Best in Show Magazine USA • February 2021

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BEST IN SHOW

TH E VOICE OF BRE E DE RS , EXH I BITORS , HAN DLE RS & J U DGES

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WE ARE

Best in Show

A new year starts and we are hopeful that it will be much better

than the last one. Even though it was not the best year we created some great projects such as The Grooming Land, BIS Creative and Talking Dogs with Ante. We want to thank you all for the great reception we received for all of these projects.

Orlando was a great experience for us, and the show was great.

Royal Canin and AKC did a great job and we were happy to be part of it. We met so many new people and got amazing feedback on the magazine. We want to thank all of our advertisers who made the first edition history for us.

We are looking forward to this year, and hopefully we will be able

to create great editions coming up, we want to thank BIS Creative for their amazing work on the editions. Almost a year ago we started this group and boy it has been one of the best things we have done! We have many happy customers from business cards to websites and more!

We also want to thank the many people helping create this

magazine. To all the writers, designers, photographers, and editors, we couldn’t deliver without all your work and creativity. Stay safe everyone, we see you down the road.

JOVANA DANILOVIC Chief Editor

MARY MARSHALL Collaborators

CHRISTIAN RANGEL Marketing Director

BISCREATIVE.COM Art Department

ANNE TUREEN & LEE GROGAN Contributing Writers



INTERVIEW WITH JUDGE

POODLES

JANICE HAYES

How 1973 has changed everything

1973 The Event

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MEET THE BREED

INTERVIEW WITH HANDLER

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JIM REYNOLDS

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CONTENT

RINGSIDE CLICK

BROOKSVILLE FLORIDA

MEET THE BREED

CHOW CHOW



MEET THE BREED

BICHON FRISE

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CONTENT

TRAVEL TIPS

INTERVIEW WITH JUNIOR HANDLER

LILLIAN BROCK

SHOW REPORT

AKC NATIONAL CH. by R. C.

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PHOENIX, ARIZONA

Vandra Huber

DEEP SMART BREEDERS



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Reynolds

INTERVIEW WITH A JUDGE

Jim

JIM

REYNOLDS times, and have judged many large shows including Santa Barbara, Louisville, Chicago, Detroit, Old Dominion

Jim, you are a legend in the dog show world as a judge. Where have some of your assignments taken you around the country and the world? I have been judging dog shows since 1967 and am

and the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship. I was also fortunate to officiate as the Best in Show judge at Ladies’ Kennel Association (in the UK) dog show. Tell me about some of your favorite judging assignments?

currently approved for all breeds recognized by the AKC

One of my favorite judging assignments was when I was

and Canadian Kennel Club. I have officiated many dog

the Best In Show judge for the 2006 Westminster Kennel

shows on five continents, including the junior handlers

Club. The colored Bull Terrier, Rufus, Ch. Rocky Top’s

at Crufts in the UK, and the World Dog Show. In the U.S.

Sundance Kid, was just one of those special dogs who

I have been fortunate to officiate Westminster several

owned the ring. He had real star quality. The great dogs

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I NT ERVI EW W I T H A JUDG E · JIM REYNOLDS

have that presence that separates them from the others.

handlers, ring stewards and the list goes on. If you are

Rufus was in peak condition and performance and told

a good ring steward and pay attention seminars will

me that night “You have to pick me,” and I certainly

never hold a candle to working with good judges and

did. Other favorite judging assignments include the Best

seeing what they do. And then I thought, well, I can do

in Show at the Montgomery Kennel Club. That is the

that. And I decided to try judging for the first time with

terrier lover’s place to be.

Boston Terriers; a breed that I was familiar with. That

I think one of my very favorite shows is the World Show, but is the Stockholm Christmas Show in Sweden that really stands out. It is a fantastic show. Well handled, and very entertaining. I also enjoyed officiating the Jr.

was one of the first three breeds that I was licensed for. In 1967, Canada’s 100th anniversary, I judged Boston Terriers in May, on Kentucky Derby Day, in Ottawa that year. When did you get interested in showing animals, and

Handling at Crufts. I also had a judging assignment for Newfoundlands at

dogs in general?

the World Show in Germany some years ago. The show

I showed my first dog in 1957 because I still wasn’t old

was huge; and the entry had gone over 17,000 dogs! I

enough to drive a car. Someone had to drive me to the

had split the group of Newfoundlands and if you recall

dog show. I had shown a variety of animals and some of

the color of Newfies, they are primarily black—we were

the larger exhibitions had dog shows with them. I would

judging these dogs in a dimly lit parking garage! What a

go to the dog shows as just something to fill in my time

beautiful group of Newfoundlands, but the lightingmade

and I got interested that way. It was an opportunity, and

the judging a bit of a challenge.

it grew from there.

Your career in the world of academia has been very

What are the other animals have you shown, and how did

successful, so how did dog show judging evolve into

it evolve into the sport of showing dogs?

becoming a fulltime career?

I’ve shown sheep, cattle, chickens, pigeons, and horses.

You must understand I bore easily. That was also true of my career, I did exceptionally well

and rose

through the ranks of teacher, head principal, and superintendent. It’s simply a case of because I get bored, I want to try something new. In education, I tried all those new things. And the same was true with judging in Canadian shows when I was exhibiting, most of the dogs were Canadian bred. And that meant that you had to stay to the very end if you had a Canadian bred going into the group. Since I had to stay at shows all day long I watched other things—details of the various breeds,

I did a lot of winning, and my father was very generous


I NT ERVI EW W I T H A JUDG E · JIM REYNOLDS

whenever we were at fairs. Even as a child, I was

able to have my first champion with that breed. So

always given the better animal, and it gave me a great

that was thebeginning, but along the way I kept going

appreciation for being able to show and learn to judge a

to dog shows and observing different breeds. We had

good-looking animal.

a neighbor who raised Scottish Terriers, so I became

In the world of show dogs, I get very annoyed with parents at times because they give their child the dog that is not competitive. A child gets tired of showing

rather fascinated with them. When the time came that I could choose my own dog I chose a Scottie, although I love all the breeds.

after that; that is not what they want. They want the

Although you judge many breeds of dogs, your Scottish

ribbon. Well, they deserve it. It was an important part

Terriers have been a favorite. How did you get started in

of learning the sport, sportsmanship, and I enjoyed

the breed, and who was a mentor in your youth?

winning and became accustomed to doing well. I love dogs and it really was a natural progression.

Betty Hyslop of Cairndania Cairn Terriers, and Scottish Terrier breeder and all-breed judge Adelaide Riggs.

When you decided to become breed specific with show

Because of meeting Betty, I had the opportunity to

dogs what breed did you start out with?

attend a lot of dogs shows and see some excellent Cairns

The first breed I got involved with were Boston terriers, and that is because Boston’s were very popular with my father’s mother so he decided I should have one. Boston Terriers can be a very difficult breed, but I was

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and Scotties. I used to drive Betty to shows, and she would let me bring along my own dog to show. It was great fun. Some years later a well-known Scottiebreeder in Canada suffered a stroke, and he allowed me to buy a dog called Topper, and he became my first Best in Show



I NT ERVI EW W I T H A JUDG E · JIM REYNOLDS

winner and my first American champion. Topper sired

an exceptional entry. The dog that I put up went back to

a number of champions for me when I was able to use

England to become England’s Dog of the Year. The top

that bloodline. Our kennels never had more than ten

bitch ended up as the top Standard Poodle the following

dogs. You must remember at that time I was in high

year in the United States. But when the specials came

school, and then I attended the university. Following

in the ring this one particular dog shot into the rain.

college, I started my career as a teacher and a new

He was from Sweden, and he just said “I am here!

marriage. There were a lot of conflicting things, but

What is your problem? You only have 70 or 80 to look

the dogs always seemed to hold their own. Our Renaldo

at.” He was just a puppy! He went on to Best in Show

Kennel had five Canadian Best in Show winners and

at the Poodle Club of America. The top bitch went on

produced more than 30 Canadian champions and 15

to opposite sex at the same show. What an exceptional

AKC champions. Another mentor who was influential

entry. One of the Wolfhound nationals was in North

was Joan Morton who raised excellent miniature

Carolina. It had many memorable moments but one of

Schnauzers in the Toronto area. I was a young teacher,

the best was in the morning. We were in a park with

and incredibly interested in learning. More about her

pine trees and mist, and the hounds all started calling.

breeding program. Joan was an incredibly successful

It was the most beautiful sound on the most amazing

breeder and exhibitor. Once again it was a matter of

morning. I’ve judged the Wolfhound national twice. If

sitting around and listening. If you spent all day at a dog

I was ever invited to do it again I would accept it right

showyou learn a lot in little bits and pieces. Eventually

off the top.

it all came together. What is a special memory from one of the specialties that you have judged?

What are your favorite breeds to judge and why? Oh, that’s a very wicked question! You must understand that I have judged over 70 American national specialties,

I think the national that I remember very fondly was

and I love good dogs of any breed. Do I have a special

judging Standard Poodles at Little Cove America. I had

breed? Yes. I have a great fondness for Irish Wolfhounds but have had a lot of beautiful dogs of several different breeds. Although we bred Scotties, our house dogs were always Irish Wolfhounds. That is one of the things about judging; you have an opportunity to get hands-on with beautiful dogs. As a breeder-exhibitor I never had the opportunity to get the experience that I have as a judge in going over exceptional dogs. What are some of your most memorable moments judging at Westminster? One of them was a year that I was judging only the


I NT ERVI EW W I T H A JUDG E · JIM REYNOLDS

sheepdogs at the Garden. It was 3:30 in the afternoon

get a kick out of is that I still can make some of them

and I had one class dog between 18 specials. Suddenly I

nervous when they enter the ring. That is good right?

noticed my ring was kind of filling up. Normally at 3:30

They really want me to like the dog. But it’s like Colton

in the afternoon everyone’s getting ready to go back to

coming in holding Swagger. He really wanted me to like

get dressed for parties. I thought, “isn’t that peculiar?”

that dog. I am a champion for the younger professional

And then into the ring came this young handler who I

handlers and owner-handlers. The work very hard to

didn’t know, Colton Johnson, with this dog. That dog

show me the best in that dog.

just stood there and was perfection. The upshot of it was his name was Swagger. He went from the classes to Best of Breed into the group to reserve Best in Show. Wow!

What impresses you about the younger professional handlers in the show ring?

I will always remember that moment with Swagger the

Sportsmanship, and the willingness to learn. They go

Old English Sheepdog.

and observe, they pay attention. Do they over handle?

The other memorable moment I must mention is when I judged Best in Show in 2005. Into the ring comes seven gorgeous dogs, but one of them absolutely dominated that ring. It was the colored Bull Terrier Rufus, and he was my Best in Show. If you had asked me previously if he was going to be my Best in Show, I would have said no. I had always liked the dog, but he just stood there and dominated the ring with this incredible presence. What I didn’t understand at the time was that the

Do they move too fast? Do they commit to doing all the right things?Sure, they do. If you ask them to slow it down, and show the dog to the best advantage they will. They always say thank you and congratulate one another. That is very important, sportsmanship and professionalism in and out of the ring. It is paramount. I am sitting ringside watching a Labrador class. A young man comes into the ring. It was a nice Labrador, but you could tell that the young man really wasn’t doing a lot of

Staffordshire Bull Terriers were being given a really hard time in the American press. Whether people were fans of a Bull Terrier or not it wasn’t the issue; he was just a great dog. How do you think professional handlers have changed through the years? I think our handlers today are far more professional. I think that they work really very hard and present their dogs to their best advantage. I really like the whole group of professional handlers and what they do. I feel the same way about owner-handlers. Overall, everyone is much more professional looking and handle their dogs the best. One thing that happens that I do

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dog shows. They are in the ring with six other dogs and

and quarantine. We’ll have to see how it transpires.

one of the other dogs receives the win. The young man

I wish them every bit of luck putting on this show. If

drops his lead on the ground, stands on it, and applauds

someone could fly a helicopter over Lyndhurst I would

the win. It was a very genuine display of sportsmanship.

just parachute it. It’s gorgeous. I think the dog show

It is wonderful when you see something like that. In the

people and fans will come out in droves. Everyone is

early days of showing, people could be hard on novices.

ready to participate and have a great show.

What is your perception of owner-handlers vs.

Do you think there is consistency in what judges observe

professional handlers?

according to the breed standard for most breeds?

Professional handlers come in the ring and make

Some breeds, like Labradors are particularly fortunate

sure they are showing the dog to the best advantage.

in the fact that when you’re in in the ring with your

Some amateurs come into the ring and can be a little

dog there is not as much to confuse judges with as in

careless. The perception might be because it was Joe Pro

terms of hair and grooming. They are a natural dog and

handling that dog instead of me. That is not the case.

shown that way. With Labs there is the whole about

Sometimes the dog being handled by the professional

color, so if I happen to put up a chocolate dog you get

might get looked at a little harder sometimes but that is

a reputation for putting up that color dog. The fact is

not always the case. It’s all about how you show that dog

that dog just happened to be the best dog that day. It

and the judge’s perception of it. There are a lot of great

has nothing to do with color, but has everything to do

owner-handlers out there who are the best at showing

with perception and how that dog fits the standard. In

their own dogs. I’ve been very fortunate to get my

Labradors there are several physical types so it can be

hands on a tremendous number of very great dogs, and

a challenge. Excellent judging requires experience and

Therefore, I can say this dog has the kind of exceptional

knowledge. It takes time to hone your skills, learn the

breed qualities to be rewarded. Can I be wrong? Sure,

different breed attributes, standards, and grooming

I can. There is no judge that gets it right every time or

styles. If you sit and you observe the dog shows and the

gets it right for everybody, but I don’t think anybody

different breed classes you will learn, and you will notice

goes into the ring to make mistakes deliberately. I think

some judges take a lot longer to make their decision.

some people can go in the ring unprepared; no one goes

So much is based on perception. Other judges seem to

in the ring to look foolish.

know exactly what they are looking at. After watching

What do you think about Lyndhurst as the new venue for Westminster this year?

a group of dogs, it is the physical contact that confirms what you have seen: bone structure, type, and presence. If you are trying to assess a group of dogs, say sporting

Lyndhurst is one of my favorite places. It is a gorgeous

group, and you look over the dogs and think “I know

old estate in Tarrytown. People will come and be bound

the type can be better, the headpiece, the nostril, the

and determined to attend Westminster. I have a couple

movement,” this all comes into play when making your

of shows the week prior, and I may have to come home

choice of what is presented to you. Some breeds have

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subtle nuances that can make judging a challenge. You

for the handlers. This is their profession, their way of

have a half an hour, at best, to judge all these dogs and

life. Many of them do not have another career to fall

it isn’t an exact science. It all comes with experience,

back on and times are difficult. It will be a relief when

and hands-on education to develop your eye for specific

we all have a true sense of normalcy, but I can’t predict

breed qualities and traits.

when that will be. The dog shows that have not been

How has the pandemic affected your judging assignments? There have been 60 or 70 shows that have been cancelled that I was asked to judge. Currently Canada

cancelled have been remarkably good, but there are very few shows to attend. What are your closing thoughts looking back on your life as a judge, breeder, and dog show competitor?

is on lockdown, so if I were able to judge a show in the

It has been more like a hobby, and the most marvelous

United States I would have to fly, get a COVID negative

journey. I will continue judging, and will not end my

test within 72 hours, and quarantine for two weeks at

career on lockdown. I feel like it will all get straightened

home. I had decided to do this if necessary, but now we

out again. The main pleasure is every moment when I

have the spread again that is going on in both countries.

would go to these shows and find a dog coming out of

I think if these restrictions are in place that we will have

nowhere that I had never seen before and knew it was

very few shows even with the availability of the vaccine.

“my dog” that day. It is pure joy, and to simply have

For the shows that do continue during the pandemic we

your hands on a wonderful example of a breed and

will have large entries because people want to get out

make it “my dog” and to be able to reward that example

and finish their dogs, enjoy life. Eventually the shows

is the biggest thrill in the world.

will come back, and go back to the normal number of dogs, but for now the pandemic is an issue. I really feel BE S T I N SH OW MAGA Z I N E

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I N T E RV I E W W I T H H A N D L E R

JANICE Hayes

Hi Janice, thank you for taking the time to answer the following questions for Best in Show Magazine. Please tell our readers how have you got started in purebred dogs? I actually started with obedience and hunt tests with my dad. Then we fell into conformation when my dad’s new field dog needed to be shown. I was hooked from nine years old on!

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I NT ERVI EW W I T H HANDLER · JANICE HAYES

What made you decide to become a professional handler? I never imagined doing anything else. Working with animals was the only thing that felt natural to me. When I found this, I studied this sport more than anything else. Who were your mentors when starting out in the sport of dog shows, and do you still have mentors you go to for advice or opinions? My friend in juniors was Erin Kerfoot. My parents had no show experience, so her family took me under their wing and got be off and running with the basics. Andrew Doyle was my first boss and taught me absolutely everything he could when it came to grooming, trimming, and running the business. Several years in Clint Livingston’s camp is where I really learned to run a set-up, multiple breeds, and campaigning dogs. Then of course Bill and Taffe McFadden really taught me those finishing touches on all of it. You have had many amazing wins in your professional dog showing career, can you please tell our readers about some of your most memorable and special wins.

