 “I READ THE ARTICLE BECAUSE OF THE COVER. It made me kind of angry that someone thought that’s all fraternity means, and it made me proud that after reading the article, it’s clear that wasn’t the case. That’s why it’s a brilliant marketing ploy. Someone sees the blurb, it makes them react, they read, they discuss.” — John Sizemore, Florida State ’15 “WHAT’S THE POINT OF A MAGAZINE COVER? To grab attention and get people to read the magazine. And as a member, no one reads those magazines; no one cares. But you can bet I read that one.” — Anonymous Beta on Reddit Forum “PLEASE STOP MY SUBSCRIPTION IMMEDIATELY to Beta Theta Pi Magazine. I found the cover of the most recent issue to be shocking, disturbing and embarrassing. It was as though I had just received propaganda from a white supremacy group. The cover is simply moronic.” — Hubert Plant, Utah ’71 “I AM EXTREMELY CONFUSED AND ANGERED by the recent magazine cover. I understand the point that it was trying to make, but sadly very few got to the article due to the bluntness of the cover.” — Eric Braasch, North Dakota ’15 “‘LATINO ATHEIST GAY LIBERAL PUERTO RICAN WEALTHY URBAN.’ I can almost guarantee that no one would [complain] about that version. Not saying the original is right, just... saying.” — Anonymous Beta on Reddit Forum

twitter.com/betathetapi


BETA INBOX

Diverse Reactions . . .

to the feature article

“I HAVE RECEIVED THE MAGAZINE FOR ALMOST 50 YEARS and I have never spent as much time with an issue as I just did with this issue. I am glad to see that today’s Betas are attracting and accepting young men of any stripe who can benefit from and contribute to the Beta way.” — Randy Roberts, Indiana ’65 “CURRENT ISSUE OF BETA THETA PI MAGAZINE IS OUTSTANDING. Honest, thoughtful, unapologetic. Hugely impressive.” — Caitlin Flanagan, Contributor to The Atlantic, Former staff writer for The New Yorker

“I’M HAVING TROUBLE FINDING RELEVANCE IN YOUR ARTICLE. Having Gays and Muslims in our Fraternity is a cause for celebration? Should I be thankful we have Muslims in our Fraternity? Is there some perfect mix that makes a better fraternity?” — Adam White, Ohio Wesleyan ’01 “I HOPE OTHER ORGANIZATIONS WILL PICK UP THE BATON and move the discussion forward to the advantage of young people who share core values — regardless of where they come from, what they look like, or how they approach some of the social issues that are so divisive today.” — George A. Condon, Ph.D., Chapter Advisor, University of the Pacific

“A CONVERSATION SO BEAUTIFULLY HUMAN that many in the fraternal world (and Like people in general) shy away from, presented honestly and unapologetically, yet with so much love and grace. Thank you for once again challenging the norm of what Fraternity can and should be.” — Melissa Rocco, Leadership Instructor, University of Maryland, College Park “I WAS ENCOURAGED AND PLEASED to see the diverse makeup of Beta undergraduates. Enriching our brotherhood enhances undergraduates’ experiences and outlooks, valuable in the fast-changing world we live in. I attended the 1954 Beta Convention when the Fraternity struggled with the issue that the Kenyon chapter intended to initiate an African-American pledge, Bill Lowry, a future brother who went on to success in his profession and is now ably serving our Fraternity. Courage conquered and we have profited.” — Burton Gerber, Michigan State ’55. “WHAT IS BROTHERHOOD? It is the active process of understanding that we all come from different places and different perspectives. It’s about working to understand that we live in a society where people experience privilege and marginalization and oppression based on greater systems. I want my brothers to understand that IT IS about race/ ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, socioeconomic status, family, age and disability. Do not ignore these identities. I find great pride in who I am and what I represent, and I hope that my fraternity and brothers will take the time to appreciate that as well. This is brotherhood.” — Nicholas Majie, Michigan ’15

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John Robbie: I’m going to have to disagree with you. I think this kind of article is necessary for the kind of conversation brothers at the undergraduate level are having. As an out, gay, brother, I was terrified of the stereotypical idea of what it meant to be a member of a fraternity and articles like this with hard facts and figures about what the makeup of our fraternity has become is crucial to the idea of redefining what fraternity means. Like 13 Drew Charles: I’m sorry you need statistics and figures to determine the type of people you choose to surround yourself with. Like 2 John Robbie: At the very base of this, I don’t understand how you can come off calling this informational presentation of facts racist or ignorant. It’s actually the opposite of ignorant because it’s well informed and thought out. From a marketing stand point it’s actually brilliant. And after reading this article I am damn proud to be a Beta. Like 3

Point of Clarification Page 23 of the article used the word “Islamic” to represent 1.2 percent of Betas who indicated in the survey that they followed the religion of Islam. Instead, the list should have used the word “Muslim.” The editorial staff apologizes to readers for this error.

Like

FACEBOOK CHAT

“WHILE THE INTENT MAY HAVE BEEN TO CHALLENGE the notion of stereotypical nature of Beta’s members, it appears that the larger point was missed completely. Unfortunately, it does little more than just confirm the stereotype, especially to see the numbers laid out. It did nothing to walk the reader to the conclusion that the fraternity is actually diverse, but rather quite the opposite.” — Meg Thomas, Beta Parent

Drew Charles: The presentation of this article is shameful, ignorant and racist. Bringing up race (among other things) in this manner/forum is in itself ignorant, insensitive and racist. This pathetic PR stunt is embarrassing. ‘To show how far we’ve come...’

Drew Charles: When you’re older, you’ll understand... hopefully. 0

www.beta.org

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BETA INBOX

Thank you!

113 (of 127) Chapters are on Facebook!

After five years of superior leadership as Beta Theta Pi’s director of leadership and education, Megan Vadnais will assume duties as associate director of orientation at the University of South Florida in Tampa. As evidenced by hundreds of comments shared on Facebook, Megan has certainly left a positive mark on Beta Theta Pi. For details, view the Fraternity's press release: www.betathetapi.org/home/about/pressrelease-vadnais-concludes-service

Congratulations, Megan! You have been critical to so many positive Beta experiences!

— Mandi Hulme, Creighton Chapter Advisor and Friend of Beta

Megan, you helped shaped my Beta experience into what it has been thus far. Thank you so much for your endless dedication! — Tyler Volkert, Wisconsin-Oshkosh ’15

Additionally, 13 staffers at the Administrative Office have completed their professional service with the Fraternity this year. Thank you to:

Thank you brothers for serving our beloved Fraternity! Best wishes to you as you continue the journey.

Expansion: Phil Erford, Dayton ’11; Daen Ekpa, Loyola Marymount ’10; Alex Gardner, Puget Sound ’11; Bradley de Wet, Virginia Tech ’11; Tristan Sopp, Washington in St. Louis ’11; Tom Martin, Loyola Marymount ’08; Paul Winterbotham, San Diego ’12; Jason Gangwer, William & Mary ’12 Leadership Consultants: Jimmy Balough, Cincinnati ’11; Kevin Bohm, Puget Sound ’12; Matthew Dempsey, Connecticut ’13 Leadership and Education: Erin Lawson, Friend of Beta Communication: Jenna Noah, Friend of Beta “Thank you Tristan for helping

— Michael Hay, re-establish Beta at Michigan Eastern Kentucky ’94 State. What you did for me and the fraternity could never be repaid, you will be missed!” — Alex Haddad, Michigan State ’15

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THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

“Matthew Dempsey.... You were a great LC but most importantly I considered you a great friend. Come back and visit us at UTA!” — Luis Mora, Texas at Arlington ’15

Want to see what your favorite chapters and colonies have been up to recently? Search for and “like” the chapters below to automatically receive their updates. For a direct link to these Facebook pages, visit beta.org/fb_chapters. American Arizona Arkansas Baylor British Columbia Cal Poly Carleton Case Western Reserve Central Florida Central Michigan Centre Chapman Charleston Cincinnati Colgate Colorado Mines Columbia Connecticut Cornell Creighton Dayton Denison Denver DePauw Drexel East Carolina Eastern Kentucky Eastern Washington Emory Florida Florida International Florida State Furman George Washington Georgia Tech High Point Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Iowa State John Carroll Johns Hopkins Kansas State Kentucky Kenyon Kettering A Kettering B Knox Lawrence Louisville Loyola Marymount Maine Maryland Miami Miami (Fla.) Michigan

Michigan State Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Missouri-Kansas City MIT Nebraska North Dakota Northeastern Northwestern Nova Southeastern Ohio Oklahoma Oklahoma State Oregon Pacific Penn State Pennsylvania Pittsburgh Puget Sound Quinnipiac Saint Louis San Diego San Jose State SMU South Carolina South Dakota Southern California Southern Illinois Stevens TCU Tennessee Texas A&M-CC Texas at Arlington Toronto Truman State UC Irvine UC San Diego UC Santa Barbara UCLA Utah Villanova Virginia Tech Wabash Washington Washington in St. Louis Washington State West Virginia Westminster Whitman Wichita State William & Mary Wisconsin Wisconsin-Oshkosh Wittenberg WPI


NEWS AND NOTES

have you heard? FOUR NEW BETA COLONIES During the 2014-15 academic year, the Fraternity will add four new colonies to it’s Broad Domain. To recommend men to one of the Re/Founding Father classes or to see how you can get involved, contact the colony development coordinators listed below: The Ohio State University Theta Delta Chapter Columbus, Ohio brock.griffin@beta.org

Purdue University Beta Mu Chapter West Lafayette, Ind. tylere.presley@beta.org

Willamette University Gamma Sigma Chapter Salem, Ore. jeff.betz@beta.org

North Carolina State University New Colony Raleigh, N.C. kip.mountjoy@beta.org

New Board and Trustee Appointments In January, Ed O’Malley, Kansas State ’97, was appointed to a three-year term on the Fraternity Board of Trustees. Likewise, Pete Barnhart, Miami ’66; Robert Beall, Oklahoma ’79; and John Hillhouse, Missouri ’69, were appointed to three-year terms on the Foundation Board of Directors.

EVENTS JUNE/JULY 2014 175th Registration Deadline.......June 15 For more information, visit beta.org/convention or call 800.800.BETA. Wooden Institute nick.gummo@beta.org Session 1...............................June 14-18 Session 2......................... June 28-July 2 Session 3................................ July 12-16 Session 4................................ July 19-23

AUGUST 2014 175th General Convention............... 7-10 beta.org/convention

SEPTEMBER 2014 SOS: Your Brothers Are Missing! Help bring your brothers back into the Beta loop by visiting beta.org/lost to see which brothers from your era are missing contact info. With your help, your brothers will once again receive chapter and General Fraternity news, event invitations, the Beta magazine and more.

Auburn 50th Anniversary................... 5-6 wwh0004@auburn.edu Idaho 100th Anniversary................ 19-21 facebook.com/ggbeta100 Puget Sound 50th Anniversary.......... 20 bert.hogue@optimumenergyco.com

OCTOBER 2014 Minnesota 125th Anniversary............... 4 bp1681@gmail.com

Nine Awards for Beta Communication At the annual conference for the Fraternity Communications Association in May, Beta was recognized with nine awards: the Beta magazine received six awards for writing and design; the Foundation Annual Report placed first; a member-submitted photograph secured a critics choice honor; and The Promises to Keep Campaign video placed second.

Northern Utah Alumni Association Annual Reunion.............................. 10-12 motes226@comcast.net South Dakota Alumni Association “Dakota Days Celebration”..................11 john.conway@cox.net

NOVEMBER 2014 Kettering 50th Anniversary................... 8 r.m.caras@gmail.com

interfraternally SPEAKING FGD ‑ Congratulations to interfraternal brother Seth Meyers, Phi Gamma Delta, who replaced Jimmy Fallon in February as the host of NBC’s “Late Night” talk show. Watch Seth weeknights at 12:35 EST.

upcoming

LCA ‑ Beta is saddened to announce the passing of Pat Ryan, Lambda Chi Alpha, who served as Beta’s lead fundraising counsel for the Upon These Principles Campaign (2001-06) and The Promises to Keep Campaign (2011-16).

Wichita State 55th Founder’s Day, Board of Trustees Meeting & Oxford Cup Presentation to Pizza Hut Co-Founder Dan Carney, Wichita State ’63............. 15 matt.brawner@beta.org motes226@comcast.net

MARCH 2015 Alabama 50th Anniversary.................... 7 pbhairell@crimson.ua.edu

www.beta.org

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MARCHING ALONG

Shining Stars of Beta Theta Pi Have you been “marching along”? Submit alumni updates via email to beta@beta.org, online at beta.org/marching or mail a letter to the Administrative Office with the subject line “Marching Along.”

Back in the Right Hands While serving in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II, Bob Ragan, Wabash ’49, lost his Beta badge in the barracks at Luke Air Force Base in Phoenix, Ariz. Seven decades later, the 91-year-old veteran has been reunited with his prized possession . . . After misplacing the pin in the barracks in Phoenix, Ragan was reassigned to Fort Sheridan, Ill. Disappointed to lose an important token from his Beta membership, Ragan figured he would never see it again. Meanwhile in Phoenix, Army Air Corps member Virgil Walenta was assigned to janitorial duties in the barracks and came across a strange looking pin. Thinking it had something to do with the military, he held on to it for nearly 70 years. Prompted by a recent move, Walenta asked his niece, Barbara, to help find the badge’s original owner, as “Ragan” was engraved on the back. After some investigation, she discovered it was a Beta badge, not a military pin, so she contacted Beta’s Administrative Office to help track down Bob. At the time, Ragan’s contact information was not on file, but the database indicated that former Foundation Board Member Cal Black, Wabash ’66, was his second cousin. Black ultimately helped Walenta’s niece return the badge to Brother Ragan.

Celebrating a Century From April 4-6, Kansas State brothers gathered in Manhattan, Kan., to celebrate Gamma Epsilon’s 100th anniversary. More than 600 attended the celebration banquet, keynoted by University of Texas Athletic Director Deloss Dodds ’59. Above, former Fraternity President Dr. Tom Purinton ’63, led the room in song during a luncheon.

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THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

Saying Hello to His Holiness The 14th Dalai Lama recently visited the United States, and former Administrative Office intern Matt “Army” Armstrong, Miami ’05, was able to shake his hand and share a few words. Armstrong said, “This is certainly one of the most amazing experiences and humbling meetings I could ever wish to have.”

Reliving the Glory Days A group of Eta Alpha alumni from Loyola Marymount met at the Angel City Brewery in Los Angeles for a tour and beer tasting. The event was hosted by Eric Hernandez, Loyola Marymount ’10, who works at Angel City as a brewer. Now 10 years since colonization, the chapter numbers 330 in total initates.


MARCHING ALONG

BOT Builder Barrett Ames, Cornell ’12, worked on the NASA team that created the Valkyrie DRC Robot. The robot is very human-like as it has seven degree of freedom arms with actuated wrists and hands, each with three fingers and a thumb. It has a head that can tilt and swivel, a waist that can rotate, and six degree of freedom legs complete with feet equipped with six-axis force-torque sensors. NASA ultimately hopes to put a man on Mars, and likely, the Valkyrie would be sent before to prepare the way. Congratulate Barrett at cbames@gmail.com.

Architecture Guru The work of Bill Rutledge, Miami ’05, was featured in the March issue of Architectural Digest, given his role in helping redesign American business magnate Steve Wynn’s apartment in New York City. Rutledge worked on the moulding and cabinetry details and drew almost every interior elevation of the apartment. Connect with Bill at rutledge.william@gmail. com. (Architecture by Partner Mark Ferguson of Ferguson & Shamamian Architects, Interior Design by Roger Thomas)

Television Debut Adam Miller, Central Michigan ’13, was a cast member of NBC’s television series “Crisis.” The show centered on an idealistic Secret Service agent who found himself at the center of an international crisis on his first day on the job. Miller played the role of Kyle Devore.

Taking a Trip to Wall Street Jason Morgan, Vanderbilt ’91, serves as the CFO for up-and-coming Mediterranean restaurant Zoes Kitchen. Recently the restaurant went public, and to celebrate its IPO, Morgan got to ring the bell at the New York Stock Exchange. Congratulate Jason on his successful venture at jason. morgan@vgt.net.

Quite the Reunion More than two dozen University of Illinois Betas from 1964-67 and their Sweethearts gathered in Captiva Island, Fla. in February. The weeklong event finished with a banquet that included a passing of the Loving Cup and an auction that raised more than $10,000 for the Wounded Warrior Project to remember Karl Teepe ’66, a brother who perished in the Pentagon on 9/11.

www.beta.org

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MARCHING ALONG

White House Invitation Vice President Joe Biden’s national task force on campus sexual assault prevention convened a special session in March with Greek leaders in his ceremonial office in the Eisenhower Office Building adjacent to the White House. In addition to the leaders of three interfraternal associations and five sororities, three fraternities were also invited to participate: Sigma Phi Epsilon, Omega Psi Phi and Beta Theta Pi. The meeting was led by U.S. Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan. Beta was represented by Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96, first director of the Men of Principle initiative and current Editor/Director of Communication and Director of Advancement for the Beta Foundation.

Remembering the Alamo Every March 7, the “Dawn of the Alamo” ceremony is held to honor those lost in the battle and this year marked the event’s 178th anniversary. George Harcourt, Texas ’68 (left) is the president of the Alamo Chapter of the Sons of the Republic of Texas and placed a wreath from his organization at the front of the Alamo. Connect with George at george@geoharcourt.com.

