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BETA THETA PI M

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10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

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MEN OF PRINCIPLE


vo l u n t e e r SHARE IN THE WORK

“I was reminded that most of the great successes our Fraternity celebrates have been fueled largely by excellent leadership and the Beta spirit in chapters across Beta’s broad domain.” Nate Deno

Chapter Counselor

Professional:

6SIGMA Group Manager, Target Corporation

Alma Mater:

University of Minnesota

Degree(s):

2001 - Bachelor of Business Administration

Hobbies:

Sports, outdoor activities, woodworking

When asked to contribute this article, I struggled with why I deserved such an honor. I have never worked for our Fraternity as a leader; I have not served as a General Fraternity officer and have largely been involved only at the chapter level.

to have a wonderful chapter of talented young men. However, the strength of our advisory team has allowed us to challenge complacency when necessary, and weather storms that may have otherwise derailed the success of the Chapter.

My involvement as a volunteer was largely inspired by Jim Curtis, Wisconsin ’86 who always amazed me as an undergraduate with how much he gave as an alumnus of another chapter. I had the good fortune of entering an advising team that was well established due to the hard work of Betas before me, including Brother Curtis.

The rewards have been many during my involvement in Beta as a volunteer. I have gained life-long friendships with other volunteers at alumni events, and with the undergraduates I have advised. I continue to develop professionally from my experience and often apply what I have learned through Beta on the job.

Over the past eight years I have served as an advisor for three different positions and am currently the chapter counselor at the University of Minnesota. During this time my ability to give of my time has varied widely, but my presence has remained constant. In recent years we have had a strong advisory team of seven to nine alumni which has allowed us each to contribute in areas of greatest ability and interest. We are fortunate

It is not always easy, but the outstanding work of our many leaders across Beta Theta Pi has laid a foundation of support which promotes our success at the local level. Regardless of situation, Beta can use you. There are so many ways to contribute and the more of us who share in the work, the more rewarding it becomes and the greater impact we can have.


The Beta Theta Pi Magazine/V Vol. 136/No. 2

[Fall Contents]

Watch the

Beta Theta Pi web site . . .

ta e b . w :/ww

http

a whole new look is coming soon to www.betathetapi.org!

18 cover story

Men of Principle 10 Year Anniversary RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

The average Beta will receive 216 issues of this magazine over 54 years. At 60 cents per issue, it will cost about $130 to produce and send all of your magazines. That is more than four times the amount of your $30 lifetime subscription! Will you make a voluntary contribution to keep your magazine coming? Visit www.betathetapi.org/ support today. Thank you!

The last decade has been tremendous; however, establishing a foothold in the culture to shift its focus back to the founding values has required intense, courageous and principled leadership.

departments

features

4

From the Editor

10

Friendship & Fidelity

6

News & Notes

8

Books by Betas

28

Making a Difference

40

Mystic Shrine

42

The Last Word

38

Unpacking Facebook

43

A Time of Reection Fraternity Happenings The 13 American Arguments In Loving Memory

Compassion, Kindness and Love

A Lasting Moment Giving Back

The 169th General Convention in Dallas was one for the ages.

The Beta Theta Pi Foundation makes building Men of Principle possible.

How members are using the social networking site to enchance their Beta experience.

THE BETA THETA PI

The OfďŹ cal Magazine of Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. The oldest continuously published college fraternity magazine, The Beta Theta Pi was founded December 15, 1872, by Charles Duy Walker, V.M.I. 1869. Member, Fraternity Communications Association

Fall 2008

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[From the Editor] A Time of Reflection For some, it is a daily ritual. To others, it may only happen on special occasions. Regardless of the frequency, each Beta is reminded of the Fraternity’s timeless values each time he stands in front of a mirror and dons his Beta badge. Since 1879, Beta Theta Pi has acknowledged its objects publicly through its open constitution. “The building up of a fraternity that recognizes mutual assistance in the honorable labors and aspirations of life, devotion to the cultivation of the intellect, unsullied friendship and unfaltering fidelity as objects worthy of the highest aim and purpose of associated effort.” In the three decades that followed, badges took on various sizes and Illustration by Roger Warrick designs. It wasn’t until 1909 that George Moseley Chandler, Michigan 1898 standardized the Beta badge. For almost a century now, each initiate into Beta Theta Pi has been ritualistically presented with a small badge — it measures less than an inch tall and half an inch wide — as a means for publicly acknowledging his membership. In accepting the Beta badge, each initiate is instructed: “Wear it proudly and, as you wear it, bear in mind the noble principles it symbolizes, ever remembering that so long as you wear it worthily as a true and sincere Beta, the light of the diamond shall never be dimmed nor the luster of the golden bearings grow less bright or fade away.” One of our modern Beta greats, William W. (Bill) Berry Jr., Vanderbilt ’68 challenged us to live up to the best hopes and aspirations of those who have preceded us. “Earn your badge, every day,” he reminded. Ask any member if he earned his badge, and he is likely to regale you with stories of his pledging days. Regardless of whether his program lasted just a few weeks or several long months, the rigors of pledging were too much for mere mortals. Thus, those who made it to the end were rewarded . . . with the prized Beta badge. Does each man deserve the right to wear the badge and bear the name of Beta Theta Pi simply by virtue of his initiation? What was Brother Berry getting at? As one year ends and another begins, this is often a time of reflection. We tend to focus just a little more closely on our physical, mental, emotional and spiritual needs. Quite often, we promise to do better. More of this. Less of that. I wonder what would happen if we resolved to earn our badges every day. What if all 120,000 of us extended the hand of mutual assistance . . . were truly devoted to cultivating our intellect . . . and did something to earn the trust and confidence of our brothers, friends and families . . . every single day? Our mission is to “build men of principle for a principled life.” That endeavor doesn’t end when the college years come to a close. It extends throughout life. One day at a time . . . for every true and worthy member of this association. So, the next time you find yourself in front of the mirror, take just a few moments to reflect on your cherished Beta badge and bear in mind those noble principles it symbolizes. Then go out and do something to earn it . . . all over again! — T. Olver

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The Beta Theta Pi

Beta Theta Pi Fraternity Founded 1839, Miami University

Board of Trustees General Secretary Charles W. Warner, Lynchburg ’87 President P. Thomas Purinton, Kansas State ’63 General Treasurer Christopher D. Miller, Kansas State ’86 Vice Presidents Scott J. Allen, Minnesota ’95 James R. Curtis, Wisconsin ’86 W. Martin Haskell, Ohio Wesleyan ’68 David E. Schmidt, South Florida ’92 Paul B. Swartz, Kansas State ’64 Joseph M. Troncale, Alabama ’63 Beta Theta Pi Foundation Board of Directors Carroll R. Black, Wabash ’66 Michael J. Dubes, Iowa State ’66 Michael G. Feinstein, MIT ’82 Garland G. Fritts, Illinois ’52 Douglas G. Houser, Willamette ’57 S. Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73 Jeffrey Lieberman, Pennsylvania ’96 Lynn C. Maddox, Georgia Tech ’64 Thomas H. McCasland Jr., Oklahoma ’56 Charles O. McCormick III, Indiana ’72 H. Kent Mergler, Cincinnati ’63 Christopher D. Miller, Kansas State ’86 Jeffrey N. Newton, Miami ’77 Richard C. Spangler III, North Carolina ’71 Editor Thomas C. Olver, Central Michigan ’98 Associate Editor Alex S. Hammel, Florida ’08 Associate Director of Communications Robert T. Umstadter, San Jose State ’05 Graphic Designer/Production Assistant Sarah Shepherd Contributors Phyllis Bowie, L. Martin Cobb, Nathan J. Deno, Donald G. DiPaolo, Chase H. Miller Editors Emeritus Erv Johnson, APR, Idaho ’53 Robert H. Kurz, Miami ’58 The Beta Theta Pi, (USPS 052-000) official magazine of

Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, is owned by the Fraternity, edited and published under the direction and control of its Board of Trustees, published Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring for $30 one-time pre-paid subscription. Periodical class postage paid at Oxford, Ohio, and additional points of entry. Canada Post International Publications Mail (Canadian Distribution) Sales Agreement No. 0397474. Copyright Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, 2008. Produced in the USA.

Deadlines Winter 2009 .............................................. November 15 Spring 2009 .................................................February 15 Summer 2009 ......................................................May 15 Fall 2009 ......................................................... August 15

Foundation and Administration Office Brennan Hall 5134 Bonham Road P.O. Box 6277 Oxford, Ohio 45056 513-523-7591 beta@betathetapi.org www.betathetapi.org

Postmaster: Send address changes to: Beta Theta Pi P.O. Box 6277 Oxford, OH 45056


[Where We Live] Number of Betas living in the state/province:

More than 10,000 5,000 - 10,000 2,500 - 4,999 1,000 - 2,499 500 - 999 100 - 499 Less than 100 Zero

You’ll declare your support for Beta Theta Pi every time you present your card. Plus, every time you make a purchase using your card, a contribution is made to Beta Theta Pi — at no additional cost to you.

Our members deserve the very best. That is why we are pleased to present the Beta Theta Pi Platinum Plus® Mastercard® credit card with WorldPoints® rewards from Bank of America. This No-Annual-Fee card delivers premium service, unsurpassed rewards, a money-saving Introductory Annual Percentage Rate (APR) and the attention to security our members expect.

REWARD YOURSELF

REQUEST yours today. Call toll-free

1.866.438.6262

SAVE THE DATE! Naples Area Beta Alumni Appreciation Dinner The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club January 31, 2009 ~ 6:00 p.m.

Hosted by the Board of Trustees and Founda�on Board of Directors. Evening Emcee General Fraternity President Dr. P. Thomas Purinton, Kansas State ’63 Featuring the General Secretary’s “State of the Fraternity” address, recogni�on of current and long-�me Beta alumni volunteers, recogni�on of all Fraternal 50s and Fraternal 25s in a�endance, including celebra�on of the 10 year anniversary of the Men of Principle ini�a�ve. For more informa�on, please contact the Administra�ve Office at 800-800-BETA or Founda�on Director of Advancement Mar�n Cobb at mar�n. cobb@betathetapi.org. Event details and invita�ons forthcoming to all area alumni in December 2008.

Use Priority Code FACQUN

Fall 2008

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[News & Notes]

John M. Spratt Jr. Davidson ’64

Zachary T. Space Kenyon ’83

Spratt, Space Re-Elected to Congress John M. Spratt Jr., Davidson ’64 (DS.C.) and Zachary T. Space, Kenyon ’83 (D-Ohio) were re-elected to the United States House of Representatives on Tuesday, November 4. First elected to Congress in 1982, Congressman Spratt defeated GOP challenger Albert Spencer 61.3% to 37% to hold his seat in South Carolina’s Fifth District. Spratt was initiated into the now-defunct Phi Alpha Chapter on February 13, 1961.

Purinton and Dealph Honored for Service General Fraternity President P. Thomas Purinton, Kansas State ’63 (right) and longtime Friend of Beta Steve Dealph (left) were honored on the final day of The John and Nellie Wooden Institute for Men of Principle this summer, celebrating 10 years of service to the Fraternity’s flagship leadership development program. Both men have served as facilitators for one session of The Wooden Institute each year since the program’s inception in 1999.

Cook and Lucas Receive The Oxford Cup Businessman William A. Cook, Northwestern ’53 and NBA Hall of Famer Jerry R. Lucas, Ohio State ’62 received the prestigious Oxford Cup in early August. The Fraternity awards the Oxford Cup in recognition of achievement of the highest order. Recipients must be loyal members who have brought honor to the Fraternity through distinguished service and accomplishments in their chosen professional fields.

Congressman Space, who won the open seat in Ohio’s 18th District in 2006, defeated Republican Fred Dailey, 59.8% to 40.2%. Space was initiated into the Beta Alpha Chapter on April 17, 1980. Beta Theta Pi’s Congressional delegation includes Senator Richard G. Lugar, Denison ’54 (R-Ind.) and Senator C. William (Bill) Nelson, Florida ’65 (D-Fla.) who won reelection to six-year terms in November 2006.

The medical device industry would not be the same today without Bill Cook. Founding the Cook Group Inc. in 1962, his first products were wire guides, needles and catheters. Today, those products are just a few of the more than 50,000 that his companies manufacture worldwide. Cook’s interests run the gamut, including producing a Broadway musical, owning a British professional basketball team and driving John Cougar Mellencamp’s tour bus. William A. Cook, Northwestern ’53

A dominant force in college basketball and the NBA, Jerry Lucas helped produce three Big Ten Championships at Ohio State and led the Buckeyes into three NCAA Finals and the 1960 championship. A three-time All-NBA First-Team selection, Lucas Jerry R. Lucas, Ohio State ’62 helped orchestrate the Knicks’ 1973 Championship and was inducted into The Basketball Hall of Fame in 1979. He has devoted his life to cultivating ideas and methods for fun and easy memory-retention. 6

The Beta Theta Pi


ALPHA HOUSE Alpha House, Beta’s first licensed clothing vendor, can meet your customized needs in more than 100 items, including golf shirts, T-shirts, jerseys, fleece vests and pullovers, sweatshirts, jackets, mesh shorts, boxers, bags, golf apparel, baby items, Beta flags and throws, ties and numerous gift items. 11 S. Main Street • Oxford, Ohio 45056 800-886-ALPHA • 513-523-8290

www.alphahouse.com


[Books by Betas] Additional Beta Books Barking Up a Dead Horse Tom Batchelder, Indiana ’93

The author advises the reader on how to avoid wasting time and effort in everyday business-tobusiness sales. Paperback. 265 pages. US$14.95 Dog Ear Publishing. 2007

Getting to Thanksgiving Allen Bohl, Bowling Green ’70 & Brett Bohl, Toledo ’93

A father and son take on a heart-warming story about coming of age, family values, self-discipline and offering thanks for life’s blessings. Paperback. 149 pages. US$13.99 Advantage Media Group. 2007

Mr. Lincoln’s T-Mails

The Thirteen American Arguments

Howard Fineman, Colgate ’70

America is known today as the arguing country, and Howard Fineman is okay with that stigma. In The Thirteen American Arguments, Fineman mixes vivid scenes and figures from the campaign trail with forays into American history. He shows that every debate, from the nation’s founding to the present day, is rooted in one of 13 arguments that thankfully defy resolution. It is the very process of never-ending argument, Fineman explains, that defines us, inspires us and keeps us free. At a time when most public disagreement seems shrill and meaningless, Fineman makes a cogent case for nurturing the real American dialogue. Shouting is not arguing, Fineman notes, but often hotbutton topics, media “cross-fires” and blogs reflect the deepest currents in American life. In an enlightening book that cuts through the din and makes sense of the headlines, Fineman captures the essential issues that have always compelled healthy and heated debate and must continue to do so for us to prosper in the twenty-first century. Hardcover. 320 pages. US$16.50. Random House. 2008

Tom Wheeler, Ohio State ’68

An elegant work of history, this book tells the untold story of how Abraham Lincoln used the Telegraph to win the Civil War. Hardcover. 186 pages. US$24.95 HarperCollins Publishers. 2006

Reflections of the Mole William J. McDaniel, Oklahoma State ’64

The untold story of how a respectable, retired Navy admiral came to pull off one of the smartest reality TV shows in history. Paperback. 282 pages. US$15 Intellect Publishing. 2007

The Man Behind the Mask

Thomas H. Mallory, M.D., Miami ’61 Mallory takes readers along on the journey of an orthopedic surgeon and the introduction of joint replacement technology for future operations. Hardcover. 208 pages. US$29.95 University of Missouri Press. Columbia and London. 2007

Submit a Book for Review

Have you recently published a book that you would like featured in “Books by Betas?” Send a signed copy of the book, a brief description of the work and a brief biography to: Thomas C. Olver, Editor; 5134 Bonham Road, Oxford, Ohio 45056

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The Beta Theta Pi

Beta Theta Pi benefits when you buy from amazon.com! Log on to http://astore.amazon.com/thbethpi-20 for the online store.


www.watchworks.ca Product Info: High quality stainless steel, scratch proof sapphire crystal and water resistant tested to 330ft

Contact: David Wong watchworks@rogers.com

The Hazel Hutchman Memorial Neuroscience Center & Neurosearch, Inc. Working hard every day to blaze a path toward improving the lives of those with Parkinson’s Disease, movement disorders and Alzheimer’s disease through compassionate clinical care and clinical trials research.