I truly respected. That win was probably one of the

Every National really gets me every time. They really

most overwhelming moments in my life, where I just

mean so much. For me, I first saw Westminster on tv

said I cannot believe this is happening at least 20 times

when I was nine. I remember it so clearly and I knew I

every hour.

would get on that floor one day. Not just the floor but in that BIS ring. I have been lucky enough to be in it twice.

Are you involved in breeding dogs as well?

And it was an absolute thrill both times. With Bunny,

Yes. I proudly breed PBGVs (Petite Bassett Griffon

the Ibizan Hound, it was just an overwhelming line up

Vendeen) and I absolutely cannot imagine ever not

and to be in the ring when Mick won was absolutely

being involved in the breed. They make my whole heart

electric. With Liz, the ESS (English Springer Spaniel),

happy every day. I “dabble” in ESS, but I leave most of

was just one of those line ups competing against the

that to Erin Kerfoot, she seems to have that down pat

best in the breeds under breed and sporting dog people

now. I just enjoy spoiling them.

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Good assistants are invaluable to help run a tight ship

Favorite thing and least favorite thing about being a

when on the road, at the shows, and sometimes at home.

handler.

Can you please tell our readers what you look for in a good assistant and what you hope to teach them in return? Assistants are the backbone. I have been so lucky to have had some really great ones over the years. I was an assistant from the time I was 12 to 25. The dog’s happiness come first. I feel like you must learn what you

Favorite thing would be the relationships you build with the dogs. Also, the least favorite is the day they go home. It’s a tough one. A difficult question but can you please tell us your favorite dog you have shown so far?

want to do in your own business and what not to do by

My old PBGV Texas. I just lost her at 14, but she had

different experiences. I could have NEVER gone out on

zest for life every time she walked in the ring. She was

my own after juniors. When I am looking for assistants,

not obnoxious but every go around after her individual

I truly want someone that wants to do this as a career. I

would end with her talking. Never a dull moment with

don’t show as many dogs as a lot of people do, so I want

that one.

people that really want to refine their skills and build relationships by always keeping things at a professional level. What is favorite breed to: own, breed and show (these can be three different breeds) and why?

I love

presenting them and trimming them into such a beautiful picture.

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have loved to show? Mick for sure. I was lucky enough to spend time with him. Man was he an impressive guy. He would stare through your soul, but I think one lap around a ring

PBGVS!!! Sorry I know that is the obvious. Springers and Setters will always catch my eye.

What dog past or present not shown by you would you

would have been amazing. What is your favorite show to attend each year and why? Westminster for me. It is my drug. Lol


I NT ERVI EW W I T H HANDLER · JANICE HAYES

How do you feel about the change of venue/date for the Westminster Kennel Club?

How do you see shows after COVID-19? I think the shows will hopefully even out again. I am not

It won’t be exactly the same, but I think they will make

a huge fan of shows every day of the week. I think dogs

it so special. And the backdrop will be just awesome. I

need rest just like we do at home. I am hoping the West

went to those grounds once and it was just a beautiful

Coast will get more shows out here again. As well as

setting. I am excited about it.

getting a bigger variety of judges back. Last year was

Would you like to become a judge some day? I am really torn on this. I think I would be interested in specialties about those breeds I’m passionate about. But I don’t think I would want to do a lot of groups. Which owner, breeder, handler or judge you most respect. And why?

very challenging showing to the same handful over and over. I know we will all be happier when things are safer for everyone again. One last thing, please tell us what future do you see for yourself? Working with dogs, as a judge, or simply move somewhere and enjoy retirement. Honestly this time home with my own dogs and training

I feel like for me that is easy. I feel like Pat Trotter has

my own puppies has really been eye opening. I truly

done absolutely every part of this sport with grace. To

love being home. I miss shows but when we were only

talk to her you just absorb so much information and

getting two days home a week, if that, it was rough. I’m

its never enough. There are many judges I respect, but

hoping to slow down a bit and try to do a little more

to see her passion in her breeding program, roll over

breeding as well as shows. I still have some awesome

to showing, and then into judging. Her willingness to

dogs to get out there but we have our own goals with

share what she has learned so freely is something to

them so we will be out and about but trying to skip out

admire.

on the two-month trips like we had to go on last year.

If you were not a Professional Handler what career would you choose? I had never thought of anything else. Now Nails. We know you started a little side business during COVID-19, how did you feel during this time of no shows and what makes you start a new venture? I found Color Street nails and have absolutely LOVED learning how the business side of this works. The nails were just a fix I needed! But I have truly fallen in love with the business, my customers, and my team of rock stars too.


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HOW 1973

POODLE GROOMING forever

changed

Story by Sasha Riess

Poodle show grooming would change forever on a cold, rainy evening at the Westminster Kennel Club Show on February 13, 1973 at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Prior to 1973 there have been only five instances of a Poodle taking the podium as Best in Show at Westminster. The trim which they sported was the old English Saddle Trim which after this night would become out of fashion.

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HO W 1973 C HA NGED POODLE G ROOMING FOREVER

The old English Saddle Trim had three pompoms on the hind legs, the characteristic kidney patch on the side of the loins. The front legs had a shaped pompom. The chest coat was left to grow to its full extent and barley shaped. The images that appeared on the cover of The New York Times on the February 14, 1974 shocked not only the very dissatisfied audience who chanted the boos throughout the awards ceremony, but also the numerous professionals and show Poodle people from around the world who saw the new Westminster winner as a new trend. Maybe the dog won because it was clipped differently. It is possible that the grooming influenced the decision of the judges. What happened? In the pictures one could see the dissatisfaction of the audience. However, beyond the picture one could recognize the sheer talent and bravery the handler Frank Sabella possessed. He realized what he had to work with and had no doubts about the dog’s quality and his performance. The challenge was to make the judges recognize the same. It only takes someone to go after what they believe in to change the course of history. The judge, Mrs. August Riggs, was able to see beyond the coat to recognize the Poodle, withstanding the pressure from the established Poodle styling paradigm of that time she chose the new the future. It is worthy of admiration and leaves one breathless having the courage to go against the grain and barring the roaring crowd.

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HO W 1973 C HA NGED POODLE G ROOMING FOREVER

This event represented a revolution in the Poodle

Once Bart took over the cover pages, everyone in the

show grooming world, it enabled one to come to the

world started to groom the chest of the Poodles much

realization of how unimportant the coat style itself is in

tighter creating a more elegant silhouette.

relation to the actual quality of the dog. The New York Times was covering this event and wrote: “A stunning white Standard Poodle, Ch. Acadia

It wasn’t about the grooming, it wasn’t about politics, it wasn’t about the audience, it was about the dog and the courage, to do it right.

Command Performance, came through with a true

For 1973 this event was epic, it was far and away from

command performance at Madison Square Garden last

the generally accepted beauty of a Poodle coat. The style

night, as the two day Westminster Kennel Club event

of the English Saddle Trim took over as an inspiration,

came to a close when he was named best in show in a

creating the new course in Poodle grooming.

field of 3,029 dogs.

With brave actions we inspire future generations to

The decision was not a popular one with the 10,000

think outside of the box, and to have the inspiration to

spectators last night and there was considerable booing.

see the Poodle beyond the in-vogue grooming style.

Mrs. August Riggs, of Woodbine, Md., who judged the

Maybe it is a time for a new 1973.

final, said, ‘” The booing didn’t bother me at all. The crowd has booed the Best in Show decision plenty of times in the past. I made the final decision on over all quality and the way of moving. The poodle’s mistakes? I don’t call exuberance a mistake.”’ Bart, as the 67-pounder is called by his owners, Mrs. Jo Ann Sering of Portland, Ore., and Edward B. Jenner of Richmond, Il., was two years old just 10 days ago. Choice of Bart is greeted by boos here. The first time out as a special, still in puppy coat, he took the top award at Santa Barbara. As a champion, he has been shown 19 times and he has taken 18 blue rosettes, one red and last night his ninth best in show. Frank Sabella of Granada Hills, Calif., who showed Bart, was lavish in praising his charge. ‘“I’ve been handling

poodles for 14 years and have seen some good ones. But Bart is a really great one.”’

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M E E T T H E BR E E D POODLES

WITH

MARY Olund How did you get involved with the world of pedigreed dogs and dog shows, including the variety of poodles you have bred and shown, kennel name, and other breeds you are involved with. My first introduction to a pedigreed dog

CABERNET

was when my parents brought me home

POODLES

wire fox terrier named Ginger. After Ginger,

from the hospital after my birth. They had a and right up to my father’s death, he always had retired champion dachshunds. He said goodbye to us with a smooth on one side and a long haired on the other. I personally had Great Danes. When my last Great Dane died, Scott suggested a Poodle

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as he had been raised with a miniature. I thought that they were foo-foo dogs and was sure I could convince him to get a Pharaoh Hound. That’s when we brought a Standard Poodle into our lives. We became involved in the world of showing after our purchase of a Peppertree bitch from Dorothy and Rudy Huck in southern California. Once we bred Brie we began to establish ourselves as Cabernet Standard Poodles. The only other breed we’ve involved ourselves with was a wire fox terrier named GCH Afterall Painting the Sky, known as Sky. Our dear friend, Diane Ryan, gifted

to do so, a work in progress….tail sets, almond eye,

part ownership of her as a birthday gift to Scott and I.

longer necks, pronounced sternum, pigment in our

Little did we know at that young age what she would

whites, coat texture while maintaining what we’ve

grow up to accomplish (BIS Montgomery, BIS Eukanuba,

always emphasized, correct movement. We were able

BIS Great Western, BIS National to name a few and 129

to improve on many of these when we imported a male

Best In Shows) with Gabriel Rangel as her handler and a

(Tango) from Lotta Sandell’s Huffish line in Sweden.

career culminating with BIS 2014 Westminster.

What is your proudest achievement in the world of

Where did you get your foundation Poodle from?

Poodles?

Our first standard litter was out of the Peppertree bitch

We are very proud of all the “champions of the heart,”

(Brie) but we did not go forward with anything from the

which are the companion dogs that we have with

litter even though she did give us one champion bitch.

wonderful Cabernet families. They are the ones that

We have always considered our foundation bitch to be CH. Randenn Beyond Hope at Cabernet (Bianca). She was bred by Randy Garren, Dennis McCoy, and Kaz Hosaka. She was an absolutely stunning bitch with a wonderful temperament. She proves how strong a bitch line can be. How have your poodles changed since you first started showing/breeding? We have made gradual improvements and continue

are out in public being ambassadors for the breed as pets, performance and therapy dogs. We have built a community within our Cabernet families. Many have become our lifelong, friends and many have become friends with each other. Having 36 Cabernet families show up to attend Poodle Day in Carmel is a very proud achievement. Another proud achievement is when we see Cabernet in a pedigree where that particular dog or bitch has gone on to attain wonderful success that we all dream of.

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What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program? We prefer to line breed for three generations then outcross but with that said we have done outcrosses in three generations to dogs that are the same phenotype in the pedigree. What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why? First and foremost would be the Poodle Club of America National, which like all Nationals showcases our breed young and old, and is probably followed by the World Show. It’s interesting to see breeds that aren’t AKC recognized, the classes that we don’t have here in the United States such as the “hound packs,” handled by two to four handlers, meeting people from other countries, seeing the Poodles being shown from other countries, and adding in vacation time in the host country. When many people think Poodle they think HAIR. What are the qualities of a Poodle you wish judges paid more attention to when judging the breed? Both Scott and I are happy to have contributed in

We wish judges would remember that this is a breed

positive ways as board members for ten-year terms

that is supposed to retrieve a bird, so they need the

on the Poodle Club of America board. We’ve always

correct structure to do that. We wish that they would

believed in giving back to the breed.

pay just as much attention to the down and back as the

Who is your most successful dog?

go around. We also wish that they would pay attention to the chin and underjaw as well as balanced movement

We appreciate what you are asking but we’ve never

with soundness. All of this and more must be in a

looked at who’s the most successful dog as to us they

package of a poodle that exudes breed type.

are all successful in their own right. We have champion bitches that have been successful in the whelping box

Trim talk!

and champions dogs that have been successful in the

The continental trim has been the preferred trim after

breeding program-- to us that’s a successful dog.

12 months of age, but the modified continental is gaining

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momentum. We had many more than ever before being

Unfortunately, our other colors have not had the high

shown at our last National in all three varieties. Now,

number of wins.

we just have to have judges get used to it in their ring. Another favorite has been the English Saddle, but one does not see it often now. What is your favorite Poodle trim to see and create? In the show ring I love a beautifully trimmed and sprayed up continental. I am not a professional handler nor groomer so I cannot create anything except a mess if given scissors. For the retired champions I love a beautiful sporting trim. As we know, Poodles come in a variety of colors, does each color have a different coat texture and do you believe some colors win more than others? I feel that when you look at all three varieties and the different coat colors and their texture it all depends on the breeding of each one. There isn’t one specific color that is dominant in giving a soft or harsh dense texture. I’ve seen both in all the colors in all the varieties. I was told many years ago and it’s mentioned every so often today, “If you want a big winner you need to go into the ring with a white as they catch the eye of judges more.” I have always felt that was not the case. I pulled out all my Poodle In America hardbound books dated 1929-2007. I tabulated the wins between black and whites looking at the photos published of our Poodle Club of America National and Specialty Show Winners. It came out almost even between blacks and whites. If I tabulated correctly there were just 16 more in black that were winners. If not correct, it’s close enough to know that each color has strength in the ring to win.

How do you feel about the parti-colored Poodle? It is burned in my mind to breed to the breed standard. Our standard says, “The coat is an even and solid color.” For those who choose to breed partis, I leave it to them. Does each variety of Poodle come with their own traits/ health problems and what do you like to test for before you incorporate a Poodle into your breeding program? As one of two breeder referral contacts for Poodle Club of America west of the Mississippi I get asked by newcomers into the breed about the difference between the three varieties both in traits and health. One can make generalizations regarding the difference in traits between the varieties. In speaking to my toy


MEET T HE B REED · POODLES • CABERNET

by researchers to retest for it every four years for dogs being actively bred. Below as written on the Poodle Club of America’s Foundation site: “Poodle Club of America’s health foundation has funded well over $700,000.00 in research grants to improve the health of Poodles. Working in partnership with the AKC Canine Health Foundation, PCAF has donated funding for many studies such as epilepsy, cancer, male infertility, canine influenza and bloat.” Much of the funding donated by PCAF goes directly to universities and other institutions for studies of specific Poodle health problems, sebaceous adenitis, Addison’s disease, Legg-Calve-Perthes, patellar luxation, epilepsy, chronic liver hepatitis, atrial septal defect, polymicrogyria, eye disorders optic nerve hypoplasia, micro papillae and juvenile cataracts. and miniature friends because we’ve not bred either, the toy is easy and convenient to carry around, they

Where in the World do you believe Poodles are the strongest currently?

can develop much more of a need attachment to their

I don’t feel that there is any one place that is currently

people. Miniatures are wonderful small space dogs

the strongest in Poodles. There are many breeders

and then you have the standard. I truly feel that the

internationally working together in all three varieties to

Poodle is the most versatile breed. What other, breed

improve the breed. We personally have imported from

can do everything they can do. Imagine that? Each

Australia and Sweden and have exported to Canada and

variety has their inherent health issues that are unique

Finland all for diversifying pedigrees keeping in mind

to the variety or to the breed. Some issues with toys

phenotype and genotype that we wanted to keep.

are shared with miniatures and some miniature issues are shared with standards. The tests we do before we

Q: Pleases name one Poodle you wished you owned/bred.

breed are as follows; OFA hips, CERF, thyroid, sebaceous

A: Narrowing this down to just one is very challenging as

adenitis, neonatal encephalopathy, PRA (rcd4), PRCD,

there have been many in all three varieties that could be

degenerative myelopathy, Von Willebrand, and

named. It’s like asking a mother to name her favorite child.

elective congenital/advanced cardiac tests. Many of

I want to acknowledge one in each variety that always put

the varieties are DNA cleared by parentage for neonatal

a smile on my face watching them in the ring and yes, I did

encephalopathy and Von Willebrand but it’s been advised

wish that we had been their breeders.

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Toys- Ch. Trevor of Ahs Capital Gain-Cappy bred by

People come from all over the United States and the

Gary Wittmeier

world knowing that it’s the one opportunity to see as

Miniatures- Ch. BarKings Scintilla-Scin bred by Kathy Poe

many poodles as one can see under one roof. It has become a yearlong plan for many to attend anticipating a reunion with friends seen once a year, learning tips

Standards- Ch. El’s Image of Belle-Sophie bred by Edna

from fellow breeders, seeing dogs that one cannot see

May

geographically, and enjoy watching the youngsters in

Poodle Club of America is synonymous with prestige, the crème de la crème of Poodles compete there. What makes the show so special and what is your favorite PCA memory? The day that our National starts shows evidence of cooperative teamwork by all the volunteers who give

the ring, the seasoned show dogs, and the veterans that still love being in the ring. They come to show their dogs in all of the performance events enjoying the bonding and hard work that has taken place to get their poodle to the point of competing. Our most favorite PCA memory:

countless hours of their time to put this wonderful

Our very first PCA at Ludwig’s Corner. Being our first

show together. Everything is done with the goal of

PCA it was special. We were in awe with seeing and

perfection and eye for a beautiful presentation. Effort

meeting all the people that we had only seen in photos

is put into making it welcoming for the exhibitors and

or read about in Poodle Variety. To us, it was like being

for those who attend without an entry. It is truly a

among celebrities.

beautiful visual experience from the decorations to all three varieties being exhibited.

