Best in Show Magazine USA • August 2021

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WE ARE

Best in Show

While sitting outside and enjoying my morning coffee with my Labrador next to me,

I have been thinking how wonderful it is to have everything getting back to normal. The show schedule is full and we should be truly happy so many shows are back and are not being cancelled.

One more magazine is done, and it is time to start working on the next one. In

the fifth USA edition the Best in Show team has prepared some great articles and beautifully designed advertisements.

We are starting with an interview with two handlers - Madeline and Adam Peterson,

young but a very well-known and successful couple.

As all of you already know, the beautiful Santa Barbara show is scheduled for the end

of August so we are looking forward to bringing you the most interesting and important details about the city and show in an article written by Mary Marshall and Bo Bengtson.

Ringside Click this time will be all about prestigious Westminster (by Westminster

K.C. and Fan Yu), followed by Crowned 100 - Breathless the Pekingese. Living Legends is all about the one and only Edward Boyes. We are very honored to have three interviews with amazing Aussie breeders such as Judy Harrington, Marge Stovall, and AJ Tavares. Last but not least is the Junior Handler interview with the talented Ryley Beckwith-Kirkland.

We wish you a relaxing and amazing August! Until our October edition—stay safe and have fun!

JOVANA DANILOVIC Chief Editor

CHRISTIAN RANGEL Marketing Director

BISCREATIVE.COM Art Department

MARY MARSHALL, ANNE TUREEN, LEE GROGAN AND CARLA IVANCIC Contributing Writers



CROWNED 100

BREATHLESS,

THE PEKIGNESE

TWO ICONS

SANTA BARBARA

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MADELINE & ADAM PETERSON

LIVING LEGEND

EDWARD BOYES

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INTERVIEW WITH HANDLERS

RINGSIDE CLICK

WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB

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CONTENT

MEET THE BREED Australian Shepherd

JUSTAMERE Judi Harrington



SILVERWOOD Marge Stovall

MEET THE BREED Australian Shepherd

LIMELITE

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF ALLISON ALEXANDER

THE SHOW MUST GO ON

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Aj Tavares & Matt Mullin

INTERVIEW WITH JUNIOR HANDLER

RYLEY BECKWITH -KIRKLAND

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MEET THE BREED Australian Shepherd

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CONTENT

RINGSIDE CLICK

GRAYSLAKE ILLINOIS



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I N T E RV I E W W I T H H A N D L E R S

MADELINE & Peterson ADAM

Who were your mentors in the dog world, do you both still have mentors to this day? Adam: I apprenticed under a few different handlers; Scott Sommers, Carlos Puig and Suzy Kipp. I am always learning new things and asking questions to those I see exceling in certain areas. Maddie: I grew up working for Lisa Miller, Tracy Szaras, Angie

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Lloyd and Mike and Michelle Scott. I still ask for advice,

Terriers. All the above breeds have fun loving, outgoing

whether it’s about grooming or business.

personalities and love to show off in the ring.

What handlers inspired you and are there any handlers

Do you have aspirations to judge some day?

today that give you inspiration? Adam: Bob and Jane Forsyth, Mike and Michelle Scott. Maddie: I love watching handlers like Angie, Tracy, Michelle, and Amy Booth... They are more than just great handlers, they are great trainers and you can see their passion for their dogs. Is there a breed of dog in particular you enjoy to handle? Adam: Dachshunds. They are clever, lively, and curious. Maddie: Dachshunds and Goldens. Both breeds are so much fun to show. With your busy schedule, do you breed any dogs? If not, would you like to and if yes then what breed? Adam & Maddie: We are breeders (under the Harewood prefix) of Standard Wirehaired and Longhaired Dachshunds, Golden Retrievers, and Smooth Fox

Adam & Maddie: Yes. How did you keep yourselves busy during lockdown when there were no shows? Adam & Maddie: We really enjoyed our time at home with our own dogs. We whelped and raised two Wire Dachshund litters. We gardened and built furniture and new chicken coops. We did some educational grooming videos through FB live. Maddie also started a side gig selling makeup, like many handlers. It is great to see dog people come together to support one another. What are some of your favorite shows to attend? Adam & Maddie: Golden Retriever and Dachshund national specialties. Favorite all-breed shows are Houston and Orlando. Have you shown at any dog shows outside of North

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I NT ERVI EW WITH HANDLERS

America? If so, how do they compare to showing at American shows? Adam & Maddie: We have shown in the Philippines and Maddie has shown in Mexico. It is very neat to learn the FCI and international intricacies. Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows? Please give reasons for your preference. Adam & Maddie: Specialties. We enjoy seeing the depth of quality at the breed level at a specialty. It is simply wonderful to see all the outstanding dogs of a particular breed at a specialty. It is an education into each breed and their traits. What is a win that you will forever treasure? Adam & Maddie: There are too many to list without leaving any out. Any win at a national or a best in show is always a standout. Please list 3 dogs that you have never shown that you wish you could. (They can be from the past too.) Adam: Manhattan (Covy Tucker Hill’s Manhattan), Stump (Clussexx Three D Grinchy Glee), JR (Special Times Just Right). Maddie: Mick (Torums Scarf Michael), Rufus (Rocky Top’s Sundance Kid) and Fifi (Protocol’s Veni Vidi Vici). What are your hobbies/pastimes outside of the world of dogs? Adam & Maddie: Kickboxing, golfing, and kayaking. In many countries outside of North America, there are little to no professional dog handlers. If this was not your career, what other occupation would you both pursue?

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I NT ERVI EW W ITH HANDLERS

Adam: Veterinarian. Maddie: Marine Biologist. There is no denying that the presentation of dogs in North America is high, do you feel that sometimes the grooming is taken too far? Adam & Maddie: Yes. There needs to be an emphasis on the natural look of each breed. Some breeds benefit from the extra grooming based on the style that has evolved within showing a specific breed, but others could benefit from less. The purpose of dog showing was (and should still be) to evaluate and “show off” breeding stock, do you think for some breeders/owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings? Adam & Maddie: Yes. Egos play a role in showing dogs. It should be more about improving the breed quality and less about ribbons and titles. The titles will come for a good dog of any breed. How did you both enjoy showing at Lyndhurst Mansion this year? Are you happy the show will move back to NYC next year? Adam & Maddie: We loved it. It was more laid back and spacious. There was actually grass and room to exercise our dogs. It did, however, lack the feel of showing at Madison Square Garden. Most that show dogs understand the importance of being sufficiently caffeinated, what are your coffee orders? Adam: Venti Flat White Quad Maddie: None Thank you both for your interview. We wish you the best of luck!