Robert M. Hutchman MD, Michigan ’93 R. Wayne Pickerell, Denver ’87 Ted Satyadi, UCLA ’03 19231 Victory Blvd., Suite 355 North Reseda, CA 91335 Phone: (818) 332-7986; Fax: (818) 698-0443 Email: drhutchman@yahoo.com

www.neurosearch-usa.com


CONVENTION

OVERVIEW

When the Fraternity was founded in Oxford, Ohio, in 1839, The Republic of Texas was still an independent nation encompassing parts of Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado and Wyoming, and was only three years removed from the historic battle of the Alamo. Beta Theta Pi’s first president, John Holt Duncan, made Texas his home and now rests in the State’s most honored cemetery along side many former governors, U.S. senators, Congressmen and Medal of Honor winners. Today, more than 7,000 Betas live in Texas, with some 1,770 residing in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. The Lone Star State is also home to chapters at Texas, Texas Tech, Texas-Arlington, Baylor, Texas A&M, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi and the soon-to-be recolonized Gamma Omega Chapter at Southern Methodist. It is said that “everything is bigger in Texas” and the 169th General Convention was no exception. Nearly 1,000 undergraduates, alumni and guests gathered at the Fairmont Hotel in Dallas, August 7-10, making this year’s Convention the third largest event in Fraternity history. Only the Centenary (1939) and Sesqui-centenary (1989) conventions drew larger audiences. From the young undergraduates who infuse life into the experience . . . to the dedicated volunteers who provide leadership and support . . . to the Silver Grays who offer perspective with entertaining stories of days gone by, participants are forever changed by the Convention experience.

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The Beta Theta Pi


Legislation

Purinton Profile On Saturday, August 9, Dr. Tom Purinton, Kansas State ’63, was reelected to a second, three-year term as General Fraternity president.

General Secretary Charlie Warner, Lynchburg ’87 (left) presides over the installation of General Fraternity Vice President Scott J. Allen, Minnesota ’95; Vice President David E. Schmidt, South Florida ’92 and President P. Thomas Purinton, Kansas State ’63.

LEGISLATION Three changes to The Code (Beta Theta Pi’s Constitution and Bylaws) were considered during the 169th General Convention. Delegates from across North America voted on several proposals, including code changes, the granting of charters and Board of Trustee elections. Delegates established the H.H. Stephenson Jr. Award, which will recognize chapters for the efforts they make in preservation and education of their own local history while adding to the collective knowledge of the Fraternity. The award honors H.H. Stephenson Jr., Miami ’39 who passed away in 2006 after serving as the Fraternity’s archivist for almost 30 years. Changes to the Trial by Chapter procedure provide for a simple majority vote to assess any penalty within the trial by chapter process following a conviction by the chapter. The change allows chapters to adopt automatic penalties within their local constitutions. Various changes to the online reporting system eliminate the requirement for district chiefs to approve temporary inactive status requests and allow for online submission. A proposal regarding academic standards for initiation was not passed. Six chapters were returned to good standing at Convention including Central Michigan, Denison, Hampden-Sydney, Iowa, California-Irvine and Southern California. Members from each chapter were led separately into the Convention Hall to an emotional homecoming and the joyous sounds of There’s a Scene.. The University of Miami (Fla.) colony received its charter as the newest chapter of Beta Theta Pi. Delegates elected three members to the Board of Trustees. Dr. P. Thomas Purinton, Kansas State ’63, and David E. Schmidt, South Florida ’92, were reelected to three-year terms as president and vice president, respectively. Scott J. Allen, Minnesota ’95, was elected to a three-year term as vice president. Each year, all members of the Fraternity are allowed and encouraged to review The Code. Proposed amendments must be submitted to the administrative secretary no later than March 31.

Purinton says he will use what he has learned during his past three years as president to help guide him through his term. “I am learning a tremendous amount about how notfor-profit boards are structured and best practices for responsibilities and operation,” said Purinton. “Whatever recommendations come out of this work, I am confident that I will be in a much better position to fulfill my role as chairman of the Board.” Prior to his election to the Board of Trustees, Purinton served as the Fraternity’s volunteer development commissioner and chapter counselor at the University of Georgia. He facilitated multiple advisory team conferences and has served as a small group facilitator for a session of The Wooden Institute each year since its inception in 1999. Purinton says the reason he has continued to stay active with Beta Theta Pi is because he believes in its mission. “Every Beta has the obligation to give mutual assistance in the honorable labors and aspirations of life. One of the ways that I can fulfill this obligation is to participate in our outstanding leadership programming, which contributes to the fulfillment of our mission,” said Purinton. Dr. Purinton resides in Watkinsville, Ga., with his wife Molly. Grandfather to eight grandchildren, he sings in his church choir and enjoys fly-fishing.

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Awards INDIVIDUAL AWARDS Advisor of the Year: Daniel J. Hasler, DePauw ’80

District Chief of the Year: Zachary T. Haines, Miami ’05

General Secretary’s Leadership Award: Jacob R. Gray, Texas Tech ’10

Greek Advisor of the Year: Wes Schaub, Case Western Reserve

Knox Award Winners

CHAPTER AWARDS John Reily Knox Chapter Excellence (# of Knox awards since 1997): Alabama (2), British Columbia (4), Connecticut (2), Georgia (3), Indiana (2), Loyola Marymount (1), Missouri (3), Missouri-Kansas City (2) Francis H. Sisson (# of Sisson awards since 1982): Alabama (3); Arizona (7); Auburn (23); British Columbia (18); California, Irvine (7); Carleton (5); Central Florida (5); Central Michigan (8); Connecticut (6); Denison (1); DePauw (9); Florida (9); Georgia (16); Georgia Tech (26); Idaho (12); Indiana (10); Kansas State (20); Knox (11); Lawrence (13); Loyola Marymount (2); Miami (11); Miami (Fla.) (1); Minnesota (12); Missouri (22); Missouri-Kansas City (14); MIT (8); Nebraska (14); North Dakota (7); Oklahoma (12); Oklahoma State (6); Saint Louis (5); San Diego (2); Southern California (1); Texas-Arlington (5); Toronto (11); Truman State (9); Virginia Tech (4); Wabash (8); Washington (5); Washington in St. Louis (10) Alumni Relations: Miami, Oklahoma, Southern California Campus Involvement: British Columbia, Case Western Reserve, DePauw, Miami, Minnesota, Nebraska, Northwestern, Texas-Arlington, Truman State, Southern California, Wisconsin-Oshkosh Charles Henry Hardin Leadership Development: Kansas State (highest overall), Eastern Kentucky (highest percentage) Bethany; California, Irvine; Case Western Reserve; Central Florida; Central Michigan; Cincinnati; Connecticut; Dayton; Denison; East Carolina; Florida International; Hampden-Sydney; Indiana; Iowa; Iowa State; John Carroll; Kettering A; Kettering B; Miami; Miami (Fla.); Middle Tennessee State; Minnesota; Mississippi; San Diego; South Dakota; Southern California; Texas A&M-Corpus Christi; Texas-Arlington; Truman State; Virginia; Wabash; Washington; Washington in St. Louis; Washington & Lee; Wisconsin-Oshkosh General Secretary’s Cup: Miami John Holt Duncan Service-Annual: Maine, (Honorable Mention: Oklahoma) John Holt Duncan Service-Ongoing: Texas-Arlington, (Honorable Mention: Iowa State) Most Improved Chapter: DePauw

Housemother of the Year: Sue Overton, Oklahoma

New Member Education: Dayton New Song Competition: Kansas State’s Ryan D. Newton ’08 and Dustin R. Jordan ’08, “Back to the Start” North Dakota (Publications): Colorado Mines (Honorable Mention: Central Michigan) Recruitment: British Columbia, Minnesota Risk Management: Carleton, Iowa State, Kansas State, Nebraska

Interfraternalism Award: Kyle Pendleton, Associate Dean of Students, Purdue

Virginia Tech (Academics): Regional: British Columbia, Colorado State, Connecticut, Dayton, Eastern Kentucky, Georgia Tech, Hampden-Sydney, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, San Diego First in Grades: Case Western Reserve, Central Florida, Clemson, Columbia, Cornell, Denison, East Carolina, Florida Atlantic, Idaho, Iowa, Loyola Marymount, Miami, Missouri, Missouri-Kansas City, Nova Southeastern, Tennessee, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, Texas-Arlington, Truman State, William & Mary Most Improved GPA: Iowa Highest GPA: Columbia

Rookie Chief of the Year: Matthew S. Paynter, Florida ’00

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The Beta Theta Pi

Web Site Excellence: Auburn, (Honorable Mention: Florida International) Whitman Choral Cup: Lawrence Wichita State (Singing): Oklahoma


*Matthew Ficken ’09, Ethan Hiatt ’11, Ellis Metz ’11, Jerry Prater ’11, Yancey Swearingen ’67, Joseph Troncale ’63, Stanford Wood ’10,

Arizona

*Jordan Rishel ’08, Cameron Warner ’08, Todd Waters ’11

Auburn

Mark Ascik ’10, Marcus Bankston ’95, John Capps ’10, Mark Chuckney ’10, Grant Falkner ’10, Kenneth Findley ’10, Daniel Harmon ’09, Roderick Hastie ’82, Nathaniel Stewart ’10, *James Wright ’09

Ball State

Douglas Kemezy ’84, Jason Melton ’99, James Vineyard ’67

Baylor

*Robert Hobson ’08

Bethany

Joseph Cole ’08, *Alexander Kemper-McCall ’10

Connecticut

Steven Alexopoulos ’08 *Matthew Farant ’09

Matthew Barry ’05, Richard Colon ’06, *Brian Davis ’10, Joseph Dunaj ’04, Christopher Dunaj ’08, Ross Gionfriddo ’09, Benjamin Swartz ’05, Joseph Synnott ’08

Carnegie Mellon

Cornell

Carleton

*Clayton Crites ’09, Edward Dawson ‘66

Case Western Reserve

James Carlquist ’83, Carlos Guerrero ’10, Thomas O`Connell ’10, *Jason Winchester ’10

Michael Taccino ’10, Charles Treloar ’10, *Jonathan Weis ’10, Eric Wieseckel ’11

Dayton

Central Florida

Denison

Christopher Boulmetis ’07, Rory Curren ’09, Lance Flint ’10, Garrett Hyer ’08, Shamir Kanji ’07, Andrick Lewis ’10, Cameron Newton ’10, *Grant Schnell ’09

Central Michigan

Mark Andersen ’08, Carlisle Braun ’00, Jamelle Dooley ’10, *Robert Hunter ’10, Brandyn Lawson ’09, Justin Mack ’11, Brett Marquardt ’09, Scott Nadeau ’89, Thomas Olver ’98

Jason Bollman ’09, *Thomas Demmer ’09, Bryce Blair ’07, Michael Boebinger ’11, Derrick Carman ’10, Zachary Coneybeer ’09, Robert Dold ’60, *Nicholas Geitner ’09, Christopher Greene ’10, Jacob Henkle ’09, Timothy Henson ’07, Ardon Judd Jr. ’59, Casey Lockwood ’10, Richard Lugar ’54, John Malloy ’60, William Malloy ’63, Joseph Ternavan ’57, Philip Vogel ’09, Daniel Whitlow ’07

Denver

Eric Corrigan ’10, Brandon Curtis ’09, Ronald Ermlick ’09, *Ian McNally ’09, Brandon Michaels ’09

Centre

Jerry Blesch ’60

Joseph Beenen ’11, Christopher Lucas, Richard Pickerell ’87

British Columbia

Cincinnati

DePauw

*David Cotterall ’09, Peter Kearney ’07, Jay Shah ’10, Christopher Thureau ’08

Cal Poly

Kevin Bedwell ’09, Thomas Cassady ’76, *Galen Crawford ’08, Daniel Farmer ’75, Eric Masters ’11, Brandon Mowrey ’11, William Ventress ’47

*Jesse Scoular ’10

Roster

Alabama

Benjamin Armstrong ’09, Patrick Geoghegan ’11, *Gregory Giometti ’10, Daniel Hasler ’80, Culley Pearson ’10, William Tidwell ’11

Duke

Charles Kuebler ’59

East Carolina

Charles Jones ’09, Scott Kinser ’09, Forrest Little ’08, Kirk Little ’82, Brian Mattern ’08, *Joseph Salacki ’09, Adam Scarboro ’06, Christopher Stinson ’08, Kevin Stussie ’09, Jacob Tidwell ’04

Eastern Illinois

*William Seidelmann ’09

Eastern Kentucky

*Stephen Caudill ’09, Martin Cobb ’96, Corey Copley ’08, Jonathan Coyle ’08, William Gahafer ’10, Michael Hay ’94, Andrew Megargel ’08, Noah Moran ’11, Gareth Saums ’11

Eastern Washington *Colby Olson ’10

Emory

California, Berkeley *Alexander Leach ’10

California, Irvine

*Michael Brenan ’08, Nikhil Damle ’09, Alexander Lamb ’08, Marshall Miller ’09, Kyle Olney ’08, Emmanuel James Penera ’11, Comron Roodsari ’10, John Rothwell ’78, Jonathan Steller ’09

California, Los Angeles

Alexander Akers ’11, Ryan Boe ’11, Michael Casey ’10, Aaron Farber ’10, *Matthew Lemen ’08, Geoffrey Lewis ’09, Marcus Perry ’10, Jared Shuman ’08, Matt Snider ’10

California, Santa Barbara

James Delaney ’68, David Northrup ’75, *Michael Reardon ’11, John Stebbins ’92

Clemson

James Segars ’06

Florida

Stephen Becker ’69, *Anthony Crawford ’09, John Gatz ’54, Matthew Paynter ’00, James Scott ’69, Jordan See ’08

Colgate

Andrew Bessette ’09, *Jonathan Friedman ’10, Daniel Hubbard ’09, Thomas Lee ’10, Daniel Lieberman ’09

Colorado Mines

*Janson Ferrera ’09, Thomas Hamilton ’07

Colorado State

*Nicholas Patton ’10

Columbia

Florida Atlantic

Robert Billoni ’95, *William Mulvey ’09

Florida International *Neil Wyatt ’09

General Fraternity

Richard Eickhoff ’02, Eugene Fernandez, Charles Huddleston

*Taylor Eichenseer ’09, Jonathan Hollander ’10, Martin Lewison ’88, Aaron Rotenberg ’09

* delegate

Fall 2008

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Roster

George Washington

John DePaul ’10, Ellis Izlar ’11, *Thomas Levy ’09, Stephen Molldrem ’10

Georgia

Taylor Bergman ’11, Branden Bosler ’11, *Trent Culbertson ’09, Michael Dalton ’11, Thomas Godfrey ’11, George Miller ’11, Ryan Reethof ’11, Matthew Rolfsen ’11, Matthew Szambelan ’11, George Wilson ’11

Georgia Tech

Theodore Haile ’75, Clinton Hodges ’10, Lynn Maddox ’64, Brent Pearce ’09, Cody Smith ’09, *Kevin Widmaier ’09

GMI-EMI

Aaron Calkins ’88

Hampden-Sydney

Jared Biggins ’10, Michael Crowe ’10, Jobe Jackson ’10, *Kyle Kneeland ’09, Robert Shrader ’08, Michael Stabile ’11, Adam Whitman ’10, Christopher Worel ’11

Houston

Jason Feller ’78, Gregory Williams ’79

Idaho

Michael Domke ’82, *Mark Morgan ’10

Illinois

Johns Hopkins

*James Siegler ’09

Kansas

*Trey Anderson ’09

Kansas State

Connor Bridge ’11, Brian Carter ’10, Matthew Crow ’11, Thomas Gentry ’09, Joshua Gross ’11, Evan Hall ’11, Taylor Hanney ’11, Jacob Harnack ’10, John Harwell ’10, Kye Hittle ’99, Bryce Knott ’11, Gregory Lott ’10, Thomas Markey ’11, Christopher Miller ’86, James Miller ’10, Robert Mosiman ’11, Ryan Newton ’08, Christopher Newton ’11, Taylor Pankratz ’11, Joshua Parker ’10, Scott Peterson ’11, P. Thomas Purinton ’63, Jeffrey Rundle ’03, Brian Sanders ’10, James Sargent ’74, Paul Swartz ’64, Kent Swartz ’99, *Matthew Tedman ’10

Kenyon

*Andrew Jurado ’11

Kettering A

*Scott Kirklin ’10

Kettering B

Calvin Diep ’12, *Daniel Todd ’10

Knox

*Bryan Lund ’09

Stephen Butz ’11, *Nicholas De Santo ’10, Anthony Farella ’11, Garland Fritts ’52, Sergey Koretskov ’11, John Minoff ’11

Lawrence

Indiana

Lehigh

Alexander Babladelis ’10, Nicholas Baldwin ’10, Matthew Drummy ’10, Eric Hetland ’10, Charles McCormick ’72, *Scott Watson ’09, John Wright ’76

John Bettridge ’09, *Elliott Gschwind ’09, Daniel Hertel ’09 John Davis ’91, William Hahn ’49, Stewart Wessel ’93

Maryland

Bruce Griffin ’87

Miami

Peter Barnhart ’66, Jonathan Brant ’75, *Benjamin Bressler ’10, Brett Bryner ’10, Eric Doerr ’10, Philip Fernandez ’06, John Groom ’58, Zachary Haines ’05, Thomas Hook ’81, Bradley Kuhn ’09, Jonathan Lawson ’11, Brian Matchett ’10, James McClanahan ’60, Jeffrey Newton ’77, Brent Sollee ’03, Austin Wieland ’11, Thomas Wiese ’11

Miami (Fla.)