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If in closing may I use print space to share what Anne Rogers Clark wrote, “What is the Poodle Club of America?”

To me its the gathering of the clan The spectacle of the breed The glamour of the new crop The nerves of the tyro The presentation of the talented The pathos of the old timers The heartache of those who are gone The annoyances of the shallow The wonder of the mind that encompasses all The curiosity to see how last year’s crop has prospered and produced

It is the opportunity to sit and watch and wonder

To lend a hand at the crates or in the ring

To try your best to show the youngster that you are hooked on to its best

To compare with friends and to compete with them

To do the same with the not-so-friendly To learn To teach To reach up and out

To mend fences-and perhaps, burn bridges

To remember 50 years of involvement

The advances The pitfalls It is to live it all To grab the brass ring

And, once grasped, realize there is much more to the

sport of dogs and our lift than simple grasping

It is a belief, a commitment, to doing something you

love and believe in.

It is Christmas in June!

It is to live it all

To grab the brass ring

And, once grasped, realize there is much more to the sport of dogs and our lift than simple grasping It is a belief, a commitment, to doing something you love and believe in.

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M E E T T H E BR E E D POODLES

WITH

MICHAEL Gadsby Please tell our readers how you got involved in the world of pedigreed dogs and dog shows. (please include the variety/ varieties of Poodle you have bred and shown, your kennel name and an other breeds you are involved with.)

AFTERGLOW POODLES

It was at the age of 13 that I had my first taste of the British dog scene through a weekend job at a local show kennel that bred Great Pyrenees. My kennel name Afterglow was registered over 40 years ago, and in the subsequent years we have bred and or owned nearly 150 UK champions in 21 different breeds. In the beginning the emphasis was on (American) Cocker Spaniels from which

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we have owned or bred two Top Dog All Breeds, a

As far as breeding I think it was an advantage to

Crufts Reserve Best in Show and a Crufts BIS winner.

have successfully bred multiple breeds and therefore

The emphasis switched somewhat and whilst we still

we placed conformation and movement equally as

have Cockers it is the Poodles (mostly Standard and

important as type and carriage .

Toy) that have become my passion for over 20 years. As an individual I cannot take credit for the successes we’ve achieved and whilst many people have played a

(I think some Poodle breeders have sacrificed too much in their pursuit of extreme carriage)

significant part, without a doubt my business partner

What is your proudest achievement in the world of

Jason Lynn and my husband Tom Isherwood have had

Poodles?

a huge influence on the success of Afterglow.

There is not one defining moment but several situations

Where did you get your foundation Poodles and what

that are totally unforgettable: Donny (The Big Tease)

breeders (if any) do you work with today?

winning Best of Breed at PCA from the open class, Ricky

Our foundation in Standards was from the controversial but brilliant breeder Pat Ashwell of Torpaz fame, whilst the invaluable help and generosity of Lesley Howard of the world famous Grayco Toys gave us a great start in Toys. How have your Poodles changed since you first started showing/breeding. This can be in quality and or presentation. A: Obviously our presentation has improved. When the British Dog Scene dropped its rather superior outlook and embraced the wealth of talent that existed around the world, this naturally upped the game of anyone who wants to remain relevant. I think the first dramatic changes of presentation came from

(Maverick Sabre) and his BIS win at Crufts 2014. Our first BIS winning toy Aloysius finishing in the top ten of all breeds, Finally for a moment of pure joy it really doesn’t get more exciting than winning the breed at the world show in 2018 with our beautiful Elektra under one of Europes most successful breeder judges Mikael Nillson. Who Is your most successful dog (show ring, litter box or stud?) It is difficult to separate Maverick Sabre (Ricky) and The Big Tease (Donny). Both Top Dog All Breeds in the UK. Ricky won the variety at PCA twice, whereas Donny won the Breed! At Crufts Donny was Reserve BIS whilst it was Ricky who took the top spot!

Scandinavia, later the brilliant talent of several US

In the litter box our Donny daughter Pitfour Popsicle

handlers, whilst Asia and in particular the Japanese

produced several champions of which two finished in

excelled in Toys. More recently a group of gifted

the All-Breed Top Ten, namely Ch. Tyrone Power, a BIS

Russians have created an iconic “second puppy” look

winner in the UK and also BIS from the classes in the

in all sizes. There’s no doubt however that at home

US (also breed winner at Westminster) and Ch. Poppa

our own level of presentation was improved when Tom

Don’t Preach (Grace) also a BIS winner in the UK and

joined the team.

in Europe including the prestigious Amsterdam winners

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show. Both Grace and Tyrone Power are co-owned by

we must be very careful not to be dazzled by the best

our dear friend Maud Nilsson who played such a huge

presentation. Don’t get me wrong, a beautiful Poodle

roll in their success.

that is beautifully prepared and handled is a joy, but

Ch. Sugardaddy has had the most long-lasting influence on the kennel despite only siring three litters before he became sterile. Interestingly his closely line bred pedigree consisted of his litter sister granddams, bred by the highly talented Margaret Kendal of Magin fame.

ultimately, we are not judging a grooming (or for that matter a handling) competition and for that reason it’s the dog under the coat that must have our upmost consideration. Good basic conformation, a square (not a bar stool), standing over a front is generally a good sign, width across the stifles and of course a shelf behind the

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding

tail. Attention to detail of the head is often lacking and

program line breeding, inbreeding or outcross?

I hate to see judges reward exhibits with Roman noses

We prefer to line breed enhanced by a regular outcross. What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why. I don’t really have one favorite show but I just love Crufts, PCA, Westminster and of course the World Show.

which are so often accompanied by a lack of chin. Trim talk! In the USA, when a Poodle reaches 12 months of age it changes trim to continue showing. Can you speak to our readers about some of the popular, not so popular and newer trims we see in the ring. I love to see Poodles (particularly Standards) in a

When many people think Poodle they think HAIR. What

continental (trim) and whilst I understand the concept

are the qualities of a Poodle you wish judges paid closer

behind the one year rule in the US, I do think that it is

attention to when judging the breed?

very difficult, particularly in tiny (under 10 inch) toys,

A: Well obviously the magnificent coat on a Poodle

to look impressive in this trim.

is one of its biggest attractions. The masses of crisp,

It is always fun to see a well corded Poodle as it is to

glossy hair is a groomers dream to work on. As a judge

see one in a sporting continental, however it is also very

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difficult to win consistently in these trims. We do not

our breed standard was written only for whole colors

have the same restriction in Europe providing there

and therefore, unless there is a change to our breed

is sufficient coat to assess texture. With the exception

standard we must observe this in the show ring.

of standards where adults are most often shown in continental, the smaller varieties are presented in various ways but mostly based on a second puppy trim. The clever Russians have created a lovely stylized

Does each variety of Poodle come with their own traits/ health problems and what do you like to test for before you incorporate a Poodle into your breeding program?

version which if not taken to an extreme is very pleasing

A: The advent of a genetic PRA test has been a game

to the eye. I love the Scandinavian T trim which is a

changer for toy and miniature breeders. Standards are

tight but glamorous trim with shaved ears and tail, and

more challenging with some health issues, whilst not

very popular for retired show dogs, I would love to see

common, still remain a challenge for breeders of this

this trim to become more popular in the ring.

variety. DNA markers for the likes of Addisons Disease

What is your favorite Poodle trim to personally see and create? Continental. As we know, Poodles come in a variety of colors. Does each color have a different coat texture, and do you believe some colors win more than others? A: Basic black is the easiest color to achieve great coats and excellent type with white/cream close behind. That is basically because from the beginning there has been a greater choice for breeders as black is the most popular color. There are fabulous Poodles of all colors to be found around the world that can win in any competition. How do you feel about the parti-colored Poodle? What’s not to like? I’ve never bred them but I have seen several lovely specimens particularly in toys, Lesley Howard of Grayco fame, bred partis that could have been competitive had the color been recognized. Parti Poodles have been around from the early days of the breed (unlike many breeds this is not a newly created color.) When dog shows and competition commenced

and Sebaceous Adenitis would be an invaluable tool for breeders.


however in my younger days when I was considered to have some talent as a handler, I would have died for the opportunity to handle the magnificent white stallion Maneetas del Zarzoso Fuego Fatuo bred in the UK. He was the creation of one of the Poodle worlds most passionate breeders the late Carlos Renau. Gordon was statuesque and athletic with a charismatic command of the ring and therefore simply could not be ignored. He exploded onto the dog scene in Finland where the much talented young couple Tiina (now Talous) and Juha Palosaari piloted him to top dog all breeds. His debut in the states at PCA with handler Dennis McCoy caused a sensation! Where in the world do you believe Poodles are strongest

The Poodle Club of America show is synonymous with

currently?

prestige, the creme de la creme of Poodles compete there.

There are pockets of great breeders in all varieties around the world. We are now a one-world Poodle

What makes the show so special and what is your favorite PCA memory?

community whereby excellence is achieved by

The show is simply a feast for Poodle enthusiasts. The

incorporating the best on offer from around the world.

great dogs are there, mostly American, but with an

Possibly a controversial viewpoint but I think that the US toy breeders are at a disadvantage from the rest of us with the 10-inch rule. Attempting to breed consistently under 10 inches, is quite simply too small for vigor and

international twist. It is the opportunity to witness new stars, consider and maybe reconsider breeding plans and of course to learn and interact with a multitude of Poodle talent new and old.

vitality to be maintained, whilst producing an under

Our winning dogs obviously gave special memories but

10-inch Poodle with an exquisite head, good bone and

probably the jaw dropping moment I saw for the first

substance is not impossible but it is huge challenge and

time around 80 Standard specials enter the football-

something of a rarity.

sized grass ring was a truly a sight to behold and literally

Please name one Poodle you wished you owned/bred. This

made my hair stand on end.

can be any dog in any point of history.

Your goals/dreams in the world of Poodles?

There have been so many wonderful Poodles. In recent

I would just love to judge Standards at PCA, but really I

times I would have said that my choice would have been

dream each time i think a planned breeding just might

the gorgeous American Ch. Stone Run Afternoon Tea,

contain the next great one.

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M E E T T H E BR E E D POODLES

WITH

NANCY Wilson Please tell our readers how you got involved with the world of pedigree dogs and dog shows. (please include the variety/varieties of Poodle you have bred and shown, your kennel name and any other breeds you are involved with.)

BAR-NONE

I breed Standard Poodles under the kennel

POODLES

bought a poodle as a family dog at the

name Bar-None, from Texas, USA. We relentless urging of our daughter, Zoe, who wanted a dog but I had allergies. Upon advice from a vet, we selected a poodle and I fell head-over-heels in love with the breed. When I bred my first litter, I was enthralled with the puppies from the birthing process through puppyhood. When it was time

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for the puppies to go to their new homes, I was struck

– Toys, Minis and Standards) for about 13 years and with

that there is not much you can do in life that passes on

Shawn Clute (Kalan, Standards, Chinese Cresteds and

pure happiness and love that equals sending a happy,

Kerry Blue Terriers) for about 10 years. Joan Archer

healthy, beautiful puppy to a new home.

Thompson and I co-owned Fabulosity and co-bred her.

I came to dog shows with that first litter. Although I had said I would never put a dog in “that trim”, I found that I enjoyed the time spent with the dogs grooming them

Joan and I have been friends for 14 years. These are my long-term relationships. Shawn and Sharon both handle my /our dogs for me.

and getting them ready to go to dog shows. I enjoyed

How have your Poodles changed since you first started

learning the process.

showing/breeding. This can be in quality and or

Where did you get your foundations Poodles and what breeders (if any) do you work with today? My foundation is from a Donnchada bitch bred line-

presentation. Entries have gotten smaller and quality – particularly type - is harder to find.

bred to a Donnchada dog that was a son of the famous

What is your proudest achievement in the world of

Spanish/English import CH. Maneetas Del Zarzoso

Poodles?

Fuego Fatuo.

I bred a bitch from that litter back to

CH. King’s Champagne Taste, which was also a line breeding. I then proceeded to outcross puppies from that pedigree for a number of years before line breeding on those out-cross pedigrees.

Producing a recognizable, healthy dog with a proper temperament that can be a good show dog and/or a great companion. My goal is to breed to meet the AKC standard and produce big-bodied, square dogs that have a recognizable outline with matching angles and

I have been co-breeding dogs with Anders Rosell and

beautiful faces. Their legs must go in the right places

Stephen Wheeler (Avatar, Minis, Standards and Afghans)

when moving and they need to have high-headed

for about 15 years, with Sharon Svoboda (Harten Poodles

carriage.

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puppies as well and is a constant source of comic relief and a lethal threat to any food left unattended. I really loved the look of CH. Bar-None Roger That, he was a dog that had a short but good show career and did some nice winning. He was beautiful and was the absolute best dog to live with. In the whelping box, CH. Donnchada We Love Lucy and CH. Bar-None You Go Girl were my biggest producing bitches. Both were heart dogs, as smart and funny as they were beautiful, and great additions to our family when my children Gus and Zoe were growing up. Along with CH. BarNone Bit Of The Bubbly, these girls can be found at least once in all of my pedigrees. As far as stud dogs. I am really thrilled with what my young dog GCHB Bar-None Piedmont Dirty Sexy Money. His sire, CH. Avatar Jupiter (a grandson of CH. Bar-None You Go Girl) was also an incredible sire who had a huge impact on my dogs. He always produced very reliably and I knew exactly what to expect from his puppies. He was also a joy to live with, loved his I am also proud of all that the dogs I have bred have achieved. There are well over a hundred USA

toys and lived a very long healthy life. These are the dogs that I have lived with.

conformation champions, many BIS, SBIS, and Group

Many others have had great success and contribution.

Winners and champions on several continents, as well

Multiple BIS, SBIS Am. Can. CH. Bar-None Dawin

as Obedience, Agility winners and beloved Therapy

Travelin’ Man had a great specials career for Dawin

dogs. I additionally love hearing from all of the owners

kennels. His brother, Multi CH. Bar-None On The

and seeing how much their dogs are a part of their

Prowl To Avatar is one of the most-titled Standard

lives. Getting photos and emails is a lovely part of my

Poodles, and had a great influence as a stud dog in

experience as a breeder.

Europe as well; he is the sire of my CH. Avatar Jupiter.

Who is your most successful dog (show ring, litter box or stud.)

More recent winners have been Multi BIS SBIS GCHS Bar-None Sriracha and Multi BIS SBIS GCHS Bar-None Some Like It Black, as well as Multi BIS SBIS GCHS Kalan

Multi BIS MSBIS GCHG Bar-None Fabulosity was my most

Bar-None She’s Got Guns. I own an impressive young

successful show dog. She has given me some fantastic

son of Sriracha who is just starting his stud career, and

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I think will become a reliable producer. Some Like It

breed them back to the other part(s) of my pedigrees,

Black has a brand-new litter of puppies with her co-

but that is consistently getting more difficult to do.

owner/handler Jason Bailey, and we are very excited to watch them grow up.

in the world and why.

I sent a silver dog to Linda Isgren in Sweden some time ago, Multi-CH Bar-None Corps Consulaire Calie, he did quite a bit of winning and had a significant contribution, I think, to silvers in that part of Europe. I can usually see him in the photos I see of his get. I sent a white bitch, Multi CH. Bar-None Avatar Cool Water to De Couture to Italy, she ended up being Top Standard in France in 2020.

What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere

I sent a black

dog, Multi CH. Bar-None Avatar Shoot The Moon to Madeleine Winburg and Avatar. He did a nice amount of winning and the photos I see of his get all have a recognizable look and way of going. I recently sent a black dog, CH. Bar-None Riding Shotgun, to

Poodle Club of America National Specialty.

The

depth and breadth of quality is as good as it is going to get. I also enjoy Royal Canin in all of its past and future incarnations in Orlando, Florida. It is a fun show in a great facility and you can see beautiful dogs of all breeds from all parts of the world. I have a lot of responsibilities at home, so I have turned into a real home-body. I raised my children when I started breeding Poodles, and between children, home, work and poodles I did not have a lot of free time. Although Gus and Zoe are now adults, I still have a full-time job with a law office (I have been working at home for over

Helen Turner in Australia. His puppies, although young, look very promising and seem to have a very consistent stamp. Barrie Drewitt-Barlow, purchased CH. Bar-None Piedmont Show Stopper from me, and she has produced very well for him. Barrie and I have bred several litters together in recent years. I am very proud that all of these dogs have gone on to compliment the breeding programs of these other breeders and am grateful for the consideration they have been given. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or out-cross? Two crosses out and one cross back. After that, if doing a line-breeding, count up your out-crosses, don’t just look at the line-breedings. I try to keep pedigrees with some separation so that I can always

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M EET T HE B REED · POODLES • BAR- NONE

30 years). I haven’t gone to shows outside of the US but

owner, I am not particularly drawn to it, mostly for the

hope I can do so once I retire from full-time work and

lack of balance I usually see in the execution of this

Covid-19 is in the rear-view mirror.

trim. The top coat needs to be in balance with the body

When many people think “Poodle”, they think HAIR. What are the qualities of a Poodle you wish judges paid closer attention to when judging the breed? Balance. And balance. And balance. Bone-to-size,

coat, and not many dogs can pull that look off in the ring. What is your favorite Poodle trim to personally see and create?

length of back to length of leg, length of head to length

For me, a shortish Terrier Trim or completely shaved

of body, front and rear angulation and movement

down with a little beret. A beautiful dog needs no

should all be balanced. If judges would look for type

cover. To see in the ring, not much can equal a

and balance the rest would be easy.

beautiful dog in a full continental.