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SANTA BARBARA Two icons Santa Barbara Kennel Club Compiled by Bo Bengtson on behalf of SBKC Co-authored by Mary Marshall

Santa Barbara, California has been called the riviera of the United States for the relaxing beaches, picturesque mountains, exciting night life, and historical culture that makes this coastal city a prime vacation destination complete with world-class accommodations. The colorful culture of this coastal city of 91,000 inhabitants would not be complete without a dog show of the same glamourous and historical magnitude. The Santa Barbara Kennel Club Show, to be held on August 28-29, is certainly one of the oldest and most prestigious dog shows in the


S A NT A B A RB A RA, TWO ICONS

country and attracts the top dogs from throughout the

the Belvedere Hotel grounds on Friday and Saturday,

nation.

August 1 & 2, 1919.

The city of Santa Barbara, founded in 1602, was first

There were five judges for the 280 dogs entered at the

inhabited by native Americans, the Chumash, who

first SBKC show.

arrived approximately 13,000 years ago. The city is a two-hour drive north from Los Angeles and lies on the central California Pacific ocean coast with the Santa Ynez Mountains forming a dramatic backdrop. The

Three of them judged one breed each - Boston Terriers, English Bulldogs and Bull Terriers. The other two shared all other breeds.

Mediterranean style white stucco buildings with the red

There was no separate point scale for dogs and bitches in

tile roofs are a reminder of the city’s Spanish colonial

those days; most breeds required little competition for

heritage. The downtown area offers visitors a chance

a 3-point major, but Boston Terriers were the country’s

to investigate the upscale boutiques and restaurants

most popular breed at the time and required eight dogs

offering local wines and seasonal food. The city boasts the famous Stearns Wharf harbor, zoological gardens, and an easy drive to the wine country of the Santa Ynez Valley where vineyards offer tours and wine tasting. The Mission Santa Barbara, home to the Franciscan friars since 1786, has a museum open to visitors, and sits on a hill overlooking the magnificent surroundings. Santa Barbara also offers outdoor adventures for sports enthusiasts with an abundance of water sports including boating, scuba diving, fishing, and excursions to the most scenic islands off the California coast that are just a short boat ride away. The annual number of visitors to Santa Barbara in 2017 (last count) was $7.2 million, and the amount of money the visitors spent is more than $1 billion annually. The Santa Barbara Kennel Club Show holds the same fascination and prestige for the dog fancy as the city and surrounding area holds for tourists seeking a unique getaway. The first SBKC dog show was held in the Palm Arena of


present for a single point, 25 for 3 points and 60 dogs for a 5-point major! Best in Show at the 1919 show was a “black and white” Cocker Spaniel named Mission Silvie, born in Pasadena but owned by the Mission Kennels in San Francisco. A second show was held in 1920, but the hotel where the show had been held burned down in early 1921 — 1938 Great Dane Ch. Zelia von Loheland

and the club held no more dog shows for the next three years. Most of Santa Barbara was devastated by a major earthquake on June 29, 1925 — only a few weeks before the SBKC show that was nevertheless held on August 1 & 2, 1925. A total of 388 dogs were entered. Since most of downtown was flattened in the 1925 earthquake, a deliberate decision was made to rebuild it in the picturesque Spanish Colonial style that has since made Santa Barbara famous. The earthquake was an opportunity to rebuild the city center in the unified architectural style. Since 1925 an SBKC dog show has been held every year except for 1933, when AKC did not grant the club

1948 Miniature Poodle Ch. Magic Fate of Blakeen 1954 Afghan Hound Ch. Ophaal of Crown Crest

permission to hold a show, during World War II, 19411945 and in 2020 due to Covid-19. The show has been held in many different locations, most memorably in Hope Ranch, on the polo grounds in Montecito, Robertson Field at UCSB and currently at Earl Warren Showground. For a couple of years in the 1990s it was even held in the Santa Ynez Valley. Earl Warren, whom this showground is named after, was Governor of California in the 1950s and Chief Justice of the U.S. He died in 1974.

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The Santa Barbara show always enjoyed prestige as one of the premier events in the country. It became one of the largest and most innovative in the country under the guardianship of Tom and Ann Stevenson in the 1970s. It frequently was the No. 1 show in the country, based on the number of dogs exhibited. In 1987 there were more than 4,000 dogs entered. SBKC is the only club anywhere to offer both a Breeder’s Showcase and a competition for best Foreign-Bred,

1968_1969 Miniature Poodle Ch. Tranchant Annabelle

and the only one to organize special competitions for Best Sighthound and Best Bully Breed. In 2021 the Best Foreign Bred will be judged on Friday and hosted by Simi Valley Kennel Club. Judges are James Mitchell and David Haddock. Entries are taken on the day of competition, but all competitors must be entered at Simi Valley KC on Friday, August 27, 2021. Total prize money awarded will be $1,150. The only dogs to have won BIS at SBKC three times are the Old English Sheepdog Ch. Kinnelon Scallywag, who won in 1927, 1931 and 1932; the Sealyham Terrier Ch. Stonebroke Right On The Money, who won BIS in 2005 and at both SBKC shows in 2006, and the German Shorthaired Pointer GCh. VJK-MYST Garbonita’s

1978 Doberman Ch. Marienburg’s Mary Hartman

California Journey, who won BIS at both SBKC shows in 2015 and one of them in 2016. Only one SBKC show per year was held through 1995; in 1996, for the first time, there were two back-to-back SBKC shows. The owner who won the most BIS at SBKC was Col. E. E. Ferguson, whose dogs won BIS six times between 1938 and 1962. His first winner was a Great Dane; his second a Standard Poodle; the last four were all Miniature Poodles.

1985 Pekingese Ch. St. Aubrey Bee’s Wing of Elsdon


No official record of the handler who has won the most at SBKC exists, but a good guess would be Frank Sabella, who won BIS six times with five different Poodles in 1960, 1962, 1968, 1969, 1971 and 1972. He retired as a professional handler in 1973 but was an AKC judge until his death in 2021. Terriers have won BIS at SBKC 27 times, more than 1992 German Shepherd Ch. Altana’s Mystique

breeds from any other of the seven AKC variety groups. Non-Sporting breeds won 23 times, hounds won 17 BIS, Sporting and Herding Group breeds won 14 times each, with Working and Toy breeds winning nine times each. The two most successful breeds at SBKC have been Wire Fox Terriers and Miniature Poodles, with eight BIS wins each. Cocker Spaniels, German Shorthaired Pointers and Old English Sheepdogs have won BIS five times each. There was no 2020 show due to Covid-19, but the 2021 shows will be held at Earl Warren Showgrounds in Santa Barbara next to the freeway on Saturday and Sunday, August 28 and 29 (preceded by Simi Valley Kennel Club shows on the same grounds on August 26 and 27). The shows are sponsored by Purina ProPlan. A total of 14 specialty shows will be held at the same time, and 15

2000 French Bulldog Ch. Obsession dell’Akiris

2015-2016 German Shorthaired Pointer Ch. VJK-Myst Garbonita’s California Journey

breeds have supported entries. The 12th Annual Breeders’ Showcase will be held on Saturday, August 28, with $7,800 in prize money sponsored by Purina ProPlan. Judges for the Breeders’ Showcase are: Sporting – Tara Schulz; Hounds – Bruce Schultz; Working – Maria Arechaederra; Terrier – Robert Myall; Toy – Evalyn Gregory; Non-Sporting – James Mitchell; Herding – Dorothy Collier; Best in Showcase – Jose Mello and David Haddock. Tie breaker – Paul Stanton. SBKC invites all exhibitors and handlers to a buffet