*Zachary Andersen ’10, Steven Cavanah ’10, Steven Coffman ’09, Peter Darrow ’09, Antonio Dell’Aglio ’10, Marshall Holland ’09, Anthony Khoury ’10, Colton Klingensmith ’10, Clark Rinehart ’09, Manuel Rivero ’09, Matthew Sidman ’09, Andrew Willert ’09, David Yeomans ’09

Michigan

Donald DiPaolo ’78

Middle Tennessee State

*Mitchell Baker ’09, William Fussell ’95, Brandon Kenderdine ’11, Jacob Moore ’11, Jacob Robertson ’09

Minnesota

Scott Allen ’95, Dustin Anderson ’05, Travis Fischer ’05, Mike Kao ’05, Michael Kokkinen ’00, *Aviran Sethi ’09

Mississippi

Thomas Alexander ’67, Benjamin Dobbs ’11, *Dominic Rodriguez ’09, Sean Ross ’09, Anthony Russell ’10, James Shute ’81

Missouri

Iowa

Adam Duggleby ’09, Patrick Hahn ’09, Benjamin Haiman ’10, Nicholas Littell ’09, Michael Roupas ’10, Matthew Schill ’09, David Southwick ’11, *Stephen Theulen ’10

Iowa State

Jacob Braunger ’09, Matthew Cavner ’12, Craig Cobb ’95, Clinton Currie ’10, Michael Dubes ’66, Kevin Friedman ’10, Judson Horras ’97, *Ryan Kennedy ’10, Cole Kersey ’11, Kevin Marquardt ’11, Matthew Martin ’10, Gregory Nash ’11, Andrew Schmitz ’09, Matthew Strayer ’09

John Carroll

*Christopher DiNapoli ’09, Nicholas Orlando ’11, Jamie Ott ’10

14

The Beta Theta Pi

Louisville

Stavan Bhatt ’98, Michael Brown ’09, *David Kitchel ’09

Loyola Marymount

Daniel Bowen ’07, Jeffrey Haluck ’07, Regan Hickey ’07, Matthew Mahoney ’08, Stephen Sarmiento ’08, *Brian Webber ’09

William Carpenter ’11, James Ellis ’56, Daniel Flynn ’10, Neal Gray ’62, Harold Hook ’53, William Keffer ’11, *John Leicht ’09, Joseph Mercurio ’10, John Morrison ’09, Ryan Nichols ’11, Charles Spener ’54, Steven Spoeneman ’10

Missouri-Kansas City

*Alexander Barrett ’09, Benjamin Favier ’12

MIT

Charles Warner ’87

Tristan Delaney ’11, Michael Feinstein ’82, Jeffrey Flanagan ’93, Ryan Luersen ’09, Gavin Lund ’10, Adam Paxson ’09, *Steven Russo ’09, Victor Sinow ’08

Maine

Nebraska

Lynchburg

Andrew Baldacci, *Jameson Hardy ’09, Nathan Oakes ’08

Burton Folsom ’49, *Kenton Moore ’09

* delegate


Pennsylvania

North Dakota

Puget Sound

Northwestern

Purdue

Paxson Glenn ’58, *Kevin Shamburg ’09 *Sean Grutzmacher ’11 Berry Conner ’52, William Cook ’53, *Daniel Innamorati ’10, Seth Meyer ’11, Thomas Nell ’10, Daniel Osher ’10, Justin Rutherford ’00, William Whitney ’52

Ohio

Jeffrey Lieberman ’96, *John Tatum ’10 Adam Harvey’09, *Torey Holderith ’09 Mark Bubien ’10, Jacob Cannon ’11, Jordon Gofourth ’11, R. Scott Hayes ’68, Brett Haywood ’10, Sean Kennelly ’11, Zachary Larsen ’11, *Corey Mikula ’09, Nick Sharpe ’11, Jonathan Zimmerman ’10

John Fouser ’09, Jae Garrison ’09, John Holden ’65, Michael Impagliozza ’10, *Russell Linder ’09

Rhode Island

Ohio State

Saint Louis

Joseph Chinnici ’64, Nelson Cintra ’08, Jerry Lucas ’62,*Devin Newsham ’09, Sean Watko ’09, David Wright ’67

Ohio Wesleyan

Eric Eickhoff ’00, William Haskell ’68

Philip Brown ’10, *Ryan Heffel ’10 *Robert Samuelson ’10, Jeremy York ’99

San Diego

Kilian Bryce ’10, Christopher Burke ’06, *William Elliott ’07, Chase Tushaus ’10

San Diego State

J. Timothy McMullen ’86, *Christopher Lake ’08, Robert Umstadter ’05

Sewanee

*Alexander Harris ’11

Martinez ’09, James McMullen ’54, Wade McMullen ’79, Anil Ramkhelawan ’09, Eugene Stone ’09, Tyler Stone ’11

Roster

North Carolina

Texas A&M

Karl Chiao ’90, *Craig Cowden ’09, James Gray ’01, Frank Hametner ’92, Michael Swanson ’92, Samuel Auderer ’10

Texas A&M-Corpus Christi

Timothy Gillespie ’09, Joshua Machicek ’06, Seamus Nelson ’08, James Owens ’04, Ian Pitman ’10, Eric Rohne ’10, *Sergio Silva ’09, Alexander Snowden ’06, John Thornton ’11

Texas Tech

Bryan Adams ’99, Taylor Beedy ’11, John Bentley ’10, Ronald Butler ’10, Bobby Butler ’10, Kevin Clark ’00, Clayton Cowan ’06, Chad Culpepper ’10, Gregory Davis ’05, *Jacob Gray ’10, Thomas Jones ’73, William Keffer ’81, Jackie Marlar ’11, Kelly Massad ’11, Kenneth Meixelsperger ’97, Ryan Olmstead ’09, Jared Price ’11, Michael Ralston ’74, Patrick Regan ’71, Patrick Sisemore ’10, R. Dean Stalcup ’71, Weston Teichman ’10, Barrett Thorne ’09, W. Trotter ’81, Douglas Turpin ’09, Weston Victor ’09, Clayton Welch ’05, Jason White ’02

South Dakota

John Conway ’56, *Ryan Fairley ’11, Dan Kirkham ’58, Robert Murray ’58

South Florida

James Barrett ’11, Michelo Dicandio ’10, Matthew Hamilton ’11, *Nicholas Heller ’10, Ryan Jensen ’10, Leonard Levi ’94, Kyle Neal ’07, David Schmidt ’92

Southern California

Oklahoma

Zachary Allen ’85, C. Richard Anderson ’55, Robert Baker ’53, Dewey Bartlett ’09, Robert Beall ’79, Fallis Beall ’55, Steven Berklacy ’10, Jakeb Black ’08, Brian Bond ’09, Thomas Brown ’11, Bradley Brown ’07, Bradley Cantrell ’10, *Jeffrey Cartmell ’09, Joseph Consedine ’09, Kyle Dahlgren ’10, Richard Farbro ’11, Keith Henry ’08, Mark Hornbeek ’10, Thomas Hutchings ’10, Ted Johnston ’11, Spencer Kinzie ’10, Douglas Kinzie ’79, Joe Kokojan ’06, Cory Lloyd ’10, Bryan Luff ’08, Mark Luff ’73, Thomas McCasland ’56, Matthew Moellers ’10, Thomas Norris ’56, Henry Ryan ’72, Ross Skinner ’10, Travis Storts ’09, Lucas Toho ’11

Oklahoma State

Hart Dubberstein ’11, Edward El Rassi ’08, Joshua Fairchild ’05, Brock Johnson ’08, Russell Katigan ’05, *Matthew McGee ’09, J. Pittman McGehee ’65, George Reeves ’61, Robert Riggs ’09, Josh Robinson ’11, Christopher Roy ’07, Philip Stout ’62, Jody Vivion ’09, Stephen Walker ’83, Caleb Winsett ’05, Fredric Wratislaw ’08

Oregon

*Allen Hardin ’09

Penn State

Adam Blank ’09, Thomas Gonze ’11, *Joseph Hirsch ’10, Brad Maniscalco ’09, Michael Maser ’11, Daniel Wilhelm ’79 Eric Wilhelm ’09, Andrew Yamarick ’09

Trevor Armstrong ’09, Corbin Billings ’10, Alexander Bozzo ’11, Reid Brooks ’09, Ian Donahue ’09, William Fasoli ’09, *Torrey Fishman ’09, Andrew Galdi ’10, Michael Garrido ’11, Sean Lask ’10, Daniel Marr ’11, Steven Ogden ’09, Nathan Ross ’10, Shayan RostamAbadi ’10, Robert Villalobos ’10, Robert Weise ’10, Richard Weise ’76, Alexander Whitehead ’11

Southern Illinois

*Ryan Ederer ’09, Ryan King ’01

Southern Methodist

Mitchell Baddour ’74, Woodrow Berry ’75, Thomas Cabe ’65, John Casson ’67, Carl Collins ’69, Jay Counts ’69, Robert Dillard ’63, Arthur O Evans ’64, Stephen Fisher ’69, John Graml ’62, William Granger ’72, John Grumbles ’76, Harry Jones ’63, Charles Mastin ’67, Charles Paul ’72, Don Pearce ’65, Robert Peinado ’82, Frank Roby ’75, Stephen Ruffini ’81, Wayne Thompson ’75, James Toole ’64

Stevens

Lee Burwell ’08, *Ryan Oelkers ’09, James Roarty ’10

Syracuse

Marc Benshetler ’82, Robert Burwell ’74

Tennessee

Andrew Bush ’81, *Jordan Frey ’10, Richard Kaniss ’76

Texas

Jamsheer Anklesaria ’11, George Bily ’08, Henry Campbell ’62, Mac Churchill ’72, *Steven Gaskin ’09, Constantine Haddad ’10, Cameron Herzog ’08, Michael Lewis’ 11, Hunter Lonon ’11, Dale Markland ’71, Ryan

Texas-Arlington

Monte Akers ’73, L. Wayne Allmond ’72, Darrell Amsden ’85, Kenneth Barton ’75, Cameron Beall ’11, Lawrence Bloom ’95, Tony Brazeal ’75, Gary Burgess ’74, Jeffrey Caffey ’90, Colin Cannon ’07, Nicholas Chappell ’07, Patrick Connelly ’74, Bryan Corser ’85, Jeffrey Coulter ’10, Timothy Dahlin ’00, Bobby Deaton ’90, Monte DeShan ’84, Daniel Ferguson ’91, Kirk Gay ’72, Jeff Godbold ’90, Scott Harris ’97, Bobbe Hightower ’73, Ryan Hoopes ’07, Nathan Horton ’04, Charles Huddleston ’98, Gordon Jacobson ’71, James Jessup ’91, Robert Jutton ’74, Jimmie Kellum ’02, James Knochel ’78, Thomas Lamson ’92, Brandon Law ’10, John Leipheimer ’11, Zachary Lupe ’08, Kevin Lynch ’06, Robert Maier ’87, Blake Manning ’10, Steven Maria ’09, Teddy McKinney ’71, Joshua Mendez ’09, Larry Minter ’72, David Minter ’75, Weldon Moore ’80, Daniel Ogle ’07, John Orona ’99, Enrique Otero ’92, Jeffrey Payne ’07, Francis Perera ’08, William Powell ’72,

* delegate

Fall 2008

15


Roster

Ray Purifoy ’74, Steven Reilly ’04, Omar Rosales ’11, Charles Royal ’88, Christopher Royal ’91, Daniel Satterwhite ’08, James Shotts ’99, William Simpson ’11, Scott Sims ’87, *William Spring ’08, Daniel Staples ’74, Adam Strawbridge ’08, Mac Townsend ’79, Kevin Trlicek ’08, Stephen Turner ’08, Rayford Vincent ’75, Daniel Walsh ’08, Edward Wenzel ’72, David Westbrook ’79, William Younger ’73

Western Ontario John Birkett ’65

Western Reserve

Thomas Lipton ’63

Westminster

*Joseph Hickey ’09, Tyler Hunter ’10, Elliott Moore ’03, Brandon Schafer ’09

Toronto

Whitman

Truman State

Wichita State

John Hilbrich ’10, Kenneth Stephen ’77 Matthew Brawner ’07, *Timothy Sitton ’09, Jason Waggoner ’04

Tulane

R. Shepheard Stahel ’59

Utah

*Christopher Pales ’08

Vanderbilt

*Patrick Frailey ’10, Sean Judge ’11, Murray Maddox ’10, Ryan Moore ’11, Michael Moore ’66, Davy Rogers ’11, James Roper ’11, James Wolf ’11

Villanova

William Hartwell ’61 Tristan Anderson ’08, *Jacob Bingenheimer ’09, Thomas Boggs ’08, Jason Carlson ’09, Jeromy Gensch ’98, Pierre Harter ’98, John McDonnell ’98, Brett Rettig ’97