Penn State Turns 125 From April 11-13, undergraduates, alumni and guests of the Alpha Upsilon Chapter celebrated its 125th anniversary. Activities included a golf tournament, football tailgate and clambake at the chapter house. The weekend ended with a morning brunch keynoted by former Pittsburgh Steelers and Seattle Seahawks standout, Ron Coder, Penn State ’76 (right). 10

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

Just Do It Nike Co-founder Bill Bowerman, Oregon ’33, is being inducted posthumously into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Bowerman is credited with developing the modern athletic shoe, completely revolutionizing the sports and business world in the process. In the Hall of Fame, he joins the ranks of Steve Jobs, Henry Ford and the Wright Brothers.

San Antonio Sweethearts In what has become an annual event, the San Antonio Alumni Association held its Beta Sweethearts Luncheon at The Argyle this past March. Contact Howard Hubbard, Texas Tech ’92, at howard.h.hubbard@irs.gov to gain insight from an actively engaged alumni association leader.

Here’s to You, Zeta Omega! On April 10, Beta undergraduates and alumni from the University of San Diego returned to campus for the 10th Annual Beta Toast, a celebration of all things Zeta Omega. The turnout was fantastic, and one of the special events was the performance by Wooglin’s 9, USD’s newest a cappella group. It’s been a great first 10 years for Beta’s Zeta Omega brothers!


MARCHING ALONG

See You at the Fair! Steve Masters, Central Michigan ’90, was recently hired as the first-ever, full-time director of the Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair. Under Masters, the 2014 fair will feature a new and expanded layout that will allow for more Midway rides, vendors, circus tents and shows. Congratulate Steve on his new gig at cvb@deltami.org. One of Dallas’ 40 Best and Brightest Michael Aars, Texas Tech ’01, president of the awardwinning Tidal Wave Agency, made the Dallas Business Journal’s list of “40 Under 40” business professionals for 2014. Each year, the Journal honors highly accomplished executives and entrepreneurs under the age of 40 with a proven track record in both business and community involvement. Aars was selected out of a group of more than 240 nominees. Congratulate Michael at maars@ tidalwaveagency.com.

Mr. Mayor Kudos to Shane McFarland, Middle Tennessee ’97, for being elected mayor of Murfreesboro, Tenn. Previously, he was a two-term Murfreesboro City Council Member. Congratulate him at shane@ shanemcfarland.org.

Transportation Guru Former General Fraternity President Bob McKinley, Missouri ’66, was sworn in as a Trustee of the Utah Transit Authority (UTA). UTA operates bus, light rail and commuter rail service along the Wasatch Front, servicing 75 cities in six counties. Give Bob a shout at rmckinley1234@gmail.com.

In The Playoffs With Darrin Travillian, Kentucky ’96, at the helm, the Maryville College Lady Scots made the NCAA Division III basketball tournament. Travillian and his sqaud earned an at-large bid after a superb 22-6 regular season. It was Maryville’s third consecutive appearance and 20th overall in the tournament.

Chillin’ with a Rap Star Former Administrative Office staffer David Rae, British Columbia ’00 (left), is the chief curator and executive producer of TEDx Portland. Thousands came for the information and inspiration-based conference. During the event, Rae had a chance to interview lyrical sensation Macklemore. Ask Dave about his experience at davidjdrae@gmail.com.

A Lifetime of Great Work General Fraternity President Doug Houser, Willamette ’57, was honored by the Defense Research Institute with the Louis B. Potter Lifetime Professional Service Award. Doug received the award at the annual meeting of the 22,000 member DRI. Congratulate Doug at doug. houser@bullivant.com.

Received Another Degree Rev. Stephen R. Davenport III, Washington and Lee ’64, received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale University for his extensive work in Haiti since 1970. He was a major supporter of the music school that eventually became the country’s national orchestra. www.beta.org

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A DISAPPOINTING CLOSURE On February 27, the Fraternity announced the closure of its Alpha Chapter at Miami University. Founded at Miami University in 1839, the chapter included 112 undergraduates and 2,791 total initiated members. On March 8, after a week of reflection by thousands of Betas, parents and friends across North America, General Secretary David Schmidt, South Florida ’92, released the narrative below to alumni, undergraduates and parents of the Alpha Chapter, outlining the rationale behind this difficult decision.

Dear Alumni, Undergraduates and Parents of Beta Theta Pi at Miami University: At certain times in life, we all encounter events that affect us so emotionally, so profoundly, that it’s hard to comprehend how we arrived in a position of such challenge and turmoil. Today we are all faced with one of those events, and unfortunately it relates to our beloved Alpha Chapter at Miami University. “What lies behind you and what lies in front of you, pales in comparison to what lies inside of you.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson My name is David Schmidt, and I write to you today as the General Secretary of Beta Theta Pi. First... Because of the Fraternity’s desire to minimize additional campus and local media coverage during such a stressful period for our undergraduates and their parents — not to mention respecting completion of Miami University’s judicial process for all individuals involved — I intentionally held off this week providing an extended statement about the circumstances that led to the Alpha Chapter’s closure. Second, this narrative is extensive; I hope you will take the time to consider it objectively and in its entirety. To be clear, many young men who belong to our Alpha Chapter are fine students and visible campus leaders. The Fraternity has

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THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

done so much to bring them together as brothers, an experience that has meant so much to so many for nearly 175 years. They are loved by their parents and they certainly love one another.

It is for those reasons that the decision to close our Alpha Chapter by the General Fraternity and University has been so incredibly difficult. Many Betas and friends outside of the daily Alpha Chapter communication network are likely unaware that in 2007 the chapter and alumni had to move through a membership review and reorganization process resulting from risk management and chapter culture concerns. While ranking at the top of their peer fraternities in most every metric measurable, culturally the chapter struggled to hold one another accountable to expected guidelines of Beta brotherhood and Miami university standards of conduct. It was hoped that the reorganization would help recalibrate the chapter and get it permanently “back on track,” however, just a few years later the cycle began anew and the chapter found itself continually responding to university, house company, advisory team and General Fraternity concerns. These concerns included but were not limited to multiple instances of


fighting, destruction of Alpha Chapter house property, illegal drugs and alcohol being consumed by some members within the substance-free chapter house, disregard for the responsible use and management of alcohol and, most recently, hosting parties at annex houses after having social activities suspended by the university and General Fraternity. Many of these activities occurred during a period of universityimposed social probation and after a joint hazing investigation had been launched by the university and General Fraternity. The hazing investigation was driven by allegations of coercive pressure to consume alcohol as a part of the pledge program, as well as line-ups, calisthenics and servitude, all of which have since been verified through interviews with Alpha Chapter members and pledges.

The Fraternity’s policy clearly dictates that chapter closure will result in any instance where a chapter is found to pressure young men in the pledge program to consume alcohol. To compound the issue, the lack of honesty, transparency and forthrightness the last several years, as well as during the recent investigations, severely undercut the chapter’s credibility and standing with the university, house company and General Fraternity. The choice by some to intimidate or minimize those brothers and new members who questioned the above actions in an attempt to “right the course” only added to the severity of the situation. Not surprisingly, the chapter’s volunteer advisors worked closely with the chapter’s leadership through the years to try and correct the mindset and attitude that rejected virtually all forms of true selfgovernance and personal responsibility from within the chapter. Despite those efforts, an irreversible and unhealthy notion of individualism and entitlement persisted. This is not to say that there weren’t young men in the chapter who wanted and tried to do the right thing to put the chapter back on positive ground. There were.

So, you may be asking yourself, “Can’t we just remove the ‘bad apples’ and give the guys a chance to rebuild?” That was certainly one alternative that was thoroughly considered by the university, advisors, house company and General Fraternity. Unfortunately the chapter’s ongoing deception, lack of accountability and the members’ and pledges’ defense of dangerous chapter practices made the risk of continuing with the current students too great. While incredibly difficult, closure of the chapter became the most responsible decision in order to protect the well-being of every young man and secure Beta Theta Pi’s future at Miami University.

Indeed, the undergraduates were actively encouraged to pursue internal governance and self-determination measures within the scope of Beta’s standards. Everyone involved in supporting the chapter believes the best and true Beta experience is one that affords the undergraduates the opportunity to take ownership for the chapter’s direction and make the decisions for its overall well-being. That includes successes and failures, most of which are all good, healthy learning experiences for young men who are growing personally and preparing for successful careers, loving families and civic duty.

(cont. page 14)

CLOSURE COMMENTARY Hundreds of Betas took to Beta Theta Pi’s Facebook page to voice their thoughts about the closure. With more than 72,600 online readers, the following is a selection of various perspectives shared: “Can y’all find something better to do than shut down chapters? Every single semester I’ve been in college a chapter has been shut down and it’s ridiculous. What happened to self governance?” — Mitchell Smith, Virginia Tech ’15

“Nationals don’t have anyone’s backs, they’re just touring the country and closing all chapters that don’t act like Girl Scouts.”

“Sickened to hear this and learn of the details. I served as Pledge Educator and President of the Alpha Chapter 05-06 and never did we have a culture of hazing. Plain and simple, hazing is beyond stupid and it’s old news in fraternities. It’s not Beta. If you get caught — Tyler Shade, West Virginia ’13 doing it, you deserve what’s “People that are asking for the AO to be more proactive coming.” — Kevin Iacofano, never hear about the “I’ve gotten used to seeing Miami ’07 countless steps involved so many closures I don’t before the ultimate decision “I have shared, at times, in even read Beta materials to shut a chapter down.” the mistrust that many feel anymore. It’s not a culture — Len Levi, towards the Administrative problem in our chapters, South Florida ’94 Office, but I admire them for gentlemen, it’s an overstaying true to the mission sensitized, bureaucratic “#CULTivationoftheintellect” General Fraternity problem and values of Beta Theta Pi, — Matt Kubic, regardless of the chapter.” more concerned with press Virginia Tech ’15 — Luke Ivey, Kenyon ’12 releases than Brotherhood.” — Zane Cavender, SMU ’14

“Sometimes you have to sit your starting point guard for having one too many turnovers. But I bet when he gets back on the court in a couple years, he will be ready to handle the rock... or diamond.” — Tyler Pennick, Wichita State ’15

www.beta.org

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However, many of the undergraduate men were unable and/or unwilling to take responsibility for their actions and commit as a unified group to re-align the chapter’s culture with what would be deemed reasonable by any objective audience. That reality breaks the heart of every alumnus, parent and Friend of Beta who has tried over the years to build an experience at Miami worthy of Beta, Theta and Pi. It is heart-breaking for so many young men in the chapter, too. Thankfully, Beta’s long-standing relationship with Miami University is strong and collaborative. And while together both institutions — and the men and women who comprise them — grieve what is a very sincere and real loss, we know in our hearts that our Alpha Chapter will thrive once again. After all, the chapter’s motto isn’t figurative. “Lasting for an age” means something. Going forward, our Alpha Chapter alumni (and Beta chapters everywhere, for that matter) are faced with some important and very relevant questions:

• How can a chapter be successful for so long and its members embrace Beta’s values so passionately only to have those same values rejected by some students generations later? • How can a chapter’s culture allow good young men with outstanding character to be silenced and marginalized by peers who feel entitled to do as they will? • How can a chapter that has won the NIC Award of Distinction, a litany of Miami University Greek and academic honors, and so many Knox and Sisson Awards quickly devolve into a culture void of responsible leadership, structure and respect for peer authority? • How can a chapter thrive over the long-term in a Greek community that faces significant cultural challenges? • How can a chapter that is located just yards from the Fraternity’s original founding site foster a brotherhood that tolerates ongoing bad behavior and incorporates pledge education practices that so clearly violate everything Beta stands for?

14

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

While the university’s administration, Alpha house company and General Fraternity continue to work through considerable details to implement the chapter’s closure, Beta remains thankful and appreciative of Miami University’s support and patience throughout this process. Under a timeline that will allow for recolonization beginning in the 2016-17 academic year, every Beta — young and old — must know that Alpha’s Beta Spirit does not waver even in times of challenge.

We will mourn. We will learn. And we will be compassionate toward our young brothers who are experiencing this significant challenge during their undergraduate years. Most importantly, we will remain steadfast in pursuit of friendship and fidelity and all that is good and true in the principles of Beta Theta Pi. Sincerely and yours in ___kai___, David E. Schmidt, South Florida ’92 General Secretary

CLOSURE COMMENTARY “Very unfortunate. It’s sad to “Another reason why the “I hope to have the think a few knuckleheads Men of Principle initiative support of Alpha and brought down the whole is a huge failure.” all Beta alumni through chapter and closure was — Andrew Kaplan, this process. Now, at apparently the only option.” Southern Illinois ’14 Convention, and next year. — David Wood, Georgia ’95 You are doing yourself and my brothers a disservice “Safe to say the Alpha “This guy fully supports if you just brush us chapter was the AO’s the Administrative under the rug. Beta has Office. Thank you for completely changed crown jewel, so I trust possibly saving a life!” my life. Between that for it to have been — Casey Pavich, experiences in my closed there must have Wisconsin-Oshkosh ’99 chapter, at Wooden, and just meeting the been an extremely “We all need to thousands of Betas that remember that we are compelling reason stroll through Oxford ‘Men of Principle’ not and that all possible every semester. I have ‘Boys.’ No matter how been blessed and am you feel about hazing alternate courses of very thankful. You can action were exhausted.” and other sophomoric take my house, but behavior, Beta has its — Brendan Power, Iowa ’15 that’s just about all I governing principles we will give you.” — Mark share as brothers as “The AO was a Cialone, Miami ’16 well as those that we have constant source of stress to live by that are part of the “It’s certainly unfortunate. to the chapter during my legal system.’” — Christian I’d be more inclined to be time there though, and Eppers, Wright State ’86 sympathetic if it’s just a select officials from the AO few bad apples. The Alpha treated Beta and the Men I think it shows strength Chapter has to lead by of Principle initiative like and character that our example. They have to act a religion more than a fraternity is willing to close in a manner that represents social fraternity created even the Alpha chapter and the Fraternity. All eyes are for the purpose of building stand up for the principles on them.” — Bruce Rayner, brotherhood.” — Mitch of our fraternity. — Conrad Miami ’78 Haus, Miami ’12 Hametner, Texas A&M ’92

“Surely other punishments could have been considered. AO needs to find alternative ways of changing chapter behavior.” — Justin Burch, Mississippi ’10


CAMPUS LIFE

forced into action SOUTH CAROLINA

Traveling to the Carolina Cup in three busses with their dates, the men of the Upsilon Chapter were looking forward to a day of horse racing in Camden, S.C. Everything changed when they were involved in a highway crash. A couch carried on a nearby truck fell into the road. In an attempt to avoid hitting it, one of the charter busses that the men were in swerved out of the way. When another bus (not affiliated with the chapter), attempted the same maneuver, it ended up crashing into the back of Epsilon’s bus. In the seconds that followed, many brothers (from inside the bus that crashed and also from the other two busses) stepped up and took care of the injured until medical services arrived. They bandaged wounds, passed out fresh water and made sure everyone made it safely off the bus. Luckily, there were no life-threatening injuries. Chapter President Chriag Challa ’15, said, “It was pretty astounding to see how much everyone was helping each other.”

WALKING A MILE IN HER SHOES On April 5, brothers of the Beta Theta Chapter at Colgate University tried their hand at walking in heels during the “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” event to raise awareness for sexual assault. Pictured above: Franklin Parker ’16, Isaac Porter ’16, Phil Steinberg ’15, Luke Lynett ’16, Payne Hadden ’16 and Oliver Hunt ’15.

SPRING BREAK SERVICE Not everyone heads to the beach for their mid-semester break. Some use their week off to give back, and Nathan Novaria, Michigan ’16, is one of those people. Brother Novaria went to Memphis, Tenn., with Michigan’s Alternative Spring Break. While there, he assisted children affected by HIV/AIDS.

THE WORLD’S BEST Jason Hays, Texas at Arlington ’16, recently won the Senior Men’s World Championship for Irish Dancing. From February through April, Hays was away from campus training in England. As you can see, he sported delicate shades of pink and blue during his championship performance. Congratulate him at jasonhays91@gmail.com.

www.beta.org

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CAMPUS LIFE

back in the bluegrass KENTUCKY’S REINSTALLATION

On April 12, nearly 250 undergrads, alumni, parents and guests joined in the reinstallation of Beta’s Epsilon Omicron Chapter at the University of Kentucky. The two-day celebration included a tour of the UK basketball training facilities, a “Day at the Races” at Keeneland horse track, a house corporation meeting, the official Installation Ceremony (and keynote) led by General Secretary David Schmidt, South Florida ’92, and Saturday night’s banquet at the Downtown Hilton which honored two men as “Alumni of the Year” and 10 alumni from other chapters by presenting them with honorary roll numbers for their service in the recolonization (*see caption).

*Honorary Roll Numbers were presented to: Jerry Blesch, Centre ’60; Michael Hay, EKU ’94; Allen Hardin, Oregon ’09; TJ Hutchings, Oklahoma ’10; Brian Webber, Loyola Marymount ’09; John Reineke, Central Michigan ’09; Trevor Voss, UCLA ’10; Josh Jehn, EKU ’93; Nathan Schilling, EKU ’98; and Kip Mountjoy, EKU ’12.

GATORS GROOVIN’ The Gamma Xi Chapter at the University of Florida was paired with the ladies of Zeta Tau Alpha for UF’s Dance Marathon. Participants danced for 26.2 hours in recognition and support of the Health Shands Children’s Hospital and the Children’s Miracle Network. Together, Beta and Zeta raised more than $50,000 to add to the overall total of $1,528,330.16!

16

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

MR. PRESIDENT X 2 After a close election, past Chapter President Kyle Nicholas, Eastern Kentucky ’15, is EKU’s new Student Government President. Nicholas is the nephew and brother of two Delta Xi alumni, and will serve in the role at the same time fellow Beta chapter brother Todd Branham ’16, holds the post as IFC President.