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dinner that will be served during the Breeders’ Showcase. 2021 Honorees for their contribution to the Sport: Sporting – Bruce and Tara Schultz; Hounds – Gretchen Bernardi; Working – David Haddock; Terrier – Cindy Vogels; Toys – Evalyn Gregory; Non-Sporting – Missy Galloway; Herding – Dorothy Collier. The 9th Annual Bullyganza competition will be held on Sunday, August 29, and judged by Connie Clark. Eligible are BOB, BOW, BOS at both SBKC weekend shows in Bullmastiffs, American Staffordshire Terriers, Mini Bull Terriers, Boston Terriers, Bull Terriers (white and colored), Staffordshire Bull Terriers, Bulldogs, French Bulldogs, Dogues de Bordeaux and Dogo Argentino, plus Select Dog and Bitch in any of these breeds that hold a specialty or supported entry during the SBKC weekend. Total prize money $1,150. The 8th Annual Sighthound Spectacular will be held on Sunday, August 29, and the event will be judged by Terry D. Chacon. Eligible are BOB, BOW, BOS at both SBKC weekend shows in Afghan Hounds, Azawakh, Basenji, Borzoi, Cirneco dell ‘Etna, Greyound, Ibizan Hound, Italian Greyhound, Irish Wolfhound, Pharaoh Hound, Portuguese Podengo Pequeno, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Saluki, Scottish Deerhound, Sloughi and Whippet, plus Select Dog and Bitch in any of these breeds holding a specialty or a supported entry during the SBKC weekend. Total prize money is $1,150. In addition, there is a Junior Handler Clinic with the Professionals on August 28, with AKC presenting “Judging Junior Showmanship” with Larry Cornelius. There is also Breeder’s Veterinary Services, and digital x-rays without sedation available on the showgrounds.

Group and BIS judges SATURDAY: Best in Show – Mr. Paul Stanton Sporting – Dr. Klaus Anselm Hounds – Mr. Jose Homem De Mello Working – Mrs. Joan P. Anselm Terriers – Mrs. Polly Smith Toys – Mr. Glen Lajeski Herding – Mrs. Dorothy N. Collier Miscellaneous – Mrs. Cindy Vogels SUNDAY: Best in Show – Mr. Jose Homem De Mello Sporting – Mr. Paul Stanton Hounds – Mrs. Polly Smith Working – Mrs. Dorothy N. Collier Terriers – Mrs. Cindy Vogels Toys – Mr. James Mitchell Non-Sporting – Mr. Paul Stanton Herding – Dr. Klaus Anselm Miscellaneous - Mr. James Mitchell




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RINGSIDE click Westminster

KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW June 12th-13th, 2021 Candids by Fan Yu



R I N G S ID E C L I C K, W ES T M I NSTER K ENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW

SPORTING GROUP GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER GCHS CH Clarity Reach The Sky Vjk-Myst

HOUND GROUP WHIPPET GCHP CH Pinnacle Kentucky Bourbon

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R I N G S I D E C L I C K, W ES T MI NSTER K ENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW

WORKING GROUP SAMOYED GCHG CH Vanderbilt ‘N Printemp’s Lucky Strike

TERRIER GROUP WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIER GCHG CH Crystal Boy De La Pomme

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R I N G S ID E C L I C K, W ES T M I NSTER K ENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW

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R I N G S I D E C L I C K, W ES T MI NSTER K ENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW

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R I N G S ID E C L I C K, W ES T M I NSTER K ENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW

TOY GROUP PEKIGNESE GCHG CH Pequest Wasabi

NON SPORTING

GROUP FRENCH BULLDOG GCHP CH Chaselands Mathew Moss

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R I N G S I D E C L I C K, W ES T MI NSTER K ENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW

HERDING GROUP OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG GCH CH Bugaboo’s Courage Of Conviction

BEST IN SHOW PEKIGNESE GCHG CH Pequest Wasabi

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Crowned 100

BR E AT H L E S S T H E

P E K I NGE S E

by Mary Marshall


Interview with Hiram Stewart Hiram Stewart was born the first of six children to a father who was a community leader, both headmaster of a high school and a Methodist minister. His mother put her growing family in first place among her priorities and perhaps because of their dedicated parenting all six children completed their college education and pursued careers in education. Stewart earned two degrees--one in biology and another in animal science. During high school he worked after school for the professional handler and Boxer breeder Richard Souse, so from an early age he knew animals would be his dominating passion. He acquired his first dog, the Pekingese Ch. Welkins Wee Too Sun King while still a youngster which he showed successfully. He occasionally entrusted him to Souse for a show further away while he remained to look after the kennel.

by a profound work ethic, he also cares for as many as 18 to 25 dogs in his home at a given time, looking after each one as though they were his own dog. As a young adult he began working as a veterinary assistant, but by his early 30’s he felt that he could not effectively fulfill his obligations in both the veterinary work and his increasing show responsibilities. He decided to pursue his handling career. Stewart is well known as a toy group specialist, with over 300 Best in Show placements in Chihuahua’s alone (his total BIS record is over 400) but he has also carved out a place

While Stewart learned about all the facets of kennel

in the non-sporting group. He holds the record for the

management from Souse, his handling skills were

youngest champion ever and the most winning bitch in

mostly acquired from experience. Stewart currently

Pekingese (Franshaw Hear me Roar). He has multiple

travels to shows solo, only occasionally with an

national specialty wins and has won the toy group at

assistant to handle the driving, prep work and showing

Westminster several times as well. Stewart’s hard work

all on his own, which is a continuation of habits formed

has paid off. He is currently handling the top Pekingese

in his early days. He works out at the gym several times

in the USA, which he has brought to the position of the

a week to keep fit for his intense work schedule. Marked

top four dogs in all breeds

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Mr. Stewart, please share with us something about your

way, of course. Les did not disappoint, he was an

involvement with the Pekingese and especially Yakee

outstanding example of the breed.

Leaving Me Breathless.