Willamette

Robert Braden ’02, Douglas Houser ’57, *Blake Piper ’09

William & Mary

Patrick Everett, MacGregor Hill ’04, John Pollock ’11, *Brett Rector ’09

Wisconsin

James Curtis ’86, Maxwell Lord ’07, *Jariberto Rivera ’09, Robert Schnese ’83

Steven Dealph, Susie Decoursey, Linda Del Pizzo, Linda Delaney, Ashley Dye, Kelly Earnest, Timothy Edgmon, Ryan Edgmon, Van Ellis, Mary Evans, Lisa Ferguson, Joyce Fernandez, Mimi Fisher, Elizabeth Fisher, Dell Folsom, Stephanie Foster, Dianne Foutch, Mark Friskney, Michelle Gatewood, Evan Gatewood, Blake Gatewood, Bailey Gatewood, Meg Gatewood, Tyler Gatewood, Mary Kate Gatewood, Jane Gatz, Mimi Glenn, Laura Gober, Holli Godbold, Monica Gomez, Jason Gomez, Melody Grand, James Gray, Charlinda Gray, Tyler Gray, Parker Gray, Ival Gregory, Steven Griffith, Michelle Harris, Janis Hartwell, Valerie Haskell, Ryan Hilperts, Carol Holden, Joanne Hook, Anna Horras, Kara Horras, Linda Huddleston, Jessie Huddleston, Brian Huddleston, Julia Huddleston, Rose Jacobson, Brenda Jones, Vikki Jones, Mary Kaniss, Susan H. Kay, James Keffer, Jeannette Keton, Jim Keton, Jenny Kinzie, Ann Kirkham, Sue Kraft Fussell, Wink Kuebler, Ann LaDriere, Estrella Lamson, Jay Langhammer, Laura Lednik, Cheryl Lewison, William Lipscomb, Lynda Anne Luff, Kristin Machalek, Debra Maier, Bonnie Mastin, Robert Maute, Susan Maute, Phyllis McCasland, Renee McClanahan, Diane McMullen, Mary Louise McMullen, Capala McMullen, Lindsay Meckler, Lindsey Mercer, Gail Minter, Collette Minter,

Michael Okenquist ’94, *Damian Shchur ’09, Stephen Smith ’99

Virginia

Timothy Akers ’82, John Campbell ’09, Hallett Connor ’10, *Sean Douglass ’09, Keller Hardy ’09, Fraser Henderson ’09, John Messamore ’09, Garrett Smith ’84

Virginia Tech

David Campbell ’07, Charles Comer ’75, John Groover ’09, S. Wayne Kay ’73, Puraj Patel ’05, *Daniel Raynes ’09

Wabash

Carroll Black ’66, Sean Clerget ’09, *Stephen Egan ’09, Jacob German ’11, Robert Grand ’78, Kyle Grand ’11, James Horrey ’09, Raymond LaDriere ’78, Chad Sorenson ’10, Iandrew Starnes ’11

Washington

James Clack ’85, Kevin Durkin ’11, Adam Garrison ’10, Max Harden ’09, James Nelson ’11, Richard Phenneger ’58, Robert Stotler ’10, *Kyle Thomas ’10

Washington & Jefferson *Daniel Martin ’10

Washington and Lee James Baird ’10

Washington in St. Louis

Michael Bullard ’11, Ferdinand Del Pizzo ’58, Paul Hamilton ’08, *Marius Johnson ’09, Michael Kearney ’62, Aaron Kozuki ’05, Matthew Lohmann ’10, Daniel Maher ’09, Tristan Sopp ’11, Daniel Zernickow ’11

Washington State

Joseph Buchanan ’53, *Connor Hennessey ’11

West Chester

*Chris Mackin ’09

West Virginia

*Zachary Houchin ’08

16

The Beta Theta Pi

Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Ryan Bares ’07, *Daniel Rieland ’09, Jacob Sherman ’04, Jordan Steinert ’10, Andrew Thomas ’97, B. Drew Thornsberry ’07, Thomas Wolf ’08

Wittenberg

*Jeffrey Schak ’09

Guests

Robyn Adams, Patti Akers, Will Allen, Jessica Allen, Karen Allmond, Angela Arrey-Wastavino, Cora Baker, Judith Barnhart, Sue Beall, Shelley Beall, Cathy Billoni, Karen Blesch, David Blesch, Mary Bowen, Mindy Brant, Caitlin Brant, Jana Brawner, Lee Brawner, Elizabeth Brown, Amy Buch, Patti Bush, Cindy Cabe, Michele Carlquist, Connie Casson, Karen Chinnici, Lu Jo Churchill, Jackye Clark, Brian Clarke, Bonnie Collins, Denise Colon, Elaine Connelly, Jenise Conway, Gayle Cook, Cari Cook, Buck Cooke, Kimberly Corser, Jackie Counts, Margaret Croft, Carolyn Croft, Anna Curtis, Mary Curtis, Chandra Daffer,

Judy Moore, Jennifer Mores, Miss Morgan, Zac Muir, Kathryn Murray, Charlene Norris, Sue Northrup, Meagan Ogle, Sue Overton, Bo Overton, Rula Peinado, Kyle Pendleton, Terry Pierce, Julie Pope, Molly Purinton, Whitney Reece, Cheryl Regan, Valerie Reyes, Kimberly Rothwell, Marc Ruffini, Karen Sargent, Wesley Schaub, Jake Schmidt, Kimberly Schmidt, Daina Schnese, Lori Schnese, John Schuman, Katie Shotts, Brenda Shute, Terisa Sims, Paul Sinders, Frank Solomon, Dee Solomon, Kellie Souza, JoeAnn Stahel, Terri Staples, Leslie Stebbins, Kay Swartz, Kara Talafuse, Claudia Talafuse, Mary Tharp, Sydney Thomas, Alexander Thomas, Coreen Thomas, Michael Thornton, Will Thornton, Fang Townsend, Judith Troncale, Tina Vincent, Marcia Walker, David Wallace, Deanne Walters, Cathy Weise, Rachel Weise, Pam Wenzel, Ann Whitney, Susan Woda, Cyndi Wright, Hollie York

* delegate


17

0

beta theta pi

General Convention july 30 - august 2, 2009

16

The Beta Theta Pi

the historic biltmore hotel phoenix, arizona

th

Beta Theta Pi is unique in having an annual Convention that oversees the governance of the Fraternity. Convention is celebrated in various cities throughout North America with up to 1,000 Betas and friends in attendance each year. The convention is vital not only as a governing body but also as perhaps the most important enduring force for the maintenance of the Beta spirit. Registration information will be available at www.betathetapi.org in early 2009.


THE MEN ...

OF PRINCIPLE INITIATIVE

10 YEARS LATER

W

e can look to the future pondering with wide-eyed wonder, but we are here, and it is now, and something must be done.

Such a concise, compelling quote may do more to explain the impetus for the Men of Principle initiative — and the resulting evolution of Beta Theta Pi over the last 10 years – than any other study, speech, video or personal interview. Interestingly enough, it made its way to an Administrative Office staff member as an email footnote from an energetic, yet frustrated, chapter president. It was five o’clock in the morning, and he was tired. He was exhausted. What caused his frustrations is really no mystery. And, at this point — on the 10 year anniversary of the establishment of the Men of Principle initiative — It is really not important. What a young chapter president experienced as he tried to mobilize a group of difficult, uncooperative peers toward a more positive Beta experience, was actually occurring all across North America. It was happening in Beta Theta Pi and in 70+ other inter/national college fraternities across the land, too.

There’s a Scene

The year was 1998, and Beta Theta Pi was about to embark upon what would become arguably one of the most pivotal moments and periods in the Fraternity’s history. The founding in 1839, the acclaimed Beta Firsts of the 1870s and 1880s, the establishment of the first administrative secretary and Administrative Office in 1949, and the long-awaited new Foundation and Administrative Office of 1994 were significant, grand achievements. They were major culture-shaping influences of Beta Theta Pi, for sure. 18

The Beta Theta Pi

But it would be Men of Principle, the organization’s first culture-reversing reversing initiative, which may prove to be the largest of tasks, the most difficult in terms of achievability. As is often suggested, “facts are stubborn, stubborn things.” So it is important to remember the context of Beta Theta Pi — and the entire fraternal movement, for that matter — in the early-to-mid-1990s. Fraternities were hemorrhaging from all angles in terms of academics, recruitment, risk management,


“WE CAN LOOK TO THE FUTURE

PONDERING WITH

WIDE-EYED WONDER,

BUT WE ARE

HERE, AND IT IS NOW,

AND SOMETHING MUST BE DONE. – Author Unknown

housing infrastructure, alumni involvement, institutional support, public relations, etc. To suggest the whole fraternal community was in a state of disrepair would be a gross understatement. Disarray was more like it, and Beta Theta Pi, in many respects, was no exception. Perhaps more important than the most easilyidentified bullet points that roll off the tongue when talking about serious fraternal issues, one word seems to sum it up better than the rest: relevance. Beta Theta Pi was slowly yet surely becoming irrelevant throughout North America, and the data supported that fact from every perspective.

The Intervention

Some call it providence. Others call it luck. A few even suggest it was a calculated, deliberate strategy. Each perspective is somewhat true — depending upon who is doing the viewing. Regardless, Wooglin surely smiled on Beta Theta Pi in the mid-90s and early 2000s. The fact remains that, at that point in time, there were multiple, independent forces stirring. Restless forces that would indeed influence a cultural revolution within Beta Theta Pi. It would be a revolution of epic proportions.

In August 1996, E.B. Wilson, St. Lawrence ’53, chairman of the board for St. Lawrence University, wrote a “Letter to the Editor” challenging Beta’s leadership to be more active in the identification of Beta’s true mission and vision, and work aggressively toward actually implementing policies and programs to achieve both. “I would strongly urge that Beta Theta Pi take a position of fraternal leadership with the publicly stated objective of reforming the Greek presence in the academic community,” noted Wilson. He advised that form should pursue at least five initial goals: 1) Define in contemporary language the base case for membership in a Greek society 2) Make academic performance an explicit commitment and find ways to demonstrate that membership in a Greek society enhances academic achievement 3) Establish and self-enforce a code of conduct which makes the Greek societies the paradigm of responsible social behavior 4) Build a program that encourages broad-based opportunity for leadership training, within the Fraternity and in service to the community at large

ROAD MAP 1 9 9 6 Summer 1996 Administrative Secretary Robert L. (Bob) Cottrell, Miami ’54 leads The Leadership Challenge book club review with the Chapter Services department. August 9, 1996 A “Letter to the Editor” critical of Beta’s state of affairs and leadership in the interfraternal world sent by E. B. Wilson, St. Lawrence ’53 to editor of The Beta Theta Pi, L. E. (Erv) Johnson, Idaho ’53. September 23, 1996 Stemming from the staff’s book club review, Chapter Management Consultant Jason R. Bennett, Georgia ’96 drafts white-paper reflective of the relevance of Beta’s Three Great Principles. Fall 1996 General Secretary Jerry M. Blesch, Centre ’60, in collaboration with Administrative Secretary Cottrell, secures Wilson as professional counsel for strategic planning exercise; larger 25-person committee membership recruited, including undergraduates, alumni, women, parents, peer fraternity and sorority executive directors, and Dr. Phil Shriver, president emeritus of Miami University.

Fall 2008

19


There were no defined formulas, no pre-existing Beta programs, no recipes or manuscripts on how best to bring the Men of Principle initiative to life.

ROAD MAP 1 9 9 7 February 22, 1997 First meeting of the Strategic Vision Steering Committee held in Cincinnati, Ohio. Winter, Spring, Summer 1997 Steering Committee meets monthly in cities across North America to advance Strategic Vision planning effort. November 1, 1997 Strategic Vision Steering Committee completes work at final meeting in Dallas, Texas; Mission, Vision and Nine Goals turned over to Men of Principle Development Team, chaired by General Fraternity Vice President, Daniel L. Westra, Virginia Tech ’76. Winter 1997/Spring 1998 Development Team begins creating modules and strategies for Fraternity-wide implementation of Men of Principle.

5) Connect these attributes of Greek membership to the outcomes of professional careers and in life-long participation in a global society as an engaged citizen. Almost simultaneously, members of the Fraternity’s staff in Oxford were gathering weekly during a summer book-club review of Kouzes and Posner’s best-selling book The Leadership Challenge. Led by thenAdministrative Secretary Bob Cottrell, Miami ’54, the Fraternity’s chapter management consultants began voicing concerns that what they were studying in Oxford was not the reality of the Beta experience on campus. Chapters lacked consistent standards of accountability, alumni involvement, leadership training, resources and opportunities to operate and foster a healthy chapter culture — one centered on academics, brotherhood and the best of the Fraternity’s traditions. As a result of those challenging sessions in the basement of the Administrative Office, Jason Bennett, Georgia ’96 composed a white-paper that suggested, “Mutual aid and assistance, devotion to the cultivation of the intellect, and unsullied friendship and unfaltering fidelity are still as critical to building better men in today’s society as they were in 1839. Like America’s founders, Pater Knox and his associates chose our founding principles wisely. It is now our charge to see that we transmit these values to future generations using current wisdom and methodology.” The primary suggestion emanating from those discussions was that, “it is not that Beta’s principles are irrelevant on campuses today. It’s just that so many of our practices and actions are.” Thankfully, as so often happens in organizations when the overly-inflated egos of a few take priority over the masses, Beta Theta Pi’s leadership — led by General Secretary Jerry M. Blesch, Centre ’60 — did

20

The Beta Theta Pi

not brush aside these offerings of constructive criticism. Actually, he and the Board of Trustees did just the opposite: Brother Wilson was engaged professionally to lead his own Fraternity through a high-level, comprehensive strategic planning exercise. Likewise, Brother Cottrell continued hiring talented young men right out of college to the Oxford staff, giving them the ownership and freedom to develop programs and implement ideas that could improve the manner in which the General Fraternity supported the on-campus Beta experience. His actions were followed closely and perpetuated aggressively by successor Stephen B. Becker, Florida ’69 (administrative secretary, 1998-2007). “Recruit and retain the best” became the mantra at 5134 Bonham Road.

An Unconventional Experiment

While risky and without precedence, a $200,000 allocation from the Baird Fund was approved by the Board of Trustees as a means to the end of saving Beta Theta Pi through a high-quality, comprehensive, extended planning effort. The strategic exercise would take nearly 12 months to complete and, following a year’s worth of piloting in the 1998-99 academic year with three strikingly different chapters at Nebraska, Georgia and Pennsylvania, the Men of Principle initiative was formally introduced at the 160th General Convention in Oxford in 1999. It was a remarkable occasion; most notably because the organization had little more than a simple Mission and Vision Statement along with Nine Goals (on a few sheets of paper) — and only a year’s worth of three pilot campus experiences from which to draw. There were no defined formulas, no preexisting Beta programs, no recipes or manuscripts on how best to bring the Men of Principle initiative to life. It was little more than a concept; little more than a possibility. It is amazing what happens when men and women come together and act on the belief


ROAD MAP 1 9 9 8 February 7, 1998 Alpha chapter in Oxford, Ohio, closes for continual risk management violations. June 1, 1998 Fraternity hires first Director of Men of Principle, L. Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96. Summer 1998 Fraternity secures Senator Richard G. Lugar, Denison ’54 as official spokesman of the Men of Principle initiative. Summer 1998 Fraternity hires Mission City Training and Development, associates of Kouzes and Posner, to create Beta-specific leadership curriculum based upon The Leadership Challenge.

that there’s nothing they can’t accomplish. Courage tends to do that to the fearless — and the threatened. What was learned as a result of the Nebraska chapter’s efforts to rebuild after a reorganization that reduced the Chapter to a dozen or so young men on campus; Georgia’s successful implementation of a completely alcohol-free recruitment period, and Pennsylvania’s struggle with membership and overall chapter operations would be the launching pad to a decade of listening. Ten years of clawing through difficult issues — one after another — by humbled, driven Beta volunteers and staff. From the beginning it was clear: no longterm success could be experienced without engaging the undergraduates from all corners of North America. An undergraduatefocused cultural change effort would require the involvement and leadership of undergraduates. It would be the proving ground for the critically acclaimed Men of Principle initiative. Ownership, involvement and relationship development was the name of the game. Former Men of Principle director, Scott J. Allen, Minnesota ’95 commented, “It was a fun time to be on staff and in the Fraternity. We were moving at a rapid pace and there was a strong sense of team among all involved.

It was new ground for our organization, but Beta’s most talented volunteers, undergraduates and staff were committed to making it work.” Thankfully, it was also through the work of Donald G. (Dipper) DiPaolo, Michigan ’78 that the intensity of Beta brotherhood at the General Fraternity level began to change. Advisory Council member and former General Treasurer John Stebbins, Emory ’92, remarked, “Under Dipper’s unique facilitation abilities, we finally started having deep, meaningful conversations — conversations that mattered and that connected us more strongly to the Fraternity and one another. All of a sudden, Beta became bigger than what she had ever been — and it happened right before our eyes.” Eventually, as those sentiments became a shared reality, more and more chapters would sign on and embrace the tenets and expectations of the Men of Principle initiative, which were essentially nothing more than a contemporary restatement of the Fraternity’s founding principles, obligations and public objects of the 1800s.