Featuring an inspiring quartet as the post-dinner entertainment, remarks were received from UK Greek Advisor Vinny Sandy, one of the chapter’s last presidents from 1996, Mike Carlos ’97, and the four presidents since recolonization in the fall of 2010. Epsilon Omicron now stands at 116 men with a 3.46 GPA. The Beta Spirit is definitely back in the Bluegrass!

SEWANEE SIGNS 10 Meet the spring pledge class at the Gamma Chi Chapter at Sewanee University (University of the South). The new members posed for a picture with former Chapter President, Rhodes Scholar and retired Sewanee Professor of History Dr. Brown Patterson ’52. The membership of Gamma Chi now stands at 42!


CAMPUS LIFE

QUITE THE CLASS The Fraternity is excited to share great news out of Gambier, Ohio. The Beta Alpha Chapter at Kenyon College signed a pledge class of 30 (largest on campus), bringing the chapter’s membership to 54. Now that’s successful recruitment!

In what’s become an important and meaningful tradition, the Beta Lamba Chapter at Vanderbilt University, along with the ladies of Kappa Alpha Theta, hosted the fourth annual “Celebration of Life: A Tribute to Kyle Craig.”

REPPIN’ BETA ON SB14 Brothers of the Gamma Pi Chapter at Lawrence University in Wisc., spent Spring Break in Puerto Rico! Here, they pose with the Beta flag before riding on the “La Bestia” zip line, one of the world’s longest singlerun zip lines that soars over a rainforest.

BRAVING THE COLD Brothers of the Xi Chapter at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., dove into chilly Lake Storey this winter for the Polar Plunge. By making the jump into the frigid water, the group raised more than $2,000 for the Special Olympics of Illinois!

mental health matters VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

The event honors the memory of Marcus Kyle Craig ’11 (bottom left), who took his own life in May 2010. This year, $31,060 was raised for mental health awareness and all of the proceeds went to the Minding Your Mind Foundation, an organization committed to helping adolescents across the country cope with mental health issues. Since the chapter started this event, more than $70,000 has been cultivated. The concert that highlighted the evening featured a performance by Nahko and Medicine for the People. Because of the efforts of the chapter, Craig’s memory is alive and well, and those in need of help are receiving it.

www.beta.org

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

Amb. John Dolibois, Miami ’42 (center), Burt Folsom, Nebraska ’49 (right), and other attendees after the parade of chapters during the 150th.

“Many” and “Much” On Saturday August 5, 1989, at the 150th General Convention, John Carmichael, UCLA ’90, the convention’s undergraduate speaker, delivered a speech entitled “With a Foundation of Principles and Framework of Friendship, Beta Can Be ‘Many’ and ‘Much.’” Here is an excerpt of his powerful words:

Building toward Beta’s 175th anniversary celebration on August 7-10, the “From the Archives” feature in the three issues of the 2014 magazines included highlights from the Fraternity’s last three major milestone anniversaries: the 100th, 125th and 150th.

18

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

“In order for the framework and foundation to remain strong, it must continue to make an impact. It must be significant enough that after many years, a Beta can look back and reflect upon something worthwhile. The fraternity world knows more than its fair share of people that have gone out and achieved great things and brought prominence on their fraternity as well as themselves. What is unique about Beta is that these very men look back and in sum-total of their experiences, Beta holds a significant place; motivating them to give a little back... Finally, we have to look towards the future. Great principles; 150 years; but are we continuing to teach these principles to young people today? Are these principles still important to young people today? Are principles still important to the young undergraduate? We live in a world where the TV pumps in information of man’s inhumanity to man. Revolutions in one part and hostages in another. Rare is the organization that teaches friendship and the values that Beta Theta Pi continues to teach. And, I will tell you all, especially alumni, that we continue to teach these values. Beta

undergraduates everywhere continue to hold dear those values that John Reily Knox and his associates founded an organization upon less than 300 yards from here 150 years ago. One day, they hope to join in building the framework of the Fraternity with their own friendship and become its leaders as well. So here we are – 150 years. An incredible heritage handed to us. But as in every convention, we must look to the future. We must maintain a constant level of excellence. We must continue to be on the forefront of the college fraternity world. With new ideas and innovations. We must continue to pledge bright young men. We must establish new chapters in places where Beta has never been before and re-establish them in places where we have lost chapters. We must continue to achieve in athletic victory, academic prowess and community award until we can unashamedly bask in the luminosity that is our great Fraternity.

Never forgetting, We are Many... and...We are Much.”


VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

No Chapter, No Problem RECOMMITTING AFTER CLOSURE

Justin Foster, West Chester ’11, is one of the Fraternity’s most dedicated volunteers. As Chief of District VI, he works with Betas at Villanova, Pennsylvania and Drexel, pushing them to new heights every year. But, this perfect match between fraternity and volunteer almost didn’t happen. When Foster’s chapter closed in December 2011, he needed a break from Beta. As chapter president, the process took its toll on him, and he was ready to walk away from the Fraternity. But he was asked to give the Wooden Institute a try as a facilitator, and despite his cautions, he agreed. According to Foster, the experience was “absolutely phenomenal” and got him recharged.

Foster works with undergraduates at a summer session of the Wooden Institute. He has served as a volunteer facilitator every summer since he graduated in 2011.

What They Said About Beta Volunteer Justin Foster: “Justin is extremely dedicated to the chapters he oversees, and even though his role is focused on working with the local advisors, he seeks out opportunities to work with chapter leaders. He shows great flexibility with his chapters. He empowers those he works with by defining appropriate action, then setting them free – ideal self-governance.”

“Justin represents everything a Beta should, especially integrity and mutual assistance. Since the founding of our colony, he has been more than just an advisor — he has become a big brother to each of us. Justin has become a part of our family. Without him, I know our colony would not be as strong and thriving as it is today.”

— Kevin Bohm, Puget Sound ’12, Former Beta Leadership Consultant

— Matt Solomon, Drexel ’15 Colony President

With a renewed Beta Spirit, he became involved with District VI in August 2011, and was named district chief in February 2012. Now, he can’t see himself not being active with Beta. Volunteering is his chance to help undergraduates make changes before problems arise. “I can influence and coach undergraduates to not make the same mistakes we did at West Chester,” Foster said. “It’s a way for me to say, ‘Hey, I lived it. It didn’t feel good. I’m here to help you not go through that and to show you what this experience is supposed to be like.’” He works to help Beta’s undergraduates realize their full potential and feels most rewarded when groups get from point A to B, as they recognize what they need to work on and follow through with the proper changes. Foster is certainly making a positive impact, and because of his work, District VI is, and will continue to be, in good hands. Connect with Justin at Justin.Foster109@gmail.com. — Kyle Grand, Wabash ’11 kyle.grand@beta.org

Interested in volunteering for Beta? Contact Director of Chapter Services Jeff Rundle at jeff.rundle@beta.org or 800.800.BETA.

www.beta.org

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REPRESENTED SYMBOLICALLY BY THE DIAMOND IN THE BADGE, BETA UNDERGRADUATES NEED THE

REAL GENEROSITY

TOWARD THE FUTURE . . .

GOAL $20,000,000

GIFTS & PLEDGES RECEIVED $10,031,011 (50.2% of Campaign goal as

Let’s face it, Beta Theta Pi has always had an eye on the future. Founded with a mindset toward expansion; heralded by peers as the “Pioneering Fraternity”; driven by the belief that tomorrow promises even more than the blessings of today. All are cherished Beta philosophies that inspire men young and old, far and wide. Maybe that’s why it’s not surprising that Beta has embarked upon yet another historic effort to prepare for a Great and Good Fraternity’s future. A future that instills in young men the confidence, leadership and sense of responsibility that comes with the privilege of wearing the badge and bearing the name. A future of fun, spirited Beta brotherhood that cements lifelong friendships for when the going gets tough.

of May 1, 2014)

Another $800,000 has been pledged to The Promises to Keep Campaign during the second quarter of the year, pushing the Beta Foundation’s effort beyond the halfway mark of the overall goal. Ten examples of inspiring generosity are included below. — L. Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96, martin.cobb@beta.org; Philip S. Fernandez, Miami ’06, phil.fernandez@beta.org

MEET A FEW CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTORS

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Bob Gillow Michigan ’56 $200,000

Judy & Jim Kewley Case ’66 Major Gift

Troy, Mich.

Colorado Springs, Colo.

CEO of HyGenesis, a firm that reduces bacterial growth in public facilities (i.e. hospitals), Bob serves as president of Lambda Chapter’s house corporation. Believing so strongly in education, Bob recently made a $200,000 estate provision to support Beta’s future young men.

During a tour of the new Colorado Mines chapter house – where both Kewley sons were initiated – long-time Housemother Sherry Wilson gave a full endorsement of Beta’s leadership programs. Jim and Judy responded by making a generous cash gift to the Campaign.

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

Anonymous Beta Couple $90,000

Making a $40,000 cash gift and $50,000 estate provision, a loyal Beta volunteer and his wife are supporting Beta’s programmatic needs by establishing an endowed leadership fund that will sponsor undergraduate Betas to award-winning programs like the Wooden Institute.

Melody & Bob Grand Wabash ’78 $50,000

Mitch Rales Miami ’78 $50,000

Indianapolis, Ind.

Potomac, Md.

Managing law partner of Barnes and Thornburg, Bob gives time and treasure to the fraternity he loves. Past chairman of the Beta Foundation and now Campaign co-chairman with Tom Cassady, Cincinnati ’76, Bob and Sweetheart Melody committed to a cash gift of $50,000.

Mitch has never lost touch with his Beta roots. He even commented during a special Campaign reception hosted at Glenstone, a museum he founded, “Everything I learned about life, people and business I learned in the Beta house.” His generous $50,000 gift will impact students directly.


CUTTING OF EDUCATION AND THE POLISHING OF EXPERIENCE.

LIES IN GIVING

ALL TO THE PRESENT. ­— Albert Camus, Nobel Prize for Literature

PROMISE I

PROMISE III

Expand and endow student participation in award-winning Men of Principle leadership programs. NEED: $13.4 MILLION (67%)

Build a state-of-the-art learning laboratory and historical preservation center within the Administrative Office in Oxford. NEED: $2.9 MILLION (14.5%)

PROMISE II

TO LEARN MORE

Launch new online training platform for all undergraduates, advisors and Beta volunteers. NEED: $3.7 MILLION (18.5%)

Watch The Promises to Keep Campaign Video BETATHETAPI.ORG/PTK

Through a cash or stock gift fulfilled in one, three or five years, or via an estate gift that provides for Beta’s long-term future, a brotherhood this special is worthy of all Betas’ generosity. Contact a Foundation staff member in Oxford to discuss how you can become a part of this exciting campaign: 800.800.BETA (2382).

Terri & Jeff Greiner SMU ’80 Major Gift

Denise & Jeremy Johnson Nebraska ’99 $25,000

Jamie Yates & Chris Althoff Kansas State ’00 $20,000

Betsy & Ethan Braden Willamette ’02 $15,000

Jeff Flanagan Rhode Island ’93 $5,000

Minneapolis, Minn.

New York, N.Y.

Chicago, Ill.

Indianapolis, Ind.

Coral Gables, Fla.

Son and daughter-inlaw of past General Fraternity President Peter F. Greiner, Minnesota ’51, Jeff and Terri committed another major gift to add to the endowment fund that sponsors the Peter F. Greiner Leadership College during the General Convention.

Elected treasurer, pledge educator and recruitment chairman, Jeremy was an undergrad when his chapter piloted the Men of Principle initiative in 1998. Passionate about Beta’s role in young men’s lives, he and Denise pledged $25,000 to help keep Beta’s programming on track.

Long-time volunteer Chris Althoff and partner Jamie, Delta Chi, are leading by example. Their $20,000 gift is in honor of one of Chris’ Beta mentors and will establish an endowed leadership fund in his name. It will sponsor Betas annually to the Wooden Institute.

Freshman Men of Principle Scholarship recipient, past chapter president, former staff member and current Foundation director, Ethan understands well the impact Beta is having on thousands of young men, as evidenced by his and Betsy’s generous $15,000 Campaign gift.

Having held three officer positions including Founding Father, Jeff eventually became an advisor at the Univ. of Miami where he was honorarily initiated by the Eta Beta Chapter. Chief of District XLII, Jeff is doing his part by making a $5,000 gift to help keep Beta’s momentum going.

THESE, TOO, ARE OUR

PROMISES TO KEEP

www.beta.org

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eight founders. eight topics.

eight facts apiece. Founders. Landmarks. symbols. traditions. achievements. bravery. governance. Motley.


64

In 1839, “eight earnest young men” formed a fraternity called Beta Theta Pi. Now, celebrating 175 years since its founding at Miami University, the eight founders reunite to share some treasured history and little known facts of the brotherhood to which they gave birth.

things You (probably) didn’t know about Beta.


Just the facts:

1 IN BETA'S EARLY years, the founders were rumored to have met just north of Oxford in a spooky farmhouse known as Cathcart’s Haunted House.

2 BETA THETA PI’S original constitution was patriotically dated July 4, 1839, by Samuel Taylor Marshall.

3 JOHN HOLT DUNCAN was the only founder who was a legacy of another fraternity. His brother was a member of Alpha Delta Phi.

4 BETA’S LAST LIVING founder was John Reily Knox, who passed away on February 7, 1898.

5 AT THE TIME of Beta’s founding, John Reily Knox was 19 years old and a senior. Samuel Taylor Marshall was 27 years old and in the junior class.

6 JAMES GEORGE SMITH and Samuel Taylor Marshall were roommates in Old Main.

7 JOHN REILY KNOX graduated from Miami University just five days after signing the official roll.

John Reily Knox — Miami 1839 —

8 and then there were nine . . .

Beta founders 24 | summer 2014 | the beta theta pi

Rev. Henry Hunter Johnson, Miami 1840, was the first to be initiated into the Fraternity after the founding, and the one originally in the founders’ minds to make up the “mystic nine.” Johnson was formally proposed for membership on October 10, 1839, and was welcomed into the Fraternity at the next meeting on November 14. He was the cousin of Founder James George Smith, Miami 1840, and succeeded him as the chapter’s second secretary, having been elected in February 1840.


1 ONLY HOURS BEFORE the official groundbreaking of the current Administrative Office, the Board of Trustees approved the addition of a new Hall of Chapters built to the exact dimensions specified by George M. Chandler, Michigan 1898.

2 WHEN VIEWED FROM the sky, the Administrative Office (AO) is in the shape of a diamond with the apex being the Hall of Chapters. Sightlines connect the Beta Campanile, AO and the Hall of Chapters.

3 WOOGLIN ON CHAUTAUQUA, located in Chautauqua, N.Y., was the site of numerous Beta conventions and summertime Beta reunions and family vacations. Due to financial difficulties, it was abandoned in 1893, and in 1901, was struck by lightning and destroyed in a fire.

Samuel Taylor Marshall — Miami 1840 —

8 Oxford vs. Cincinnati Leading up to the construction of the current Administrative Office, the off-the-floor conversations at the 150th General Convention in 1989 centered around replacing the highly overcrowded office (then housed next to the Alpha chapter house). The arguments centered on whether the office should remain in Oxford as the birthplace of the Fraternity and location of its archives, or relocate to an area providing better transportation, information and support services. Just prior to the opening of the convention, the Board of Trustees made an offer on a showplace mansion and gardens in Cincinnati called Laurel Court, which had been put up for sale at a bargain price. However, the Board quickly withdrew the buy offer when a bevy of Miami alumni and a number of former Trustees made a strong protest. Thanks to the eventual purchase in 1993 of the childhood home of Tim Potter, Duke/Miami ‘56, and Coe Potter, Miami ‘62 (owner), 5134 Bonham Road has been the AO’s professional home ever since.

4 SIGNIFICANT SYMBOLISM of the

Beta landmarks

Just the facts:

number eight at the Administrative Office is no accident. Built on eight acres, the office overlooks two ponds that form the figure eight. Each flight of stairs leading up to the office from the ponds contains eight steps.

5 THE MUSEUM INSIDE the Administrative Office was built in the shape of the eight-sided Beta badge. Mirroring the placement of the diamond on the actual badge, a diamond-shaped display case holds Beta badges that have been donated to the museum, including Marshall’s and Ryan’s founder badges.

6 ONE PROJECT not completed by

1939 was the construction of the Beta Campanile. The cornerstone of the Beta Campanile was laid on November 10, 1940.

7 THE FIRST BETA CHAPTER house (and believed to be the first “house” of any fraternity) was a section of one of the college buildings at Hampden-Sydney College in 1850. In 1885, the Amherst chapter built the first Beta-owned chapter house.

64 things you (probably) didn't know about Beta |

25


Beta symbols Just the facts:

1 BEFORE THE DEVELOPMENT of the pledge pin, pledges wore pink and blue ribbons.

2 THE FOUNDERS ENVISIONED a badge with clasped hands on its face. The jeweler who made the original badge couldn’t execute that design, so he created a crescent instead.

3 BETA BROTHERS MAY allow mothers, wives, daughters, sisters and fiances to wear their Beta badge.

4 BETA WAS THE FIRST FRATERNITY to select a flower. “In beauty and purity, it symbolizes our principles. Its hardihood reminds us of our adaptability to our environment and of the universality of our moral aims.”

5 BETA’S FIRST FLAG WAS DESIGNED in 1890 with a white rectangular border in honor of the 1889 alliance with the Mystic Seven, and a rose in the center. It was redesigned in 1902 to its current version.