Trim talk! In the USA, when a Poodle reaches 12 months

As we know, Poodles come in a variety of colors, does

of age, it changes trim to continue showing. Can you

each color have a different coat texture and do you

speak to our readers about some of the popular, not so

believe some colors win more than others?

popular and newer trims we see in the ring.

I am fairly color-blind for black, although I do own

The traditional trims in the U.S. are the U.S. Puppy

a blue and a white. I am very lazy and like to do as

Trim, Continental and Saddle Trim. The Modified or

little work as possible with a coat, so I prefer a good,

Historically Correct Continental is starting to be seen

dense, non-matting black coat. Other coats appear to

here in the ring. For me, the jury is still out on this

me to need more coat care and attention. For a very

trim. While I understand the desire to not spend a lot

short time, I bred some silvers, there is nothing more

of time with big hair, and that an absence of that hair

beautiful than a gorgeous platinum silver bitch, fully

can contribute to a more carefree lifestyle for dog and

cleared and in a Continental. That said, I do believe that black or white poodles usually win more than the other colors, but there are more of them, so to some degree that is a function of math. The U.S. Standard for the Poodle says that color is immaterial, and it should be. How do you feel about the Parti-color Poodle? Since the AKC does not allow Parti-colors to compete in conformation, I don’t think that much about it. When I look at the pedigrees, they make no sense to me, so I can’t really do that evaluation.

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Does each variety of Poodle come with their own traits/health problems and what do you like to test for before you incorporate a Poodle into your breeding program. I haven’t bred Toys or Minis, so I cannot comment on those breeds other than what I have been told about by others. For Standards, I test for hips, eyes, skin and thyroid. Yes, there are health problems in this Variety, and that is why it is important to know your dogs and pedigrees, do your testing, and maintain contact with your puppy owners. Knowledge is an important tool. You must also be prepared to make the tough decision when a dog does not prove to be a breeding prospect. Where in the World do you believe Poodles are strongest currently. I don’t have enough perspective on Poodles around-theworld to give an informative answer. I have seen photos of some beautiful dogs from Europe, Asia and Australia, and see very worthy dogs from the US and Canada.

based on Tim Brazier’s article praising his temperament and what a joy he was to live with. Poodle Club of America is synonyms with prestige, the creme de la creme of Poodles compete there. What makes the show so special and what is your favorite PCA memory? There is as much depth of quality and presentation, I believe, as you can find. I love(d) to be able to go and see generations of dogs, numerous dogs from a variety

Please name one Poodle you wished you owned/bred. This

of breeders and gain inspiration on what I wanted to

can be any dog in any point of history.

do as a breeder in the future. To me, this is the best

That is just a very difficult question. I have seen a great number of dogs that I have greatly admired and would have been proud to have bred. I have loved photos of all of the greats and very much appreciate what I feel are their contributions to the breed and would have loved to see and meet them. I have taken inspiration from these photographs and tried to incorporate what I see as their attributes into

part of being a breeder; seeing and imagining and trying to make it a reality. PCA is where you go to see and imagine, then you fly home on a high and get to work. I have so many fantastic memories from PCA, wins, meeting friends, old and new, having a great time with friends from all over the world, it is difficult to pick just one memory. Your goals/dreams in the world of Poodles?

my own dogs. However, in order to want to own them,

I would like to continue to breed happy, healthy,

I would have to know them. If I had to pick one that

recognizable and beautiful poodles as long as I am able

I never met, it would probably be CH. Eaton Affirmed,

to do so.

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M E E T T H E BR E E D C H OW C H OW

WITH

MATTHEW Fan First can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed Chow Chows? Growing up at New Territory, Hong Kong, I was exposed to many dog breeds originating from mainland China due to its relatively

EASTERN MAGIC

close distance from the country’s border. I

CHOW CHOW

One of my best memories as a kid is of a

am very interested in all the Chinese breeds. dog with a big fluffy coat and purple-blue tongue. As I grew older, I came to realize that dog I was a Chow Chow. In 1983 when I am still a student, my passion towards animals drives me to start a small tropical fish breeding farm of my

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own. Other than the fishes, I kept a few dogs on the

purebred dog which was a Shar-Pei. Two years later, I

farm as guard dogs and did some occasional breeding.

bought my first Chow Chow.

In 1985, I came across my first purebred Chow Chow and immediately fell in love with this breed, and that is where the breeding journey started. What is the story behind your kennel? When did you breed your first litter? How many litters have you had so far?

What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have you bought or leased dogs from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? My breeding policy is based upon what I perceive from

Eastern Magic is the prefix of my kennel. The name

the breed standard. I have bought and leased dogs from

came from the fish farm I owned during the 1980’s. I was

other kennels for my breeding program, including dogs

relatively successful in breeding Discus fish back then.

from the US and some from Europe.

The Discus came in all sort of vibrant magical colors, and we are located at the eastern part of the world--born the name Eastern Magic. I had my first litter in the late 80’s but couldn’t recall the numbers of litters I’ve had. Where did your first dogs come from?

Which dog do you consider the foundation of your breeding? I don’t believe that there will be a specific dog or bitch that can be considered as a foundation in a breeding, no matter how outstanding they are in the show ring.

My first dogs are the ones we had in the family when I

I believe that breeding isn’t about the evolution of one

was born. They used to guard the house compound and

dog, rather a constant pairing of genetics from different

control pests. Then in the 1980’s, I bought my very first

dogs.

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M EET T HE B REED · C HO W CHOW • EASTERN MAG IC

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding

What three qualities do you think are the most important

program, line breeding, inbreeding, or outcrossing?

when you look at the chow?

Line breeding will be the preferred choice in my

The three qualities will be the dog’s profile, style, and

breeding program.

soundness.

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a

Which fault would you not tolerate in your breed?

breeder so far? At different age and stages, individuals will have a different perspective on achievements. My greatest achievement as a breeder so far is to be able to translate my constant growth and understanding of the Chow

The least tolerable fault to me should be dogs with eye problems. How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone better or worse?

Chow breed standard into a real living animal. I find that

I would split my answer for the changes into eye of the

as a combination of both science and art that provides

public and sight of breeders that worked closely with

me with the highest satisfaction.

the breed.

What do you consider should be the most important

The Chow Chow was a popular breed in the AKC during

attribute of the Chow; type, movement, or head?

the 1980s. The large number of dogs also means there’s

For me, the type and movement of the Chows are equally important.

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a higher probability for one to come across a nice specimen especially at the show ring. Over the years, the popularity and numbers of Chows had declined


M EET T HE B REED · C HOW CHOW • EASTERN MAG IC

significantly. The probability of seeing a nice dog has

how great she is, but just pure sentimental. The name of

greatly declined due to its scarcity, hence chances

the one dog that’s not owned nor bred by me, Ukwong

of seeing a Chow Chow winning at shows or even in

King Solomon.

attendance has been greatly reduced. So, a small part of the public may argue that they no longer as good as they used to be. But for me and other Chow breeders, we have seen the

What homebred dog of yours come closes to your ideal? To me all my dogs are still far from ideal, that is why I am still working hard on achieving the dream.

changes in the breed for decades. It’s the nature for all

What would you say is the secret to continued success in

breeders to improve the breed. Attention has been paid

breeding Chow?

to not just the overall appearance but also working to improve the overall health of the breed. A few common health problems such as the hip, elbow, thyroid, and

Keep up the hard work and put in all the effort you have toward reaching your goal.

eye are problems slowly being eliminated and hardly

What advice would you give to the younger generations

appear in the modern dogs. Even the temperament

in the breed?

has improved to a great extent. The healthier representatives of the Chows might not possess those exaggerated features of the older dogs, but they are better in the movement.

When it comes to breeding, nobody has the answer. So, try! Because without trying you will never know the answer.

Some people say a Chow Chow is just a head breed, but to me the breed is much more than that. The unique stilted gait, the squareness described within the standard, and all the other breed qualities can never be retained or improved if breeders only focus on just one specific feature. When picking a dog I will always focus on these five elements: type, soundness, style, showmanship, and condition. A lot of the hard work of the breeders seems to be dismissed by outsiders that say the breed isn’t as good as the older days, but in my opinion the Chow Chow has taken a great leap for betterment. Please name three of your all-time favorite winners bred by you and three not owned nor bred by you. I would only name one of my bred by dogs which is Mayli, Eastern Magic Channel Beauty. Not because of

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M E E T T H E BR E E D C H OW C H OW

WITH

MICHAEL Brantley First can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed Chow Chows? My parents bred and showed Pekingese in the 50s and got their first chow in 1961 from

DREAMLAND CHOW CHOW

one of the top breeders of the time, Mr. Hal Allen. My interest came from theirs and as I grew up showing our Chows it just continued. What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? When did you bred your first litter? How many litters have you had so far? My parents kennel name was Ken Chi and I bred a few dogs under that prefix, but in 1988 I married Linda, whom I had met due to her

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breeding of the first chow I won a best in show on named

each generation, and working with other like-minded

Dream Weaver, and from that our name of Dreamland

people allows us to do that.

came about.

Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own

Where did your first dogs come from?

breeding?

Hal Allen of Tsang Po kennels was the breeder I grew up

Both Linda and I fell in love with a dog named Ch.

with and learned from, but When Linda and I married we

Teabears Cheese Whiz and have tried to base many of our

decided to go in a different direction and used dogs from

original breedings on him. He was a beautifully balanced

the lines she was working with, which go back to some

dog with tremendous bone, beautiful head, and ring

of the same dogs as my parents, but with some different

presence to boot.

lines mixed in. What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have you bought or leased dogs from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself?

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or out-cross? Definitely line breeding, and sometimes tightly. Even when breeding to an outcross it will be for the next generation that we take back into our line. To us the

We have been very fortunate to have several breeders

best way to solidify a line of dogs with the look and

around the world in China, and Brazil that co-breed and

consistency you want is to breed closely.

work with the same lines as we do which gives us a much larger gene pool to work with. We also will co-own dogs with other breeders to have access to them as stud dogs,

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far?

or trade puppies from time to time. I think it is important

Consistently producing healthy dogs that fit my view of

to have a larger number of combinations to work with as

the standard. Winning has always been secondary and is

a breeder to truly make a line of dogs that improve with

just a byproduct of breeding good dogs.

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really a labor of love to do so. In that aspect I would say we have not fared as well. What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Chow? A:The proper profile standing or moving, (square, balance of leg to body, head carried proudly above the topline). Stilted rear movement, and correct head. Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? Short legged, long bodied dogs! Please name three of your all-time favorite winners bred by you and three not owned nor bred by you. Bred by us: Ch. Dreamlands Wanna Be A Billionaire, GHCG CH Dreamlands Game Changer, Ch. Dreamlands ABOUT THE BREED What do you consider should be the most important attribute of the Chow, type, movement, head? The Chow is a breed of balance, there is not one part or another that is more important to me. It is the harmony of all the parts together, movement is a part of type, head is a part of type, etc. How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone to better or worse?

American Revolution. Others: Ch. Xi Shans Guardian Angel, Ch. Eastern Magic Fly Me Safe, and a wonderful dog from England Ukwong King Soloman. What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? Ch. Dreamlands Thrill of the Chase (Rush) What would you say is the secret to continued success in breeding Chow? Having a complete picture in your mind of your ideal

We have come a long way from the heavy overdone

dog and understanding basic canine structure, and the

dogs of the 70s and have returned somewhat to more

most important is having someone who shares your

of what the breed was meant to be, an athletic short

passion!

coupled upstanding dog that could go all day. So, I would say better in that respect, but there are very few breeders with the resources and drive to have a large

What advice would you give to the younger generations in the breed?

kennel and do the work to make a consistent line of

Learn and listen to the old timers, understand that you

dogs in their breed. It is a full-time commitment and

don’t know everything, and be willing to try.

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M E E T T H E BR E E D C H OW C H OW

WITH

PAULO Clerice First can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed Chow Chows? My name is Paulo Clerice and my Kennel name is Ayran Hong. It is based in Brazil. I have been breeding and showing in

AYRAN HONG

the USA since 2004, when I had my first

CHOW CHOW

to share my background and how my

American champion. I feel honored breeding program started. I have been a dog lover since I was a kid. I always had pets and collected every single book about dogs that I was able to find. In 1989 I went back to my country, Italy, to spend six months. I was in Bologna, a beautiful city located in the north of the country.

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Walking in the streets of Bologna downtown, I came

standards. We started a wonderful friendship sharing

across a couple walking with a very exotic black dog.

breeding experiences. I used several fantastic Chows

I was not able to say if the dog looked like a lion or a

bred by them and vice-versa.

bear. It was love at first sight. It was a Chow Chow. I started to study about the breed. Reading, contacting clubs and breeders all over the world to learn about

Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding?

them. I was sure at that time sure that I wanted to

I have a few I could mention, but I am proud to say

become a breeder.

Stormy, Ayran Hong’s Eye of the Storm is the one that

What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel

is on most of my pedigrees.

name? When did you bred your first litter? How many

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding

litters have you had so far?

program line breeding, inbreeding or outcross?

Ayran is the name of a river, a lake in China. Hong

I learned over the years that I get the best results,

means water. I wanted a strong name, with the

conformation, and health tests with linebreeding. I

meaning of abundance of energy, good vibes, and at

usually know what I’ll have and it is a comfort work

the same time the feeling of relaxation. My first litter

zone. Of course, there are times that I have to do an

was born in 1999. I was very excited about the five

outcross breeding when my line gets very close. I

puppies we had. It was the start of a long journey. It

never felt comfortable doing inbreeding. So, in my

is difficult to say how many litters I have had so far. I

opinion, best results come working with linebreeding.

would say around 70 in 21 years.

What would you say was your greatest achievement as

Where did your first dogs come from?

a breeder so far?

When I started researching back then, after talking

I am very proud of so many achievements, being

to some very important breeders around the globe,

awarded best breeder for so many years in a row in

I imported two Chows, a female from Holland and a

Brazil, being the first breeder all-breed outside the

male from the UK.

USA to be awarded Breeder of Merit by the AKC.

What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have you bought or leased dogs from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself?

Having many Chows, I bred BIS and BISS in the USA. Number one all-breed in China and the Philippines, but I must mention that for me, a very special moment was when Multi BR.BIS AM.BIS.BISS. Ch. Ayran Hong Jamal Black Tiger won a big specialty show in Atlanta

In 1997 I met Michael and Linda Brantley, from

in 2005 with a very large entry. Jamal also was my

Dreamland Kennel, located in Lubbock Texas. We

first black Chow to win a Best in Show in the USA and

had the same goal about breeding purposes: health,

in a short time finishing as number two in the same

temperament, soundness always respecting the

year. That was a special achievement for me.

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In my opinion, Chows actually are not as heavy as years ago. I see more moderate types which is good. I used to see in the past so many overdone Chow Chows. Breeders are looking for healthy dogs. What it is very difficult to see and find is a Chow with no angulation in the rear. Consequently, it is very hard to see Chows with the proper movement nowadays. Please name three of your all-time favorite winners bred by you and three not owned nor bred by you. A: Bred by me here are my three all-time favorites: - Multi Br. BIS Int. Ch. Am. BIS and Multi BISS Ayran Hong Black Tiger–Jamal - #3 Chow of the Year, 2005, ABOUT THE BREED

USA.

What do you consider should be the most important

- Multi Br. Ch. Am. BISS Ayran Hong For Your Eyes Only-

attribute of the Chow, type, movement, head?

-Bond

Elegance, substance, bone, square body--compact,

- Am. GCh. Ch. Ayran Hong’s Red Passion – Campari, #2

blue-black tongue, stilted gait. large head but never

Chow of the Year, 2010.

exaggerated, snob attitude. They should be sound. No angulation in the rear makes the Chow Chow unique in the movement, what we call stilted. What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Chow?

Bred by other breeders there are more than three Chows that I like. But I will mention the top three that I really consider extremely important for the breed and of course I love them conformation wise: - Multi Am. BIS. BISS.Ch. Can. Ch. Xishan’s Guardian

Profile. Must be square. Gait, stilted, correct movement.

Angel – ROM – Jordan – USA – Breeder: Cynthia Lakowski

Eyes; must be perfect.

– Owners: Bruce Shayne, Cynthia Lakowski, Janet Burke

Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? Aggression, exaggerated (overdone), short legs, consequently long bodies, and hidden eyes.