I had been working with John Shaw for some time

I would say the Pekingese is a breed that selects its

before Les, and we had been following the work of the

people rather than the other way around. Once you

Yakee kennel and the career of Breathless. Then the

fall under the spell, you can’t get away. Though I feel

call came in, ‘Can you please go over to Scotland and

passionately about all dogs and I am honored to be

pick him up?’! My expectations were sky high, and so I

trusted to show several breeds, the Pekingese is simply

was caught off guard when Easdon received me in such

a part of my life. I will always have one with me. My

a friendly and informal manner, he said: ‘The dogs are

first win in Pekingese was as a 13-year-old with my own

playing in the garden if you’d like to go see them’. That

dog Sun King. He went winners’ dog, best of winners,

is when I first saw both Les and Dangerous Liason. I

and best of breed from the classes. There were several

was deeply impressed by them both, though at the

champions showing that day under Mrs. Peggy Dillard

time and still looking back now, I knew that Les was

Carr at the Pekingese Club of Texas show. Many other

the dog best suited to show in the USA. His color, a

Pekingese have come into my home and worked with

rich intense russet with a plush black velvet mask, his

me since then. I showed the youngest BIS winning Peke

size (12lbs), his temperament, the whole package was

in 1990 (St. Aubrey Jeeves of Elston, only 9 months of

a very good fit.

age), and still hold the record for the top winning Peke bitch in history, but I have to say that Les (Leaving Me Breathless of Yakee) was the sort of dog that brings you up a notch. The United Kingdom is the country in which today’s Pekingese breed was developed. I feel they lead the breed in quality, speaking in a general

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Getting him over was a huge question. It was 2001, so 9/11 had already happened and all the red tape was in place, but Les was hardly the sort of dog you check into cargo and wait for at the other end. He had a traveling bag which fit under the seat in front, but his full coat filled all the bag, and this is a brachycephalic breed.


C RO W NED 100 · B REATHLESS THE PEK ING ESE

I had to pay attention to every detail on every level.

would he break down and graciously concede some

My home base near New Orleans, Louisiana, is not

play time with the other dogs. He made an exception

ideal for the Pekingese breed because of the long hot

for German Shepherds. I don’t know what it was about

humid season. During the time we spent there, I had a

that breed that drew him down from his pillar, but he

series of tactics which I had developed over the years

was always interested in connecting with that breed.

to keep him cool and happy. He slept on a cooling mat, I started him on a reliable fresh feed that I had used successfully in the past, and he drank mineral water. I made a few alterations to his grooming, and I needed to pay special attention to his coat due not only to the humidity in Louisiana, but to the nearly constant bathing and drying of his routine while showing. Lanolin based conditioning is better than any oil product which would weigh down the natural lift of the coat.

We were on the road every weekend, and he held up extremely well. He responded well to his favorite squeaky toys and if that failed, to some fresh chicken bits, but as a rule, he just gave his command performance and allowed the world their moment of adulation. Sometimes I would start to feel a little burned out and I couldn’t help thinking that he must be too, though he was too proud to show it, so we would occasionally stop for a little holiday and relax. However, 126 BIS wins means we were busy. With

We made careful choices in the selection of shows. We

just a few more than that he would have broken the

gave top priority to a quality judging panel, we looked

standing record of Chik T’Sun of Caversham, but after

not only for breed specialists, but truly qualified all

going back to the UK and taking CC at Crufts, his team

around judges as well, such as Anne Rogers Clarke. We

decided he should stay on there, and so it was.

also needed to be certain that Les would not be out in the sun, on burning hot asphalt or subjected to any other element that would make him uncomfortable. It felt like all he had to do was to show up and we went straight to BIS. On top of his breed virtues, he was such a showman and had that magnetic quality about him that created a sort of mystique among dog people. To find him in your ring was akin to meeting a celebrity, and he earned his place by showing his heart out. That is not to say that he was an endearing or charming sort of dog. He was imperial. He fully embodied that aspect of breed type that commands respect. Even in his private time, when we were travelling with other breeds, I would have a play session. He would sit in his space aloof from the others, and only occasionally

Shortly thereafter the Yakee dog If Only broke onto the scene with David Fitzpatrick, and they went on to establish that new record and more. Breathless left us with an important legacy. He brought the Pekingese forward again as a top winning breed, and it helped that there were other quality kennels showing at the time. He was bred from, both within Franshaw and with other kennels, and so he is still with us in a sense. For me personally, it was a highlight in my career, perhaps like no other. I regreted parting with him in the UK, he was a wonderful Pekingese. Setting aside statistics, I think the USA shows have not yet seen a better example of the breed than Leaving Me Breathless of Yakee.

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a lovely dog, Singlewell Jason bred by Pam Edmonds. After the photo shoot I asked the breeder if she had any pups, which she didn’t. That was disappointing but then she mentioned that he had recently sired a litter from a bitch outside her kennel and we were very excited to obtain a bitch puppy from that litter. We were lucky to have some mentoring from Pekingese Mr. Bert Easdon- Yakee kennel I had already been in Boston Terriers and Shih-tzu quite a while, when we first thought of getting a Pekingese (I showed my first Boston when I was 11 years old, and I had my first champion at the age of 16, and in 1988 I judged Boston Terriers at Crufts). I must have been about 25 years old, over 40 years ago, when my partner, Philip Martin, wanted something for himself and we were attracted to the Peke. We obtained two from Pauline Bull of the famous Chang Pekingese, which he showed with some satisfaction, but they were borderline small, about eight pounds so not quite a sleeve. We felt breeding them would be too risky. One weekend I was judging Best in Show, and I put up

experts, but we had already had enough experience that we did not face any significant challenges in preparing or showing the Pekingese. Still today, when we have many dogs, 24 just counting the veterans, I keep up with the daily brushing and maintaining the coat. Even just 10 minutes a day helps me get one ready for the show much more easily. I wash the face paying attention to the wrinkles, and if the feathering is looking a bit greasy, I might wash and blow dry just the tips of the ears and the trousers. They say this is an untrimmed breed, but you need to trim very carefully so that the final effect appears untrimmed and untouched! You don’t want so much hair that they can’t walk, you need to keep the bottoms clean, keep tufts on the feet but not impair their walking, and many other little things, maintaining that natural look. One thing that has got me down about the Covid restrictions is missing my ring training. I am used to going about twice a week to ring training groups. There is much more to ring training than just the up and down - getting into the car, sitting in the box waiting, getting brushed up, and people touching them. We start about a week or two after the second inoculation. The first few times in class the puppy doesn’t do anything specific, he just sits and watches what the others do. By the third week we try to get

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them out of the box and walk them. Pekes are so clever; they watch first then just come out and start training. Sometimes we have a ‘Madam’, she will do the up and down, but when the time comes to be examined, she gets fed up. ‘Oh, now they’ve touched me, now I am done with this!’ The tail goes down, I am telling you, I’d rather have a slightly lesser dog but who loves to show than perhaps a finer example who will not carry on. We don’t breed necessarily from each bitch, especially if a bitch has not been enthusiastic about motherhood, we let it be, on the other hand if she enjoyed maternity then we are happy to have 3 or 4 litters from her. In a brachycephalic breed we prefer to keep the breeding ratio low. We do an outcross often; in fact, I would say our top dogs have been the result of outcrosses

you can decide, but with the Pekingese you have got to run them on until they are four and five months of age as they change so much.