6 A PROPOSAL TO CREATE the Fraternity’s shingle was made in 1865, but never moved forward. The idea again surfaced more than 30 years later thanks to Morris R. Ebersole, Cincinnati 1898, a Cornell graduate student. The Ebersole shingle was eventually modified by Chandler and approved by the 1913 convention.

7 BETA ALTERED CLASSICAL symbolism, choosing the

David Linton

— Miami 1839 —

dragon as a fitting guard of the secret lore of the Fraternity. Unlike some images of the fantastic beast, it is alert, not dormant; it is calm, not threatening. The Beta dragon is closer to the Oriental species than the European, as it represents the virtues of prudence, respect and courage, rather than being an embodiment of evil. Beta’s dragon was first used by the Epsilon Chapter at Centre College in 1881.

8 Delicate Shades of . . . Royal Purple? The colors of the Fraternity are “delicate shades of pink and blue.” This is the only Beta symbol which Maj. George M. Chandler, Michigan 1898, neither devised nor altered, despite his violent opposition to them. These colors had been in use for some time in the 1870s by the Ohio Wesleyan and DePauw chapters. The question of fraternity colors arose at the convention of 1879. W.C. Ransom, Michigan 1848, supported royal purple, but Walter E. Dennison, Ohio Wesleyan 1877, and Paul Wilcox, DePauw 1879, spoke “impassioned speeches” for their chapters’ colors. Their choice was finally approved after a hot fight near the close of the convention.

26 | summer 2014 | the beta theta pi


Just the facts:

1 THE LOVING CUP ceremony is of unknown origin but was performed as early as the 1903 convention.

2 BETA CONVENTIONS have been held since 1842. At first they were held triennially, then biennially, and since 1864, have been held annually. (However, no convention was held in 1874, or from 1943-45 during WWII.)

3 IN THE EARLY YEARS of Beta, most college students were required to study Latin and Greek. Studying the language was so significant to Joseph S. Tunison, Denison 1873, that he wrote the popular Beta song, “Gemma Nostra,” which translates to “Let Our Jewel (Brightly) Shine.”

4 THE SYMBOLISM of Beta ritual, and the design of the “ideal” chapter hall reproduced in the ritual book, are both strongly influenced by the traditions of the Freemasons.

5 AS SUGGESTED by George W. Switzer, DePauw 1881, Betas receive a “Fraternal Fifty” recognition upon their 50th year of membership with the Fraternity. The idea was heartily approved by the 88th General Convention and the recognition took form in the shape of a card to be presented on a special occasion, commencement banquet or other homecoming.

6 THE FIRST ISSUE of The Beta Theta Pi magazine was published in 1872, making it the first and oldest continuously published college fraternity magazine in existence.

7 FROM 1994-2001, Beta produced the Beta News Network, a 14-minute video message patterned after television news programming. The VHS recording was mailed three times a year to all chapters and colonies, chapter counselors and General Fraternity Officers.

James George Smith — Miami 1840 —

8 Chapter Mottoes

With few exceptions, most chapter mottoes were chosen and assigned by John Calvin Hanna, Wooster 1881, with support from George M. Chandler, Michigan 1898. All of the chapter mottoes are Greek and their words begin with the chapter’s Greek letter designation. For example, the Greek motto of the Alpha Chapter begins with the Greek letter “Alpha.” Following Hanna’s and Chandler’s leadership, heraldic devices and chapter mottoes were interpreted by the following Betas in chronological order: Seth R. Brooks, St. Lawrence ’22, Joseph H. Lane, HampdenSydney ’90, Dr. Bill Fox, St. Lawrence ’75, and current Assistant Historian Zac Haines, Miami ’05.

Beta traditions 64 things you (probably) didn't know about Beta |

27


Beta Achievements

Just the facts:

1 FOSTER HEWITT, TORONTO ’25, was the first radio broadcaster of NHL hockey games live-to-air. He originated the famous catchphrase, "He shoots! He scores!"

2 SCHUYLER COLFAX, DEPAUW, 1854, was the 17th Vice President of the United States (1869– 73) under Ulysses S. Grant.

3 CHRIS DEWOLFE, WASHINGTON ’88, is the co-creator and former CEO of MySpace. His MySpace profile was the sixth account ever created on the site.

4 CARL BLAUROCK, COLORADO MINES, 1916, was the first American to climb all mountains taller than 14,000 feet in the continental United States.

5 BETA CURRENTLY HAS 84 Rhodes Scholars, more than any other fraternity.

6 BETA HAS 34 OLYMPIC MEDALISTS, including swimmer Murray Rose, Southern California ’61, who won three gold medals (1956), and silver and bronze (1960).

7 LEIGH HARLINE, UTAH ’29 was an Oscar-winning

Charles Henry Hardin

composer and conductor. He wrote the music to Disney’s “When You Wish Upon a Star,” which won an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1940.

— Miami 1841 —

8 “I swear it, Mr. Lincoln.” In 1864, a woman went to the White House to explain to President Lincoln that her son, a Confederate soldier, had been captured and was sick in a northern prison. She wanted permission to take him home where she could nurse him. Lincoln suggested that she see Stanton, his secretary of war. “I’ve just come from there,” she replied. “He said, ‘All rebels should die!’” “Did he say that?” Lincoln shook his head. “If I release your sick son into your custody, will you give me your word of honor that he will never again bear arms against the Union?” “I swear it, Mr. Lincoln,” the woman said. Many years later in 1909, the woman’s son was appointed by President William Howard Taft to the Supreme Court of the United States. He was Beta brother and Justice Horace H. Lurton, Cumberland 1867.

28 | summer 2014 | the beta theta pi


Beta bravery Just the facts:

1 MORE THAN HALF OF ALL MEN initiated into the Fraternity by 1861 were fighting in the Civil War. (More than 300 on each side.)

2 ENSIGN JOHN PERRY EDWARDS, Kansas '39, was the pilot of the first plane to engage in combat at Pearl Harbor.

3 SIX BETA BROTHERS have been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, the United States of America’s highest military honor.

4 FOUR BETAS HAVE EXPLORED space as American astronauts.

5 EIGHTY-SIX MEN of the Toronto Chapter enlisted for Canada in WWI. More than ten percent of the chapter died – more than any other chapter.

6 THE FRATERNITY LOST FIVE brothers in the 9/11 attacks on the United States.

7 A LETTER DATED AUGUST 16, 1944, told of the formation of an alumni chapter at an Air Force prison camp in Germany.

John Holt Duncan — Miami 1840 —

8 the ultimate sacrifice After graduation, Andrew Stern, Tennessee ’01, deployed with his platoon and four tanks to Fallujah, Iraq, where his platoon engaged in intense fighting. On September 16, 2004, the platoon was ordered to dispatch two tanks to the Corps of Engineers as security for road construction. Andy led the tanks into this assignment. Taking his own tank ahead to check out a suspicious pile of debris, Andy’s upper body was outside of the tank, and the gun loader was looking out, too. Andy saw something and yelled, “Oh no!” As the debris-concealed device exploded, he covered his loader’s body with his own before the deadly shrapnel hit him in the neck. Saving his loader’s life, Andy died four hours later.

64 things you (probably) didn't know about Beta |

29


Just the facts:

1 SUPREME LEGISLATIVE POWER is in the hands of undergraduate delegates to each General Convention.

2 ARTICLE VI OF THE ORIGINAL constitution provided that no chapter should have more than nine or less than three regular members. Knox remarked, “The number nine was soon dropped, leaving the Order free to select good fellows wherever and in whatever number it might find them.”

3 BETA’S FIRST FORM OF government was the Presiding Chapter System under which administrative duties and the responsibility for communication rotated annually among the chapters.

4 BETA HAS LONG HAD A STRONG commitment to academic excellence. It was the first Fraternity to adopt a minimum 2.5 GPA for a chapter (1984), a 2.5 minimum GPA for each member (1997), a 2.7 minimum GPA for a chapter (2006), a 2.8 minimum GPA – or the campus All-Men’s Average – for a chapter, whichever is greatest (2012).

5 PRIOR TO 1872, chapters were to collect a tax of $1 per man to pay for expenses of the convention and General Fraternity.

6 THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES was expanded in 1998 from six members to nine. And then expanded from nine to 12 at the 170th General Convention in 2009.

7 IN 1873, DISTRICT CHIEFS were appointed by Beta’s first General Secretary Charles Duy Walker, VMI 1869, dividing 26 chapters across five districts. This was the first time a fraternity organized its management system accordingly.

Michael Clarkson Ryan — Miami 1839 —

8 Beta's secret constitution goes public Fraternities were originally secret societies – a characteristic which gave them much of their charm, but also attracted opposition and animosity based principally upon suspicious ignorance. To counter this problem, it was proposed that a new constitution be written to eliminate all of the esoteric material. This material would be incorporated into a separate private ritual, and the new constitution would be open and public. This unprecedented event in the fraternity-world was approved by Beta’s 1877 convention, and became effective upon its ratification by the 1879 convention.

Beta governance 30 | summer 2014 | the beta theta pi


Beta Motley Just the facts:

1 TWO FIRST LADIES have Beta family ties. Barbara Bush’s father is Marvin Pierce, Miami 1916, and her brother is Scott Pierce, Miami ’54. Nancy Reagan’s father is Dr. Loyal Davis, Knox 1914.

2 THE TOTAL COST to publish the first issue of The Beta Theta Pi magazine was $480. It was only eight pages.

3 THE LOVING CUP was presented to Knox and his wife on their golden wedding anniversary. Each chapter gave $2 with a letter of congratulations. The Cup is on permanent loan from the Alpha Chapter and is currently housed in the Beta museum.

4 THE OLDEST CHAPTER in continuous existence of any fraternity is Beta’s Gamma Chapter at Washington & Jefferson College in Pennsylvania. It was originally founded on June 1, 1842.

5 THE BETA BELLS were first hung in the towers of Old Main and rang publicly for the first time on Centenary Day, August 8, 1939, with their notes broadcast over national public radio for Betas to hear from coast to coast.

6 NO NAME HAS BEEN designated with the first roll number of the Toronto chapter. Billy Moore, the founder of the local Theta Zeta Society, died before the chapter was chartered, and therefore was never initiated into Beta Theta Pi.

7 GEORGE M. CHANDLER preferred to pass the Loving Cup to the left. Francis M. Shepardson preferred to pass the Cup to the right.

Thomas Boston Gordon — Miami 1840 —

8 back to the future

A time capsule was sealed at the Centennial in 1939 featuring memento contributions by various Beta Greats. Currently housed in the archives at the Administrative Office, the time capsule will be opened in 2039.

64 things you (probably) didn't know about Beta |

31


“I THINK WE ARE ON THE RIGHT TRACK.” JONATHAN, I received your recent voice message following up on our board meeting in Miami. I thought the meeting was very informative. I didn’t realize the General Fraternity was doing so much in the leadership training area for the undergrads. While I knew there were programs, I didn't realize they were that extensive. For years I did not want to recognize the importance of Beta’s leadership programs, but I changed my mind a few years ago. Being from the older generation so to speak, I assumed young men received leadership training in their homes growing up and in athletic programs in high school. Having been back involved in depth with the Zeta Phi Chapter after about a 10 year absence (on the alumni house corporation board but not real active), I realize the young men of today get to college without much of the training my generation received at home. In addition, over the last 15 years my wife has been back teaching high school boys, and that experience has taught me they are not getting much leadership training in high school. It seems sports teams have become more focused on winning and on a couple of star players who can play in college than they [are] on developing leaders. In any event, I think we are on the right track. I don't know that I can directly translate the leadership programs into the higher GPAs the chapters are experiencing around the continent but it sure doesn't hurt. Once again, thanks for following up with me after the meeting. —KAI— JOHN HILLHOUSE, MISSOURI ’69, NEWLY-ELECTED BETA FOUNDATION DIRECTOR (Email sent to Foundation Director Jonathan Brant, Miami ’75, following the winter board meeting January 24-25, 2014.)

BETA LEADERSHIP FUND

developing men of principle for a principled life www.beta.org/gift


STATE of the FRATERNITY This past academic year has been one of tremendous gain for Beta Theta Pi. As you’ll see on the next page, Beta continues to grow in dramatic fashion. Most importantly, we take pride in the improving culture of our chapters across the land. Empowered and afforded the opportunity to govern their own affairs — yet supported with strong local advisors and award-winning leadership programs, resources and operational tools — our young men learn from the successes and challenges of their brotherhood. They learn from running a complex and diverse organization with a multitude of peer opinions, environmental influences and stakeholder interests. Held to appropriate high Beta standards, our undergraduates are gaining real-life experience in one of North America’s greatest learning laboratories. Confidently, generations of Beta leaders have held the notion that — while not free of risks nor lacking room for improvement — our fraternity adds value to young men’s lives and, yes, campuses across the continent. That’s why we encourage all Betas, parents and friends to stay engaged and champion this fraternity whenever possible. The 9,375 undergraduate men who proudly wear our letters are worth it. Sincerely and yours in ___kai___, David E. Schmidt, South Florida ’92, General Secretary Douglas G. Houser, Willamette ’57, General Fraternity President S. Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73, Foundation Chairman Judson A. Horras, Iowa State ’97, Administrative Secretary Jonathan J. Brant, Miami ’75, Foundation Director


: S T A T E

of the

F R A T E R N I T Y

SELF-GOVERNANCE // This priority

RECRUITMENT // This priority seeks to

seeks to champion good judgment and effective decision-making by our undergraduate members behaviorally and academically, along with local volunteers and General Fraternity Officers who support them.

reinforce the notion that one of the best indicators of the relevance of our Fraternity on any given campus is the ability of Beta chapters and colonies to recruit new members who align with our core values.

:Beta’s collective GPA for all 127 chapters achieved another

:Beta set a new record with 9,375 undergraduate members.

record-breaking milestone of 3.193 — among the highest in the fraternity world.

:The Fraternity’s liability insurance provider, Liberty International Underwriters, is exiting the entire fraternity liability market based upon loss history and a hardening market; the General Fraternity is seeking comparable coverage with the expectation that rates will increase. Chapters and local volunteers will be kept informed as the Fraternity’s leadership moves through this important process.

:Following significant efforts to support and empower Beta undergraduates to rectify matters of significant concern, the Fraternity closed three chapters and colonies this year:

Chapter

Founded Men Reason for Closure

Miami University 1839 112

Lack of Leadership, Self- Governance and Peer Accountability; Hazing; Substance Abuse

Hanover College 1853

Low Membership

14

UC Berkeley 1879 44

Violations of University and General Fraternity Directives; Ongoing Risk Management Violations; Hazing; Substance Abuse

EDUCATION //

This priority seeks to continually raise member and constituent knowledge of Beta-specific values, projects, resources and current events, while also advancing the mission and vision of Beta Theta Pi. :Some 1,656 individuals graduated this year from one of Beta’s leadership programs, totalling 16,016 since the Men of Principle initiative began in 1998.

:Following last year’s launch of the Pursuit Learning Center, the Fraternity continues to refine how best to deliver online education and operational resources to students and volunteers that complement Beta’s in-person leadership programs.

:Nearly four years into vendor research and one full year of technical development, the Fraternity has partnered with “ChapterSpot” and will unveil new co-branded websites for all participating chapters and colonies during the 175th General Convention. Integrated fully with the Administrative Office’s member database, the websites will provide 1) chapter communication tools, 2) alumni engagement resources and 3) undergraduate recruitment technology. No start-up or maintenance costs are being passed on to the undergraduates at this time; 71 chapters and colonies have enrolled and will benefit immediately.

34

:

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

:Beta’s average chapter size with 127 chapters is 73.8 — among the highest in the fraternity world.

:Eight re/colonizations occurred at American (c), Drexel (c), Florida State(rc), Illinois (rc), Pittsburgh (c), Puget Sound (rc), Quinnipiac (c) and UC San Diego (rc).

:At the 175th General Convention in Oxford, eight colonies will be petitioning for their charter: Centre, Chapman, Charleston, Creighton, Denver, Michigan State, Pacific and TCU.

:This coming academic year, the Fraternity will re/colonize at least four campuses: North Carolina State (c) Ohio State (rc), Purdue (rc) and Willamette (rc).

VOLUNTEERS // This priority seeks to support Beta’s 1,500 volunteers who support our young men on a daily basis as coaches and mentors. We know undergraduates thrive when caring adults are active and present in their lives. :Following the General Convention this past August, the General Secretary established a goal of having 100% of all five core advisor positions filled for all chapters and colonies by the 175th Anniversary (chapter counselor, recruitment, pledge education, finance and risk management). At the time of publishing, 27 remain to be filled out of a possible 635 advisor positions (or 96% filled). One vacancy exists of the 43 district chiefs (98% filled). All 10 regional chief positions are filled.

:In the midst of record levels of volunteerism (on average seven advisors per chapter), chapters and colonies still need men and women to mentor their officers and brothers beyond Beta’s five required core advisor roles. If interested, please contact Director of Chapter Services Jeff Rundle, Kansas State ’03, at jeff.rundle@beta.org or 800.800.BETA.

:Of Beta’s 63 house corporations that own properties, 49 (78%) are members of the Cornerstone Housing Program. Some 596 volunteers serve on Beta’s 86 active house corporations.

BETA-AT-A-GLANCE // Collective GPA

Leadership Program Graduates

Undergraduate Members

Core Advisor Positions Filled

3.193* 1,656* 9,375 96% *

*

*All-time Beta record!


of the

:

F R A T E R N I T Y

T

his “State of the Chapters” report shares subjective and objective insight into the culture of each chapter and colony. Listed throughout, a chapter officer has written about his chapter’s major achievement this academic year and a fun fact that is unique to his chapter. Each chapter’s update is coupled with quantitative data that reflects the chapter’s progress in the Fraternity’s four strategic priorities: Self-Governance (S), Education (E), Recruitment (R) and Volunteers (V).