Summer 1998 Fraternity hires Richard Harrison Bailey/The Agency to spearhead Men of Principle public branding and marketing strategy. Summer 1998 Beta Foundation sponsors 15 undergraduates to the North-American Interfraternity Conference’s Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute. Summer 1998 The Fraternity Executives Association asks Beta Administrative Office staff to assume leadership for organizing annual Field Staff Conference, official training program for all inter/national fraternity staff consultants. August 1998 Robert L. (Bob) Cottrell, Miami ’54 retires as administrative secretary; Stephen B. Becker, Florida ’69 assumes full-time role as 10th administrative secretary. August 1998 159th General Convention delegates enlarge Board of Trustees from six to nine members. Men of Principle initiative introduced in draft form by Donald G. (Dipper) DiPaolo, Michigan ’78 at Convention opening session. August 28-30, 1998 First Men of Principle Kickoff Weekend conducted with pilot chapter at University of Nebraska. September 11-13, 1998 First Men of Principle Kickoff Weekend conducted with pilot chapter at University of Georgia. December 1998 For the first time, the Administrative Office staff sends all Beta staff members, including education consultants, to the NIC’s and the Association of Fraternity Advisors’ Annual Meeting.

But hope is not a strategy, and establishing a foothold in the culture in order to shift its focus back to the founding values of the Fraternity would require intense, courageous, principled leadership. Leadership that would agree to Fall 2008

21


ROAD MAP 1 9 9 9 January 29-31, 1999 First Men of Principle Kickoff Weekend conducted with pilot chapter at University of Pennsylvania. Winter 1999 Alpha chapter re-opens by three Miami undergraduates committed to the Men of Principle initiative, including Brian Fey, Miami ’00, grandson of first Administrative Secretary Ralph N. Fey, Miami ’40. June 1, 1999 Fraternity hires second Director of Men of Principle, Scott J. Allen, Minnesota ’95. June 26-30, 1999 Inaugural The Institute for Men of Principle held in Oxford, graduating 45 undergraduates, along with six Beta alumni and six nonBetas as program faculty. June 26-30, 1999 Friends of Beta “status” born from faculty serving as facilitators to The Institute for Men of Principle. September 1, 1999 Jonathan J. Brant, Miami ’75, former executive vice president of the NIC, hired as director of the Beta Theta Pi Foundation. Fall 1999 Beta Foundation provides $500 grants to 18 chapters in their effort to conduct the Recruitment Through Scholarship Program. Fall 1999 Advisory Team training sessions launched to recruit and train five-person advisory teams supporting chapters in pursuit of Men of Principle values. Fall 1999 Model Men of Principle Pledge Education Program provided to all chapters and colonies as a resource for continual pledge program improvement.

22

The Beta Theta Pi

four non-negotiables for chapters choosing to sign-on to Men of Principle: 1) a five-person trained and active advisory team 2) alcohol-free recruitment 3) elimination of the rogue “National Test” (also known as “The Shep Test”) 4) commitment to a 100% hazing-free pledge program Ultimately, to be a fraternity of integrity and relevance at the turn of the century, Beta’s record must match her rhetoric. We could no longer claim to be one thing, yet act like something completely different. The philosophy of the Men of Principle initiative was strikingly different from most fraternities’ membership programs that were rolled-out during the ’90s — namely because every Beta chapter and colony was encouraged to take ownership for developing their own customized annual plan, and to select resources and participate in programs offered by the General Fraternity based upon the unique needs of their own chapter’s culture. UCLA’s needs may be different than those of Maine, and the needs of our Washington chapter could be quite distinct from that of Central Florida. Recounted former staff director, David Rae, British Columbia ’00, “I vividly remember Vice President Pete Morse, DePauw ’90, on stage at the 2001 Convention charging the undergraduates toward a more full understanding of Men of Principle and Beta as a unified Fraternity of all chapters: ‘We don’t care how you get there. Just get there!’” And so it was. A plan more concerned with substance over style, function over form.

Gaining Momentum

Chapters that embraced the Men of Principle philosophy would, week-by-week, continue to add momentum to the revolution, as young Betas everywhere chipped away at the

negative aspects of their own chapter culture by engaging in hard, difficult conversations. Aided by encouragement from their trained local advisors and district chiefs, intense staff support from Oxford, and a growing menu of experiential leadership programs and operational resources provided by the General Fraternity, they would: •

Understand and accept the fact that the genius of Beta Theta Pi at the undergraduate level rests upon the concept of self-governance and personal responsibility

Strengthen internal accountability measures for all brothers through proper and purposeful use of the Eye of Wooglin and Kai Committee

Prioritize academics as an important value of Beta membership and use it as a singular most-important measuring stick during recruitment

Reach out to alumni, advisors and the General Fraternity for genuine coaching and advice on how better to run their local chapter

Participate in new leadership programming being offered by the General Fraternity and consider it a prerequisite for current and up-andcoming chapter leaders

Genuinely engage their university or college’s Greek advisor as a friend and advocate of Beta Theta Pi, and practice a long-held Beta tradition of interfraternalism

Of course, Men of Principle would meet its share of challenges over the years. Recalled former staff director for Men of Principle, Vince Mikolay, Bethany ’00, “Along the way we had complications with advisory team dedication, new member buy-in, policy adherence and Greek community accountability. But


Academics All-Beta Chapter Grade Point Average

3.050 3.000 2.950

2.939

2.920

2.950

2.984

2.999

3.008

3.015

2005 2006

2007

3.004

2.900 2.850 2.800 2.750

2.820

2.846

2.821

2.700 1997 1998 1999

the beauty of Men of Principle was that it was created with our constituents, for our constituents. This gave it flexibility to change and adapt to challenges to help it grow and improve. Given all the great upgrades we’ve made since 1998, I’d like to think that, today, we’re really running on Men of Principle 2.0.”

2000

2001 2002

2003 2004

Stebbins, general treasurer during most of Men of Principle’s explosive growth, added, “Changing a culture is hard, very hard. We knew that we had to be revolutionary at the chapter level and evolutionary at the General Fraternity level until there was a critical mass in support of truly living lives consistent with the Ritual of the Fraternity.”

More than 10 international honors have been received from Beta’s interfraternal peers and related associations since inception of the Men of Principle initiative, namely because a pillar of the whole initiative was to only engage in resource, program and policy development that the General Fraternity could execute with absolute excellence. Since superior quality and professionalism has long been a paramount virtue in Beta Theta Pi, maybe there’s no greater tribute to Beta’s heritage — once known as The Pioneering Fraternity — than to now be acclaimed by many as The Leadership Fraternity. A new moniker for which Betas everywhere can take justifiable pride.

Make no mistake, had it not been for the General Fraternity’s volunteer and staff leadership making a commitment to listen — truly listen — to the organization’s undergraduates, local advisors, house corporation members and campus Greek advisors, what we now know as the Men of Principle initiative may never have come to fruition. For it was from that sincere listening — and by confronting the brutal facts of the organization’s culture — that award-winning resources would be developed. Programs that have now become the envy of the interfraternal world and a centerpiece of the organization’s culture.

A surprising development was that much of the interfraternal reputation Beta was garnering since launching Men of Principle was a result not so much of Beta’s actions, but because non-Betas came to love and care for the Fraternity as much as her own members. Conceived as a result of the first non-Beta faculty that helped facilitate the first session of The Institute for Men of Principle in 1999, as well as Steve Dealph (Lambda Chi Alpha) and Lisa Fedler’s (Sigma Kappa) service on the inaugural Men of Principle Development Team, the Friend of Beta network has become a powerful, positive force within the culture of Beta Theta Pi.

ROAD MAP 2 0 0 0 Spring 2000 Staff directors of Men of Principle visit with original Strategic Vision Steering Committee facilitator E. B. Wilson, St. Lawrence ’53 in Boston to revisit original goals and outcomes, followed by visits with national leadership staff directors of Pi Kappa Phi (Charlotte, N.C.) and Sigma Phi Epsilon (Richmond, Va.) fraternities. Summer 2000 Fraternity contracts with Franklin-Covey to develop student planners with Men of Principle resources, Beta-specific reporting reminders, etc.

Fall 2008

23


ROAD MAP 2001-02 Winter 2001 Beta Foundation sponsors seven undergraduates to NIC’s Futures Quest program for newly initiated members.

We shall not cease from exploration, and the end result of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started, and know the place for the first time. ~ T. S. Eliot

April 2001 Beta Theta Pi hosts Interfraternal Education Summit in Oxford as a means for inter/national fraternities to exchange lessons learned and further explore successes and challenges of one another’s educational efforts. June 2001 L. Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96 promoted to Beta Foundation staff; Vincent E. Mikolay, Bethany ’00 and David J.D. Rae, British Columbia ’00 appointed staff directors of Men of Principle initiative. Summer 2001 In collaboration with former Administrative Office staff member Jayson Gaddis, Utah ’95, the Beta Foundation sponsors two inaugural sessions of The Beta Wilderness Challenge in the Uinta Mountains of Utah. August 2001 The Men of Principle Implementation Team launched to broaden the pool of high-caliber facilitators for Kickoff Weekends and the Fraternity’s evolving leadership programs. December 2001 Thomas C. Olver, Central Michigan ’98 appointed the editor of The Beta Theta Pi. Summer 2002 The Leadership College launched in Kansas City, Mo., to improve undergraduate programming during the Convention experience. Summer 2002 Standard Chapter Operating Expectations adopted by the Board of Trustees to reinforce consistent performance measures for all chapters and colonies.

24

The Beta Theta Pi

Over the past 10 years, 492 non-Beta men and women have volunteered as advisors and program faculty to help bring the Men of Principle initiative to life for Betas everywhere. They have been one of the most critical ingredients in this successful recipe celebrated and known as the Men of Principle initiative.

Stoking the Fire

A recent, pivotal moment in the life of the Men of Principle initiative was the launching of Beta’s ground-breaking $15 million capital campaign for educational programming, Upon These Principles – A Campaign For Every Beta. Resulting from the reality that all of the Fraternity’s new leadership programs were putting the organization in an unenviable position of having created demand without a long-term strategy for providing supply, more resources were needed to keep the momentum and cultural-change initiative going. In spite of the economic downturn in the early 2000s, the Board of Trustees and Foundation Board of Directors chose to press forward with the campaign because the leadership development needs of Beta undergraduates everywhere were on the line. Simply put, it was not the time to play it safe. Beta Theta Pi was on the brink of a major cultural breakthrough.

Thankfully, thousands of enthusiastic and loyal Betas, parents and Friends of Beta rallied to the cause, and — at the 2006 General Convention in Toronto — Honorary Campaign Chairman Senator Richard G. Lugar, Denison ’54 and Campaign Chairman W. H. (Bert) Bates, Missouri ’49, announced publicly that $20.1 million had been raised toward the overall campaign goal. It was electric. At the point of celebrating the Upon These Principles campaign, Beta laid claim to the largest fundraising campaign in Greek world history. Fortunately, many of Beta’s peers have since launched even larger capital campaigns — a testament to the positive direction, tone and energy of today’s interfraternal movement.

Relevance, Once Again

By all accounts, Beta’s Men of Principle initiative has become a case-study in organizational change. True, systemic cultural change. As director of leadership development Ryan King, Southern Illinois ’01, former staff director, reflected, “Men of Principle has shown us that Beta Theta Pi’s success will forever be dependent upon the integrity and personal responsibility of undergraduates, alumni and Friends of Beta everywhere.” So, whether it is the quantifiable hard data that points to the effectiveness of increased accountability and discipline at both the


Advisors Involvement

1998

2008

1.95

4.63

1998

2008

147

121

Average Chapter Size

1998

2008

Average Beta Chapter Size All-Fraternity Average Chapter Size

49 38

58 42

Core Volunteer Advisors Per Beta Chapter

(Chapter Counselor, Recruitment, Pledge Education, Financial and Risk Management)

Number of Chapters Number of Beta Chapters and Colonies

(Reported by the NIC)

local chapter and General Fraternity level — including the closing of some 67 chapters with the re/colonization of 41, the fact that Beta’s alcohol-free chapter houses perform at a higher level in virtually every category measurable, or growing chapter memberships, to the intangible emotions experienced at The Wooden Institute, in the weekly chapter meeting or during an exchange between an undergraduate officer and his advisor. Beta is once again a relevant, powerful force on the college campus. It can surely be pointed to as a result of the independent, stirring forces in the ’90s that helped form and advance the Men of Principle initiative. Senator Lugar probably said it best when announcing publicly the Fraternity’s plan to celebrate the coming academic year as the 10 year anniversary of the Men of Principle initiative: “The last decade has been tremendous for Beta Theta Pi, without diminishing for a moment the decades following our foundation in 1839. This really has been the best organized movement — and one that was against the toughest of odds.” As a key Men of Principle influencer, DiPaolo, recently commented, “The most important thing is that Men of Principle has made a difference in the lives of individual men and their families. Because we are striving

more than ever before toward organizational integrity, brothers, sisters, parents and grandparents have also been edified. This added benefit has come about simply because a young man who they love affiliated with Beta Theta Pi.” Indeed, Betas and Friends of Beta everywhere who believed the “here” and “now” is worth being “wide-eyed” are to be thanked. For it has been their faith, foresight and fortitude that has again provided another generation of young Betas with a relevant, worthwhile fraternal experience. One of substance and depth. Like the passionate young chapter president who is working feverishly through the middle of the night to build a stronger, more vibrant fraternity on his given campus, Beta’s longterm success is only secure if her principles are placed above her members’ personalities. Such has been the case this past decade thanks in large part to the Men of Principle initiative.

ROAD MAP 2003-04 June 2003 Ryan E. King, Southern Illinois ’01 appointed staff director of Men of Principle initiative. August 9, 2003 With lead $1.5 million gift by Ann and David L. Brennan, Ohio State ’53 and Thomas L. Brennan, Ohio State ’51, Beta Foundation publicly launches Upon These Principles – A Campaign For Every Beta, to raise $15 million for the advancement and growth of the Men of Principle initiative. August 28, 2003 E. B. Wilson, St. Lawrence ’53 meets in Oxford with members of the Board of Trustees, Men of Principle Steering Committee and Administrative Office staff to review progress after first five years of implementation. Position endorsed to fully integrate Men of Principle Fraternitywide; Chapter Services department in Oxford restructured accordingly. “Beta is Men of Principle.” June 2004 Jon A. Steiner, Willamette ’63 hired as first full time director of volunteer development.

The question now remains whether that same humble hunger is in place at all levels of the Fraternity to keep Beta on the move, constantly looking for ways to strengthen the brotherhood and remain relevant on college campuses across North America. In the end, it is still a never-ending quest of proving relevance. Relevance. — L. Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96 Fall 2008

25


Total number of undergraduates involved in Beta Foundation sponsored leadership programs since th 2,000 1,500 1,250 1,000

465

500 400

ROAD MAP 2005-06

300

January 2005 Focusing on the development of Beta’s volunteer and staff corps, the inaugural Leadership Summit conducted in Oxford, Ohio.

50

February 2005 The inaugural Chapter Presidents Leadership Academy conducted in Oxford, Ohio. May 2, 2005 Kye D. Hittle, Kansas State ’99, promoted as first full time director of Information Technology. August 4, 2005 Beta Theta Pi Foundation Board of Directors expanded from 12 to 18 members. February 2006 District Conclaves eliminated as General Fraternity organized program. The Keystone Regional Leadership Conference launched in St. Louis and Seattle in response to growing requests from undergraduates and advisors for high-quality operational officer and advisor training. July 2006 Beta Foundation celebrates achievement of historic Upon These Principles – A Campaign For Every Beta, raising $20.1 million toward original $15 million goal. July 2006 167th General Convention delegates raise Beta’s chapter GPA standard from 2.5 to 2.7, highest in interfraternal world.