- #1 Chow USA - English Champion Fort Knox Here’s The Tiger At Towmena – Chow of the Year 1984 UK – Breeder: AnneCatherine Ekengren – (Fort Knox Kennel, Sweden) –

How has the breed changed over the years? Would you

Owner: Rodney Oldham – (Towmena Kennel, United

say it has gone to better or worse?

Kingdom)

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- Int.Ch. Crufts Winner 2015, World Winner 2014, Italian,

the breed. There are so many ups and downs during the

Danish, German, Finnish, Swiss, Belgian Ch. Heart Mind

journey and it is our responsibility to keep the work

Fire Dei Leoni Imperiali – Breeder: Massimialiano

going. I have a long way to walk and so much more to

Carinelli, Tiziana Campi – Owner: Stefania Bettini.

learn about this fantastic breed.

What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your

What advice would you give to the younger generations

ideal?

in the breed?

Stormy, Ayran Hong’s Eye of The Storm, is the closest to

My main advice is to study the breed. To read the

my ideal, even if I never showed him. He had a very nice

standards, research the literature available, to meet

balance, beautiful head, square body, and a wonderful

reputable breeders, especially the ones who care about

temperament. He was my diamond in the rough. As I

health testing and temperament. Attend a few important

mentioned before he is in most of my Chows pedigrees,

shows like the Chow Chow National in the US, a great

having all health clearances, hips and elbows.

opportunity to meet breeders and exhibitors. Research

What would you say is the secret to continued success in breeding Chow?

the pedigree databases available online. Find a mentor with a lot of experience in the breed. These are just a few tips that will make an extremely big difference

A: Being persistent. To be a Chow Chow breeder is not

in the path of the new generation. And finally, to be

an easy task. You need to be strong and passionate about

persistent. It is an amazing journey!

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NOTES of the

BICHON FRISE Protagonist of the Ringand the Sofa b y A n ne T u re e n

‘’ On March 5, 1933, the official standard of the breed,

as written by Madam Abadie of Steren Vor Kennels, was adopted by the Societe Central Canine de France. As the breed was known by two names, Tenerife and Bichon, the President of the International Canine Federation, Mme. Nizet de Lemma’s, proposed a name based on the characteristics that the dogs presented and the name Bichon a Poil Frise (Bichon with the curly coat) was adopted. The anglicized version is Bichon Frise (curly lap dog). On October 18, 1934, the Bichon was admitted to the official registry of the French Kennel Club.’’ The Bichon Frise can easily be confused at first glance with similar dogs such as it’s cousins the Bolognese,


NO T ES O F T HE BICHON FRISE

the Havanese and the Maltese, the Coton de Tulear

The standard makes free use of the term ‘breed’ which

and the Miniature Poodle which are also comparable

is misleading. A brief search online will produce

in size. The roots of the breed are noted in the first

paintings claimed in turn by the clubs of Maltese,

line of the History section of the FCI standard- Italy,

Bolognese, Coton de Tulear and Havanese as proof

home of the Maltese and Bolognese. The ancestors

of the ancient origin of their breed, solely based on

of all of these breeds were traded throughout the

phenotype, it is nearly impossible to distinguish any

Mediterranean basin and carried from the main ports

dog as a Bichon Frisé before the third decade of the

to central Europe. Small white companion dogs were

20th century. Fortunately, the value and position of

highly prized by women over the centuries. There

any breed today is not necessarily linked with ancient

were at least two practical reasons for women to

origins, and the Bichon is among the most striking

want a lapdog before modern times. Firstly, it was

little dogs to grace the show ring, and a much sought-

believed that lapdogs ‘drew off’ the fleas, so keeping a

after family companion. As Bo Bengtson writes,

finely combed little dog would help relieve the owner

‘’Usually, it takes a few decades for a newly approved

of this annoying pest, and secondly, within the noble

breed to become established before individual dogs

family circle, dogs were associated with personal

start winning really big. A notable exception is the

loyalty, an indispensable virtue for a woman. While

Bichon Frisé…Within a few years the Bichon was a

Hounds were primarily manly dogs, the lapdog was

frequent Best in Show contender, climaxing with Top

also known as ‘lady’s dog’, and generally eschewed by

Dog and Best in Show at Westminster in 2001. In the

men.

United Kingdom, in an even shorter time, Bichons

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have done even better, winning Top Dog three times – in 1990, 1999, and 2004. ’’ The first thing that stands out reading the FCI standard of the Bichon Frisé is that the original language of the standard is French, therefore reading it in English is necessarily a translation, in fact this breed has it’s development in two countries, France and Belgium. It is grouped in the FCI among the companion/toy breeds, and in the AKC in the nonsporting group. Under the heading General Appearance, we find the coat texture described as ‘very loose, white, corkscrew-curled hair’. This is similar for the lay person to the Bolognese (pure white fluffy), and

draw a balance with other distinctive breed traits of the Bichon and all breeds of companion dogs.

Poodle (Frizzy, curly, corded) and the Coton (dense,

Cali-Col’s Scalywag was shown to win in the 1970’s

profuse, slightly wavy).

in a coat with natural texture in the ears and tail,

‘’Head carried proud’’ indicates a sufficient length of neck to bring the entire headpiece above the topline creating a distinctly two tiered effect of head and body. Pigmentation is important in creating the ‘’lively and expressive’’ appearance of the eyes which are later described as forming an equilateral triangle with the nose. The tail is ‘’gracefully curved over the back’’.

and the Kennel review cover of the 75th anniversary edition featured Ch Chaminade Syncopation

with

a domed head shape but otherwise a wavy/curly coat. By the 1990’s the coat was subject to more intensive grooming , and the prominent UK handler Michael Coad presented Ch PaRay’s I Told You So in a completely round headpiece vaguely reminiscent of today’s West Highland head finish. By 2018 the well known handler Bill McFaddon showed the Bichon Gr

This is a rectangular breed with length of leg equal

Ch Belle Creek’s All I Care About is Love (Flynn) to top

to depth of chest, a very workmanlike conformation,

honors at Westminster in a teased and posted coat

efficient at the trot. Often, the companion breeds

with an oval head shape which is usually seen in rings

are seen as dogs without a function, the antithesis

today. While such fashions can easily be construed as

of a Pointer. Yet as the Bichon reminds us, solid

impediments to the evaluation of coat texture, the

construction can go hand in hand with the important

same must be then said of many breeds, notably the

function of companionship. Thus, as breeders and

Poodle which had at the beginning been presented in

judges we must carefully consider construction, tone,

a corded coat, and the Pandora’s box of style versus

teeth, eyelids, and muzzle length, then attempt to

natural explodes.

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WITH

PAUL Flores Please tell us, how did you get involved in dogs? How did you start with Bichons? What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? In 1972 I purchased my first two Bichons when they were still in the miscellaneous

PARAY/STIRLING

class. Shortly thereafter I opened my

BICHON FIRSE

going to want to groom my own dogs after

first grooming salon and decided I wasn’t grooming all day. As a result, I was involved with Salukis as my main breed for the next 25 years. I started grooming and showing Bichons for my salon clients. In 1990, I decided to show dogs full time and started my Bichon breeding program a year later. My original kennel name was Stirling, named

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MEET T HE B REED · B I CHON FRISE • PARAY/STIRLING

after the car brand of the first show room new car I had just purchased. A few years later, I started Paray with Raymond Pittman. Twenty years later we split up and Kim Furlong and I started breeding under the Stirling banner. Where did your first dogs come from? I was not that impressed with any one kennel of dogs that were available at that time. Too many rejects came through my salon from the big-name breeders of that time, so I was privy to the good, bad, and the ugly they all were producing. I’m sorry if this sounds arrogant but I decided to make my own line of Bichons from this and that dogs that passed through my life at the time. Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? My foundation bitch, who really put me on the road to success was a little rescue bitch that a client of mine didn’t want to keep after I finished her and she had her

males, and she produced a BIS dog by each male. When

first litter. Her name was Ch. Mon Ami Chloe D, and she

I bred her to Rumor Has It, she produced Ch. Paray’s I

was just the product of a backyard breeding, but she

Told You So ROM who also was the num-ber one Bichon

had the greatest temperament. I bred her to another

in America and the Number One Non-Sporting dog.

client’s dog who was dripping in type and so far ahead

Then when I sent him to England to be campaigned, he

of his time but had a screw loose! He could only win one

was the Number One Dog All Breeds that year. These

day on a certain weekend! I’m positive he saw ghosts!

dogs were very dominant in passing on their good

His name was Ch. Dibett’s Pal Joey, and he was also a

qualities to almost any bitch they were bred to. Both

total outcross between American lines and British lines.

dogs produced BIS offspring.

Those two outcross dogs produced Ch. Sterling Rumor Has It ROM. He was the Number One Bichon for three years and one of those years he was the Number One

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or outcross?

Non-Sporting dog in America. I then purchased another

In the beginning of my breeding career all my dogs

bitch I had finished for a client and she too was the

were the result of total outcrosses. Today, now that we

product of backyard breeders and her name was Ch.

have a line, we do mostly line breeding with occasional

Prancing Full of Cuddles. I bred her to three different

outcrosses.

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M E ET T HE B REED · B I C HON FRISE • PARAY/STIRLING

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a

Frise Club of America, it shows how that extra 25% is

breeder so far?

from the withers forward to the post sternum and not in

My greatest achievement as a breeder is knowing my dogs are responsible for some of the major successes of other breeders the world over. They are rewarded for their type, movement, and temperament.

the middle of the back like so many judges and breeders like to think it reads! My dogs were criticized early on as being too short backed! But only two dogs that I have ever campaigned were the proper 25% longer than tall! All the others I presented were too long backed. If mine

Which attributes are your priorities when breeding the

were too long just how much longer were all the others

Bichon?

in the ring at the time! I’m not going to say the breed is

My priority in breeding has always been to breed to the standard and not to what I like or what the judges like. The standard is not some vague words that are open to a great deal of interpretation. What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Bichon? The three most important qualities for a Bichon are balance, proportion, and movement. Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? The greatest fault this breed can possess is a bad temperament. Bichons should love everyone and everything!

any better or any worse now than before. However, the few breeders that are left need to be better students of the standard. Too many breeders let their handlers call the shots instead of honing a critical eye, so they make decisions based on their own ideals. Can you describe an ideal Bichon? Because this is a coated breed that needs to be sculpted before it enters the ring, a good student of Bichons needs to see beyond a haircut. More and more now I’m seeing photos of Bichons being trimmed so extremely to look like a modified poodle trim. The standard says the trim is just to follow the outline of the dog! As a result, if it is trimmed so short on the belly to look shaved then the groomer is trying to make a short-legged dog look leggier.

How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say

If the front of the dog is so short you see pink skin and the

it has gone to better or worse?

crest of the neck starts in the middle of the back the dog

This breed has gone through some very major changes in its short time as a recognized breed. Because the standard first stated that a Bichon should be slightly longer than tall, everyone’s interpretation was very different. We had white hairy Dachshunds winning BIS’s. Later the standard was clarified to read the back is short, but from the post sternum to the rear it is 25% longer than tall. And in the Illustrated Standard commissioned by the Bichon

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is undoubtedly long! To me when the ideal Bichon enters the ring, it should appear almost square in its haircut. That is because we leave the hair on the crest of the neck long, the back of the front legs’ hair is longest and the front of the rear legs the hair is longer. This triggers your eye to relay to your brain that the dog is square and not a rectangle. But if this was a drop coated breed or wet you would see how it is now easily 25% longer than tall. But you must train your eye not to be fooled by hair. If


MEET T HE B REED · BICHON FRISE

a dog enters the ring and looks long it is very long and not what the standard describes. Also, this is not a shortlegged breed. The depth of body is equal to the length of leg from the elbow to the ground just like the Boxer and Doberman standard states. So why do so many judges and breeders reward short legged Bichons? Please name three of your all-time favorite winners bred by you and three not owner nor bred by you. My four all-time favorite bichons bred by me are:

Favorite Dogs not owned by me: 1) Ch. Chaminade Mr. Beau Monde 2) Ch. Devon’s Puff and Stuff (I finished her) 3) Ch. Paw Marks Fire and Ice What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? A: Ch. Sterling Rumor Has It ROM was very close to the ideal Bichon for me. He couldn’t put a foot down wrong and was a moving machine. He didn’t need a handler,

1) Ch. Sterling Rumor Has It ROM - number one Bichon,

only a groomer. He made me look good! But Ch. Paray’s

BOB winner of the National Specialty, Number One Non-

I Told You So ROM was bigger than life and made the

Sporting dog and possibly still the number one Breeder/

world take notice of him and forget he even had faults.

Owner Handled dog of all time. 2) His son Ch. Paray’s I Told You So ROM- Number one Bichon, winner of BOB at the National Specialty, Number One Non-Sporting Dog, and Number One All Breeds in England.

Which breed would you have if you did not have Bichons? My heart breed will always be Salukis! What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? As a new person in any breed don’t be afraid to talk to

3) Ch. Paray’s Propaganda ROM (another Prancing Full of

the successful breeders. We can’t help you if you don’t

Cuddles son) the sire of more BIS Bichons in the history

ask! I don’t bite and now more than ever I want as many

of the breed, winner of BOB at the National Specialty and

new people to be involved in this sport and activity. Don’t

another Number One Bichon in the States.

expect to be an overnight sensation and if you are, be

4) GCh. Paray’s Magic Wand - the most perfect Bichon bitch in my opinion.

humble and help the next up and comers! Kindness is in short supply these days!

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WITH

MICHAEL Coad Please tell us, how did you get involved in dogs? How did you start with Bichons? What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? My mother always had Poodles, so l guess it was a natural progression for me to

PAMPLONA

continue. It was whilst buying a Std Poodle

BICHON FIRSE

first saw a Bichon in the flesh for the first

from Wendy Streatfield ‘Leander’ that l time and l knew straight away that was to be my number one breed. The dog was all American breeding, from Rick Beauchamp’s Beau Monde knl, i bought him and then incorporated him into old English bloodlines and the rest is history, as they say! He was the foundation of the Pamplona Bichon

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MEET T HE B REED · BICHON FRISE • PAMPLONA

Frise. I then purchased another male from Clare Coxall

was the first Bichon to go Best in Show in Ireland at an all-

‘Tiopepe’ Poodles, English & Irish Ch Tiopepe Mad Louie

breed championship show’

at Pamplona and he went onto become the first Bichon to win al all breed best in show, the first to win a group at Crufts, handled by my partner Geoff Corish, and he was

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or out-cross?

also the breed record holder for the breed at that time.

I always prefer to line-breed but occasionally i will have to

My kennel name PAMPLONA comes from a village in the

outcross. I only outcross when its necessary for us to bring

French Pyrenees

in some new blood. But the outcross really must be a line-

Where did your first dogs come from?

bred dog. The resulting progeny from this breeding would then be put back into a bitch of my own who is line-bred.

My first two dogs came from two of the top breeders in

We did this with great success when we imported Ch & Am

the UK, both of Poodles. They also loved Bichons. Wendy

Ch Parays I Told You So. He changed the breed in the UK

Streatfield ‘Leander’ and Clare Coxall ‘Tiopepe’. She was

dramatically producing wonderful Bichons for Pamplona

mated to the dog l bought from Wendy Streatfield Snow

through his children and grand-children.

Shamrock of Leander and produced many champions. Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding?

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? This would be breeding Ch Pamplona Bring Me. ‘Eric’ was

I would have to say a very pretty bitch called Irish Ch

a Dog Of The Year winner and Crufts group winner as well.

Lameda Irish Lace. She was very much ahead of her time.

He is now the breeds record holder in the UK and has

Super type and balance, lovely size and a great showgirl.

produced more ch’s in the UK than any other other, dead

She won many groups in Ireland (my home country)and

or alive.


Which attributes are your priorities when breeding the Bichon? Type MUST come first, along with temperament. Not only do we want to breed top winning dogs but also want them to be healthy as well with the typical Bichon temperament. What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Bichon? When im judging l look at them all first, to see balance and shape. I then move them around together as with so many coated breeds, presentation can hide so much. Moving them around l can see head carriage, outline and tail carriage. I want them to have reach and drive. I then go over them on the table for a closer examination. The three qualities l look for are type, temperament and correct head and expression. Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? We would not tolerate long and low, so ugly in a Bichon. Can you describe an ideal Bichon? I am not a breeder who is ever kennel blind, far from it. And no one is more critical of Pamplona Bichons than ourselves., but l have to say that ‘Eric’ Ch Pamplona Bring Me Sunshine is my ideal. He is now 13 years of age and is stunning now as he was in his prime. He has the correct balance and type, his head is perfection, with such a pretty and super pigment something so important in the breed. When he moves he comes alive and commands such attention as when he won the group at Crufts he gained so many admirers for the breed., My goal is to breed another little gentleman like ‘Eric’

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MEET T HE B REED · BICHON FRISE • PAMPLONA

How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone to better or worse? I have been fortunate to judge the breed in many countries and l must say the breed has improved greatly. Very seldom do we see those that are long and low, the completely wrong balance. There are a lot of clever and dedicated breeders out there, who have one goal, and that is to improve our wonderful breed. The perfect bichon has yet to be born, but everyone is certainly working on it. Please name 3 your all time favourite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. A: The three dogs bred and owned by me are Ch. Pamplona Bring Me Sunshine. Ch. Pamplona It’s All About Me. Ch. Pamplona Could It Be Magic. Not owned or bred my, my choices would be Am Ch. Devon Puff and Stuff. Am Ch Paray’s Propaganda. Finnish Ch. Ashmair Here Comes Sunshine. What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? That’s an easy answer ‘Eric’ Ch. Pamplona Bring Me Sunshine. Which breed would you have if you did not have Bichons? Great Pyrenees and Irish Wolfhounds. What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? Read as many book as you can find on the breed. Attend lots of shows, then watch, listen and learn from the experts. Watch them prepare and handle their dogs. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, at the right moment of course.