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e Gra 3 Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3 201 nt Y e ars Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

: S T A T E

Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

Alabama (ΔΘ) Tuscaloosa, Ala. WHAT’S UP: At the Greek Excellence Banquet, the chapter won the Outstanding Philanthropy and Community Service Award for the second year in a row. FACT: The chapter was named the Most Improved Fraternity at the Order of Omega Banquet. — John Trippe ’14, jctrippe@crimson.ua.edu

3.05

2.90

16

17

American* (Colony) Washington. D.C WHAT’S UP: Coming to campus this spring, we’ve nominated Beta Sweethearts, held elections, started our philanthropy, organized our first socials and built lasting friendships. FACT: Sweetheart Eve Young is the granddaughter of a Beta alumnus. — Alex Fram-Schwartz ’15, alexfz2392@gmail.com

3.40

N/R

N/A

N/A

Arizona (ΔΒ) Tucson, Ariz. WHAT’S UP: We raised more than $2,000 in our second annual philanthropy, “Beta Lei,” and were approved for the first time to offer the Men of Principle Scholarship to potential new members. FACT: We are the only Beta chapter in the state of Arizona. — Nicholas DeJaco ’16, ndejaco@email.arizona.edu

2.91

2.84

9

9

Arkansas* (Colony) Fayetteville, Ark. WHAT’S UP: We started the “1839” initiative with the purpose to contribute 1,839 service hours to the community. We will complete it this spring. FACT: Only two years on campus, we have more than 100 members, nearing the campus chapter average. — Cody Hardison ’16, crhardis@uark.edu

3.20

2.94

14

N/A

Auburn (ΔΖ) Auburn, Ala. WHAT’S UP: Our chapter hosted a successful Crawfish Boil philanthropy with Alpha Gamma Delta, raising nearly $8,000. FACT: With more than 150 brothers, we are one of the largest chapters in the nation, and this year marks our chapter’s 50th anniversary. — Harrison Smith ’15, hfs0003@auburn.edu

2.93

2.83

9

9

Baylor* (ΔΨ) Waco, Texas WHAT’S UP: The men of Delta Psi participated in the 62nd annual AllUniversity Sing! The act put Beta on the map. FACT: With the spring 2014 class, we’ve found our place among the many IFC chapters by hitting the average chapter size. — Conner Gilliland ’15, Conner_Gilliland@baylor.edu

3.26

N/R

15

N/A

Bethany (Ψ) Bethany, W. Va. WHAT’S UP: We exceeded our service requirement the second week of classes and also worked with our charity, Augusta Levy, to raise money and awareness. FACT: We are the oldest chapter of Beta in West Virginia. — Brian Davis ’15, Bdavis@bethanywv.edu

3.01

2.53

21

12

British Columbia (ΓΟ) Vancouver, B.C. WHAT’S UP: We won the interfraternity sports trophy again and hosted our annual philanthropy, Beta Strongman, benefiting children with physical and cognitive disabilities. FACT: We won the intramural sports trophy 16 times in a row from 1984-2000. — Nicolas Buse ’15, nicolasjabuse@gmail.com

3.20

N/R

9

10

Cal Poly (ΕΔ) San Luis Obispo, Calif. WHAT’S UP: Our size has increased more than 35% to 63 men, and we raised $25,000 for the Hopeful Hearts Foundation by co-hosting the first Dance Marathon, while adding three new advisors. FACT: We currently have three brothers who are legacies. — Jonathan Lee ’15, jonathan.ang.lee@gmail.com

2.94

2.89

8

9

Carleton (ΕΥ) Ottawa, Ont. WHAT’S UP: Revamping our recruitment program, we added 15 brothers and more than doubled our active number of brothers in two semesters, while better engaging our alumni. FACT: Our chapter is the oldest Greek-lettered fraternity at Carleton. — Joe McGarvey ’16, mcgarvey219@gmail.com

N/R

N/R

1

7

*N/A: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. N/R: Data which is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of May 1, 2014. Red: Chapter GPAs that fall below the Fraternity’s minimum chapter GPA of 2.8 or below the campus all mens’ average.

29/74

44 139

69 62

52 147

49 107

42 156

22 57

6 22

25 84

34 77

18 28

V 25

7

7

43

8

7

N/A

15

N/A

54

9

7

N/A

10

N/A

46

6

7

N/A

7

N/A

11

6

7

30

5

8

21

3

1

9

5

6

www.beta.org

35


of the

FF R R A A TT EE R R N N II TT Y Y ::

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e 3 Gra Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3Y 201 n e ars t Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

:: SS TT A A TT EE

Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

36

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

Case Western Reserve (ΛΚ–Β) Cleveland, Ohio WHAT’S UP: Our chapter was first in the Greek Week Variety Show and we began a member education series about Beta, the Ritual and life lessons. FACT: Our chapter is the only one to have a three letter chapter designation and a hyphen (Lambda Kappa - Beta) — Ryan Oshinsky ’16, rdo12@case.edu

3.43

3.23

14

18

Central Florida (ΖΨ) Orlando, Fla. WHAT’S UP: With more than 1,200 participants, our Betas Best Dance Crew philanthropy raised more $3,000 for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. FACT: In the past three years, we’ve had two SGA Presidents, two Homecoming directors and one Speaker of the Senate. — Nat Jones ’16, Ncj715@aol.com

3.06

2.84

17

15

Central Michigan (ΕΓ) Mount Pleasant, Mich. WHAT’S UP: We were victorious in Greek Week for the first time since refounding. We’ve added “Movie Night Monday” at the chapter house for brotherhood. FACT: Our chapter introduced the original “GO BETA” pins at the 144th General Convention. — Dave Kobel ’16, Kobel1dj@cmich.edu

2.85

2.81

16

17

Centre* (Ε) Danville, Ky. WHAT’S UP: Epsilon is moving in a new chapter house next semester. To prepare for the move, we compiled historical artifacts and composites of the chapter’s past. FACT: The Beta dragon was adopted from Epsilon’s chapter allegory in 1881. — Gray Whitsett ’16, gray.whitsett@centre.edu

3.23

2.94

23

N/A

Chapman* (Colony) Orange, Calif. WHAT’S UP: We won the Excellence in Membership Recruitment Award at Keystone. The colony took the largest pledge class of all fraternities on campus. FACT: 10% of the Chapman University Ambassadors are members of the colony. — Dylan Reuter ’15, reute104@mail.chapman.edu

3.24

3.14

19

N/A

Charleston* (Colony) Charleston, S.C. WHAT’S UP: The colony won the campus’ Homecoming Week festivities. We had the highest GPA on campus and won all but two Borelli Awards. FACT: The colony is home to the Greek Man of the Year and New Member of the Year. — Patrick Mitchell ’16, mitchellpc@g.cofc.edu

3.17

2.84

19

N/A

Cincinnati (ΒΝ) Cincinnati, Ohio WHAT’S UP: A number of our men went on a mission trip to Mandeville, Jamaica, to volunteer at different children orphanages, teaching basic math and grammar skills. FACT: Beta Nu has the original copy of its charter, which is signed by John Reily Knox. — Andrew Naab ’16, naabas@mail.uc.edu

3.19

2.96

26

29

Clemson (ΔΝ) Clemson, S.C. WHAT’S UP: The chapter’s Dragon Classic Alumni Golf Tournament was won once again by the Segars family. FACT: The office of student body vice president recently transferred from one pledge brother, Parker Rhoden ’15, to another, Lee Cochrane ’15. — Ryan Tucker ’15, rptucke@g.clemson.edu

3.18

3.02

9

12

Colgate (ΒΘ) Hamilton, N.Y. WHAT’S UP: The chapter’s focus this year has been philanthropy. In the fall, at our annual charity auction during Parents’ Weekend, we raised $9,000 for the Madison County Day Camp. FACT: The chapter is the oldest living fraternity on Colgate’s campus. — Ben Rogers ’15, brogers@colgate.edu

3.26

3.20

9

8

Colorado Mines (ΒΦ) Golden, Colo. WHAT’S UP: The Beta Phi Chapter has increased its community outreach by working with Reading Partners to assist children in the development of their reading skills. FACT: Beta Phi sits at the highest elevation out of all Beta chapters. — Jordan Daubenspeck ’16, jdaubens@mines.edu

3.11

2.99

21

11

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

29/74

14 56

32 68

19 59

12 33

45 108

20 63

30 91

31 101

25 64

27 67

V 25

7

7

17

11

13

38

6

7

19

7

7

14

11

7

N/A

5

N/A

N/A

9

N/A

31

6

8

32

7

5

21

8

7

23

6

9


of the

F R A T E R N I T Y

*N/A: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. N/R: Data which is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of May 1, 2014. Red: Chapter GPAs that fall below the Fraternity’s minimum chapter GPA of 2.8 or below the campus all mens’ average.

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

:

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e Gra 3 Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3 201 nt Y e ars Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

: S T A T E

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

Columbia (ΑΑ) New York, N.Y. WHAT’S UP: The Alpha Alpha Chapter ratified a new constitution and judicial system. Our newsletter, “The Paper Dragon,” was revived. FACT: The chapter is one of two Greek organizations at Columbia University to own their own house. — Angel Valle ’16, lav2118@columbia.edu

3.62

2.99

10

9

Connecticut (ΖΧ) Storrs, Conn. WHAT’S UP: The chapter won the 2014 Chapter of the Year Award and is excited to continue striving for excellence. Also, the executive team has been working on constitutional revisions. FACT: Every fall, we drive to Oxford for initiation. — J.C. Gonzalez ’16, juan.gonzalez@uconn.edu

3.22

3.04

19

19

Cornell (ΒΔ) Ithaca, N.Y. WHAT’S UP: The Beta Delta Chapter initiated 100% of its new members this spring. FACT: Our house used to not have a roof in order to take advantage of a loophole in the state law that limited the number of occupants by the volume of their building. — Daniel Anderson ’15, da327@cornell.edu

3.57

N/R

18

13

Creighton* (Colony) Omaha, Nebr. WHAT’S UP: The colony raised more than $900 for Completely Kids at its annual Crêpes for Kids event. We initiated 15 men, our largest recruitment class to date. FACT: The colony’s Beta Dinner Club travels to a new restaurant each week. — Josh Bucy ’15, joshuabucy@creighton.edu

3.37

3.27

18

N/A

Dayton (ΗΔ) Dayton, Ohio WHAT’S UP: For the second semester, we spent a night in the woods and did some fireside bonding at our Brotherhood Retreat. We made it back to campus in time to cheer on the Flyers to the Elite Eight! FACT: Our past three presidents all pledged in the same class. — Vinny Spahr ’15, spahrv1@udayton.edu

3.37

3.11

18

11

Denison (ΑΗ) Granville, Ohio WHAT’S UP: Our pledge class of 12 was the largest on campus. Philanthropywise, we raised more than $1,400 for Big Brothers, Big Sisters through our “King of the Wing” competition. FACT: We have more brothers in student senate than any other fraternity! — Ryan Erickson ’16, ericks_r1@denison.edu

3.32

3.11

1

13

Denver* (ΑΖ) Denver, Colo. WHAT’S UP: For eight straight quarters, we’ve had the highest GPA on campus. Our February Date-a-Beta event raised more than $8,000. FACT: Most founders of our university were Betas. — Mackenzie Nelson ’15, mackjrnelson@gmail.com

3.52

3.20

15

N/A

DePauw (Δ) Greencastle, Ind. WHAT’S UP: The Delta Chapter initiatied 30 men this semester and held Llama Plop philanthropy event to raise money for a local elementary school. FACT: The chapter has had the best grades of any fraternity on campus for three straight semesters. — Eric Tandy ’15, erictandy_2015@depauw.edu

3.36

3.06

11

12

Drexel* (Colony) Philadelphia, Pa. WHAT’S UP: The colony participated in its first Greek Week. We took first place with our Bruce Springsteen-inspired theme, “Born to Be a Beta.” FACT: Drexel’s mascot is a dragon, so fittingly we have nicknamed ourselves the “Dueling Dragons.” — Matt Solomon ’15, MattJSolomon@gmail.com

3.34

3.10

8

N/A

East Carolina (ΕΑ) Greenville, N.C. WHAT’S UP: The Epsilon Alpha Chapter is back in Good Standing and is eligible to receive awards at the 175th General Convention for the first time in years. FACT: We have won three of the last four flag football championships. — Ryland Jennings ’15, jenningsry11@students.ecu.edu

2.84

2.75

14

14

29/74

20 56

24 75

20 67

29 65

20 63

17 64

25 77

27 113

56 41

30 57

V 25

7

7

21

6

12

24

8

7

21

10

6

N/A

6

N/A

18

8

7

18

8

5

34

6

7

31

7

5

N/A

10

N/A

17

11

12

www.beta.org

37


of the

FF R R A A TT EE R R N N II TT Y Y ::

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e 3 Gra Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3Y 201 n e ars t Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

:: SS TT A A TT EE

Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

38

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

Eastern Kentucky (ΔΞ) Richmond, Ky. WHAT’S UP: At EKU’s Greek Awards, we won the New Member and IFC Overall Scholarship Awards, New Member of the Year Tyler Gilbert ’16, and Outstanding Alumnus Michael Hay ’94. FACT: Delta Xi boasts both the IFC and Student Body President! — Mark Wolf ’17, mark_wolf8@mymail.eku.edu

3.05

2.82

11

16

Eastern Washington (ΕΩ) Cheney, Wash. WHAT’S UP: We participated in Mt. Spokane’s “Hope on the Slopes,” benefiting the American Cancer Society. Our team of 15 members raised more than $1,000 for the event. FACT: The chapter is excited for a minor house remodel happening this summer. — Jon Sato ’16, jrtsato@eagles.ewu.edu

2.65

2.98

7

7

Emory (ΓΥ) Atlanta, Ga. WHAT’S UP: The chapter has made leaps in improving its philanthropic outreach. We raised more than $4,000 for both breast and bladder cancer research. FACT: The chapter currently has brothers born in nine different countries around the world. — Ethan Cohen ’16, evcohen@emory.edu

3.22

3.23

12

8

Florida (ΓΞ) Gainesville, Fla. WHAT’S UP: The chapter held “Beta Bring It On,” a cheerleading competition that raised more than $30,000 for the March of Dimes and Alzheimer’s Association. FACT: We are one of two fraternities in the country to have a solar panel system on our roof. — Matt Sheinbaum ’15, MSheinbaum@ufl.edu

3.32

3.19

7

15

Florida International (ΗΓ) Miami, Fla. WHAT’S UP: We raised $4,100 from our philanthropy event, “Beta Breakdown.” For the fourth year in a row, 100% of our members joined the Sons of the Dragon Club. FACT: Our chapter’s GPA is steadily increasing. We have moved up to third in the IFC. — Jesse Peinado ’14, jpein001@fiu.edu

2.86

2.77

13

19

Florida State* (ΔΛ) Tallahassee, Fla. WHAT’S UP: The colony had the IFC’s highest GPA for the 2013 school year. We took our first pledge class and initiated 15 men. FACT: Our colony has three generations of orientation leaders: two from 2012, six from 2013, and one on the 2014 staff. — Tyler Welliver ’15, tw11s@my.fsu.edu

3.13

2.86

8

N/A

Furman (ΖΛ) Greenville, S.C. WHAT’S UP: We restructured the academic standards within our chapter’s Constitution. The resulting legislation holds brothers more accountable for their academic performance. FACT: Decades ago, we absorbed a local chapter, Beta Epsilon. — Ricky Schosky ’15, ricky.schosky2901@furman.edu

2.98

2.95

11

12

George Washington (ΖΝ) Washington, D.C. WHAT’S UP: Despite the hardship our chapter has gone through this semester, we have seen our members come together and support one another. FACT: We initiated the father of one our current members in recognition of his countless hours donated to our chapter. — Matt Zahn ’15, mattzahn24@gmail.com

3.27

3.14

17

13

Georgia (ΕΕ) Athens, Ga. WHAT’S UP: We committed ourselves to more than a dozen philanthropies and raised thousands for different organizations. Our annual philanthropy, “Choral Cup,” raised more than $10,000 for cancer research. FACT: 2014 marks the 30th anniversary of our charter. — Carlton Clack ’15, cclack@uga.edu

3.33

3.09

18

16

Georgia Tech* (ΓΗ) Atlanta, Ga. WHAT’S UP: The chapter returned to campus in the fall, and is off to a great start. We recruited and initiated fourteen new members and restructured the chapter’s leadership system. FACT: Ed Hamm ’28, won an Olympic gold medal in long jumping.— John Riley ’17, john.riley@gtbeta.org

3.24

3.05

7

N/A

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

29/74

16 35

27 41

21 76

31 179

24 50

120 92

10 34

32 93

42 127

16 40

V 25

7

7

15

9

11

14

6

8

30

5

7

58

6

6

23

7

8

N/A

11

N/A

11

4

6

32

4

7

34

7

9

N/A

9

N/A


of the

F R A T E R N I T Y

*N/A: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. N/R: Data which is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of May 1, 2014. Red: Chapter GPAs that fall below the Fraternity’s minimum chapter GPA of 2.8 or below the campus all mens’ average.