(double OO). We look for a male that has virtues in

If someone is looking for a show dog, they need to

areas our bitch could improve upon, but he must

take it to twelve weeks but then take a chance on their

be overall an attractive dog for us. According to the

choice, they need to get on with their training, and so

Pekingese yearbook 2020, Yakee has produced 54

do we if we are keeping one. However, we have some

British champions since our start in the 1970’s. That

important questions for our buyers, are they going to

is a record.

come and pick up their puppy? How are they going to

My partner and I ran a hotel in Glasgow for many years. We are now retired and have moved to the countryside and I can say I don’t miss the business, but I can’t stop the breeding and showing--it is just my life. We still have seven or eight Boston Terriers with us, so we have a busy day at a show keeping up with the two rings. I feel frustrated if I miss the Boston judging due to the Pekingese, but occasionally that happens. We won breed at Crufts a couple of years ago with our Bostons, so we are still enjoying that breed immensely. If you are living in a townhouse, I really think you cannot do any better than a Boston Terrier A Boston Terrier is a straightforward sort of dog, at eight weeks

take care of it? And what is the life of this puppy after the show career? If they plan on housing the dog with a responsible forever home, that is all right with us, but we need to feel that it will be well thought through. We have a take back promise, sometimes an owner has died or there have been other occasions when a dog needs to come back to the kennel and we always honor that. Then sometimes a dog that was less promising as a youngster turns out better than the one we’ve kept on, as many champions as we have had, perhaps an equal number of dogs of comparable quality have gone as pets. We had a clear idea of how we wanted to manage


C RO W NED 100 · B REA THLESS THE PEK ING ESE

Dangerous Liaison (Danny). Danny had begun to show his promise early, winning his first CC at only seven months then placing BIS at a general championship show at the tender age of ten months! Only six months later we got Leaving Me Breathless out of Yakee Lasting Impression! We were going neck in neck with ourselves within the breed which didn’t seem like a good idea, so we had to find a solution. We had met John Shaw and Maria Francis before and knew they were professional and trustworthy, so we let Breathless go to the USA for two years in the capable hands of Hiram Stewart. We our Peke breeding when we started. We focused on certain lines with certain dogs that we admired. First, I bought a dog from Vandy Williams, Limited Edition at Toydom, and I used him on Mulverne Aimee at Yakee. The keeper from this litter was my first homebred

were able to carry on in the UK with Danny reaching top dog all breeds in 2001, Crufts Group, RBIS in 2002 and finally, in 2003- BIS. This established a record triple win in the toy group, and he was the very first Pekingese to be honored with the Crufts BIS trophy.

Pekingese champion Yakee Patent Pending. We then

Breathless however was doing his part on the other

brought her back to her great grandfather, which

side of the pond. After winning the Silver Collar, he

was Shiarita Cassidy, a very famous dog. This litter

accrued over 100 BIS placings, was among the top

produced For Your Eyes Only and his sister Gentlemen

three dogs all breeds both years of his visit, then went

Prefer. These are two dogs I still believe to be among

on to win toy group at Westminster both years as well.

our greats. In 1989 He showed to BIS all breeds, then reserve BIS in Crufts, only our third champion, but a good start! About that time, I also brought home a third ‘import’ a daughter of Toydom Trump Card, Marbyrn Solo Girl of Yakee, another Cassidy descendent. These dogs were our starting point. We then bred among these dogs and allowed our males to go out to stud if there was a bitch from whom we wished to keep a puppy. We must have done something right, because we were averaging a champion each year including group, BIS, and a Crufts RBIS win!

What both dogs possessed was showmanship. They were excellent dogs, but they had that extra ‘look at me’ quality. Danny had such a beautiful bright russet color, and he never stopped showing--just attach lead, and off he went, he did it all on his own. We could not have been more pleased with what Breathless had achieved, then he came back home with Hiram, he walked out of his traveling crate and won CC at Crufts straight away. Danny sired Yakee If Only and the top professional handler David Fitzpatrick, who had established a name for himself in the Pekingese breed,

Then we get to the halcyon moment, from Winifred

handled him in USA. In his first year he arrived at

Mee’s Tenling Golden Arrow of Pekehuis we obtained A

second top dog all breeds and then in his second year,

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2005, he stepped up to first place in the ranking. He then conquered the toy group at Westminster with 129 BIS to his credit. These are accolades we are proud of; they show us that our breeding is appreciated outside of the UK as well as at home. At this point we averaged two new champion Yakees each year, as well as many other top honors.

the back feet, the dog is overcoated. Overall, I would say that the breed has improved in the years I have been active with Pekingese. Showmanship is much more important than it was in yesteryear. The eyes and everything else are all improving. Registration numbers are a bit down recently in this breed, but we have quality. One of my favorite memories was

When evaluating a Pekingese, the head is an important

the Centenary show, all the Pekes were there, it was

focal point, with the features well-spaced, eyes not

judged by Pam Edmond, a legend in her day and so was

obstructed by the wrinkle, (I think we are getting

Bill Taylor. BIS under them was indeed a great honor

deeper sockets now, the eyes of the Peke are much

for us, especially with a bitch, Yakee Forget Me Not

improved since I began in the breed) and I like to

(sire Ch. Pekehuis Pure Gold of Tenling and dam, Yakee

see the ridge of the nose, not have it buried in coat

Charlotte). The Silver Collar won by Breathless was

under the wrinkle. The general proportions need

another great moment. We have slowed the pace only

to be sufficiently high that the dog moves well and

slightly, in part due to the big move from Glasgow and

rectangular in outline. The front legs must have the

simply due to the desire to stop and smell the flowers

elbows well in tightly and feel straight going down

a little more often. There is a lot of heartache involved

the outer side, but they have a slight bow along the

in breeding, some of the dogs have taken with them

inner face, the feet point out just a little, without that

a large piece of me. But we love the excitement of

they will not roll properly on the move. On closer

showing and the friends we meet when we are out. I’m

examination you will note that a good Peke is heavy

looking forward to judging again at Crufts next year,

in relation to the size (sometimes we see a larger size

always thrilling. Dogs have given me so much.

nowadays, perhaps too large). I always open the mouth and have a quick look; you’d be surprised what good dentition can be found in this breed. You know right away when something is wrong with the bite because the tongue peeps out, very bad fault. The coat texture must be harsh on the body and have natural lift. If you press the coat down with your hand, it should bounce right back up again, no spray needed. It is smooth over the head then increasing to a good mane but then shorter on the body. If you move the dog around the ring, he is not overcoated if you can easily discern the back feet in profile. This is my opinion, if you can’t see

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EDWARDBoyes by Mary Marshall

Retired handler Edward Boyes has enjoyed an exemplary career as a professional in the competitive sport of dog showing for over sixty years. He has compiled numerous best in show wins and multiple group victories at specialties and the world’s most prestigious dog shows during his prolonged career.

One of the standouts that Boyes handled was the Lakeland Terrier bitch Ch. Cozys Mischief Maker who won the Terrier Group at the Westminster Kennel Club Show in 1979-80. Boyes also handled the personable Smooth Fox

Terrier GCH Slyfox Sneaks a Peek, nicknamed Adam, to a coveted win in the Terrier Group at Westminster in 2013.