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WITH

KATHY Vogel Please tell us, how did you get involved in dogs? How did you start with Bichons? What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? Our kennel prefix is Vogelflight—Der vogel means bird in German. My father was a

VOGELFLIGHT BICHON FIRSE

pilot in the USN. We started showing and breeding Miniature Schnauzers in the mid 1960s. Because a Schnauzer’s coat dictated when you could go to shows this necessitated us going one direction and sending another out with a handler, Claudia Seaberg (now a judge). Later we decided that we wanted a breed we could show anytime- no stripping and no waiting for coat to come in. We fell in love with the

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MEET T HE B REED · B I CHON FRISE • VOG ELFLIG HT

Bichon Frise’ and became dedicated to getting the breed recognized into AKC. My Father served on the Standards Committee, was President of The Bichon Frise’ Club of America and stayed home with the dogs so Mom and I could pursue our passion. The Bichons were admitted to

This breeding produced The Brothers Four (1975): 1.Ch. Vogelflight’s Music Man- winner of our first three National Specialties, 1976, 1977 and 1978 handled by the Watermans.

miscellaneous status in 1971. In 1973 we were welcomed

2.Ch. Vogelflight’s Choir Master- top winning Bichon in

by AKC into regular AKC pointed shows! All the hard

1979 handled by Ted Young.

work of our fellow breeders paid off! Where did your first dogs come from? Our foundation bitch was Ch. Vogelflight’s Be Be Zwingalee (Goldsdale line.) We bred her back to her sire, kept a daughter, and

bred her to a Reenroy/

Goldsdale cross. A daughter of this breeding we bred to a very influential sire of the time, Ch. Chaminade Mr. Beaumonde. Chaminade was Barbara Stubbs, one of our breeds first registrar. Beau Monde was Mr. Richard Beauchamp of Kennel Review magazine. Later, Richard was fondly referred to as Father Bichon.

3.Ch. Vogelflight’s Choir Boy of Leander- winner at the first Bichon Frise’ Club of Great Britain Specialty where he repeated the win the following year. handled by new owner, Wendy Streatfield of the English kennel, Leander. 4.Ch. Vogelflight’s Linus Diandee - owner handled. Interesting and fun fact - Claudia Seaburg handled a six-month-old pup at our first national judged by Langdon Skarda to Winners Dog! I believe this young boy was bred by the Keator’s of the Tres Beau kennels.

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What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Bichon? Expression, silhouette, and balance Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? Poor temperament, low tail sets, and goose or ewe necks How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone to better or worse? This breed started out long, low and with fiddle fronts! In order to correct the front, the members of the parent club voted to be in the Non-Sporting Group-not the Toy Group as we needed larger dogs to correct our Claudia finished many Bichons over the years, including Vogelflight’s. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or outcross? Now that my parents are gone, my co-breeder, Danielle Ardagna and I still prefer line breeding. When we need to go out, we seek a line bred dog of similar type.

short, crooked fronts (longer bones) Size 9 1/2 to 11 1/2 inches. Great decision. Can you describe an ideal Bichon? Visualize a fancy show pony standing over his front, arched neck and rear quarters extended behind. This visualization shows the beautiful front and rear angulations that allow the Bichon it’s powerful yet flowing reach and drive. When viewing the Bichons side

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a

movement, you will understand and recognize how this

breeder so far?

dog is put together.

Perhaps the honor of judging non regular classes

Please name three of your all-time favorite winners bred

numerous times at specialties and our Nationals, and

by you and three not owned or bred by you.

the AKC Breeder of The Year for Non-Sporting in 2015 or receiving the Winkie Award in 2013 for Non-Sporting Breeder. Which attributes are your priorities when breeding the Bichon?

Only three not bred by me? There are so many wonderful Bichon breeders- I do not want to slight anyone’s breeding program so I am naming dogs no longer being shown; Ch. Gaylor’s Drop Dead Gorgeous (bitch), G. Antetomaso, Ch. Alpenglow

Temperament is the hallmark of our breed and I love

Ashley Du Chamour (dog), L. Morrow, Ch. Drewlaine Beau

pretty. Bichons should never be coarse.

Monde Batiste (bitch), Mills, Beauchamp, and Shapland.

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MEET T HE B REED · B I CHON FRISE • VOG ELFLIG HT

Our home bred dogs include BIS Ch. Vogelflight’s Banana

Terriers and won the breed with our bitch at The Biewer

Pudding (bitch) Vogel, Bill McFadden handler; BIS BISS

Terrier Club of America show under judge Greg Kantak,

GCH Ch. Vogelflight’s Honor To Pillow Talk (dog), group

piloted by Danielle, in 2018. The Biewer’s were just

winner at Westminster-#1 Bichon 2012/2013, Vogel, E.

admitted to the Toy Group this year.

Charles, Kornfeld and M. Abbott, (Lisa Bettis handler), and Ch. Vogelflight’s Taywn Tarragon (bitch) #1 Bitch 2012, K. Vogel, and O. Ardagna. What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal?

What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? Assuming you understand basic conformation go to as many specialties and breeder kennels as you can. Establish the style you want and pursue it. I highly

Every breeding Danielle and I do is with the Bichon

recommend choosing your foundation bitch from

standard in mind.

someone that is willing to be your mentor. Coat care

Which breed would you have if you did not have Bichons?

on this breed is demanding and if you can’t maintain it your mentor may help you or recommend a handler accomplished in maintaining and trimming this breed.

I have bred and shown the German Shepherd Dog on a

Be familiar with the standard and subscribe to our

very limited basis since the 60’s. I have one old man left

breed magazine The Bichon Frise’ Reporter and lastly,

that was finished by the late Junior McDaniel and his

be prepared for many belly laughs because this breed is

beloved husband, Ashley Lowery. We now have Biewer

all about FUN!

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M E E T T H E BR E E D B I C H ON F R I S S E

WITH

MIMI Winkler Please tell us, how did you get involved in dogs? How did you start with Bichons? What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? My name is Mimi Winkler, and I have been involved in the wonderful world of purebred dogs for over thirty years. My

JUDGES CHOICE

involvement and how I started is rather

BICHON FIRSE

the late 70’s and was privileged to judge in

unique. I have been a gymnastic judge since Europe on a few occasions. While sitting at a cafe in Cologne, Germany I noticed a woman walking three adorable white dogs and asked her the breed. “Bichon Frise,” she said. I think that I drove her crazy asking questions--half in German and half in English. When I returned to the states there

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was a local dog show where I found the Bichons, who were groomed so completely different that I almost did not recognize them. Where did your first dogs come from? The breeder I met was Doris Hyde of Dove Cote Bichons and it was she who suggested my kennel name knowing I was a gymnastic judge. “Judges Choice,” she said, and I loved it. I named the bitch that I bought from her Dove Cote Judges Choice aka Muffy. Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding?

tests you can do inbreeding safely. Line breeding is the most comfort-able avenue for me. Knowing the dogs in the pedigree makes it easier for me to plan the next generation. There are times when there is a need for different

I feel a bitch is most important in a good breeding

strengths and a different bloodline, so an outcross is

program. I would say the bitch from my first ever

needed. But that dog must be tightly linebred. I will only

breeding played such an important role. Ch. Judges

use a dog from a breeder who cares as much about their

Choice Purple Rain “Pumpkin” gave our Bichons body,

line as I do mine.

leg, more elegance, and that special twinkle in her eye that has been stamped into eve-ry generation. My foundation bitch and foundation dog were related. My bitches’ father was my dogs’ grandfather. I like to do research and ask questions of highly suc-cessful breeders to garner as much knowledge as I can when venturing into something new. Over the years I have gone out of my line but have only bred to tightly line bred dogs. Breeding to the flavor of the month has never been my style nor has buying dogs from all over the world with no common ances-tors at all. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or an outcross? When you are honest in your evaluation of your breeding program, when you know your dogs, their strengths, and weaknesses, and have done all the health

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? I guess most would say my biggest accomplishment has been that I am the breeding program behind JR BIS Winner of Westminster Kennel Club in 2001. I bred his mother, his grandmother, his great grandmother and on back to Pumpkin. I would say my biggest accomplishment is breeding healthy, happy dogs that bring joy and love to their owners. Which attributes are your priorities when breeding the Bichon? When I am planning a breeding, I list the strengths and weaknesses of my bitch. I want a stud that will compliment her. In addition to my priorities of movement, temperament, coat, pigment, tail set, and of course type I might look for better shoulder layback if

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M E ET T HE B REED · B I C HON FRISE • JUDG ES CHOICE

I felt that was what my bitch needed. Each breeding is different of course, but the want for a perfect Bichon is always the goal.

Can you describe an ideal Bichon? My ideal Bichon gives me chills when it walks into my ring or runs around my house. Type, type, type, with

What three qualities do you think are the most important

black pigment, eyes that penetrate your soul, tail

when you look at a Bichon?

over its back, gliding in free movement, extension

Type, balance, and movement. Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? There are things you can forgive and things you cannot. I do not want ag-gression or lack of confidence. We each have personal peccadillos and mine are too much white of eye, lack of pigment, and low tail sets.

through the neck, all the while saying ”I am having the time of my life. Please name 3 your all-time favorite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. Three dogs bred or owned by me; Ch. Judges Choice High Ridge Right On ROMX, Ch. Dreams Came True Jennifer ROMX, and Ch. Judges Choice Diamond Jim ROM. Dogs not owned by me; Ch. Tauro Misoko, Ch. Special Times

How has the breed changed over the years? Would you

Just Right ROMX, and Gr,Ch.Wendans Because I’m

say it has gone to better or worse?

Happy.

If you loved this breed when they were longer, with

What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal?

less leg, and ears and beards almost down to the ground then you would be disappointed in the style of today. Yes, we have evolved. We are more up on leg, with more neck, more elegance, and certainly more style. Do we need to work on better fronts, better rears, better pigment, stronger chins, better tail sets? Of course, we do. But doesn’t every breed if we want perfection.

Reno, Ch. Judges Choice High Ridge Right On ROMX. He had type, bal-ance, attitude, heart, and soul. He never let himself down. He never let me down ever. Which breed would you have if you did not have Bichons? I would have German Shorthair Pointers--love them and miss them. What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? Do not be a collector, do not breed to the flavor of the month. Learn how to establish a line, to read pedigrees, learn genotype, learn phenotype, and structure. Be honest in your evaluation of your dogs. Ask questions to old time breeders and listen. Soak up their knowledge. I have bred 93 Bichon Frise champions so far. I accomplished this because I listened.


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TRAVEL Tips

PHOENIX POPULAR AND SECRET PLACES IN PHOENIX

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T RA VEL TIPS · PHOENIX

We were hoping our travels would take us to Phoenix,

Found: RE Phoenix is a place where the community

Arizona, in March but unfortunately the pandemic is

gathers to experience great local design, art, and food.

still an issue. Either way, we will be back in Phoenix

Located downtown is Phoenix’s newest lifestyle hotel

hopefully sooner than later. It is a great city to visit for

with 104 industrial-chic guestrooms featuring custom

an event or seminar and of course the dog shows. Some

locally designed fixtures and furnishings, eclectic local

events have changed over the years, clubs have split but

art, and thoughtful amenities. Browse the work of local

they still manage to put on some great shows. Here we

artists in the Gallery and Studio, or host an unforgettable

recommend to you some of the best places to rest, relax

meeting surrounded by inspiring, thought-provoking

and enjoy in Phoenix—the Valley of the Sun.

art in the 6,000+ square feet of flexible, indoor/outdoor

TIME TO REST AND REJUVENATE! After a long day at the show we (dogs included) need

event spaces. Pet Policy: Pets allowed.

some good rest for the next day. Orlando is well known for their park resorts and big hotels so here are a few that are some of the best for you and your four-legged friends. Arrive Phoenix Check-in at the Pop Stand and let your vacation begin with a frozen treat. They have an everchanging menu made from fresh fruit, cream and even a few boozy options. The coolest and trendiest hotel in

The Camby, Autograph Collection is a new independent

Phoenix! Excellent food and drinks, professional and

lifestyle hotel that is part of Marriott’s Autograph

friendly staff, fun pool atmosphere, and amazing and

Collection. Discover a place of inspiration where

stylish rooms with unique character! This hotel is a

imagination and elegance blend seamlessly to create

must if you are visiting the Phoenix area.

a vibrant air of productivity. Here at this boutique

Pet Policy: Pets allowed.

hotel in Phoenix, Arizona, you’ll experience the latest in technology, along with a distinctive sense of sophisticated celebration delivered with an unmatched and refreshingly authentic approach to service. Enjoy your days with breathtaking views of iconic Camelback Mountain. Pet Policy: Pets allowed.

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It’s time to celebrate or just to hang out with friends

wine list too. Just relax, enjoy, and make sure you try

after your wins at the show. Here are some great

the grilled hangar steak!

restaurants for all size pockets! We hope you try them and enjoy! BEST OF BREED MEAL Rosita’s Place A very popular place by the size of the 5:00 crowd. Rosita’s Place, operating since 1964, offers great Mexican cuisine, strong margaritas, and friendly service. It is a very popular local hangout. Highly recommended, and the mango margarita is a must have.

Postino When you have been traveling for several days, eating often, and exercising seldom, Postinos is a welcome break. The food is satisfying, full of flavor, but oh so light. When food is good, you don’t need a lot of to feel satisfied. Great food, friendly staff and good ambiance, it’s all you need. BEST IN SHOW MEAL Different Pointe of View Poised 1,800 feet above the

The whining Pig The Whining Pig was established in

Valley of the Sun, Different Pointe of View offers guests

2013 and is your neighborhood beer and wine bar.

breathtaking views second only to the outstanding

Offering a friendly environment for all, specializing in

regional American cuisine that features fresh local and

craft beers, great wines and wonderful service. They

organic ingredients. The restaurant’s mountaintop

offer a variety of unique grilled cheese sandwiches and

location and floor to ceiling windows provide stunning

a meat and cheese plate that changes based on seasonal

views of the desert landscape, the city’s twinkling

availability. Come in for a drink! There are plenty of

lights in the distance and Arizona’s brilliant sunsets. No

HOPTIONS!

restaurant in the state has a longer streak of consecutive

GROUP 1 MEAL Cocina Madrigal The food here is so delicious! Such amazing flavors! Parking is rather limited and tight getting in and out. The restaurant itself is pleasant inside and there are two patio areas. The service is extremely friendly and attentive, and the owner is gracious and makes sure everything is satisfying. You have to try the barbacoa enchiladas! Rusconi’s American Kitchen A must do when in Arizona. It’s where the locals go, yet everyone is treated like family. The food is unique, fresh, and creative. Bring on your stingy foodie friends, it will surpass your expectations and at a reasonable rate. “Chef” always has something you wouldn’t expect. A few gems on the

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AAA four-diamond awards and Sunset Magazine named it one of the top ten mountaintop restaurants in the nation.


T RA VEL TIPS · PHOENIX

Binkley’s Restaurant Combining the most incredible food pairings with multiple locations within the property makes this experience incredible. Your journey begins in the courtyard with some wonderful bites and a cocktail before touring the garden, then the kitchen, followed by the bar area, and finally the dining room, which has a full view of the kitchen to enjoy the show. The choreography of moving the guests throughout the property is amazing. Nothing was ever rushed, and nothing was ever slow or dragging. Each

TIME TO HAVE FUN Hole in the Rock This is essentially its name, and it truly is a hole in a rock. The front side is steep and if you are adventurous enough, you can scramble your way to the top. Otherwise, there is a gentler, very easy path the goes around the back side of the rock. The easy path takes all of ten minutes to get the top. Once there, you have a pretty good view of the surrounding area. Good photo spot.

course was explained wonderfully and is a one-of-akind experience!

T. Cook’s You are in for a real treat! This place is exceptional. The moment you turn into this charming resort lined with palm trees and embrace the ambiance of its Mediterranean feel you will fall in love. A perfect place for date night or a special occasion. The food and drinks are always wonderful and tasty! The service is awesome! You will love it!

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The Phoenix Zoo Visit the Phoenix Zoo and explore a wondrous world of curiosity, imagination, and discovery. For more than half a century, the zoo and its animals have amazed guests from across Phoenix and around the globe. Whether you are on the lookout for awe-inspiring Asian elephants, on safari to spot the great Sumatran tiger or seeking towering giraffes roaming the savannah - a day at the Zoo offers adventures like no other place in the Valley. The Phoenix Zoo is one of the nation’s largest non-profit zoos, committed to conservation and providing experiences that inspire people and motivate them to care for the natural world.