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

:

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e Gra 3 Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3 201 nt Y e ars Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

: S T A T E

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

High Point* (Colony) High Point, N.C. WHAT’S UP: The end of this term marks the graduation of a large majority of our Founding Fathers. They have given so much to help us grow and improve. FACT: For the first time, 100% of our chapter joined the Sons of the Dragon Club. — Will Trimble ’15, trimbw11@highpoint.edu

3.00

2.72

12

N/A

Idaho (ΓΓ) Moscow, Idaho WHAT’S UP: We posted the highest grades of any Greek organization on campus and also initiated 23 new members. FACT: The chapter was originally founded with the local fraternity name Theta Mu Epsilon. — Colin Cain ’15, cain3566@vandals.uidaho.edu

3.35

2.90

12

14

Illinois* (ΣΡ) Champaign, Ill. WHAT’S UP: The colony is currently ranked second in the academic standings at the University of Illinois. We have participated in numerous on-campus philanthropies and have had great success in them. FACT: Sigma Rho has more than 1,300 living alumni. — Jack Kalanik ’16, jack.kalanik@gmail.com

3.38

3.07

9

N/A

Indiana (Π) Bloomington, Ind. WHAT’S UP: The Pi Chapter won the IFC Leadership Development Award at Indiana University. Furthermore, our Beta Bike team placed in the top 10 in this year’s Little 500. FACT: Founded in 1845, the Pi Chapter was IU’s first fraternity. — Francis M. Zirille ’16, fzirille@gmail.com

3.25

3.03

19

18

Iowa (ΑΒ) Iowa City, Iowa WHAT’S UP: The chapter held “Voices for Veterans,” raising money for veterans living in Johnson County. We also implemented a new Academic Assistance plan. FACT: Summer sunsets with delicate shades can be seen over the Iowa River from the house.— Ryan Steele ’16, ryan-steele@uiowa.edu

2.66

2.86

13

8

Iowa State (ΤΣ) Ames, Iowa WHAT’S UP: We officially moved from “Small” to “Large” house status on campus and got third place in Greek Week. We also raised almost $4,000 for the Special Olympics of Iowa. FACT: Jake Swanson ’14 founded the Bacon Expo at Iowa State. — Matthew Swanson ’14, mjswan92@iastate.edu

2.80

2.87

13

15

John Carroll (ΗΕ) University Heights, Ohio WHAT’S UP: The Eta Epsilon Chapter has taken strides in bettering its brotherhood, increasing self-governance and revamping our recruitment system. FACT: Our brothers completed a total of 450 hours of service in the spring 2014 semester. — Daniel Mascio ’16, dmascio16@jcu.edu

3.16

3.01

21

15

Johns Hopkins (ΑΧ) Baltimore, Md. WHAT’S UP: The chapter hosted the first-ever Blue Jay Tailgate, which saw participation of more than 1,000 undergraduates, which is approximately 20% of the student body. FACT: Nine of the first 16 students to graduate from Johns Hopkins were Betas. — James Koch ’16, jkoch19@jhu.edu

3.47

3.37

19

15

Kansas (ΑΝ) Lawrence, Kan. WHAT’S UP: We completed more than 3,000 hours of community service. One event was a chapter-sponsored 5K run to benefit the KU Hannah & Jayhawk Friends. FACT: The Alpha Nu Chapter was the first fraternity at KU, established in 1873. — Evan Nichols ’16, president.alphanu.btp@gmail.com

3.43

2.94

9

8

Kansas State (ΓΕ) Manhattan, Kan. WHAT’S UP: Gamma Epsilon celebrated it’s centennial year by hosting nearly 500 alumni in Manhattan in April. The celebration included a golf tournament, social gatherings and awards banquet. FACT: The chapter has won 10-straight intramural championships. — Kyle Rieger ’16, Kjrieger@ksu.edu

3.23

2.85

14

19

29/74

14 44

25 84

89 71

54 164

20 47

52 61

18 35

23 72

24 84

27 98

V 25

7

7

N/A

6

N/A

24

5

5

N/A

8

N/A

50

6

8

22

8

6

15

7

7

17

11

10

21

9

9

24

10

7

24

5

6

www.beta.org

39


of the

FF R R A A TT EE R R N N II TT Y Y ::

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e 3 Gra Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3Y 201 n e ars t Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

:: SS TT A A TT EE

Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

40

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

Kentucky (ΕΟ) Lexington, Ky. WHAT’S UP: After a successful Installation, we attended the Greek Awards Banquet and were recognized with 12 awards, including Highest Cumulative GPA. FACT: We are the largest chapter to achieve 100% membership in the Sons of the Dragon Club. — Devon Wilson ’15, devon.wilson@uky.edu

3.48

2.98

58

17

Kenyon (ΒΑ) Gambier, Ohio WHAT’S UP: The chapter added 26 new members, doubling the membership. We held “Save a Puppy, Dunk a Beta” to benefit a local animal shelter. FACT: Built in 1928, the Beta Temple of Kenyon College is one of two Beta Temples in the Fraternity. — Nick Gasbarro ’15, gasbarron@kenyon.edu

3.21

3.27

12

7

Kettering A (ΔΗ) Flint, Mich. WHAT’S UP: For the winter term we decided to try recruitment, which is not typical of fraternities on campus, but we ended up securing a pledge class. FACT: Our chapter goes to school in the summer, which is something no other chapter does. — Cody Grant ’16, gran7276@kettering.edu

3.44

2.99

13

12

Kettering B (ΔΗ) Flint, Mich. WHAT’S UP: We started a project in our community called “Flint Brush Up” where we have gathered students from the different schools and members of the community to clean up Flint. FACT: Everyone in our chapter has a full-time job for half of the year.— Nicholas Foggia ’16, nafoggia@gmail.com

3.42

3.08

23

23

Knox (Ξ) Galesburg, Ill. WHAT’S UP: Our chapter has lead the way in Greek Week this year and even won the school talent show by performing a funny dance to Eric Prydz’s famous song “Call On Me.” FACT: The Xi Chapter was the first fraternity established in the state of Illinois. — Greg Ventris ’15, gventris@knox.edu

2.93

3.06

9

7

Lawrence (ΓΠ) Appleton, Wis. WHAT’S UP: Gamma Pi initiated 15 new members. Our chapter GPA was highest among all fraternities on campus, and was also higher than the campus’ all-men’s average. FACT: The chapter actually started in 1902 as the Beta Sigma Phi fraternity. — August Lawson ’15, august.h.lawson@lawrence.edu

3.15

3.15

9

13

Louisville (ΔΠ) Louisville, Ky. WHAT’S UP: The Delta Pi Chapter raised more than $2,000 through our philanthropy efforts. All proceeds benefitted the Susan G. Komen Foundation for breast cancer research. FACT: Delta Pi has won the last eight Porch of the Year awards. — Nick Ostertag ’15, naoste01@louisville.edu

3.15

2.89

15

13

Loyola Marymount (ΗΑ) Los Angeles, Calif. WHAT’S UP: The Eta Alpha Chapter is back in Good Standing with the General Fraternity. Our chapter’s dedication to the Men of Principle values is as committed as ever. FACT: More than 40% of the chapter will have graduated this past spring. — Taylor Ito ’16, taylorito32@gmail.com

3.27

3.11

10

13

Maine (ΒΗ) Orono, Maine WHAT’S UP: We raised more than $7,500 for Bangor Rape Response Services from our annual Beta Sleepout event. FACT: We are the only Beta chapter in the state, and our house corporation is considered the oldest corporation in Maine. — Jacob Longfellow ’14, jacob.longfellow@umit.maine.edu

2.97

2.88

17

11

Maryland (ΔΩ) College Park, Md. WHAT’S UP: This semester, Delta Omega placed second overall in UMD’s Greek week, and won in skit performances. FACT: Every year, we honor the deceased sister of brother Jon Prezant ’13, by awarding the Stephanie I. Prezant Beta Spirit Award. — Guodong Fu ’15, g_fu25@yahoo.com

3.19

3.07

13

14

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

29/74

39 115

30 50

4 15

12 33

13 43

22 51

27 68

30 100

20 72

22 52

V 25

7

7

46

8

5

11

6

6

6

9

9

10

14

11

14

4

7

18

5

6

32

9

10

33

9

8

25

9

9

18

6

8


of the

F R A T E R N I T Y

*N/A: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. N/R: Data which is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of May 1, 2014. Red: Chapter GPAs that fall below the Fraternity’s minimum chapter GPA of 2.8 or below the campus all mens’ average.

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V

:

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e Gra 3 Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3 201 nt Y e ars Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

: S T A T E

Chapter / Colony

S

E

R

Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

3.19

3.01

13

13

Miami (Fla.) (ΗΒ) Coral Gables, Fla. WHAT’S UP: We raised $11,450 in our philanthropy effort for the Jimmy V Foundation for Cancer Research. We have maintained one of the top three GPAs on campus for five years running. FACT: Our chapter is the southernmost chapter in the Fraternity. — John McIntosh ’16, jackmac7894@gmail.com

3.41

3.20

8

10

Michigan (Λ) Ann Arbor, Mich. WHAT’S UP: In February, we celebrated the chapter’s official Reinstallation ritual and banquet with brothers, alumni, advisors and General Fraternity Officers. FACT: Our newest advisor is the director of the Michigan Marching Band! — David Mertz ’15, drmertz@umich.edu

3.25

3.25

16

12

Michigan State*(ΓΨ) East Lansing, Mich. WHAT’S UP: This past semester, our entire chapter has been focused on preparing to petition for our charter this summer at the 175th General Convention. FACT: For two years running, we’ve had the highest GPA of any fraternity on campus. — Matt Wackerman ’14, wackerm1@msu.edu

3.16

2.98

18

N/A

Minnesota (ΒΠ) Minneapolis, Minn. WHAT’S UP: The Beta Pi Chapter at the University of Minnesota participated in Relay For Life and it was a great success as it raised more than $5,000 for the American Cancer Society. FACT: This year, the chapter is celebrating its 125th year of continuous operation! — Harrison Burton ’14, burt0330@umn.edu

3.17

3.10

22

20

Mississippi (ΒΒ) Oxford, Miss. WHAT’S UP: Beta Beta is looking forward to a great rush in the fall. The brothers are working hard to contact potential new members to explain what our fraternity is about and who we are. FACT: The chapter is one of the Mystic Seven chapters of the Fraternity. — Ian Ford ’15, ipford@go.olemiss.edu

2.56

2.57

12

10

Missouri (ΖΦ) Columbia, Mo. WHAT’S UP: We have topped the IFC in grades for seven consecutive terms, and sent brother Zach Hanson ’14, to the coveted Mizzou 39. FACT: The Zeta Phi Chapter is the oldest fraternity chapter in continuous existence at the University of Missouri. — Kevin Kafoury ’16, KPK535@mail.missouri.edu

3.31

2.95

13

15

Missouri-Kansas City (ΕΛ) Kansas City, Mo. WHAT’S UP: The Epsilon Lambda Chapter showed its appreciation to UMKC faculty and police at its first UMKC Faculty Appreciation Dinner. FACT: We had a 100% acceptance rate into graduate school including medical, pharmacy and dental. — Brandon Kratz ’15, bmkt3c@mail.umkc.edu

3.48

3.09

17

16

MIT* (BΥ) Boston, Mass. WHAT’S UP: This semester, our colony has been pushing towards operating independently and growing both in number and influence on campus. FACT: The house was renovated this past summer, and we couldn’t be more excited to move in next semester! — Luke Verdi ’16, laverdi@mit.edu

3.52

N/R

9

N/A

Nebraska (ΑΤ) Lincoln, Neb. WHAT’S UP: At UNL’s annual Dance Marathon, benefiting Omaha’s Children’s Miracle Hospital, we helped raise more than $10,000 for the kids. FACT: The chapter celebrated its 125th anniversary on the University of Nebraska’s campus in August.— Michael Nordell ’15, mnordell2@yahoo.com

3.46

2.94

20

19

North Carolina (Η) Chapel Hill, N.C. WHAT’S UP: After months of planning, fundraising and construction, the Eta Chapter unveiled a brand new dining hall expansion in January. FACT: At the Eta Chapter, we currently have eight brothers who are legacies. — Chase Furr ’15, Chase_Furr@kenan-flagler.unc.edu

3.24

3.12

21

13

29/74

39 110

17 55

21 54

26 69

48 79

40 155

23 64

13 20

33 95

19 76

V 25

7

7

38

7

7

32

13

9

40

11

N/A

23

10

8

29

8

8

43

6

7

22

6

5

N/A

9

N/A

29

7

8

21

8

7

www.beta.org

41


of the

FF R R A A TT EE R R N N II TT Y Y ::

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e 3 Gra Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3Y 201 n e ars t Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

:: SS TT A A TT EE

Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

42

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

North Dakota (ΓΚ) Grand Forks, N.D. WHAT’S UP: The chapter has continued to grow with younger members making a concerted effort to take on leadership roles. Gamma Kappa has also established a better presence in the community. FACT: The chapter is home to eight licensed pilots. — William Hatfield ’15, williamhatfield@hotmail.com

2.97

2.88

1

9

Northeastern (ΗΖ) Boston, Mass. WHAT’S UP: We were proud to win “Most Improved Chapter” at this year’s FSL awards and look forward to continued growth. FACT: Every semester, we have a “Beta Cookoff” competition where brothers compete in teams to serve up the best dishes. — Terry MacCormack ’15, maccormack.t@husky.neu.edu

3.45

3.21

17

21

Northwestern (Ρ) Evanston, Ill. WHAT’S UP: The Rho Chapter recently learned that Northwestern plans on investing $2.5 million to renovate the chapter house. We couldn’t be more excited! FACT: Our most recent pledge class had two Rho Chapter legacies. — Jesus Echezarreta ’16, jesusechezarreta2016@yahoo.com

3.33

3.40

11

12

Nova Southeastern (ΖΜ) Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. WHAT’S UP: We held our first “Fight Diabetes” event, which raised money by pledging to do physical activity for contributions. We were able to get support from deans, faculty and students. FACT: We are hoping to more than double our chapter size by next year. — Bendik Stenersen ’16, stenersen93@aol.com

3.12

2.92

8

9

Ohio* (BK) Athens, Ohio WHAT’S UP: Beta Kappa raised more than $23,000 for the Wounded Warrior Project, a charity organization that helps troops and wounded veterans. FACT: Beta Kappa is the first and finest fraternal organization at Ohio University. — Harrison Frost ’16, hf672011@ohio.edu

2.88

2.73

14

N/A

Oklahoma (ΓΦ) Norman, Okla. WHAT’S UP: We won the President’s Trophy, an award given to the best fraternity on campus. We also received first place in Sooner Scandals. FACT: The Gamma Phi Chapter is the largest in the fraternity with 192 brothers calling it home. — Jackson Lisle ’15, jackson.lisle@ou.edu

3.26

3.01

20

15

Oklahoma State (ΓΛ) Stillwater, Okla. WHAT’S UP: The chapter placed first in new member grades, overall grades and intramurals. FACT: We have an oak tree in our front yard that was planted from a seed given to a Gamma Lambda Olympic athlete by Adolf Hitler at the 1936 Summer Games in Berlin. — Alex Rindels ’14, alex.rindels@okstate.edu

3.29

2.79

6

9

Oregon (ΒΡ) Eugene, Ore. WHAT’S UP: The Beta Rho Chapter had a spectacular spring term as multiple of our young chapter leaders have fulfilled positions within our student government as well as the IFC. FACT: Beta Rho is the only active Beta chapter in the State of Oregon! — Brody Foster-Cohen ’16, brodyf@uoregon.edu

3.04

2.99

9

13

Pacific* (Colony) Stockton, Calif. WHAT’S UP: We were able to recruit and initiate the largest pledge class on campus, and we swept all of the awards in Tri-Delt’s singing competition philanthropy “Delta Idol.” FACT: The colony has three pairs of brothers in a chapter of 76 members. — Tyler Young ’15, tyoung127@gmail.com

3.14

2.95

17

N/A

Penn State (ΑΥ) State College, Pa. WHAT’S UP: This term, brothers went to Washington, D.C., to help with a fundraising event for “Luke’s Wings,” a non-profit that benefits the Wounded Warrior Project. FACT: We are currently celebrating our 125th year at Penn State. — Jason Klanderman ’15, jyk5389@psu.edu

3.32

2.96

21

23

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

29/74

24 39

15 53

29 84

7 17

29 56

58 192

52 155

33 86

31 76

29 77

V 25

7

7

14

6

6

18

10

10

26

10

6

14

6

6

N/A

8

N/A

56

13

11

53

6

8

34

8

9

N/A

5

8

23

9

14


of the

F R A T E R N I T Y

*N/A: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. N/R: Data which is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of May 1, 2014. Red: Chapter GPAs that fall below the Fraternity’s minimum chapter GPA of 2.8 or below the campus all mens’ average.