26

The Beta Theta Pi

213 137

200

72

100 25 10

15 7

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION 1999 The John and Nellie Wooden Institute for Men of Principle - Most Outstanding Use of a Foundation Grant, North-American Interfraternity Conference Annual Foundation Seminar 2000 Men of Principle Initiative - Excellence in Educational Programming Award, Association of Fraternity Advisors 2001 Men of Principle Initiative - Hobbs Group Fellow for Educational Program Development Men of Principle Initiative Spokesman Senator Richard G. Lugar, Denison ’54 - Silver Medal for Outstanding Interfraternal Service, North-American Interfraternity Conference 2002 Men of Principle Initiative - Laurel Wreath Award, North-American Interfraternity Conference 2003 Men of Principle Initiative - Exemplar Award, Miami University Greek Values Society

The Donald W. English Beta Wilderness Challenge - Excellence in Educational Programming Award, Association of Fraternity Advisors 2005 The Miller Nichols Chapter Presidents Leadership Academy and The Hugh E. Stephenson Jr. Leadership Summit - HRH Fellow for Educational Program Development, Fraternity Executives Association The Miller Nichols Chapter Presidents Leadership Academy - Most Outstanding Use of a Foundation Grant, North-American Interfraternity Conference Annual Foundation Seminar 2006 The Miller Nichols Chapter Presidents Leadership Academy - Excellence in Educational Programming Award, Association of Fraternity Advisors 2008 The Donald W. English Beta Wilderness Challenge - Most Outstanding Use of a Foundation Grant, North-American Interfraternity Conference Annual Foundation Seminar The Keystone Regional Leadership Conference - Excellence in Educational Programming Award, Association of Fraternity Advisors


e the inception of the Men of Principle Initiative 1,454

1,605

May 5, 2007 Judson A. Horras, Iowa State ’97 appointed as 11th administrative secretary by General Secretary David W. Wright, Ohio State ’67.

1,060 534

ROAD MAP 2 0 0 7

898

488

July 3, 2007 Sue Kraft Fussell, Friend of Beta and former executive director of the Association of Fraternity Advisors, begins professional service as co-director of leadership development.

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Ten Year Reflections On The By E.B. Wilson, St. Lawrence ’53

2006-07

2007-08

Men of Principle Initiative

November 3, 2008 First and by far most important, congratulations to Beta Theta Pi…its Board of Trustees, Foundation Board of Directors, the Administrative Office staff and the network of chapters across the United States and Canada together with their support system of advisors and counselors. Their hard work and dedication, while executing one of the most challenging of strategic transformations, deserves the applause and loudest possible kudos from every living Beta. When the Fraternity, now 10 years ago, began an open and candid reassessment of its mission, in the context of its distinguished past and its recent history, the final outcome was far from certain. Much is owed to the participants in that reassessment: they never shrank from the stark and factual realities that were ever present in the wide ranging discussions. They faced squarely the imperative need to find the ways to ensure the future vitality of the Beta mission in a new and rapidly evolving student culture and campus environment of what was then the approaching 21st century. An important reason that the final outcome was uncertain was that a strategic path had to be found that reconciled potentially competing

goals: articulate a fresh, promising and enduring Beta vision deeply rooted in the rich legacies of Beta’s traditions and heritage, and to do this in all ways that are competitively distinctive, that set Beta at the pinnacle of the Greek world and visionary, transformative change. The result, as we now all well know, is the Men of Principle initiative. The challenges, cultural and environmental referred to above, remain and perhaps are growing in strength, intensifying their influence on student life. But the central purposes of Men of Principle, when faithfully and enthusiastically adopted by Beta chapters, not only fulfill the Beta mission and vision of helping to prepare young men for futures that are rewarded by personal and professional success and engaged citizenship. But additionally, by so doing, Beta Theta Pi becomes a welcome, vital and respected partner in the educational community that it serves and in which it resides.

ROAD MAP 2 0 0 8 August 9, 2008 Spokesman Senator Lugar declares 2008-09 academic year as the official 10 Year Anniversary of the Men of Principle initiative.

Now that’s worthy of a 10 year celebration! But not an invitation to relax. Men of Principle must be dynamic, not static, constantly evolving, challenged and tested. Sustained leadership at the top is never the easy road. It takes the special character of Beta Theta Pi to fulfill that destiny. Fall 2008

27


Beta Foundation Chairman’s Letter Extracted from the fall 2008 Annual Report

I am hopeful you will take a few minutes to seriously digest and reflect on the work of the Beta Foundation, along with the important role you have played this past year in helping advance our personal and leadership development mission. Together, we are committed to “building men of principle for a principled life.” Like the undergraduates we develop on a daily basis, you matter, my friend. You matter a lot.

Michael G. Feinstein, MIT ’82 Dear Brothers, Parents and Friends of Beta: As newly appointed chairman, it gives me considerable pleasure to personally share with you the Beta Theta Pi Foundation’s 2008 Annual Report summary. What a year of achievement and focus it has been. This year’s publication reinforces the parallels of the Beta Foundation’s work and that of “nature.” Believe it or not, the similarities are striking. Nothing summarizes the philosophy under which we’ve been working to improve our beloved Fraternity than the quote once penned by Nelson Henderson:

“The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit.” We couldn’t agree more. While the pages that follow are chockfull of organizational/financial data and undergraduate-centered achievement, a primary purpose of this publication is to also thank those individuals and organizations who continue to provide their treasure in helping nurture and grow a brotherhood of purpose. In fact, a brotherhood of lifelong relevance to the lives of thousands of energetic young men across North America.

Of course, as you can imagine, now that the academic year is back in full swing, the Foundation is once again actively rallying Betas and Friends of Beta across the land to support our annual fund drive, the Beta Leadership Fund. When called upon by Foundation Director Jonathan Brant and our staff in Oxford in the coming days, it’s my hope that you will give all you can so we can keep our important undergraduate leadership programs and services going. Young Betas everywhere are counting on all of us! Yes, as we take on another year of important challenges and opportunities, your annual support of the BLF is critical to the continuation of the high-caliber leadership programs and services that build strong Beta chapters at the local level. It’s these programs that provide a premier undergraduate experience – one that distinguishes Beta from all other fraternities. Again, let me stress how important you are to the continued progress of Beta Theta Pi. You truly are making a difference. Finally, I would like to recognize our two outgoing Foundation Board members, Jim Ellis, Missouri ’55 and recent

“The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit.” ~ Nelson Henderson 28

The Beta Theta Pi


Chairman Tom Hook, Miami ’81. Both have been so instrumental in providing the resources and leadership necessary to push the Men of Principle initiative and our Fraternity’s educational Foundation forward. Their contributions in both insight and encouragement have been instrumental, and we are grateful. Indeed, I am humbled to serve as your Foundation’s chairman in the coming year,

my friend. With that, please know we will continue to be effective and efficient in garnering and managing the resources that make Beta Theta Pi one of North America’s greatest college fraternities. Sincerely and in ____kai____, Michael G. Feinstein, MIT ’82 Chairman Foundation Board of Directors

“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.” ~ Robert Louis Stevenson

Financial Statement Michael G. Feinstein, MIT ’82

Beta Theta Pi Foundation statement of financial position for the fiscal years ending May 31, 2008 and 2007.

Assets Cash and Cash Equivalents Investments Inventory Accounts Receivable Due from Other Funds Buildings, Furniture and Fixtures Due to Other Funds Total Assets Liabilities Accounts Payable Liabilities - Other Annuities Payable Total Liabilities Net Assets Unrestricted Unrestricted Board Designated Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted Total Net Assets Total Liabilities and Net Assets

Residence Bedford, Massachuse�s

2008

2007

$912,749.95 11,897,669.10 29,274.01 1,443,049.49 108,286.63 2,212,756.19 -127,314.69 $16,476,470.68

$848,992.13 11,360,547.48 34,043.95 2,171,057.08 105,587.73 2,036,440.76 -179,828.95 $16,376,840.18

$41,124.34 123,959.36 303,310.96 468,394.66

$58,156.92 46,570.67 263,453.78 368,181.37

3,989,727.24 3,196,379.95 3,814,293.81 5,007,675.02 16,008,076.02

3,293,172.46 2,845,379.78 5,300,370.03 4,569,736.54 16,008,658.81

$16,476,470.68

$16,376,840.18

For the complete 2008 Foundation Annual Report log on to www.betathetapi.org or contact the Foundation & Administrative Office at 800-800-2382.

Family Married, two children Interests Avid Patriots, Cel�cs and Yankees fan; also enjoys music and traveling with his family Professionally Managing Director at Sempre Management; former General Partner at Venrock Associates; Board member of Boston-Power. Former Board member at Quantum Bridge Communica�ons, CircleLending, Ciclon Semiconductor and WaveSmith Networks. Beta Involvement Former financial advisor and current house corpora�on vice-president for the Beta Upsilon chapter at MIT. Current pledge educa�on advisor to the chapter; served as an area captain for the Upon These Principles capital campaign and on the Beta Theta Pi Founda�on Board of Directors since 2003.


Merit Scholarships Beta Foundation Merit Scholarships The Beta Theta Pi Foundation’s merit scholarship program, instituted in 1949 by the Beta Theta Pi Board of Trustees, has enabled our members to achieve their academic endeavors by providing important financial assistance.

This year’s scholarship recipients are active in varsity athletics, university-wide organizations and philanthropy. They are often Eagle Scouts, community volunteers, youth coaches and tutors.

Beta Theta Pi offered 69 scholarships — totaling $83,425 — to undergraduate and graduate student members of the Fraternity as well as sons and daughters of Betas who excelled in the areas of academics, chapter leadership and campus/community involvement. Their achievements and leadership range from officer roles within the chapter, student government and interfraternity council, to honorary societies such as Order of Omega, Phi Eta Sigma and Golden Key.

For more information about next year’s opportunities, log on to www.betathetapi.org. Scholarship forms and details will be available on the web site in early February. The deadline for submission is April 1. All scholarships will be awarded prior to the 170th General Convention in Phoenix, Arizona.

Top Eight Scholarship Recipients

The top eight Founders scholarships (pictured below) are endowed by an estate gift of Robert C. Lafferty, Ohio Wesleyan ’28.

30

$2,375 John Reily Knox Memorial Scholarship

$2,375 Samuel Taylor Marshall Memorial Scholarship

$2,375 David Linton Memorial Scholarship

$2,375 James George Smith Memorial Scholarship

Brian F. Reynolds, Kansas ’08

Matthew D. Martin, Iowa State ’10

Robert J. Dusak, West Chester ’10

Bahram J. Nikmard, Texas A&M ’09

$2,375 Charles Henry Hardin Memorial Scholarship

$2,375 John Holt Duncan Memorial Scholarship

$2,375 Michael Clarkson Ryan Memorial Scholarship

$2,375 Thomas Boston Gordon Memorial Scholarship

Grant E. Schnell, Central Florida ’09

Jason A. Carlson, Wichita State ’09

John Scott A. Beeler, Missouri-Kansas City ’12

Fraser C. Henderson Jr., Virginia ’09

The Beta Theta Pi


$1,800

Horace G. Lozier Memorial Scholarship Bruce E. DeBruhl, Kettering ’10

$1,625

Todd Elias Memorial Scholarship Kenton M. Moore, Nebraska ’09

$1,475

Thad Byrne Memorial Scholarship Joshua M. Mitchell, Virginia ’10

$90,000

$1,475

William H. Bates Oxford Cup Scholarship Kyle A. Becker, Oregon ’10

$80,000

$1,400

Otho E. Lane Memorial Scholarship Michael J. Scott, Miami ’09

$70,000

$1,350

Seth R. & Corrine H. Brooks Scholarship Brooke M. Allen daughter of Zachary W. Allen, Oklahoma ’85

$1,350

Seth R. & Corrine H. Brooks Scholarship Alyssa M. Zagorac daughter of Brian G. Zagorac, Carnegie Mellon ’83

Total Merit Scholarship Awards *Number of Merit Scholarships Awarded

$83,425 69*

$82,550 66*

$85,000

$75,000

$68,975 58*

$66,500 64* $58,900 58*

$65,000 $60,000 $55,000 $50,000 $0

-04

03

20

-05

04

20

-06

05

20

-07

06

20

-08

07

20

$1,325

William C. Scheetz Family Scholarship Matthew L. Holzner, George Washington ’10

$1,325

William C. Scheetz Family Scholarship Joshua D. Kresge, Carnegie Mellon ’10

$1,050

John R. Simpson Memorial Scholarship John R. Palmtag, Nebraska ’09

$1,325

William C. Scheetz Family Scholarship Thomas S. Nell, Northwestern ’10

$1,050

John R. Simpson Memorial Scholarship Hunt J. Rose, Oklahoma State ’10

$1,300

E. William Palmer Memorial Scholarship Maxwell J. Muheim, Lehigh ’09

$1,050

John R. Simpson Memorial Scholarship Christopher J. Smith, Missouri-Kansas City ’12

$1,250

Douglas W. Hill Jr. Memorial Scholarship Galen R. Crawford, Cincinnati ’08

$1,050

Steven Craig Merrill Memorial Scholarship Rishi P. Singh, Virginia ’11

$1,250

Douglas W. Hill Jr. Memorial Scholarship Stephen G. Theulen, Iowa ’10

$1,025

Burton L. Gerber Scholarship Timothy C. Devane, Wesleyan ’09

$1,200

Carl A. Kroch Oxford Cup Memorial Scholarship Thomas M. Demmer, Dayton ’09

$1,000

Ben C. Rich Memorial Scholarship William C. Brubaker, Iowa State ’10

$1,125

Douglas J. Neeley Memorial Scholarship Daniel A. Gajewski, Kenyon ’09

$1,000

Ben C. Rich Memorial Scholarship Joseph E. Gruber, Willamette ’09

$1,125

Douglas J. Neeley Memorial Scholarship Joseph S. Higgins, Truman State ’09

$1,000

Edith Cantor Morrison Memorial Scholarship Graeme H. Allen, Truman State ’08

$1,125

James L. Gavin Memorial Scholarship Jordan L. Brewer, Cincinnati ’10

$1,000

Fred A. Seaton Memorial Scholarship Anthony V. Crawford, Florida ’09

$1,125

James L. Gavin Memorial Scholarship Corey J. Georgesen, Nebraska ’10

$1,000

Fred A. Seaton Memorial Scholarship Travis M. Fischer, Minnesota ’05

$1,125

James L. Gavin Memorial Scholarship Jared S. Halpin, Missouri-Kansas City ’08

$1,000

John J. and Elizabeth Rhodes Scholarship Scott W. Cantonwine, Willamette ’10

$1,050

Bertram W. Bennett Memorial Scholarship Thomas S. Salistean, Nebraska ’09

$1,000

John J. and Elizabeth Rhodes Scholarship Carson D. Vaughan, Nebraska ’10

$1,050

Bertram W. Bennett Memorial Scholarship Kevin M. Widmaier, Georgia Tech ’09

$1,000

John J. and Elizabeth Rhodes Scholarship Jacob B. Wittler, Kansas ’09

$1,050

Cleveland Alumni Association Scholarship Janson P. Ferrera, Colorado Mines ’09

$1,000

Thomas D. & Karen Cassady Scholarship Lawrence P. Lampe, Cincinnati ’10

$1,050

Cleveland Alumni Association Scholarship John S. Gawey, Oklahoma ’08

$875

Gupton A. Vogt Oxford Cup Memorial Scholarship Matthew C. Schweinzger, Indiana ’10

$1,050

Cleveland Alumni Association Scholarship Andrew K. Jennings, Hampden-Sydney ’09

$850

Ronald, Randall & Roger Helman Scholarship Andrew P. Sholudko, Connecticut ’09

$1,050

Cleveland Alumni Association Scholarship Matthew R. Schill, Iowa ’09

$825

Misty & Sally Shoop Scholarship Brian N. Barry, Florida ’08

$1,050

Edward M. Brown Oxford Cup Memorial Scholarship Richard J. Cassidy, Florida ’10

$725

Delta Tau Chapter Scholarship Brendan B. Chapman, Western Ontario ’04

$1,050

Edward M. Brown Oxford Cup Memorial Scholarship Clayton S. Crites, Carnegie Mellon ’09

$700

Stephen D. Bechtel Oxford Cup Scholarship Matthew D. Rarity, Whitman ’01

$1,050

John R. Simpson Memorial Scholarship Patrick R. Cleary, Pennsylvania ’03

$650

Michael W. Toennis Scholarship Daniel A. Heathcock, Willamette ’09

$1,050

John R. Simpson Memorial Scholarship Marvin B. Haiman, Iowa ’10

$625

James P. Kirkgasser Memorial Scholarship Harrison Tsai, Cornell ’10

$1,050

John R. Simpson Memorial Scholarship Eric Jesse, George Washington ’06

$550

Hugh E. Stephenson Oxford Cup Scholarship Tyler J. Thompson, Willamette ’09

$1,050

John R. Simpson Memorial Scholarship Thomas B. Jones, Indiana ’10

$500

H. Hiram Stephenson Oxford Cup Memorial Scholarship Jonathan R. Dattilo, Northwestern ’10

$1,050

John R. Simpson Memorial Scholarship Spencer D. Kinzie, Oklahoma ’10

$400

Adam S. Burford Memorial Scholarship Paul M. Saridakis, Ohio State ’08

Fall 2008

31


Leadership Programs 22% – Percentage of Beta

undergraduates participating in one or more leadership programs in 2008.