EDUCATE AND DISCOVER Phoenix Art Museum The Phoenix Art Museum has provided access to visual arts and educational programs in Arizona for more than 60 years and is the largest art museum in the Southwestern United States. In addition to an annual calendar of exhibitions, Phoenix Art Museum’s permanent collection galleries are drawn from more than 19,000 works of American, Asian, European, Latin American, Western American, modern and contemporary art, and fashion design. Visitors also enjoy photography exhibitions through the Museum’s landmark partnership with the Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona.

Mystery Castle Built by a father to realize his daughter’s dream, this three-story castle, completed in 1945, is made of stone, adobe, automobile parts and petroglyphs and is held together by a cement mixture including goat’s milk. Take a tour - usually led by the daughter, who still lives there - of this odd, yet imaginative dwelling.


T RA VEL TIPS · PHOENIX

Musical Instrument Museum Phoenix is home to the world’s only Global Musical Instrument Museum which holds the MIM Music Theater—a 300-seat acoustically superb performance space—as well as the awardwinning Café Allegro and the MIM Museum Store. The average guest spends nearly four hours at MIM. Please allow plenty of time to fully enjoy MIM’s galleries and exhibits.

Arizona Science Center Located in the heart of Downtown Phoenix, Arizona Science Center has been a hub for science and discovery for the community and visitors. The Center features more than 300 hands-on exhibit, live demonstrations, a state-of the art Dorrance Planetarium, a five-story IMAX(R) theater, and newly opened CREATE at Arizona Science Center - a place where science, design and engineering collide!

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BEST IN SHOW & HOUND GROUP GCHP CH Pinnacle Kentucky Bourbon WHIPPET


RI NGS I D E C L ICK · AK C NATIONAL

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r.BEST IN SHOW & TOY GROUP GCHS CH Pequest Wasabi PEKINGESE


RI NGS I D E C L ICK · AK C NATIONAL

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SPORTING GROUP CH Kan Trace Very Cheeky Chic LAGOTTO ROMAGNOLO

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WORKING GROUP GCHP2 CH Cinnibon’s Bedrock Bombshell BOXER


RI NGS I D E C L ICK · AK C NATIONAL

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TERRIER GROUP GCHG CH Brightluck Money Talks WELSH TERRIER

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RI NGS I D E C L ICK · AK C NATIONAL

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NON SPORTING GROUP GCHB CH Hightide Tarquin Venus STANDARD POODLE


RI NGS I D E C L ICK · AK C NATIONAL

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HERDING GROUP GCHS CH Stonehaven Bayshore Secret Sauce AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD


RI NGS I D E C L ICK · AK C NATIONAL

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I N T E RV I E W W I T H J U N IO R H A N D L E R

LILLIAN Brock Lillian, thank you for accepting our invitation and taking your time to do this interview with us. I’m sure many people around your country know you as a very successful junior handler and show assistant. Let us know a little bit about your beginnings in the dog world? How did it all start for you and what you love the most about the sport? I will admit I had a very unusual start to dogs. My mother was involved in a vehicle accident and bedridden for over a year. During that time, we picked up our very b y C a rl a I v a n c i c

first Australian Cattle Dog puppy as a physical motivator for her therapy. I started in AKC obedience and rally competing with my 4-H team. I love our sport for the camaraderie with my animals and the community of people I have met. What was your first experience at a dog show, and who introduced you to the sport? My first experience at a dog show was in 2014. I competed in my first AKC obedience competition. Sue Barlow, my 4-H leader introduced me to AKC sports, she

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was a driving force in my beginning. I spent four years

AKC Pals dog as my junior’s dog. I remember my first

competing in 4-H before Sue convinced me to attend my

competition like it was yesterday. I had my dog “Foxy”

first AKC event.

ungroomed and on a walking lead, and I walked into the

Who do you consider your biggest support along the way? The one person who always supports me is my mother. She has been with me for every decision I have made. When I first asked to get a dog, she was on board and has always been in my corner! What are the sides of dog shows you like, and what do you dislike?

class wearing sneakers and a blue dress. It was certainly something to remember. But I wouldn’t be here today without these first moments. Did you have a mentor or do you consider someone as your role model throughout the years? Throughout the years I have been in dogs, I have had a lot of mentors come into my life. Robbie Hughes mentored me in Australian Cattle Dogs, and the herding group.

Things about dog shows I like--being able to work on

He taught me the basics of dogs, and care of animals.

animal husbandry, the skills required to properly care

Robbie was my number one supporter and continues

for a multitude of breeds and the needs based on size,

to be one of the reasons I show dogs. Losing him was

coat, and genetics among other things. I also like the

devastating but he will always be with me! Cindy Lane-

amount of life skills I use and continue to learn every

Smith has been mentoring me in Dobermans including

day. Things I dislike--unfriendly competition including

the working and sporting groups. I am learning a new

examples of bad sportsmanship and seeing unpleasant

level of dedication and care for animals.

behaviors. Just like any teenager I dislike the early mornings! How did you start competing in Junior Handling? Do you remember your first competition?

What do you consider your greatest win in Junior Handling and in the Breed ring and why are these ones so unique to you? My greatest win in juniors was winning the Oklahoma

Competing in juniors did not happen for a couple years

Kennel Club 2019 Scholarship with Dexter, under three

after my involvement with dogs. I started with an

highly respected handler judges and spending the night

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with great support from a whole building of spectators

time as a 24/7 assistant or part time meaning just for

just to cheer on the 120+ juniors exhibiting. It was a

show days. Depending on the handler will depend on

special night I will forever remember. My greatest

the breeds you work with and the care you can learn.

breed win would be showing my Australian Cattle Dog

Each professional will teach you different things,

to Best of Breed at the Canadian Regional from the

but you can learn everything from care to handling

classes. It was an important moment in my life where

skills.

I truly understood the joy I received from the dogs and not just winning. Do you have a favorite breed or group you specifically like to show or prepare for shows?

Would you like to become a professional one day and do this job for a living or do you have other plans? I am unsure of my plans for the future, but I know dogs will always be a part of my life. I hope to handle

I feel everyone has a favorite even if they don’t admit it.

for fun instead of employment. I have the best crew

I love the herding group! It is my favorite and I plan to

to keep me supported and always want the best for

always own at least one herding breed.

me no matter what path I choose!

What do you like doing more: showing dogs or grooming

Have you ever considered becoming a breeder? What

and preparing them?

breed would you choose for yourself?

I really prefer grooming and preparing for the show. I

Yes, I have considered becoming a breeder and I have

love being a part of the beginning process and seeing

plans to do so. I plan to breed Australian Cattle Dogs.

the final product all the way through. A huge part of preparing the dogs includes training and conditioning. I enjoy spending time with the dogs during this period as it’s a more one-on-one experience. When grooming dogs, I find it to be very soothing and relaxing! How does a life of a show assistant looks like? What options do you get by working for a professional and how much can you learn from them? Life as an assistant is a different lifestyle, From traveling every weekend to keeping a tight schedule. I am a fulltime assistant living with Cindy Lane-Smith, so where

Have you attended or watched any shows outside of the USA? If not do you wish to visit some of them? What in your opinion is different in respect to the dog shows in America? Yes, I have attended shows outside the USA, I traveled to Canada for two weeks of shows. I loved it, it was much more laid back and fun. I loved the people and cannot wait to go back! Except for dogs you also have a love for horses. Do you own any of them?

she goes, I go. In between Cindy’s show schedule I have

I have been very blessed to have grown up with

been able to travel and work for other handlers as to

horses. I currently do not own any, but I have been

increase my knowledge. Assistants work and focus on

fortunate for great people to enter my life and allow

the care of the dogs. Options you can get are living full

me the opportunity to work with and care for some

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I NT ERVI EW W I T H J UNI OR HANDLER · LILLIAN BROCK

of their amazing horses, Penny and Jake. Penny has

year. I attend an online university, which takes just

quickly become my heart horse and someone I enjoy

as much dedication to be successful. I spend the day

spending time with.

working with animals and most nights studying. I have

What’s different in taking care of horses compared to dogs? Do you also compete with them?

a schedule worked out with Cindy which allows me to be successful in both dogs and my education. When you put together the correct amount of time and the

Although there are many differences in care the ideas

work you can be very successful. It is hard, and can be

remain the same. The best diets, and the correct amount

exhausting but you have to remember to keep your

of exercise play important roles for both horses and

head up and keep going.

dogs. I do not compete in horses currently but growing up my mother and I competed in horse shows almost every weekend. You seem to be a girl that never rests and loves animals. How do you manage your school activities with all your hobbies? How difficult it is?

How has Covid-19 influenced your life and activities? Well, Covid-19 has affected my life in many ways, my mother contracted COVID-19 in February of last year. It was a long and rough journey for health in my family. When dogs shows became scarce, I was separated from friends, and I was unable to do something I’m so

I fortunately was able to graduate high school a year

passionate about. I had to take on a job position at my

early. Currently I am attending DeVry University as a

local barn to create income. I took on more classes to

full-time student in my first semester of my sophomore

further my education. I planned out travel with other

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every day. Behavior is hard to judge, everyone will act differently. Juniors should be respectful and pay attention to those who have spent the time to work hard and excel in this sport that is why we work with mentors. Juniors behavior at home should include being grateful and always remember that without our support and the people who help us we may not have gotten to where we are! Besides the two mentioned hobbies, do you have also other things you like to do? I have a few hobbies that I enjoy spending time on. I love to sketch although it doesn’t happen often. This year I was able to work harder on correct technique and handlers to continue working. I always continued to

improve my drawings. While I never keep drawings for

work on planning my future.

myself, I really enjoy it! I also really enjoy reading and

Were there any special dogs for you along the way with

spending time with a good book.

whom you had a special bond and connection?

Have you changed your opinion regarding dog shows?

There have been several dogs that hold a place in my

Absolutely! When I started, I did enjoy dog shows but

heart. Dexter is my heart dog; without him my life would

I enjoyed them because of winning ribbons. Now I

have not taken the turns it has. He has opened doors for

understand the work and dedication it takes to be

me I never expected. Bear was my first Bloodhound; she

successful. I enjoy just spending time with people and

and I have spent countless hours training in search and

enjoying the dogs as pets before show animals.

rescue recovery work as well as my first AKC Champion. Tug, my Australian Cattle Dog, was gifted to me by Robbie Hughes before he passed, and Marg Ure his breeder to start my breeding program. What are the most important things when showing dogs? And how should a junior handler or handler behave, in your opinion, at the show and at home?

Do you have any suggestions for younger kids just entering the dog show world? What should they be aware of? My suggestion for younger kids just starting in our sport is to remember to keep going. It will get hard and probably very frustrating but in the end it is worth it. Always be aware of your actions and how they will affect

The most important thing in dog shows is to have fun!

the people and animals around you. Enjoy your dog and

While it is a serious sport and highly competitive at

the time you get to spend with them! They should be

the end of the day, it is a show and the judges change

your pet before a show dog!

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DEEP SMART & PRESERVATION BREEDERS By Vandra L Huber©

“Throughout the dog community, there are people with deep smarts. Their judgment and knowledge—both explicit and tacit—are stored in their head, in their hearts and visible through their actions”

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D EEP S MA RT S A ND PRESERVATION BREEDERS

Excellent breeding is often described as part science

for example, that your line tends to get uterine inertia

and genetics, part history about dog lines and part

if the litter is large. Waiting it out means dead puppies.

luck. While I agree that these things are important, the

Conveying that to a veterinarian you do not know in an

message that I want to convey is that being a breeder

emergency situation often ends up with dead puppies.

that endures, that produces consistent type, and that helps preserve the breed requires deep smarts. Deep smarts require long term deliberate learning, open acceptance of feedback including the good with the bad, and hard work finalized with stretch goals. Passion comes out of this long-term immersion in the breed. It’s this passion for the breed that helps you be resilient when things get tough.

Deep smarts also call for, when necessary, the ability to dive into component parts and understand the details and nuances. For example, in a medical emergency such as two terriers locking onto one another in death holds, tearing skin and not breaking free of one another. How to get them apart and still be safe goes beyond normal explicit knowledge or on-line reading. The mental pockets are deeper on the person with deep smarts. For

Being a conscientious breeder requires a desire

example, if throwing water onto the two dogs doesn’t

to preserve and improve the breed. It requires

work, grabbing the balls of one or both dogs may work.

experience,

wisdom,

If that doesn’t work, grabbing one or both dogs (if two

empathy, and intuition. The breeder with deep smarts

people are available) by the rear legs and lifting them

is a combination of animal behaviorist, zoologist,

off the ground can loosen their hold on one another.

commonsense,

knowledge,

caretaker, preservationist, genealogist, and artist with a conceptual eye for detail. Deep Smarts Deep smarts are based more in doing than in knowhow and know what. Deep smarts are as close to wisdom as it gets. Deep smarts derive from firsthand life experiences and are shaped by beliefs and social forces followed by action. They result in tacit knowledge as opposed to formal, codified explicit knowledge. Tacit knowledge is the kind of knowledge that is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing or verbalizing it. Instead, deep smarts derive from the ability to comprehend complex, interactive

Deep smarts may involve technical intelligence (e.g., how to tube or sponge feed a Havanese puppy, how to strip the coat of a dog) or social intelligence (e.g., knowing how to read what is stated as well as unstated by a prospective puppy buyer, self-regulating emotions after a loss at a major dog). Intelligent people can develop competence within a couple of years, but truly deep smarts are gained only through ten or more years of diverse, active, hard-won experience. Some intelligent people never develop deep smarts because they don’t work at acquiring or retaining knowledge tidbits or are unable to make bi-association or lock puzzle pieces together in new or different ways.

relationships such as making breeding choices. Deep

Other people get comfortable when they think they are

smarts allow one to make swift, expert decisions based

competent. It’s good enough. But it isn’t always enough

on that complex cognitive comprehension. It’s knowing

or even sufficient to do the job well or to protect a line

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or breed. This is mentally stressful, and the decision

should not place a puppy is as important, if not more

hard won. Amateur and beginner breeders alike may

important, than focusing on why you should place a

eventually make a similar decision. But the decisions are

puppy

made much slower or not in time. So how do you become a breeder with deep smarts? Table 1 delineates the steps necessary to acquire deep smarts. If the breeder has deep smarts, she is more likely to see the whole picture and also to follow this process without implicit thought. Then she does what’s needed to be done -- even if it is unpleasant, heartbreaking or unpopular. Acquiring a “Good as You Can Get” Brood Bitch It may not be easy to get a good bitch. You may first need to prove you are serious about the breed. This may entail joining and participating in the local breed club, attending a world congress and/or finishing one or two male dogs before being put on the list for a promising female. Millennials who want it now are not very receptive to the old-fashioned notion of waiting your turn and proving your worth. Other people feel that if they offer enough money, they should get what they want. In my mind, I’m placing one of my precious children; not selling her to the highest bidder. I’m happy if I even cover the costs of breeding. Before I will consider a placement, I must know the prospective owner well enough that I feel comfortable. Money doesn’t make that happen any faster. In fact, it may take you off my waiting list completely (e.g. a preservation breeder is less likely to be bought). Here is where deep smarts can kick in. I must not only

There was an individual who had one of my dogs. She did well with the dog in the breed ring, but her wins were never enough. She always complained that the dog should win more. I began to dread her calls. When she divorced, she decided to downsize and place my dog. I helped her find a wonderful new home for her Scottie. But it was far away, such that I could not use the dog at stud. Later when she got settled, she wanted another dog from me. I had misgivings, but she was a good talker. I sold her a wonderful dog, a pick of the litter. I berated myself for giving in to her. When she got home, she again called regularly with updates. Unfortunately, she listened to people who may or may not have had her best interests at stake. She focused on the negative comments they purportedly made about my dog. Soon those statements became HER reality. I finally made the decision that enough was enough. I told her I was sending her money back and she should ship the dog back COD. If he was such a bad dog, she should not have him one minute longer. I kept the dog and he went on to have a specialty winning career and to sire several litters. After this experience, she had the audacity to ask me a third time for a puppy. I finally learned and consequently said “no.” This time more firmly. I stated, “Let’s remain friends but not share dogs.” Get an Articulate Mentor

look at what is on paper and what is said in conversation.

I waited two years for my foundation bitch until the

I must consider misgivings I have, try to articulate

breeder did a breeding she felt was worthy and a bitch

what’s holding me back or propelling me forward in my

was deemed “nice enough.” I thank her for that. As a

decision to let you own a puppy. Considering why you

single woman farmer, the breeder did not have much

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D EEP S MA RT S A ND PRESERVATION BREEDERS

money or time to show her dogs. But she was farm-

issue with the line I tapped into or with my beginning

smart about breeding and whelping but could not

line. A handler standing nearby said something like, “

mentor me in other ways. I ended up finding a dog club

yup, that’s a seizure. They happen with that line.” The

and people with Scotties to help me learn and utilized

handler went on about her business of prepping her

my first handler as a grooming and showing mentor.

dogs as if it was nothing. I was shocked, but I stopped

Sometimes, you need multiple mentors. No one, not

and analyzed. I stayed away from the sire and his sire.

even someone with deep smarts, has all the answers.