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

:

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e Gra 3 Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3 201 nt Y e ars Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

: S T A T E

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

Pennsylvania (Φ) Philadelphia, Pa. WHAT’S UP: Our annual charity concert was a huge success. We raised more than $10,000 for the Philadelphia Police Athletic League and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. FACT: We were one of three pilot chapters for the Men of Principle initiative. — Daniel Zuvia ’15, zuvia@sas.upenn.edu

3.37

3.39

8

9

Pittsburgh* (Colony) Pittsburgh, Pa. WHAT’S UP: Our colony had a great first year on campus. Three brothers were voted onto the University Student Government Board, including president. FACT: We wrote and performed original songs for every mixer, a tradition we hope to continue. — Ron Reha ’15, rer48@pitt.edu

3.53

3.04

9

N/A

Puget Sound* (ΔE) Tacoma, Wash. WHAT’S UP: Beta is back at Puget Sound, and it feels great to wear the letters once again! The newly-formed bonds of brotherhood are growing stronger every day. FACT: In September, our chapter house will be 50 years old! — Ryan Del Rosario ’15, rdelrosario@pugetsound.edu

3.30

N/R

8

N/A

Quinnipiac* (Colony) Hamden, Conn. WHAT’S UP: The highlight of our year was placing second in Greek Week. We were partnered with the ladies of Alpha Delta Pi. FACT: Our colony initiated 39 Founding Fathers from various backgrounds and upbringings. — Andrew Bouchahine ’15, Aebouchahine@quinnipiac.edu

3.23

3.05

8

N/A

Saint Louis (ΖΤ) Saint Louis, Mo. WHAT’S UP: The Zeta Tau Chapter had a great year, exemplified by the 13 individual and chapter-wide awards won at SLU’s Order of Omega Ceremony. FACT: There are seven brothers with families currently living outside of the United States. — Jacob Berry ’15, jberry17@slu.edu

3.33

3.06

12

14

San Diego (ΖΩ) San Diego, Calif. WHAT’S UP: We celebrated our 10th year on campus with the annual Beta Toast. In attendance were actives, parents and many Founding Fathers. FACT: We have won the Dean’s Trophy for best fraternity on campus three years running. — Kevin O’Reilly ’15, koreilly@sandiego.edu

3.38

3.11

24

29

San Jose State (ΖΗ) San Jose, Calif. WHAT’S UP: Zeta Eta has connected with multiple alumni, and we are proud to say that we have a full advisory team working with the chapter. FACT: Our brotherhood is unique through our diverse mixture of ethnicity and culture. — Justin De Castro ’15, decastro_justin@yahoo.com

2.94

N/R

9

12

Sewanee (ΓΧ) Sewanee, Tenn. WHAT’S UP: We have the second highest GPA of all fraternities, which includes the GPAs of our 10 new members. We also won the 5 vs. 5 basketball intramural championship. FACT: This year our chapter has won all but one intramural sport offered. — Param Singh ’16, Singhp0@sewanee.edu

3.26

3.03

5

7

SMU (ΓΩ) Dallas, Texas WHAT’S UP: From having the highest fraternity GPA and a new member education program with a 100% retention rate to winning intramurals, we had a great year. FACT: Our basketball court is the largest Beta flag in the country. — Tyler Friske ’15, tcfriske@smu.edu

3.21

3.07

13

17

South Carolina (Υ) Columbia, S.C. WHAT’S UP: The Upsilon Chapter had the top GPA in the IFC. For the second time in three years, we were crowned Homecoming champions. It’s been an awesome year! FACT: We are the oldest active chapter at the University of South Carolina. — Chirag Challa ’15, SCbetapresident@gmail.com

3.41

3.04

16

18

29/74

20 74

55 52

42 38

49 39

41 119

32 105

14 33

13 41

34 117

56 144

V 25

7

7

22

4

1

N/A

9

N/A

N/A

11

N/A

N/A

8

N/A

38

9

7

36

7

7

14

8

6

17

6

3

33

5

5

42

7

8

www.beta.org

43


of the

FF R R A A TT EE R R N N II TT Y Y ::

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e 3 Gra Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3Y 201 n e ars t Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

:: SS TT A A TT EE

Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

44

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

South Dakota (ΓΑ) Vermillion, S.D. WHAT’S UP: At the recent Order of Omega Greek Awards banquet three brothers won awards, making Beta one of the most decorated houses at the event. FACT: Several Betas were part of the Summit League Indoor Track and Field Champion team. — Aaron Riswold ’15, Aaron.Riswold@coyotes.usd.edu

3.18

3.03

20

15

Southern California (ΓΤ) Los Angeles, Calif. WHAT’S UP: The Gamma Tau Chapter has taken philanthropy to heart. Over the past year, we have raised more than $20,000 for the Movember Foundation and Swim with Mike. FACT: Our members are involved in more than 75 different campus organizations. — Aaron Goldwyn ’15, aarongoldwyn@gmail.com

3.34

N/R

12

17

Southern Illinois (ΖΟ) Carbondale, Ill. WHAT’S UP: We held our second annual “Beta Theta Pi-athon” and raised more than $1,000 for Relay For Life. We also have five great seniors graduating, and wish them the best of luck! FACT: We are the oldest inter/ national fraternity at SIU. — Zack Fahey ’15, Zack_fahey@yahoo.com

2.83

2.77

9

10

St. Lawrence (ΒΖ) Canton, N.Y. WHAT’S UP: Our alumni have raised nearly $500,000 to make vast improvements to our Temple on campus. We are looking forward to the renovations! FACT: Our chapter is on track to move back into a full house in fall 2015. — Tucker Stockman ’15, ztstoc11@stlawu.edu

3.22

3.06

7

8

Stevens (Σ) Hoboken, N.J. WHAT’S UP: We have been especially active on campus this semester with more brothers involved in more organizations and parts of campus life than ever before. FACT: We are entering our 135th consecutive year as a chapter! — Carrick Porter ’16, Carrickoconnorporter@gmail.com

3.16

3.23

15

15

TCU* (Colony) Fort Worth, Texas WHAT’S UP: We finished first in GPA for the IFC community and tied for first with 15 4.0 GPAs. Cody Westphal ’15, was re-elected as student body president. FACT: We are working to charter at the 175th in Oxford while Founding Fathers are still around. — Michael Ridings ’15, m.ridings@tcu.edu

3.42

2.96

17

N/A

Tennessee (ΔΚ) Knoxville, Tenn. WHAT’S UP: This semester, we had our first Delta Kappa Chapter alumni dinner. We also placed second overall in Greek Week. FACT: Our chapter participates in a ritual that only one other chapter in the world does. — David Snapp ’16, dsnapp2@utk.edu

2.84

2.90

6

10

Texas A&M (ΕΗ) College Station, Texas WHAT’S UP: We won the IFC Chapter of the Year award at the Aggie Greek Awards Banquet. We also held “Beta Round Up,” a philanthropy benefiting the United Service Organizations (USO). FACT: Our chapter meets in a barn, not a house. — Banner Long ’15, banner_long@yahoo.com

2.98

2.78

12

14

Texas A&M-CC (ΖΡ) Corpus Christi, Texas WHAT’S UP: The Zeta Rho Chapter is proud to announce it won the Homecoming Spirit Award! FACT: Our chapter is regarded as the “Country” fraternity because we have a lot of members who hunt regularly. — Michael Greene ’15, mikegreene2010@yahoo.com

2.44

2.57

10

10

Texas at Arlington (ΔΡ) Arlington, Texas WHAT’S UP: We achieved first place in semester GPA in the IFC for the third consecutive semester. We were also first in grades for the whole Greek community. FACT: This year, we were the first chapter to get 100% participation in the Sons of the Dragon Club. — Luis Mora ’14, luis.mora@mavs.uta.edu

3.17

2.76

18

12

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

29/74

31 47

37 126

17 28

27 61

13 43

37 133

13 22

40 112

13 26

11 24

V 25

7

7

21

9

9

40

8

7

14

9

6

23

6

3

9

8

7

N/A

7

N/A

8

5

5

30

8

6

17

9

7

14

8

5


of the

F R A T E R N I T Y

*N/A: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. N/R: Data which is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of May 1, 2014. Red: Chapter GPAs that fall below the Fraternity’s minimum chapter GPA of 2.8 or below the campus all mens’ average.

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V

:

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e Gra 3 Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3 201 nt Y e ars Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

: S T A T E

Chapter / Colony

S

E

R

Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

3.19

3.01

13

13

Toronto (ΘΖ) Toronto, Ont. WHAT’S UP: The past semester has been nothing short of successful for Theta Zeta, as it won the Fraternity-wide Greek Olympics, a combination of many different sports and outdoor events. FACT: Theta Zeta is the first and longest standing Canadian chapter. — William Baric ’15, billy.baric@mail.utoronto.ca

3.03

2.70

1

10

Truman State (ΖΞ) Kirksville, Mo. WHAT’S UP: We welcomed more than 30 alumni back to Kirksville for our Spring Alumni Weekend and raised hundreds for charity in Greek Week. FACT: The chapter has recorded a higher GPA than every other fraternity on campus for the past 13 years. — Jake Ohlhausen ’15, jao2871@truman.edu

3.37

3.07

23

18

UC Irvine (ΔΣ) Irvine, Calif. WHAT’S UP: We began the year with 25 active members and have essentially doubled in chapter size within a year’s time. FACT: The popular “Building Men Θf PriΠciple” slogan was created by then VP of Recruitment Alejandro Lomeli ’12, in 2011. — Freddy Vega ’15, Freddycvega0624@gmail.com

3.01

2.96

10

8

UC San Diego* (ZΓ) San Diego, Calif. WHAT’S UP: We were able to reach the average chapter size of fraternities on our campus the fastest of any previous colonization. Continuing to build on our strong brotherhood is our ongoing priority. FACT: By next year, the Miami Triad will be complete at UCSD. — Wesley Calove ’15, wcalove@ucsd.edu

3.30

3.03

8

N/A

UC Santa Barbara (ΕΠ) Santa Barbara, Calif. WHAT’S UP: We are proud to say that more than 80% of our chapter completed 20 hours of community service per person this last term. FACT: The Epsilon Pi Chapter is the longest running fraternity at UCSB and is celebrating its 25th anniversary. — Roberto Pregadio ’16, Roberto.pregadio@yahoo.com

3.15

3.02

10

9

UCLA (ΓΝ) Los Angeles, Calif. WHAT’S UP: This year, we placed first out of the 20 other fraternities on campus to receive the award for highest functioning fraternity on campus. FACT: More than 600 men came through the house on the first day of rush, a UCLA record. — Christopher Long ’15, clong7@sbcglobal.net

3.36

3.19

18

18

Utah* (ΓB) Salt Lake City, Utah WHAT’S UP: Our Philanthropy Week raised more than $2,000 for the Rape Recovery Center, and we hope to continue our partnership with this incredible organization. FACT: We won the University of Utah’s Greek Week for the second time in three years. — Mitchell Cox ’15, mitchell.allan.cox@gmail.com

3.43

2.98

21

N/A

Vanderbilt (ΒΛ) Nashville, Tenn. WHAT’S UP: The chapter held the fourth annual “Celebration of Life: A Tribute to Kyle Craig.” In its four-year history, the event has raised almost $100,000 (see more on page 17.) FACT: The fathers of two of our members are Colgate University Betas. — Jay Reynolds ’16, jay.p.reynolds@vanderbilt.edu

3.27

3.35

1

12

Villanova (ΖΕ) Villanova, Pa. WHAT’S UP: This semester, we recruited a pledge class of 16, raising our numbers to a total of 62 members. FACT: For our philanthropy, “Ducky Races,” we race rubber ducks down our quad. We raised around $4,000 for the United Cerebral Palsy of Philadelphia — Dominic Cifelli ’15, Dcifell1@villanova.edu

3.35

3.27

7

8

Virginia (Ο) Charlottesville, Va. WHAT’S UP: Last semester, we were given an award for having the top GPA, not only in the fraternity community, but out of the entire Greek system. FACT: Our chapter currently has the son of our chapter advisor in it. — Kevin Whitehead ’15, krw4zr@virginia.edu

3.54

3.18

6

12

29/74

15 37

32 95

26 50

68 60

27 130

42 122

41 102

22 85

23 62

22 83

V 25

7

7

13

5

7

26

4

5

26

5

6

N/A

10

N/A

53

2

2

51

6

5

N/A

8

N/A

26

4

4

22

5

5

26

7

6

www.beta.org

45


of the

FF R R A A TT EE R R N N II TT Y Y ::

*N/A: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. N/R: Data which is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of May 1, 2013. Red: Chapter GPAs that fall below the Fraternity’s minimum chapter GPA of 2.8 or below the campus all mens’ average.

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e 3 Gra Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3Y 201 n e ars t Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

:: SS TT A A TT EE

Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

46

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

Virginia Tech (ΑΦ) Blacksburg, Va. WHAT’S UP: The Alpha Phi Chapter is celebrating another year of having the highest GPA out of all campus fraternities. FACT: Every year we celebrate the accomplishments of our graduating seniors at our brotherhood event known as “Betastock.” — Matthew Donaldson ’15, emd724@vt.edu

3.30

3.05

9

17

Wabash (Τ) Crawfordsville, Ind. WHAT’S UP: The Tau Chapter held a couple of big brotherhood events in which the house went to local hockey games. FACT: The Tau Chapter was founded just 14 years after the opening of Wabash College, making it the oldest fraternity on campus. — Zachary Mahone ’15, zjmahone15@wabash.edu

3.11

3.01

15

19

Washington (ΒΩ) Seattle, Wash. WHAT’S UP: For four out of the last five terms, we’ve finished first in grades out of the campus’ 32 fraternities. Last term, more than half of our members were on the Dean’s List (3.5+ GPA). FACT: We have members on the UW football, basketball, crew and lacrosse team. — Tom Gebert ’16, tjgebert@uw.edu

3.43

3.18

23

27

Washington & Jefferson (Γ) Washington, Pa. WHAT’S UP: We raised $590 for the American Cancer Society during our Beta Swim Marathon, where every dollar paid by members of the student body meant a brother had to swim a lap. FACT: We are the longest-continually running chapter in Beta. — Danny Walters ’15, waltersdj@jay.washjeff.edu

3.02

2.92

8

10

Washington and Lee (ΑΡ) Lexington, Va. WHAT’S UP: The Alpha Rho Chapter initiated 20 new members this past semester. We couldn’t be more excited for our new brothers! FACT: Our chapter has brothers on five different varsity sports teams. — Nick Peacher ’15, peachern15@mail.wlu.edu

3.27

3.32

2

12

Washington in St. Louis (ΑΙ) St. Louis, Mo. WHAT’S UP: We initiated a pledge class of 30 men. Our chapter won the Grade Cup with an overall chapter GPA of 3.58, beating the all men’s average. FACT: Our chapter has members who speak more than 15 languages. — Jakob Leonard ’15, jake.leonard015@gmail.com

3.58

3.42

10

20

Washington State (ΓΘ) Pullman, Wash. WHAT’S UP: We surpassed attendance at previous philanthropies both internally and within our Greek community. FACT: This year, Taylor Hennessey ’14, served as the president of the Associated Students of Washington State University. — Garrett Boger ’15, garrett.bogar@wsu.edu

3.14

2.88

19

12

Wesleyan (ΜΕ) Middletown, Conn. WHAT’S UP: We helped the university organize “Take Back the Night,” a supportive sexual assault survivor event. FACT: The Mystic Seven Society was founded at Wesleyan University in 1837, and later merged with Beta Theta Pi in 1889. — Matt Gross ’15, mbgross@wesleyan.edu

N/R

N/R

5

5

West Virginia (ΒΨ) Morgantown, W. Va. WHAT’S UP: This semester, 20 fraternities competed in seven different philanthropies. We took home three out of seven championships with a trip to the finals in another. FACT: For more than a century, our chapter has been a strong symbol of Beta Theta Pi. — Richard Schultz ’15, rjschultz@mix.wvu.edu

2.42

2.75

1

13

Westminster (ΑΔ) Fulton, Mo. WHAT’S UP: Our intramural team has been experiencing a lot of success and we are poised to win overall. FACT: We are the oldest chapter west of the Mississippi that hasn’t been recolonized. — David McDermott ’15, DMcDermott.15@westminster-mo.edu

3.10

3.02

25

15

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

29/74

48 113

25 71

32 135

15 40

20 63

39 115

26 65

13 55

38 81

13 57

V 25

7

7

31

8

7

20

8

8

32

8

9

14

6

4

18

9

10

30

7

10

23

10

10

17

5

5

29

5

6

18

6

7


of the

*N/A: Data may appear unique or may not apply given this school’s re/colonization during the last three years. N/R: Data which is not tracked by institutions or was unreported by chapters as of May 1, 2014. Red: Chapter GPAs that fall below the Fraternity’s minimum chapter GPA of 2.8 or below the campus all mens’ average.