Individual Leadership Program Summary Reports Since inception of the Men of Principle initiative in 1998, Beta Theta Pi has become known interfraternally as The Leadership Fraternity. Boasting some of North America’s most high-caliber, progressive collegiate leadership programs, our Fraternity believes that a safe, enjoyable, high-quality undergraduate Beta experience is the result of intentional leadership training – programs aimed at developing the hearts and minds of more than 6,500 young Betas across North America. Recognized internationally with 11 awards by our interfraternal peers, the following pages summarize the awe-inspiring participation growth of our treasured Beta Foundation sponsored leadership programs.

The Donald W. English Beta Wilderness Challenge 2008 — Grand Teton, Wyoming

“In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.” ~ Aristotle Total number of undergraduates involved in Beta Foundation sponsored leadership programs since inception of the Men of Principle Initiative

1,605

2,000

1,454

1,500 1,250 1,000

465

500

488

534

898

1,060

400 213

300 200

137 72

100 50 25

7

10

15

1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 32

The Beta Theta Pi


Tapping Up-and-Coming Leaders to Build the Beta Bridge Futures Quest, hosted by the North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC), is a two-day interfraternal institute for newly initiated fraternity men. Held in the winter, Futures Quest focuses on leadership development and personal leadership styles. Number of participating undergraduates 120

107

104

101

100

87

80 60

39

40

31

23

20

7

0

-01

00

20

-02

01

20

-03

02

20

-04

03

20

-05

04

20

-06

05

20

-07

06

20

-08

07

20

Answering the Call of Principled Leadership Endowed through a gift of the Miller Nichols Charitable Foundation The Presidents Academy provides an opportunity for all chapter and colony presidents to travel to the founding site of the Fraternity in Oxford, Ohio, for three days of intense leadership training and networking with other undergraduate presidents from across North America. Number of participating undergraduates 110

101

100

100

100 89

90 80 70 0

-05

04

20

-06

05

20

-07

06

20

-08 07 20

Fanning the Flame of Principled Leadership Keystone is a high quality, regional education experience focusing on chapter officer development, principled leadership and volunteer training. Although Beta has other popular values-based leadership opportunities, this is the first that teaches operational concepts to every chapters’ top eight executive officers. Number of participating undergraduates *Number of sessions

700 701 4*

526 3*

600 500 400

256 2*

300 200 0

-06

05

20

For the complete 2008 Foundation Annual Report log on to www.betathetapi.org or contact the Foundation & Administrative Office at 800-800-2382.

-07

06

20

-08

07

20

Fall 2008

33


Discovering Beta Theta Pi’s True Principles The John and Nellie Wooden Institute for Men of Principle, endowed by a gift of James A. (Jim) Collins, UCLA ’50 and his wife Carol, is a five-day values-based leadership experience that has garnered international attention and recognition from the Greek community. It continues to be a hallmark education program for the Fraternity.

Number of participating undergraduates *Number of sessions

300 250 200

236 3*

202 3*

196 4*

304 4*

272 4*

294 4*

269 4*

150 3*

150

102 2*

100

45 1*

50 0

-99

98

19

-00

99

19

-01

00

20

-02

01

20

-03

02

20

-04

03

20

-05

04

20

-06

05

20

-07

06

20

-08

07

20

Applying Beta’s Principles to Daily Life The Donald W. English Beta Wilderness Challenge, endowed by a gift of Jeffrey N. Newton, Miami ’77 and his wife Carolyn, is a six-day outdoor leadership experience that takes Beta undergraduates through a bold agenda focusing on the principles and obligations of the Fraternity and a series of challenging outdoor elements that promote personal development.

Number of participating undergraduates *Number of sessions

60 50

39 4*

33 4*

40 30

49 4*

47 5*

41 4*

41 3*

42 3*

17 2*

20 10 0

-01

00

20

-02

01

20

-03

02

20

-04

03

20

-05

04

20

-06

05

20

20

-07 7-08 06 0 20

Championing Beta’s Principles for a Better Future Endowed by a gift of James J. Ellis, Missouri ’55 and his wife, Van, The Hugh E. Stephenson Jr. Leadership Summit provides an opportunity for all regional directors, district chiefs and assistant district chiefs to meet annually in Oxford to focus on the future of Beta Theta Pi. Participants receive focused training on how to utilize all available resources of the General Fraternity, while at the same time learning how to better support undergraduates and advisors at the local level. Number of participating General Fraternity Officers 70

67

64

65

67

68

60 40 20 0

05

20

34

The Beta Theta Pi

06

20

07

20

08

20


Embracing Beta’s Interfraternal Responsibility The Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute (UIFI), hosted by the North-American Interfraternity Conference, is a five-day co-educational leadership institute that focuses on personal and chapter values, leadership development, team building and the art of building community.

Number of participating undergraduates 72

70

68

70 60

51

50

50

35

40

51

39 34

27

30 15

20

7

10 5

-97 7-98 8-99 9-00 0-01 1-02 2-03 3-04 4-05 5-06 6-07 7-08 9 9 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

96

19

Connecting “the Beta Spirit” with our Principled Future Endowed by gifts from family and friends of Beta’s past president, Peter F. Greiner, Minnesota ’51, The Leadership College provides leadership training and education for up-and-coming leaders of Beta chapters and colonies. Conducted during the Fraternity’s General Convention, this year’s program curriculum focused on Stephen Covey’s best-selling book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.

Number of participating undergraduates 333

350

310

311

300 250

212

200

175

174 163

150 100 0

-02

01

20

-03

02

20

-04

03

20

-05

04

20

-06

05

20

-07 7-08 06 0 20

20

Recruiting Men of Principle to Help Build Beta Theta Pi The Men of Principle Scholarship Grant Program supports chapters and colonies by helping them award merit scholarships to non-affiliated males who have distinguished themselves inside and outside the classroom. Applicants are not required to join the Fraternity, but it is through the application and interview process that Beta chapters and colonies meet some of the most accomplished, achievementoriented young men on campus.

Men of Principle Scholarship Grants ($500 per chapter or colony) *Number of chapters participating

$50,000 $40,000 $30,000 $20,000

$49,500 99*

$41,500 81*

$39,750 80* $34,500 $34,000 69* $31,000 68* $28,000 62* $26,500 56* 53* $13,500 27*

$11,500 18*

$10,000 $0

-99

98

19

-00

99

19

-01

00

20

-02

01

20

-03

02

20

-04

03

20

-05

04

20

-06

05

20

-07

06

20

-08

07

20

Fall 2008

35


Leadership Report Card Leadership Program Involvement Report Card This report summarizes leadership program participation by all chapters and colonies in the 2007-2008 academic year. It is our hope, however, that in addition to providing a summary, this information will encourage Betas to increase participation by their chapter, district and region. Leadership development is a trademark of our Fraternity that yields signiďŹ cant beneďŹ ts. Through the support of alumni, leadership consultants, district chiefs, regional directors, chapter advisors and Greek advisors, Beta undergraduates can achieve their full leadership potential.

Report Card Key Futures Quest .............................. FQ The Chapter Presidents Leadership Academy .............. CPLA The Keystone Regional Leadership Conference ......... KRLC The Institute for Men of Principle ..........................IMP The Beta Wilderness Challenge.............. BWC Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute ................ UIFI The Leadership College .............. LC The Men of Principle Scholarship Grant ..................... MPS

36

The Beta Theta Pi

Chapter/Colony Alabama Arizona Auburn Baylor Bethany* British Columbia Cal Poly California, Berkeley California, Irvine* California, Los Angeles California, Santa Barbara Carleton Carnegie Mellon Case Western Reserve* Central Florida* Central Michigan* Cincinnati* Clemson Colgate Colorado Mines Colorado State Columbia Connecticut* Cornell Dayton* Denison* Denver DePauw East Carolina* Eastern Illinois Eastern Kentucky* Eastern Washington Emory Florida Florida Atlantic Florida International* George Washington Georgia Georgia Tech Hampden-Sydney* Idaho Illinois Indiana* Iowa* Iowa State John Carroll* Johns Hopkins Kansas Kansas State Kenyon Kettering A* Kettering B* Knox Lawrence Lehigh Louisville Loyola Marymount Maine Miami* Miami (Fla.)* Middle Tennessee State*

FQ 2 2

3

CPLA KRLC 1 8 1 1 10 1 1 3 5 1 1 1

1 2 4 2 4

1 1 1 1 1

1

1 1 1

3 2

1 1 1

1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2

1 1 2 4 1

7 3 1

4 2 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2

1 1 1 1 1

IMP 3 3

BWC 1

3

1 1

2

1

4 2 4 7 8 8 8 9 4 8 5 4 8 6 8 5 7 7 3 7 11 8 2 2 8 7 8 7 8 9 5 5 8 9 8 7 4 8 7 6 8 6 5 7 8 8 8 7 8

5 2 13 8 1

4

1 1 2 1 1

7 5

1 1

2 1 6

2

1 3

1

1

2

1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

5 4 5 3

2 1 2 1

LC 4 1 7 1 4 2

5 8 1 1 3 2 4 3 4

2 1

3

5 5 4 7 8

1 1 1

2 2 1

7 1

3 1 2 7 2

1

1

3

2 2 3

UIFI

3

2 1 2 4 2 4 4 4

3 9 3 6 4 4 6 9 2

19

1 2

2 7 11 3

Total 19 5 21 1 13 8 3 2 14 10 2 5 14 17 30 24 20 5 5 13 7 6 18 8 19 16 10 10 14 3 22 13 9 6 4 18 12 20 17 18 15 10 22 20 22 19 10 5 35 9 15 16 13 11 8 10 9 16 27 27 20

MPS $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500

$500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500


100% – Percentage of chapters participating in one or more leadership programs in 2008.

Chapter/Colony FQ Minnesota* 6 Mississippi* 3 Missouri 1 Missouri-Kansas City MIT Nebraska 2 North Carolina North Dakota 2 Northwestern 1 Nova Southeastern Ohio Ohio State Oklahoma Oklahoma State 2 Oregon Penn State Pennsylvania Puget Sound Purdue 2 Rhode Island Saint Louis 1 San Diego* 2 San Jose State Sewanee South Dakota* 3 South Florida Southern California* 2 Southern Illinois Stevens Tennessee Texas 2 Texas A&M Texas A&M-Corpus Christi* Texas Tech Texas-Arlington* Toronto Truman State 2 Utah Vanderbilt Villanova Virginia Tech Virginia* Wabash* Washington* Washington & Jefferson Washington and Lee* Washington in St. Louis* Washington State 1 Wesleyan West Chester West Virginia 5 Westminster Whitman Wichita State 5 Willamette William & Mary 1 Wisconsin Wisconsin-Oshkosh* 4 Wittenberg TOTAL

107

CPLA KRLC 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 6 1 8 1 8 1 6 1 8 1 7 1 1 7 8 1 1 3 6 1 8 1 1 6 8 1 7 1 1 5 1 8 1 9 1 8 1 5 1 8 8 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

IMP 10 3 2 5

BWC 1

1 5 2 1

1

UIFI 3

2

1 2

4

4

1

2 4

8 10 8 4 7 8 7 8 7 4

3 7 1 4

3 3 1 8 1 6

4

1

5 5 2

8 1 1

3 4 2

1

2

3 1 10 2

2

2 3 5 3 9 3 3 5

1 2

2

5 16

5

7 8 8 8 8 7

LC

1

2 10 1 4 14 12 1

6 1 2 3 1

1

1 5 6 4

1 1

1

6

2

3 2

2

1 1 1 1 1

8 7 9 7 8 6

4 3 2 5 2

2

1 1

1

100

701

294

42

51

1

1

310

Total 29 18 21 15 13 13 12 14 20 7 16 10 11 15 9 10 7 13 18 9 14 11 3 5 15 15 32 8 11 12 12 2 10 15 17 11 23 11 15 11 13 14 21 26 12 9 21 10 7 12 13 8 1 15 12 16 10 19 11

MPS $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500

$500 $500 $500

$500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500

1,605 $49,500

*Charles Henry Hardin Leadership Development Award winner, which is extended to chapters and colonies who send 15 total participants – or 20% of the chapter roster – to at least three different Beta leadership experiences (excluding Keystone).

For the complete 2008 Foundation Annual Report log on to www.betathetapi.org or contact the Foundation & Administrative Office at 800-800-2382.

Fall 2008

37


Hammel is a former philanthropy chairman for the Gamma Xi Chapter at the University of Florida. This past year, he spearheaded a campaign that grossed more than $15,000 for the philanthropy, The Beta Challenge, now in its third year. As an undergraduate, Hammel was appointed overall marketing chairman for Dance Marathon at UF for both his junior and senior years. Hammel received his degree from the College of Journalism and Communications in public relations with a minor in Chinese language. From Tampa, Fla., Hammel enjoys college football and basketball, being on the water, music and traveling. Friends

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night? Your showdown with a molecular biology exam tomorrow morning whispers in the back of your mind, but you know this will only take just a few, short, timeless moments. The actions listed above are mere side effects one might experience while using the popular social-networking website, Facebook. This world-wide phenomenon, which generates more than 90 million users each month and two million new accounts each week, was developed in 2004 by Harvard student, Mark Zuckerberg.

Jordan Steinert, Wisconsin-Oshkosh ’10 “Having Facebook has helped me stay connected to all my brothers, especially after leadership development opportunities. A majority of the time I have joined the session groups that are created to talk about new ideas on how to improve our chapter, or just to keep in touch with the Betas that I have met.” Wall-to-Wall - Write on Jordan’s Wall So what is Facebook? The site claims that it is “a social utility that connects you with the people around you.” It allows members to express themselves via the internet. Applications on the site give users the opportunity to create a viral replica of themselves. Members can establish profiles that list their likes and dislikes, favorite movies and books, and allow them to post anything about themselves they wish for other members to see. Then there are “The Wall” and “Friends”, both of which have proven to be the most popular applications. The Wall application is featured on every member’s profile, and allows other members to post comments to you. James Siegler, Johns Hopkins ’09, describes the Wall as an uncensored form of communication between two people. “Typically, messages are posted here as they would be brought up in conversation. Meaning posters do not care if others read what they say. If a message is more private, there are other options on Article continues in side bar

Students can also find a list of events that will be held at the chapter houses throughout the recruitment period. Contact information for the recruitment chairman and executive board can also be found. This form of “virtual” recruitment has proven to be quite popular with several Beta chapters.