Throughout the “only job he has ever held” Boyes and his wife Lesley traveled throughout the country with family in tow showing the best dogs in the sport. Boyes has an eye for conformation, presence, and breed quality. On

many occasions if he saw a dog that he liked, he would buy it for a client, add it to the show string, and finish that

dog at the top of the sport when others failed to see the star quality. As Boyes said, “he was a natural” and blessed with the ability, eye, finesse, and know-how to get the job done right.

Boyes tried his hand at judging but felt that ultimately it was not his calling for one very succinct reason.

“I couldn’t give everybody the win,” he said. “When you are in the ring judging a group of dogs you want to give them all the prize. They are all deserving.” In addition to handling, Boyes has also bred terriers for over 50 years. He currently breeds Smooth Fox Terriers under the Tregoad kennel prefix with partner and kennel manager Jenna Orvos. In addition to showing and breeding Boyes also runs The Kennels, a boarding and grooming facility near Grass Valley, California, that he has operated for nearly 30 years along with the help of a great group of “dog people” who kept the business running smoothly when he was on the road. Many successful handlers have worked with Boyes as an apprentice throughout the years and have mirrored his technique with their own success in the sport. “I enjoy sharing my knowledge,” said Boyes. “It is something you have to love and requires dedication and a true love of dogs and the sport to get it done right.”

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L I VI NG L EGEND · EDWARD BOYES

What breeds did you handle as a junior handler, and which dog stands out as a favorite? I did not show in juniors. Keep in mind that I am 82 years old. One of my favorites to show was the Wire Haired Fox Terrier Fallstaff Ladyfaire. She was my favorite at the time. Who were your early mentors in the world of showing dogs and how did they influence what you do today? Ben Brown, Jimmy Butler, and Anne Stephenson. I really taught myself and I ran on my ego, but was fortunate enough to have Ben and Jimmy to tell me I can go out on my own. You must understand that. I was a natural, it was what I was born to do. I have never held another job than handling dogs, and if you love it (the job) then it really isn’t work. Although I can tell you that there are other ways to make a lot more money than showing dogs. But if you do what you are meant to do in life it rarely seems like work. You have had a legendary career as a show handler with an amazing resume of BIS wins, which victory stands out as your most memorable win. Jamboree Jubilee, known as Judy, winning Best in Tell our readers about your early beginnings in the world of showing pedigreed dogs. How did you get started? My mum bred and showed Airedales, and I began working for Ben Brown when I was 17, and only being paid $50 a month. I was a natural and it was great fun, so the small amount of money at the time didn’t mean

Show at Montgomery County in 1982 from the classes. I guess winning the groups at the Westminster Kennel Club show were good wins too with Ch. Slyfox Sneaks A Peek in 2011 and 2013. You have handled some of the most famous terriers in the sport, who are your favorite dogs that you have handled and why?

very much. I was doing what I loved to do, and that

Molly, Ch. Raybills Limoges Crystal (Smooth Fox

made all the difference.

Terrier), she was something else. Of course, Misty,

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Ch. Cozees Mischief Maker, the Lakeland Terrier bitch, she was in a whole different league. Adam, Ch. Slyfox Sneaks a Peek (Smooth Fox Terrier), he was outstanding, such an athletic dog and gave his all every time. What was your favorite breed to show and why? I was fortunate to show some amazing Lakeland Terriers, but would have to say that the Wirehaired Fox Terrier is probably my favorite. The have a ton of presence, and don’t respond as much to the bait as to the other dogs in the ring. The good ones don’t need a handler; they stack themselves and own the ring from the moment that they walk into it. That is the thing with a terrier; they focus less on the bait and more on the other dogs. Other breeds would be the Irish Setter, Standard Poodle, Doberman, and every other member of the terrier group. What is one of the funniest things that ever happened to you at a dog show? When a young Bill McFadden was working for Les and I and he had to pull me off Woody (Wornall). Back in the day the dog shows could get a little rowdy. When egos clashed you never know what might happen. It might not have been funny at the time but looking back on it is humorous. What is your favorite dog show and why? The Santa Barbara Kennel Club show. It is a very classy show and well put together. It is right up there with Montgomery weekend and the Garden but east coast people don’t support west coast shows like we do for them. It is a show worth attending, and is held in the picturesque backdrop of Santa Barbara, California.

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SPECIALQuotes Having worked for Eddie and Lesley for 13 years, almost the entirety of my adult life, there is so much I have learned and so much I could share. I am forever indebted to Ed and Les, and am eternally grateful for the knowledge and opportunities they’ve granted me. For those who don’t know Eddie, he may come off a bit abrasive or harsh at times, but he has a heart of gold and he truly is one of the best terrier men you will ever know. It has been an honor working for the Boyes and I hope to make them proud by carrying on the legacy that is Tregoad. -- Jenna Orvos

I’ve known Eddie for 44 years. I was raised in Washington State and Eddie would frequently fly up for shows and always win the terrier group. I had a nice Cairn dog that would often go second. I can remember calling the airlines and canceling his reservation once. He still came and I still went second. I eventually went to work for Eddie and Leslie in Malibu. I spent two years and learned a lot, although Eddie had a carefully curated persona as being tough and “Crazy Eddie”. He really has a heart of gold and is a bit of a softie. Eddie has been a constant in my life as a friend, big brother, uncle, and celebrating my success and challenging me to do better. He and Leslie and their boys C.R, Derek, and Brian are family. As a dog man I don’t think there is anyone better. He is the best Kerry trimmer I’ve ever seen! The expression he would put in Lakelands and wires was amazing and always unique to each dog. I feel so lucky and grateful to have been in his circle and so happy he did this interview -- Bill McFadden

I got my first smooth from Eddie and Lesley Boyes and Jim Smith 13 years ago little did I know it would be the first of many! He’s taught me so much about the breed and when learning to trim the smooths he would always say “It’s just hair! It’s gonna grown back!” He’s always been there to encourage me, even if sometimes he expresses it in his own unique ways. He is definitely one of the greatest terrier men there is and I’m forever grateful for everything I’ve learned from him and I’m glad to be apart of the Tregoad family. --EBaylee Lewis

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Beautiful dogs, beautiful people, a stunning setting by the ocean. It doesn’t get any better than that. How do you prepare for a dog show? I make sure the people working for me are on it. Organization is a main concept to successfully get ready for a show. As a career all-breed handler what, if anything, would you change about showing dogs? Make it so more owner-handlers win, which sounds crooked, but you’ve got to spread wins around or there will be no one to compete against. Many ownerhandlers have dogs that are just as good or better than the dogs that the recognized handlers are showing. Some judges will give the win to a professional with a recognized face and name, and the dog who isn’t as good may win over the owner-handled dog who is the better of the two. We need more owner-handlers recognized for the quality dogs that they own, show and breed. If it doesn’t change, there won’t be anyone to attend these shows. I have seen many ownerhandlers who are just as good, if not better, than the professionals because they know their dog and it matters to them if they get the point. Ultimately it is still a face and recognition game and it is hurting the sport. What advice would you give an owner-handler-breeder? Get out there and show your good dogs. Eventually it will pay off and you will be glad you did. Learning the ropes takes time, and even with the best dog you are not going to win all the time. You must be smart, have perseverance, and dedication to your breed and be willing to sacrifice the time, effort, energy, and