My first solution was to never breed that sire to that

it’s your job to find mentors who have deep smarts in

bitch again. With more learning, I added in knowledge

areas you are lacking knowledge. Of course, you must

about a coefficient of inbreeding, followed up by an

determine what you know, what you think you know,

assessment of the seriousness and/or frequency of the

what you need to know and who can help you know.

specific fault and whether it was a fault I could live with

It is easier to learn if your puppy comes from a breeder who is accomplished herself, has the show and health

as a breeder or not. I’m still learning about that. I tend to err on the side of conservativeness.

records to back up her claims and has time for you.

Second, think about what knowledge you need to be

She will check you out and you should check her out.

successful and to successfully work with the breeder.

There needs to be person to person fit between you

Tread cautiously, you may not know what you need

and your mentor (s). You’ll know she is “the real deal”

to know until you need to know or experience a crisis.

only by having numerous conversations with her and

But you can learn through trial or error or by working

verifying what she claims. If she is the real deal, she

your way across the knowledge gap. Determine whether

will be honest about her line, health challenges and

a mentor can provide you a safety net of knowledge

concerns. A trick used by good negotiators is to move

should you run into problems. Other questions to

away from broad questions (e.g., Does your line have

ponder include: (1) Do they have time to help you

any health challenges?) and ask specific questions

choose the right stud dog for your girl? (2) Can they

about each area of concern (e.g., Vwd, Legg-perthes, hip

help or talk you through a whelping; (3) Can they help

or elbow dysplasia, autoimmune thyroiditis, congenital

you with grooming or showmanship; and finally, (4) Are

deafness). Verify statement and check health registries

they a good cheerleader to get you through the tough

such as the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) or

times (e.g., hard fought loss in the ring or the loss of a

The Kennel Club in Britain, to name several.

puppy at four weeks).

Personally, I didn’t ask the right specific questions the

Know what the standard means

first few times I bred a bitch. The first breeding went well; but the subsequent breeding produced a dog that was ever so lovely but which cramped at his first show. Slow learner that I was, the next litter produced a dog who had a seizure at a show. No one told me that was an

Deep smarts require an intimate understanding of a breed standard. Many breeders can quote the key points of their standard, but it’s the nuances of words and phrases contained within the standard that matter. For

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example, what does “with no evidence of snippiness”

them a more linear and rectangular feel. Cardigans,

mean? I know that a person needs education if I hear

by comparison, feel curvier due to round bone and a

them talk about “a terrier front.” There isn’t one

sloping rear. Preferred angulation of the front feet also

terrier front. Visualization of a breed doing its work

varies. Cardigan front feet point outward at no more

helps one connect form and function. It also gives you

than a 30° angle to balance the width of the shoulders.

a memory portal to store knowledge.

Pembroke Corgis have elbows parallel to the body.

Individuals with deep smarts also are not afraid to use decision aides as one of many ways to assess how their dogs stack up relatively to the standard. I measure and weight my puppies at 8, 12 and 16 weeks to determine

Consequently, their feet neither turn in nor out. Deeps smarts requires going beyond the differences; it also includes knowledge regarding why the two breeds are related, but distinct.

how closely their proportions lock into the standard.

Here’s another example of how deep smarts drives

One study of American Scotties showed an average

actions. I had two sisters which were different in one

height of 9.9 inches tall, a back length about 10.3

way or the other, but were still of high quality. The UK

inches and a head length of approximately 8 inches.

and FCI standards allow an extra inch in height than

Extrapolating, a puppy with a 6-inch back should have

the U.S. standard allows. I sent Eng. Am. Can. Russ.

a head length of about 4.8 inches (80% of back length).

GCh. McVan’s To Russia with Love “Knopa” to Europe

I do the same thing with weight. I use a weight chart

because she was a taller, bigger and fancier bitch than

taken from an old STCA handbook to determine the

her sister Am. Can. Ch. McVan’s Be Bop Baby “Betsy”.

eventual size of my dogs. It works well for my line. I

Knopa ended up going Best in Show at Crufts; Her

extrapolate the data to determine how close a puppy

sister Betsy stay home and won more specialties than

will be to a 22-lb. Scottie at one year of age. Let’s

any Scottish Terrier in history.

say your Scottie bitch weighs 12 lbs. at 20 weeks (5 months). The chart says the pup should weigh 13.25 lbs. The calculations are: 12.00 lbs. /13.25 lbs. = .91 or 91% of expected weight. Multiple the percentage by 22, the ideal weight. The answer is that the bitch should weigh 19.9 lbs. at one year-of-age, well within the standard. Deep smarts also evolve by examining differences.

In the next issue of Best In Show magazine Dr. Vandra Huber will discuss how to get hands on learning, choosing a sire, designing a breed strategy, minimalizing health issues and more in the second installment of the series “Deep Smarts and Preservation Breeders.” Get Hands on Learning

Consider Cardigan and Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

Pedigree analysis is a necessary but not sufficient

“Besides the tail, Cardigans are slightly larger with

approach to breeding and preserving a breed. In today’s

heavier bone (e.g., Male Cardigans weigh up to 38 lbs.;

technology driven world, genetic analyzers also are

Pembrokes only up to 30 lbs.). Further, Pembrokes

available to interpret genetic compatibility. Both are

have oval bone and a squared-off rear end that gives

decision aids that may or may not be useful to breeder.

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Sometimes, it what you might have learned without awareness that may be most useful. Drawing from the business world, the best saleswoman in a company may not know what she’s doing that separates her from the rest of the pack. It’s the same with a super-breeder. Deep smarts that are difficult to codify is often what makes the difference. You still must get your hands on the dog to truly see how he measures up relative to the standard and whether the dog produces what you need. I recall one dog that did a lot of winning in the U.S. The dog was particularly noted for its long head. From ringside, it looked like a long, well balanced head.

Wait and See Before Choosing a Sire A breeder with deep smarts does not jump on the bandwagon and breed to the stud dog de jour. If the dog is from outside of a breeding family, she may hold off judgment until she sees numerous off springs – hopefully some of similar type and lines. By focusing on what is produced, such an experienced breeder is better able determine how dominate the sire is and for what structural and temperament features. Going over the stud dog and if possible, his get provides invaluable information.

Close up, I found that the top skull and muzzle were not

Nor does she use a dog because of its color or lack of a

proportional. Nor were the planes parallel. The top skull

color gene or because they like versus dislike the owner

had been cleverly lengthened with hair built up behind

of the stud dog. Novices may use a dog that is convenient

the ears to create the illusion of parallel planes equal

to home. She may also use a stud for which a breeder

top skull to muzzle length.

has taunted the merits of his dog and bashed the merits

In sum, you not only need to know what is right, you need to determine through action if what you see is what really is . This can only be accomplished through experience (e.g., by touching live dogs – particularly exemplars of the breed again and again until you develop a category prototype and exemplar. against which a specimen is assessed. A prototype is an example or model for identifying an ideal. In the case of canines, the dog. The prototype enables final decisions to be made about the quality of a specimen relative to the exemplar. In contrast, a stereotype is something that is repeatedly attributed to one breed versus another (e.g. Chinese Shar-peis are willful, obstinate, and dominant, American Cockers are neurotic and aggressive). These things are usually negative or demeaning. They do not reflect an absolute or some inescapable reality for that group.

of others dogs. Breeders with deep smarts want the best stud dog possible – preferable the one who potentially can minimize two or three faults. Smart breeders make it work with the right dog I don’t have to like him or agree with his politics (dog club or national). I want to improve my breeding program. Sometimes you’ve got to move away from the usual dogs and your line and try an outcross. If it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work. But they add that knowledge to her tool box of knowledge. Help Others – You Might Learn Something Helping others to evaluate their puppies is also a useful learning tool. A hands-on evaluation of a litter got me one of my most important bitches, namely Westminster BIS winner Am. Can. Ch. McVan’s Gaelforce Postscript, aka Peggy Sue, who was bred by Camille Partridge. We were friend, but I never had bred with Camille; she was more focused on performance than conformation.

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I was happy when she asked me to evaluate several show prospects out of a litter. We began the evaluate the same way I always evaluate litters by measuring and weighing. We watched the puppies interact and play. I made loud noises, dropped a chair. I introduced one of my puppies to mash it up a bit. We watched the puppies for more than an hour.

Acknowledge and Try to Minimize Health Challenges Health statistics indicate that every purebred dog has at least 5 serious health issues. The question to ponder as a breeder is which problems can you tolerate and which are impossible for you to live with. I am not a believer that dogs that carry a specific health fault —even a significant one --

Despite a long coat, one bitch caught my eye. I went

should be neutered. If we do that, then our gene

over her first and then I went over the others. I can’t

pool shrinks even more than it has. Recall that the

completely articulate (tacit knowledge) why but I knew

number of purebred Scottish Terriers in the U.S.

this bitch was very special. Even ungroomed, she had

and U.K. are about half what they were 15 years ago.

structure, attitude and potential. She did have one top

Genetic tests are growing in number. I am hopeful

tooth out of alignment but I had never been a tooth fairy.

we will have significantly more markers in the near

Camille ranked her third in the litter. She didn’t walk on

future.

a lead; she was as shaggy as President Roosevelt’s dog Fala. I didn’t have any money. But I really wanted this bitch. I had to ask.

I am greatly concerned about health transparency. Some breeders don’t do testing: then they don’t have to face up to the results. Others have the information

”Is there any way I can get this bitch? I’ll show her and

but hold the information tight to their chest. They

get her U.S. and Canadian title. ? I could pay over-time,”

will talk about a health issue in their line only if you

I stated. Camille thought for what seemed like forever,

ask the right question. Otherwise, they are mum.

she then stated, “Well I know you will show her much

Partial disclosure is still a lie. Breeders who do

more than I will. I could use a stud fee on one of your

open up about a serious health are not generally

dogs. So, if you promise to show her and give me a free

rewarded; they are branded. The scarlet letter effect

stud service, she is yours.” “Yes!”, I said immediately.

is so strong that it can be difficult to get a bitch bred.

Her belief in me, propelled me forward. I would do the

I’ve speculated about the reasons for this shunning.

absolute best. The rest is history. I showed Peggy Sue

They may be protecting their line; they may not

in Canada to 2 owner handled Best in Shows. With her

have solid knowledge of genetics; or they know it’s

handler Maripi Woolridge, Peggy Sue won 6 national

in their line or all lines and they cowardly won’t

specialties (a record that holds), a record of 22 specialty

acknowledge it. Achieving transparency regarding

nests and eventually Best in Show at Westminster

health is one of the most important goals we face

Kennel Club. For 20 years, Peggy Sue also held the

if preservation of our precious breed matters. Deep

specialty record. The record was broken in 2015 by

smarts require dealing with health challenges head

Peggy Sue’s great-great-grand daughter, Can. Am. GCh.

on through open registries, education and sound

McVan’s Be Bop Baby HOF CHIC aka Betsy.

breeding

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Develop a breeding circle One of the most helpful things I have found is to develop a breeding circle composed of individuals with deep smarts in areas you are less knowledge. The individuals in your inner circle also should have similar goals as you. It’s interesting to have a mash up of breeders who have differing levels of experience. A novice may ask different questions

Scot) or because I feel the dog needs more attention than I can provide). I like to call what I have “a boutique kennel.” The aim is to produce the best dogs (health and conformation) we can and match our dogs to the best human we can find. I also provide a safety net of information and a lifetime return policy. What is your strategy with your line of dogs? Are your practices strategically-aligned?

(e.g. Why should a shepherd’s eyes be well set)

One tactic I use that may differentiate me somewhat is

and make you stop and think. A circle of friends

that I always have at least two bitches of breeding age

provides you with a relatively safe place to raise and

such that I can have two related but somewhat different

ask difficult questions. You can share the names of

lines. I was actually unaware I was doing this until a

stud dogs you are considering and have a serious

handler friend pointed it out to me. The alpha bitch is

discussion about the dogs. If a health challenge pops

typically the star, conformationally and in the breed

up, you can discuss it, cry on a colleague’s shoulder,

ring. She is my priority when I think about stud dogs.

pick yourself up and jointly develop an action plan..

However, she may or may not be the star in the whelping

Breeding cohorts are also the ones you call or text

box. While my alpha bitch is being shown by my handler

when you achieve something special or are dragged

and breeding partner Rebecca Cross, my beta bitch is at

down by something bad.

home with me. I try something different with her initial

Develop a Breeding Strategy

breeding and perhaps the second breeding. But on her final breeding, I usually go with what has worked best

Finally, deep smarts require an over-arching

with her or with my alpha bitch. Having two bitches

breeding strategy. I limit my breeding’s to one and

that are similarly but also differently bred provides me

no more than three litters a year. I can’t handle

with a safety net if things go awry. As the saying goes,

any more than that. Now that I am retired, I don’t

it’s not good to have all your “dogs” basket.

know how I was able to do plan bleedings, whelp, and care for puppies, show, judge and work in my

Set Proximal and Distal Goals

professional job simultaneously. If I use business

Acquiring deep smarts entails goal setting. Goals on

terminology, I am not a low-cost provider. Save that

the immediate horizon are called proximal goals. Long

designation for large scale commercial breeders.

term goals requiring a 5-10 years investment are called

Nor am I a high-priced elite provider of Scottish

distal goals. And then there are bodacious, gutsy goals

Terriers. I seldom if ever make money on a litter.

such as ensuring the preservation of a breed. Goals need

Sometimes I give my dogs to people to help them

to be difficult but attainable to motivate action. They

overcome a crisis (e.g., accidental death of a beloved

also require performance feedback so you can revise a

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failing strategy and renew a winning strategy. Some

Scottie FALA in the White House, the Scottish Terrier

initial proximal goals might be to finish a first show

was one of the most popular dogs in the United States

dog. A second goal could be to owner-handle a dog to its

(e.g. No. 3 in 1935). From 2008 to 2018, the number of

championship with a specialty win or to place first in a

registered Scotties dropped 35% and from 65th to 90th

class at your national specialty. Goals may be specific to

in popularity. The same decline can be seen for many

showing, whelping litters, increasing your knowledge,

other breeds such as Greyhounds, Smooth, Wire and

giving back via involvement in clubs or to the breed.

Toy Fox Terriers, Schipperkes, Chows, Dalmatians,

Because I am getting older and I have no genetic children interested in carrying on with my dogs, I’ve been concerned that my line will just end. All that work and Poof! It is gone I’m taking action steps to prevent the demise of McVan Scotties. I am strategically locating

Samoyeds, Keeshonds, English Cockers silky, basenji, Cairn and Silkies to name a few. In contrast, designer dogs such as Goldendoodles, Labradoodles, Puggles, Maltipoos, Yorkipoos, Shinpoo have made gargantuan leaps in popularity, relative to AKC purebred dogs.

some of my dogs in different parts of the world. The

Preserving a breed requires deep smarts in new areas

goal is to diversify the gene pool. I hope the dogs I place

such as counteracting the “fake news” about purebred

will be used and the bitches will provide some amazing

dogs and propaganda about the value of designer

puppies. My instincts or deep smarts tell me this is the

dogs. It requires working together rather than against

right thing for me to do. I’ve placed dogs in numerous

other breeders. It requires the power of many, rather

countries (e.g. Finland, Singapore, Germany, Israel, Italy,

than the few. We need more committed people and

Denmark, and The Netherlands). I’ve had great success

younger people. It requires educating companion

in Brazil, Japan, and Australia. I am delighted to see

breeders so they understand the standard and breed

more breeders following in my footsteps by swapping

to the standard, they health test parents according to

dogs, selling good to great, rather than inferior, dogs, to

national club recommendations, and place puppies with

other countries.

purpose. We need deep enough smarts to know what we

The objective, of course, is to strategize like a chess player and think at least three or more generations ahead. The problem is that “stuff” happens. Stud dogs become sterile; a health issue crops up; or a brood bitch needs to be spayed. COVID-19 makes it nearly impossible to import or export dogs which require digging deeper to ensure that purebred dogs endure.

have been doing is not enough. Summary For the sport of purebred dogs to evolve and endure in these tough times, we have to develop and nurture dog women and men who have deep smarts and are willing to transfer that knowledge to others less advanced in their Deep smarts is anchored on tacit (non-

A second superordinate goal relates to doing what can

quantifiable, implicit) knowledge. Such knowledge

be done to preserve a breed for its original purpose

is based on observation and first-hand experience.

and design and for the future. When FDR had his

It is shaped by beliefs, social forces and emotional

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D EEP S MA RT S A ND PRESERVATION BREEDERS

knowledge. It requires not only knowing how and

stories with a purpose and moral, Socratic questioning,

knowing who but also on knowing how to bridge fault

and learning by doing at the actionable end. To ensure

lines and taking action. Deep smarts are what allow

the survival of our sport generally and the preservation

breeders and preservationists to make good, and often

of purebred dogs specifically, coaching and mentoring,

excellent, judgments well before others. It is “as close as

and post mortem analysis of a mentor’s and her

we get to wisdom,” and is dubbed “deep smarts” by the

apprentice’s behavior and decisions must be conducted.

authors. Deep smarts can be cultivated through passive

Only then, can the transfer of knowledge and evolution

as well as active actions. Techniques range from passive

of deep smarts occur.

observation and presentations, derivation of rules of thumb that mostly work, the telling and recalling of

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