Brothers are also using the site as a way to stay connected with other Betas they meet during various leadership conferences and conventions. Jordan Steinert, Wisconsin-Oshkosh ’10, says the website is a great way to stay in contact with Betas from different chapters. “Having Facebook has helped me stay connected to all my brothers, especially after leadership development opportunities. A majority of the time I have joined the session groups that are created to talk about new ideas on how to improve our chapter, or just to keep in touch with the Betas that I have met,” Steinert said. Chapters also use Facebook as a means to communicate and reconnect with alumni.

So… it is now 12:43 in the morning. After logging in more than an hour, you have still failed to beat your buddy’s Jetman high score. Unfortunately for you, molecular biology still lurks a mere seven hours away. Welcome to Facebook.

|

The Beta Theta Pi

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View Photos of me (664) Edit Profile

Write Something about yourself. Information Alex Hammel joined the Administrative Office staff in August 2008 as associate editor of The Beta Theta Pi. His responsibilities include coordinating the production of the Fraternity’s quarterly magazine and serving as the primary liaison to chapters and alumni associations.

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But somehow you immediately become sidetracked. It is the everso-popular Jetman application that has caught your attention. You have had lofty hopes of terminating your buddy’s high score for weeks. You’ve been well within range before. Will tonight be the

It’s 11:19 at night. Your chin rests steadily on the palm of your left hand while you click through one of the most recent weekend photo albums from your classmate’s profile. During the past hour and 13 minutes, you have perused through the Marketplace, cried laughing at countless bumper stickers, peeped through random events and done a sufficient amount of “stalking.”

All Posts

What are you doing right now?

Yesterday

Quote

James Siegler, Johns Hopkins ’09 “Typically, messages are posted here as they would be brought up in conversation. Meaning posters do not care if others read what they say. If a message is more private, there are other options on Facebook available for such forms of communication.” Wall-to-Wall - Write on James’ Wall

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Article continued . . .

Facebook available for such forms of communication,” said Siegler. The Friends application facilitates personal connections through people that you know or meet. Meeting someone in a class or at a party, often results in a request to become a friend on Facebook. Individuals literally become virtual friends via the internet, even if they’ve never actually “met” face-to-face.

Facebook is being used for more than fun applications, online games and marketing schemes. Undergraduates from across North America are using the website as a vehicle for recruitment purposes. Chapters are developing groups on the site that are focused on joining Beta Theta Pi. Potential new members can use the group to view different pictures from activities such as athletics, philanthropies, social life and volunteer work.

39

Fall 2008


[Mystic Shrine]

In Loving Memory Amherst

Arnold, Wright H. ’48, Feb. 5, 2007 Glenn, James H. III ’51, Oct. 10, 2007 Sisson, Harry M. Jr. ’57, Sept. 19, 2007 Taylor, F. Chase Jr. ’43, Sept. 30, 2007 Waldron, Kenneth E. ’49, May 5, 2007

Beloit

Blazer, Cedric W. ’52, June 8 Dunning, Bruce B. ’45, June 10

Bethany

Faulk, Norman S. ’32, Dec. 24, 2007 Henderson, Byron S. Jr. ’47, May 3 Herbert, Victor J. ’40, July 14 Wilson, Walter E. (Walt) ’56, May 15

British Columbia

Canty, John L. (Les) ’46, March 28 Taylor, Michael G. ’61, April 23, 2007

California, Berkeley Banker, William H. ’43, July 19, 2007 Lewis, Kenneth D. ’41, Feb. 28

Carnegie Mellon

Wright, Robert H. ’54, Sept.12, 2007

Case Tech

Dick, Robert K. ’37, Feb. 14 White, Richard H. (Dick) ’39, Dec. 27, 2007

Central Florida Durkin, Michael J. ’09, May 14

Chicago

Milnikel, Robert S. ’50, Feb. 28

Cincinnati

Mehornay, Richard C. (Dick) ’49, April 7 Rainey, William D. ’91, March 21, 2007 Utter, Norwood J. Jr. ’42, April 23

Colgate

Banitch, Dr. George P. ’42, Feb. 6

Colorado

Myers, Matthew J. ’85, Sept. 25, 2007 Ten Eyck, Thomas W. ’41, May 13 Steel, Ned M. ’37, Jan. 5

Colorado College Keesling, M. Hollis Jr. ’43, May 17

The Beta Theta Pi

Rios, Adalid F. ’96, June 4

Idaho

Gilb, Charles E. ’50, May 18 Paine, Glenn F. ’52, Aug. 13

Illinois

Pfau, James R. (Jim) ’56, Aug. 23 Wilson, Charles M. ’38, April 7

Iowa

Kliebenstein, Don ’57, April 16

Iowa State

Columbia

O’Neill, Robert C. ’73, Feb. 3

Dickinson, John M. ’53, Aug. 1 Hendrickson, Richard A. ’55, April 14 Walton, James C. ’42, May 29

Cornell

Kansas

Tusinski, Walter J. ’69, April 7

Denison

Bammann, Glen A. ’48, July 29

Denver

Beazley, W. Tyson ’43, Sept. 30, 2007 Hughart, Robert P. ’47, May 11 Shutts, Franklin P. Jr. ’53, Sept.1

DePauw

James, Michael A. ’61, Feb. 10

Eastern Kentucky Mountz, Edsel R. ’47, July 25

Florida

Merton, Douglas S. ’73

40

Houston

Diehl, Donald W. ’46, April 14 Stickrod, Don P. ’51, June 27 Wienecke, Emil A. ’38, July 1

Kansas State

Manning, Patrick J. ’54, June 3

Knox

O’Connell, Theodore W. Jr. (Ted) ’50, Dec. 23, 2007

Lawrence

Smith, David R. ’48, March 5

Lehigh

Snyder, Wilson P. (Smokey) ’44, Jan. 27

Miami

Smith, Lowell E. ’48, Aug. 11


Michigan

Higley, Hugh C. Jr. ’67, July 12

Howard T. Hargrove

Minnesota

Southern California ’51

Durrell, Richard J. (Dick) ’50, March 7 McNally, Miles W. ’44, Aug. 17 Upham, A. Tyler ’40, Dec. 25, 2007

One of Beta Theta Pi’s most dedicated and inspirational bothers, Howard Thomas Hargrove, passed away on March 4 after a battle with cancer. He was 79.

Mississippi

Davis, Samuel R. II ’61, Oct. 9, 2007

Missouri

McComb, Wood S. ’58, Feb. 26 Smalley, David R. ’51, June 10

MIT

Chittick, C. Yardley ’22, July 18 Netsch, Walter A. Jr.’43, June 15

Nebraska

Folsom, Willard S. ’65

North Dakota

Arneson, Bruce A. ’71, April 2 Nord, Orval W. (Ozzie) ’49, June 15

Northwestern

Kroeschell, William O. (Bill) ’48, July 26 Miller, James C. ’37, April 8, 2007 Niedenthal, Rev. Dr. Morris J. (Morry) ’53, Feb. 8 Stefan, Joseph J. ’35, Nov. 5, 2007

Ohio State

Hollenback, Donal C. ’51, May 28 Lynn, Dr. Arthur D. Jr. ’41, March 6 Roth, Richard W. (Dick) ’60, Dec. 23, 2007 Wagner, William L. ’45, June 12

Oklahoma

Kitchen, David H. ’86, March 16 Latimer, Jarrod A. ’04. June 19 Lunsford, Tom R. ’44, Aug. 28

Oklahoma State

Kennedy, John E. ’45, June 8 Magers, Justin W. ’08, Aug. 17 Stegall, G. Gary ’59, Dec. 31, 2007 Welch, Thomas H. ’81, May 14

Oregon

Addison, William M. ’52, July 5

Oregon State

Erwin, Warde H. ’35, Sept. 28, 2007 Hayes, Brig. Gen. Thomas L. ’47, July 24

Penn State

Keller, John G. ’43, Jan. 25

Puget Sound

Jones, R. Benson II ’74, April 10 McCrystal, Ian Y. ’89, May 31

Purdue

Stambaugh, David J. ’49, May 1, 2007

South Dakota

Clinton, F. Edward III ’66, June 26 Martinson, Russell V. ’68, Aug. 20 Shaw-Perry, Timothy ’74, May 12

From his initiation into the Gamma Tau Chapter on October 7, 1951 and continuing throughout his life, Hargrove set the example of what it means to be a Beta. His lifelong service to the Fraternity was remarkable. For more than 20 years, Hargrove served as a district chief representing chapters in California. Hargrove was a member of the Gamma Tau Chapter Alumni Association throughout his life and was one of three trustees of the Beta Theta Pi Scholastic Foundation of Southern California for more than 35 years. As important as his official duties were, Hargrove was a good friend and mentor to generations of undergraduate Betas. He was a true bridge between young and old and his lifelong friendships with his Beta Brothers were legendary. Hargrove is survived by his wife Leda, his son Mike, Southern California ’77, and daughters Laurie and Dianne. Donations may be sent to the Howard Hargrove Memorial Scholarship Fund, c/o John Williams, 4300 Long Beach Boulevard, Long Beach, CA 90807.

Southern Methodist

West Virginia

Stanford

Western Ontario

Brindley, Justin P. ’00, June 20

Barsotti, Jules M. ’45, Aug. 25 Mellen, Richard C. ’59, Jan. 27

Tulane

Wright, Fred E. Jr. ’43, Aug. 17

Shapiro, Neil S. ’92, June 28

Westminster

LeGardeur, Rene J. ’43, June 1, 2007

Folsom, Willard S. (Bill) ’65, June 6 Smith, Dr. Curran J. ’63, May 12, 2007

Washington

Whitman

Angelel, James M. ’61, Aug. 18, 2007 Covington, John D. Sr. ’38, April 24 Harrison, Walter B. ’43, April 6 Names, Richard C. ’61, Dec. 13, 2007 Sanders, Robert M. (Bob) ’42, June 29

Washington in St. Louis

Bailey, Gerald F. (Jerry) ’41, Nov. 26, 2007

Washington & Jefferson

Doak, P. James (Jim) ’45, April 17 Siegrist, Richard W. ’41, June 10

Washington & Lee Moremen, John S. ’57, March 1

Wesleyan

Krause, Herbert E. ’68, Sept. 14, 2007

Speir, Gilbert C. ’39, March 15

Wichita State

Rogers, Robert R. (Roy) ’56, June 13

Willamette

Beals, Rodney K. M.D. ’56, Aug. 7 Frederickson, William A. ’56, June 9 Peterson, Dr. Davis A. ’59, May

Wisconsin

DeNoble, Brian D. ’59, June 21 Sherman, Dr. David E. ’58, May 30

Wittenberg

Young, Howard E. ’39, Dec. 2007

Yale

Lawrence, John T. Jr. ’50, May 10

Fall 2008

41


[The Last Word]

Compassion, Kindness and Love by Chase H. Miller, Georgia Tech ’10

T

he definition of “faith” according to Webster’s is “a firm belief in something for which there is no proof;” however, it is more commonly referred to in the context of religion, or one’s personal belief system. As a brotherhood we all come from different backgrounds, upbringings and cultures, but we come together striving for one common goal, to build and raise up leaders and men of principle.

“Compassion is being conscious of others’ distress as well as having a desire to ease it.”

As we come together to pursue this common goal, we are often so consumed with the future that we forget where we came from and the values instilled in us as children. When it comes to faith, the Gamma Eta Chapter at Georgia Tech has brothers who claim Christianity, Judaism, Catholicism, Greek Orthodox Christianity and Atheism. On the surface it seems that conversation relating to these belief systems is frowned upon, but when they are discussed it is quite the contrary; many brothers are often open to hearing one another’s beliefs and why they believe the things they do. Sometimes mindsets are even changed and people begin to think differently. Though not all of these religions are regularly practiced, they all are very important to those who believe them. With all the temptations of this world and the immorality that constantly surrounds us, it is hard for even the most dedicated men of faith to stay the course. That said, we have started a Beta Bible study, open to the entire brotherhood for those interested in pursuing a relationship with Jesus Christ. In this Bible study, we read passages out of the Bible, discuss them in relation to Jesus, and then apply them to our lives. One thing that continues to come up repeatedly is the character of Jesus and how we should do everything in our power to live our lives like him. Through our studies, we have discovered

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The Beta Theta Pi

that Jesus is compassionate, loving, patient, meek, kind, helpful, humble and much more. In my time at Beta I have realized that these are all strong characteristics of the men of principle we strive to build. Compassion is being conscious of others’ distress as well as having a desire to ease it. This is synonymous with the mutual aid and assistance that we, as a brotherhood of principled men have for one another. There are numerous stories throughout the Bible of Jesus exercising his compassion for those around him, including healing the sick and feeding the hungry (Mark 7:24-39). This also ties in with the helpfulness of Jesus, seeking to aid those who are less fortunate, be it lepers who were thought of as unclean, children who were thought of as weak or the blind, deaf and paralyzed who were cast out of the city. This is illustrated in our philanthropic and community service events where we put forth our time and effort in seeking the betterment of those less fortunate than us (John 6). Jesus’ kindness relates both to his helpfulness and love for others. He does not harbor any anger in his heart against anyone, but he has love for them despite their inadequacies and imperfections. I feel that this is the fire that fuels the flame of compassion and kindness. To lead principled lives we must root ourselves in these valuable truths of love and kindness, so that we may go forth and provide our brothers with mutual aid and assistance in the honorable labors and aspirations of life. Furthermore, religion and faith are more than just a set of beliefs. They are a lifestyle. Whether Christian, Catholic, Atheist, Jew or Eastern Orthodox, we are Betas one in the same, building bridges for the next generation that are built upon the core truths of compassion, kindness and love.


A Lasting Moment

L I

am a single man in my 50s who has buried both parents. At this point in my life, I have more seriously examined the question, “What will I leave behind?” I will not leave behind a son or daughter and our family name will end when my brothers and I pass. I will not bequeath a fortune to my favorite causes and no building will be built with my gift. To the casual observer, one’s chance to leave a legacy seems reserved to those “successful” Beta brothers who have followed a traditional route to affluence or influence. John Holt Duncan has always been my favorite founder. I suppose I could relate to him as the lone bachelor in our early ranks. He spent his life giving back to the family that saved his life. Though dying penniless in a Texas home for old soldiers, we remember his contribution to Beta Theta Pi to this day.

I have been honored to be a part of the Men of Principle initiative since its earliest seed. The success of it has brought great purpose and satisfaction into my life as I marvel at how Beta has been able to reshape the interfraternal landscape. Betas come in all sizes and shapes. Our lives look differently and take divergent paths. But, regardless of your Beta life or journey, we can all give something back — we can all leave some kind of legacy. There is a place for all of us. This is why I contribute to the Beta Foundation and all of the many programs it supports. — Donald G. (Dipper) DiPaolo, Michigan ’78 A revered speaker and facilitator at Fraternity leadership development programs, DiPaolo played an integral role on the Men of Principle steering and implementation committees, and has served as General Fraternity vice president, regional director and district chief.


Beta Theta Pi Foundation & Administrative Office Brennan Hall P.O. Box 6277 5134 Bonham Road Oxford, Ohio 45056 www.betathetapi.org

THEY SAY A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS . . .

Beta undergraduates only need two. Beta undergraduates pose for a picture this summer to thank the scores of donors who support the Beta Leadership Fund’s annual drive, which makes all of the Fraternity’s leadership development programs offered as a part of the Men of Principle initiative possible.

10 YEAR

ANNIVERSARY

Men of Principle B E T A

T H E T A

P I

www.betathetapi.org/gift

The Beta Theta Pi Magazine (Fall 2008)  

Contents: Men of Principle 10 Year Anniversary (p.18), The last decade has been tremendous, however, establishing a foothold in the culture...