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inconvenience of traveling to shows with your dog

How has the pandemic affected the world of dog

after working all week long.

showing? Do you think it will resume with the same

What advice would you give young aspiring handlers just starting out in the world of showing dogs? Get the best dog you can get and find a good breeder and a handler who will mentor you. Stay at the show after your class is finished and watch all through breeds, groups and best in show. Learn from the best and soak up all the knowledge and experience you can. Do you have a favorite breed or group you specifically

enthusiasm? It put a stop to them for a minute but now they’ll be back and bigger than ever. I would just really like to see more participation from owner-handlers. It is more important than ever to have them involved to keep the sport and the continuation of breeding purebred dogs moving forward. Now that you are retired what are your current

like to show or prepare for shows? All hard coated terriers and Brussels Griffons. Preparing them for show is an art form. What advice can you give to mentally connect with a dog in the show ring for the best performance? Have that dog’s attention before ever stepping foot in the ring and just let them be. I see handlers making too much of a fuss over a dog in the ring when they should just leave it alone. A good conformationally correct dog will appear at its best if it stacks itself as he naturally stands. Posing it this way and that way is not going to change its conformation, and a good judge can pick up on an illusion that a handler may be trying to create by positioning a dog a certain way. If a dog has great conformation he will naturally stand and show himself off to his best advantage with very little extra positioning. Just let him be. How much time does it take to prepare a puppy or young dog for shows? None. We don’t even leash break them. Let them go in and have a great time and think it’s all their idea.

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difference in European dog shows? No and no. It is a business here in the states, and it is a hobby/sport over there. An amateur can win at big shows over there easily, not saying it can’t happen here but it’s not likely. It is a much more casual affair at most shows, and they seldom use professional handlers. Owner-handlers show their own dogs and accomplish a lot with them. When you have some free time, what else do you like to do? Work on my wax figurines that eventually go to bronze. pursuits? I breed smooth Fox Terriers with Jenna (Orvos) who has worked for me for 13 years and spend a lot of time with my grandkids. I live in a beautiful country home in northern California surrounded by nature and dogs. How do dog shows influence your life? Were there a lot of sacrifices you had to make over the years? Dog shows were my life. You don’t have to make sacrifices if it’s what you love to do.

Were there any special dogs for you along the way with whom you had a special bond and connection? Molly, Judy, Misty, and Adam. They were all unique in their own way, I don’t know how to explain it. They just had their own personal qualities that made them in exceptional in addition to their breed conformation. What are the most important personal qualities to have that helps to make a handler successful? You must have a big ego, want the win, and love dogs.

Have you ever considered becoming a breeder? What

It is a nomadic life, so you must enjoy traveling to new

breed would you choose for yourself?

places, and have an understanding family who either

Lesley and I started breeding smooths in the 1980s and in the 1990s went into partnership with Jim Smith of

travels with you or has the patience to handle the lifestyle. It isn’t for everyone.

Absolutely Smooth Fox Terriers. We co-bred some

For those who are interested in showing their dogs what

nice dogs and were very successful up until his death

advice would you give?

in 2018. Since then, Jenna and I have bred smooths under the Tregoad kennel prefix. Have you handled at any shows outside of the USA? If not do you wish to visit some of them? What is the main

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M E E T T H E BR E E D AU S T R A L I A N S H E PH E R D

WITH

JUDY Harrington Please tell our readers how you got involved with the world of pedigreed dogs, the Australian Shepherd, and dog shows. Many years ago, I purchased a show quality Great Dane puppy from a breeder that my longtime friend, Virginia Perry Gardiner, had purchased a puppy from. We both

JUSTAMERE

enjoyed showing them and bred our first

AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD

time. Virginia went on to become the very

litters in that breed around the same talented artist who was known world-wide for her jewelry creations and sculptures. I continued with my passion of breeding and showing Great Danes. My kennel name was Justamere and it was a time when Dane entries were quite large and there was much depth in the breed. Many of

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M EET T HE B REED · AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD

the top breeders were in the northeast and had very

is also an airport and the family history is one with a

recognizable linebred Great Danes.

background in aviation so that is where the Propwash

I always owner-handled my dogs to some wonderful

name came from.

successes and championships and that did eventually

Other than Great Danes and Australian Shepherds I

lead to a career in all breed handling as a professional. It

have also owned a Briard that was the first American

was at that time when I was visiting a client’s friend that

bred Briard to finish in France, a Whippet that I truly

I was introduced to the Propwash Australian Shepherds

adored and an Afghan.

and truly felt they were beautiful visually and had a level of loyalty and smarts that I loved. I did show at a few ASCA shows and eventually at AKC shows once

Where did you get your foundation Australian Shepherd and what breeders do you work with today?

the breed was recognized in 1993 for Leslie Frank, the

All the Australian Shepherds I have co-owned and

founder of Propwash Australian Shepherds. The farm

co-bred with Leslie Frank are all from her Propwash

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foundation. There are a few very special breeders that

How have Australian Shepherds changed since you first

we have worked with in a small circle of friends.

started showing and breeding? This can be in quality and

Who was your mentor in the breed when you started out and do you still have mentors today? I think it would be fair to say that we all have mentors when we care deeply about a breed and want to continue to learn in depth about pedigrees and dogs from the past that we may not have seen as well as share opinions and conversations with those we respect for their depth and knowledge in the breed. That is and should be a lifelong experience.

or presentation. I honestly can say that percentage wise I believe there was more depth of quality when Aussies came into AKC. That said there are good breeders that consistently produce proper representatives of what this breed is all about and should be. I believe the presentation regarding grooming can often be out of control and if you are judging the breed you better be getting your hands on the structure and confirming what you are about to see. Coats are blown out straight so that a coat

Are you currently mentoring anyone in the breed, and

with wave is sometimes not judged as glamorous if left

if not do you have time to mentor a new person that is

natural and hair can lift over the back and loin on the

passionate about the Australian Shepherd?

move making a solid topline appear incorrect. Confirm

I have been asked by judges that plan to apply to judge the breed to mentor them and greatly respect the ones who follow up with calls after they have judged to have conversations. It means they care about their selections and do want to get it right. I personally find that my calls to my mentors in other breeds that I

with your hands. A shorter and equally correct coat will not appear as glamorous as a flowing, longer correct coat. It should not be about the glamour factor that can lull judges into decisions that aren’t the strength of what this breed should be as far as being athletic and sound.

am applying for are usually most valuable after I have

Who is your personal most successful dog in the show

had an actual assignment with questions that can only

ring, litter box or at stud?

come up after the experience of a comparison that might be very easy for a longtime breeder but not for a person that might have just started judging the breed. It is always rewarding to find the new person that is passionate about the breed and truly wants to be properly involved in the breed and the exhibiting

It would be BIS, BISS, GCh. Propwash Twelve O’clock High. He was the consummate showman with many bests in shows in the United States and Italy when he was with Richard Helman. I will always miss his presence in my home.

process. You can tell a great deal about the sincerity

What is your proudest achievement in the world of

of someone new in the sport by the way they present

Australian Shepherd’s?

themselves and their dogs and especially how their dogs are cared for. That will always make a big difference to me.