: Self-Governance = S, Education = E, Recruitment = R and Volunteers = V Chapter / Colony

S Summary of All-Beta Chapter/Colony Performance

E

R

3.19

3.01

13

13

Whitman (ΓΖ) Walla Walla, Wash. WHAT’S UP: This term, we revived our advisory board which now consists of a very involved and interested group of community members. FACT: Our chapter sang its way to victory, securing the Whitman Choral Contest Cup for yet another year. — Nate Dorlac ’16, dorlacnt@whitman.edu

N/R

3.39

8

4

Wichita State (ΔΓ) Wichita, Kan. WHAT’S UP: Our chapter initiated 21 new members into the Fraternity, and recruitment will continue to be our primary focus this summer. FACT: Our chapter’s 55th Founders’ Day is on November 15th, 2014. Dan Carney ’63, will receive the Oxford Cup. — Tyler Pennick ’15, typennick@gmail.com

2.88

2.84

19

13

William & Mary (ΖΥ) Willamsburg, Va. WHAT’S UP: Betas currently serve as the president of the student body (second Beta in a row to hold this position), president of the finance academy, president of the junior class, and more. FACT: Beta is currently the largest chapter on the W&M campus. — Stuart Veal ’15, seveal@email.wm.edu

3.25

3.19

7

14

Wisconsin (ΑΠ) Madison, Wis. WHAT’S UP: Through comprehensive work with alumni and our advisory board, we have improved the way we function as an executive board and as a chapter. FACT: Founded in 1873, our chapter is the longest-standing chapter in continuous existence on campus. — CJ Savage ’15, cjsavage72@gmail.com

2.95

3.19

11

10

Wisconsin-Oshkosh (ΖΖ) Oshkosh, Wis. WHAT’S UP: We have been nominated for a community service award through the city of Oshkosh for our extraordinary efforts with the Christine Ann Domestic Abuse Center. FACT: We will attempt to break a world record later this year. — Forrest Buck ’14, buckf79@uwosh.edu

2.91

2.84

10

15

Wittenberg (ΑΓ) Springfield, Ohio WHAT’S UP: We have worked on streamlining our meetings, making communication clear and open in the chapter. FACT: For the fifth time in the last six semesters, we have had the highest GPA of all fraternities on campus. — Aeron Roach ’15, roacha@wittenberg.edu

3.33

2.79

10

14

WPI* (Colony) Worcester, Mass. WHAT’S UP: We raised $1,142 via our weeklong Teeter-Totter-a-Thon event, benefitting diabetes and cancer research. FACT: The colony has 18 members who are either international students or of foreign descent. — Tusher Narayan ’15, tushernayaran@gmail.com

3.47

3.27

13

N/A

RECOMMEND A YOUNG MAN OF PRINCIPLE beta.org/recommend

:

F R A T E R N I T Y

201 Po 3 Gra int Ave de rag 201 e Gra 3 Ca de mpu Po int s All-M Ave rag ale 201 e Pro 3-14 gra Lea ms der Att s Avg end hip Du . Ann anc ring ua e l Pre Atte vio n us danc 3 201 Yea e rs & T 3-14 ota Tot a lC hap l Men Avg ter Siz Pledg Du . Ann e (5 ed ring ua /20 Pre l Rec /14 vio r ) us uitme 3 201 nt Y e ars Act 3-14 N ive Ad umbe vis ors r of Avg Du . Acti ring ve Pre Advi vio sor s us 3Y ear s

: S T A T E

29/74

14 38

39 63

30 91

8 26

22 43

14 50

17 56

V 25

7

7

19

12

5

28

7

6

25

6

5

8

4

4

14

4

5

20

6

6

N/A

8

N/A

With a mission to develop men of principle for a principled life, the Fraternity seeks gentlemen, leaders and scholars who are excited about doing fraternity the right way. If you know of a young man who exhibits the qualities of a Beta, recommend him at beta.org/recommend. www.beta.org

47


MYSTIC SHRINE

in loving MEMORY

Honor your brothers and friends with a memorial gift to the Beta Theta Pi Foundation and consider asking loved ones to name the Beta Leadership Fund in your obituary: www.beta.org/gift Requesting loved ones to donate your Beta badge and important Beta artifacts and documents to the Administrative Office archives and museum in Oxford is always gratefully appreciated.

Alabama Carl P. Parsons Jr. ’72, Feb. 16

Dartmouth Clifford M. Roberts Jr. ’42, Feb. 20

Amherst Theodore G. Mixer ’50, April 1 C

Denison John T. Allan ’42, Feb. 20

Auburn James L. Hill ’88, March 22

Denver William R. Jones ’40, Feb. 13 J S. Moore ’50, Aug. 9, 2012

Bethany Theo Christman ’52, March 26 C William M. Sutton ’61, Feb. 7 C Bowdoin Donald F. Mortland ’50, Feb. 27 C Carnegie Mellon William R. Weborg ’71, April 1 Case Rodman F. Duncan ’66, May 1, 2013 Cincinnati Keith E. Eastin Jr. ’63, Jan. 3 George P. Sellers ’50, Feb. 3 James E. Steinway ’49, Feb. 17 Colorado College William J. Peters ’54, March 8 Colorado Mines James E. Curzon ’53, March 18 C Arthur F. Hewitt Jr ’46, Oct. 13, 2013 C Columbia Charles “Frank” Faddis ’53, April 25 Richard J. Stepcick ’59, Jan. 29 C Cornell Roger L. Corbett ’51, July 7, 2013 Frederick T. Gutz ’56, March 8 C John D. Moores Jr. ’60, Dec. 24, 2013 David D. Peterson ’53, Jan. 30 Phillip M. St Clair ’53, Nov. 28, 2013 Francis T. Stadelberger ’67, April 1, 2013 Theodore W. Welles ’51, April 24, 2013

48

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

DePauw Richard H. Fitzpatrick ’69, Feb. 6 Myron M. Nichols, MD ’42, Feb. 18 Edwin F. Snider ’42, Feb. 13 Dickinson Wallace L. Pelton ’56, March 28 Florida Robert E. Boardman ’50, Feb. 3 C John G. Riley Jr. ’74, Feb. 5 George Washington Benjamin Asma ’17, April 2 Georgia Tech Richard L. Clements II ’42, Feb. 20 James D. Kirkpatrick ’56, Jan. 4 Hanover David B. Johnston ’55, Feb. 21 Illinois Deane R. Stewart ’50, Feb. 9 C Wayne E. Thomas ’53, Feb. 24 Indiana Duke D. Fisher ’61, Jan. 28 Dixon L. Hughes ’51, June 13, 2013 David M. Link ’87, April 22 John M. McLaughlin ’67, Jan. 1, 2012 Carrol V. Perkins ’51, Jan. 1 Iowa Norris S. Gould ’50, April 19, 2013 Carlos F. Serrato ’07, Feb. 3


MYSTIC SHRINE

Iowa State Frank W. Griffith ’47, Sept. 7, 2013 John J. Hollowell ’49, July 18, 2013 Richard A. Rowlands ’40, Jan. 2, 2012 C Bruce H. VanDruff ’42, Feb. 26 Kansas Howard E. Gard, MD ’53, April 13 C Marchlin K. McCune ’57, March 13 Kansas State Norville R. Gish ’47, March 4 C Stephen D. Nelson ’65, Jan. 15 David Pfuetze ’58, Nov. 6, 2013 C Lawrence William G. Diver ’42, Feb. 25 Lehigh Louis T. Girdler ’41, Feb. 13 James L. Horning ’55, April 18 C William N. Packard ’48, June 28, 2012

Northwestern Everett L. Curtis ’49, Aug. 22, 2013 Ohio John W. Cox Jr. ’49, June 9, 2013 Thomas E. Eslocker ’73, March 24 Ohio State Robert W. Beatty, MD ’63, March 2 C Harold W. Burdekin ’42, Feb. 13 John B. Decker ’51, March 15 Robert W. Parmenter ’49, Feb. 18 Ohio Wesleyan William M. Robinson ’49, Feb. 8, 2013 Oklahoma Robert W. Baker Jr. ’53, Feb. 4 C William R. Broach ’58, April 29 C Harry L. Brown ’53, March 31

Oklahoma State Richard N. Knoblock ’46, April 18 Maine James M. Pearson ’55, March 21 John W. Comstock ’71, Feb. 26 C Michael R. Raines ’96, Feb. 7 George K. Keiner ’57, Dec. 7, 2013 Gregory R. Stump ’79, Feb. 3 Lester J. Tarbell ’38, Feb. 11, 2012 John M. Waggoner ’75, Dec. 5, 2013 Miami Robert H. Biehn ’60, April 26 Thomas A. Collins, DDS ’64, March 27 C John E. Dolibois ’42, May 2 Raymond A. Gates ’66, Feb. 9 C James T. Howell, MD ’41, Jan. 14 C Frank H. Oram ’38, Oct. 28, 2013 Richard D. Rieke ’58, May 14, 2013 James E. Swaim ’68, Feb. 7 Michigan J. D. McCalmont ’43, Dec. 9, 2013 Michigan State John N. Bissinger ’55, Feb. 16 Missouri Ralph C. Hook Jr. ’47, Jan. 18 C Jim A. Jackson ’49, Feb. 17 C Conger R. Weightman ’60, Feb. 27 MIT Donald P. Kahn ’46, Aug. 10, 2013 Richard H. Sanders ’34, Jan. 7, 2013 Michael J. Wargo ’73, Aug. 4, 2013 Nebraska Robert L. Hinrichs ’60, May 11, 2012 John P. Jacupke ’77, June 27, 2013 Paul C. Jessen ’74, Feb. 14, 2012 Louis M. Meyer ’41, Feb. 14

Oregon Patrick J. Groff ’50, April 2 George R. Kilborn ’42, Jan. 14, 2012 Cecil E. Walter Jr ’45, Feb. 10 C Penn State John E. Ruane ’64, Feb. 27

Benjamin Asma GEORGE WASHINGTON ’17 A first-year honors student majoring in bio-medical engineering and pre-med, Ben passed away on April 2 at the age of 19. Found unconscious in his residence hall room after an apparent suicide attempt, Ben was kept on a ventilator as his parents wanted his organs donated to help others “find miracles.” Friends and family described him as a compassionate and kind person with a contagious smile.

Edward Friedrichs C W&J ’52 Former Vice President on the Fraternity’s Board of Trustees, Ed passed away peacefully at home on April 8, with his Beta Sweetheart Ruth Ann at his side after returning from Bible study at Fellowship Presbyterian Church. Ed served as an officer in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict, and later was employed by Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation for 37 years.

Pennsylvania Ward S. Becker Jr. ’41, Feb. 13 C John A. Bosman ’42, Feb. 13 Purdue George F. Haase ’52, April 8 C Roger W. Pocock ’46, Feb. 20 SMU Hudson D. Weichsel ’57, Aug. 7, 2013 South Dakota Kenneth E. Relf ’42, Dec. 21, 2013 C Robert G. Tillman ’74, March 17 Steven R. Wendling ’75, March 18 St. Lawrence Roderick A. Baird, II ’73, Feb. 4, 2013 Peter E. Van de Water ’58, April 29 Stevens John M. Whelan ’41, March 4 Syracuse Gerard D. Phillips Jr. ’50, April 6 C

North Carolina Robert W. Little, MD ’68, April 5

Flags indicate those who have served in the United States or Canadian armed forces.

“They rest, they sleep the dreamless sleep! While cycles move, but in our hearts eternally we keep their faith and love.”

www.beta.org

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MYSTIC SHRINE

Texas Fredrick S. Black March III ’54, March 29 J. C. Dougherty III ’37, Feb. 20 Richard S. Freeman ’77, April 14 Jack Hensley ’57, April 23 C Arthur E. Moers Jr. ’64, Dec. 20, 2013 Claude H. Montgomery II ’51, Feb. 27 Arthur Newton ’37, March 26 C Marchshall H. Pengra Jr. ’58, April 10 C

Virginia Robert N. Davids ’60, March 31

Tulane Robert Bernhard Jr. ’50, Jan. 25 C Frank D. Montague Jr. ’50, Dec. 22, 2013 C Lee F. Murphy Jr. ’45, Feb. 11 C F. C. Parkerson ’52, Feb. 2 C

Washington and Lee Richard E. Bartlebaugh ’47, March 23 Ray V. Hartwell III ’69, Feb. 7 C

UCLA Charles S. Bailey ’47, Nov. 18, 2013 Robert J. Thomas ’43, March 14 C

Wabash Warden D. Harms ’42, Feb. 13 Washington Stephen M. Chase ’67, July 10, 2012 C Washington & Jefferson Edward C. Friedrichs ’52, April 8 C

Washington in St. Louis Terrell Covington Jr. ’40, April 13 Robert L. Harmon ’49, April 20 Clifford G. Jordan ’60, April 12 C

Washington State Union D. C. Brockway Jr. ’71, April 10 C Robert H. Hochuli ’53, Feb. 24 C Wesleyan Theodore J. Mattle ’55, Jan. 17 Richard W. Leighton ’42, June 29, 2012 C Utah West Virginia David B. Dee ’44, Jan. 28 C George L. Dolin, DDS ’47, March 24 C Vanderbilt Sidney H. Gillis ’49, Feb. 5 C Todd A. Powell ’89, Sept. 7, 2013 Robert B. Orders ’54, April 22 C Jack Whiteaker ’51, April 9 C

Westminster John A. Henry ’56, April 10 C Ralph E. Schulenburg ’42, Feb. 13 Jeremiah H. Wyatt ’41, May 3, 2012 C Whitman Richard C. Powell ’58, March 2 Willamette David S. Barrows ’57, March 15 C Larry I. Voth ’71, Oct. 11, 2012 Wittenberg Jeffrey K. Kimpel ’68, Feb. 5 James S. Yeager ’62, Nov. 24, 2013 Yale Philip W. Farley ’42, Feb. 13 Robert P. Masland ’42, Feb. 20 This listing includes Beta’s whose passing was reported between Feb. 1 and May 5. Contact Phyllis Bowie at 800.800.BETA or phyllis.bowie@beta.org to report a brother’s passing or for assistance locating an obituary.

John Dolibois C

Bob Thomas

Peter E. Van de Water

MIAMI ’42

UCLA ’43

ST. LAWRENCE ’58

Former U.S. Ambassador to Luxembourg and Oxford Cup honoree, John Dolibois passed on May 2 at the age of 95. Initiated as one of Alpha’s “eight earnest young men” at Beta’s Centennial Celebration in 1939, John served as Alpha Chapter president, in the U.S. Army, and as one of five lead intelligence officers who interrogated top-ranking Nazi war criminals for the Nuremberg Trials. At the conclusion of his 34-year tenure as Miami’s first alumni director, he was appointed Ambassador to Luxembourg by United States President Ronald Reagan.

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Western Reserve Robert A. Kerckhoff ’39, Feb. 8 John J. Pallam ’62, March 1 Victor J. Robison ’42, Jan. 13, 2013 C

THE BETA THETA PI SUMMER 2014

An American Hollywood film industry biographer and reporter, Bob died on March 14 at the age of 92. Covering a record 66 Oscar Ceremonies during his tenure with the Associated Press, the Publicists Guild awarded Bob its Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. In 1988, Bob became the first reporter-author awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Thomas is survived by his wife of 67 years, Patricia; daughters Nancy Thomas, Janet Thomas and Caroline Thomas; and three grandchildren.

Former General Fraternity President (1981-84), Peter passed away on April 30. Of Van de Water, current St. Lawrence University President and Beta Dr. Bill Fox ’75 said: “For St. Lawrence University, one of its giant oaks has fallen.” Sharing close personal relationships with legendary St. Lawrence Beta leaders like Dr. Seth R. Brooks ’22, Dr. Joe Romoda ’33, and Dr. Allen Splete ’60, Van de Water served his university in a litany of professional capacities for more than 20 years, eventually as vice president of student affairs.

Flags indicate those who have served in the United States or Canadian armed forces.


BRIDGE BUILDER

I’ll never forget New Year’s Day 1963. My 22-year-old brother, a member of the Air Force, died unexpectedly. Six weeks later, as I tried to move on, I pledged the Alpha Chapter. Though I had just lost my brother, I quickly gained many new ones.

The Bridge Builder An old man going a lone highway came in the evening, cold and gray, to a chasm vast, both deep and wide,

PETE BARNHART, MIAMI ’66

through which was flowing a sullen tide.

In my time of need, the Alpha Chapter took me under its wing while demonstrating true “Men of Principle” ideals. Further, I gained incredible mentors, including, Seth R. Brooks, St. Lawrence ’22, and former Administrative Secretaries Ralph N. Fey, Miami ’40, and Frederick F. Brower, Miami ’50. These men helped shape me into the man I am today.

The old man crossed in the twilight dim;

I was so inspired by my Beta experience that in 1972, following service in the U. S. Air Force, I became the Fraternity’s fourth administrative secretary. I was dedicated to giving back to the fraternity that had given me so much. My time as administrative secretary may be over, but I am as proud a member of Beta as ever and want to continue helping undergraduates by doing my part to provide them with the many outstanding leadership training programs and scholarships Beta currently offers. The inclusion of the Fraternity in our estate planning was an obvious choice for my wife Judy and me. We encourage you to give back by joining the Bridge Builder Society and ensure undergraduates, present and future, enjoy a life-changing fraternity experience just like the one I had. — Peter W.C. Barnhart, Miami ’66, pwcbbanana@gmail.com Pete graduated as a Distinguished Military Graduate in AFROTC with a degree in business. After serving in the Air Force and working for the Fraternity, he had a 29-year career with National City Bank in Columbus, Ohio. In 2012, he was awarded the Fraternity’s Shepardson Award. Pete and Judy (a member and former international president of Delta Gamma Fraternity) divide their time between Worthington, Ohio and Sarasota, Fla.

the swollen stream was as naught to him; but he stopped when safe on the farther side, and built a bridge to span the tide. “Old man,” said a fellow pilgrim near, “you are wasting your strength in labor here; your journey will end with the closing day, you never again will pass this way. You’ve crossed the chasm deep and wide; why build you this bridge at eventide?” The laborer lifted his old gray head, “Good friend, in the path I have come,” he said, “There followeth after me today, a youth whose feet must pass this way. This chasm which has been naught to me, to that young man may a pitfall be. He, too, must cross in the twilight dim. Good friend, I am building this bridge for him.” — Miss Will Allen Dromgoole


Beta Theta Pi Foundation & Administrative Office Brennan Hall PO Box 6277 5134 Bonham Road Oxford, Ohio 45056 www.beta.org

175ANNIVERSARY TH

BETA THETA PI

AND GENERAL CONVENTION A Celebration of Lifelong Fraternal Brotherhood

“My first convention was 50 years ago, the 125th, and now this year is my 45th, some 40 of them in a row. How well I remember that very first one, so many great Betas. I recall the plaque dedication vividly, and again the next dedication at the 150th. In just eight weeks, we’ll gather at the Shrine and sing a song of Wooglin — and raise our glasses high!” ­— Tom Lipton, Western Reserve ’63 Above: Tom speaks with Phillip W. Morris, Wittenberg ’40, former district chief and vice president, at the 125th General Convention in 1964.

175TH BETA THETA PI ANNIVERSARY AND GENERAL CONVENTION August 7-10, 2014 | Oxford, Ohio | beta.org/convention

The Beta Theta Pi Magazine - Summer 2014  

Darkening of the Hall (p. 12), 64 Things You (Probably Didn't Know About Beta (p. 22), and State of the Fraternity and Chapter Reports (p. 3...