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Sharing my life with some very special ones! I would say that GCh. Propwash Reckon winning best in show


M EET T HE B REED · AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD

at the AKC Eukanuba National Show in 2010 and then

Please name three Australian Shepherd’s that you wished

following it up with winning the Eukanuba World

you owned or bred. These can be any dogs in any point

Challenge the following year would be it. Ch. Propwash

of history.

Indicate Precisely was number one all systems and best of breed at the national specialty so that was also very special.

Again, this is a difficult question to answer since I came into aussies after they were quite well established at a time when there were many exhibiting in ASCA and at

What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in

a point in history that if I had been involved, I would

the world and why?

probably be giving you names since there was much

This cannot have just one answer! Westminster Kennel Club and the amazing entry of the cream of the crop;

quality. I’m certain many of the longtime breeders would agree on dogs of the past.

The national specialty because it is where we can see

Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows?

what is taking place in the breeding programs of others

Please give reasons for your preference.

and hopefully find something we would like to breed to; Morris and Essex because of the retro dog show atmosphere.

No preference and this breed has very few specialties compared to many other breeds.

The Australian

Shepherd clubs that would like to have specialties

Do you judge? Who is the greatest Australian Shepherd

have a process that is required by AKC to complete for

you have ever had the pleasure of judging or have seen?

independent specialties and I am not certain that many

Yes, I do judge. All sporting and working breeds, a few hounds, toys, and herding. Although approved for aussies I don’t accept assignments at all breed shows since I am currently very involved in breeding and exhibiting myself. Since I haven’t judged aussies so haven’t had my handson ones that have caught my attention, I can only say

have started or completed that process. We have many all-breed shows, and it is once again becoming a fun and social event after what seems like a forever COVID-19 lockdown. The purpose of dog showing was to evaluate and “show off” breeding stock, do you think for some breeders/ owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings?

that there are a few I have admired from ringside but

Since rankings are posted everywhere and once a dog

without having judged them myself I will refrain from

has finished its championship it becomes clear (usually)

names here.

that the show is over, and the dog disappears to live a

Which Australian Shepherd breeder do you respect most, anywhere in the world?

good life at home. As a breeder, if you don’t know that dog exists and could be a good possibility to add to your breeding program, out of sight, out of mind, out of your

Too many to list because there are some internationally

breeding program. And the breed may not benefit from

and several in the US.

future possible combinations.

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There is no denying that the presentation of dogs across

Shepherd, so I have no plans to breed Miniature

North America is high, do you feel that sometimes the

American Shepherds. I do think that the breed has

grooming is taken too far?

improved in consistency of type.

I feel that the grooming is often out of control and find

What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of

that it is making it easier for exhibitors who truly know

pedigree dogs?

the breed to quickly learn who can judge the breed well by there selections and who they can fool with grooming.

I am currently working on adding herding breeds to the breeds I judge. I have some young dogs that I would like to put obedience titles on and exhibit

What are your feelings on the Miniature American

when ready. One already has nearly half of his points

Shepherd? Do you own or breed them, and would you

towards his championship. I also continue to enjoy

ever wish to?

judging and have assignments that I am looking

I will be applying to judge them soon, adding to the herding breeds that I judge. My focus is the Australian

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forward to although I accept very few assignments in the northeast where I live and exhibit.


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WITH

MARGE Stovall Please tell our readers how you got involved with the world of pedigreed dogs, the Australian Shepherd, and dog shows. My world of Australian Shepherds began at the age of four when my parents bought me an unregistered companion puppy from a

SILVERWOOD AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD

vegetable farm in Fife, Washington. He was my best friend for years! Where did you get your foundation Australian Shepherd and what breeders do you work with today? A: In the mid 1970’s I purchased a blue merle female that was stock dog registered. She later produced my first litter of puppies. She came from the older dogs in Barbara

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Nielsen Hager’s Blue Isle lines. In 1982 I went to visit Barb and ended up purchasing my first show quality female ASCA (Australian Shepherd Club of America) Ch. Blue Isle Sassy Made A Rainbo CD. Button opened the door to dog showing and breeding for me. She later became my foundation bitch and produced my first bred by champion. She was named ASCA Ch. Blue Isle’s Lace Me In Silver, with a call name of Asti. At this point a kennel name was needed so Silverwood was born. Silver came from Asti’s registered name and wood for the beautiful trees that surrounded my home. I have lived with aussies for 65 years, and have bred, raised, handled, and shown them for four decades. Fortunately, my dreams continue to come true thanks to some great co-owners, handlers, and cobreeders. I have been so blessed to have achieved so much especially working with the small numbers of Australian Shepherds I have produced. I have chosen not to breed dogs just to sell puppies, but rather breed dogs to continue with my needs for the next generation. I have found great satisfaction in co-breeding great aussies. I enjoy breeding, whelping, and raising the babies then turning them over to others for training and handling. Not being able to physically show my

Adrianne Tullier of Emerald Isle Australian Shepherds, as we began co-breeding and showing together. The youngsters are now yearlings and are just beginning to flourish. It is an exciting time! Are you currently mentoring anyone in the breed, and if not do you have time to mentor a new person that is passionate about the Australian Shepherd?

own dogs anymore has been very challenging. It took

As far as mentoring in this breed, I find it to be a great

me several years of sitting home to get used to waiting

challenge. Most of the younger people feel they either

for text messages or calls.

know it all or know enough, which makes mentoring

Two decades has been spent dreaming, planning, and cobreeding with A.J. Tavares and Matt Mullin of Limelite

very defeating. I am always open to learn something new and continue to do so.

Kennel. The dreams and goals were and are being blown

What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in

off the charts as the individual dogs continue to surpass

the world and why?

the initial dreams set. I added another chapter in 2020 by adding Kip, Vicki, and

AAttending national specialties are my favorite choice of shows and boasts of great wins. I enjoy supporting

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purpose of this breed. Breed to the words of the standard, and do not waiver. Breed away from the weaknesses and build stronger, athletic individuals. Dogs that can work in the field without tiring. Dogs that float on a loose lead, dropping their head and moving forward with grace, balance, and beauty. Trim and groom so that they look natural. Do not sculpt and cut every hair on the dog making them look like something they aren’t. Those who are out there wanting to change the standard, or wanting to convince individuals, whether judges or breeders, that we don’t need to watch down and backs, and we should not be grooming this breed, or that fast side movement with overdrive is okay, and strong top lines don’t matter are leading individuals down the wrong path, and not working for the betterment of this breed. ASCA, AKC all breed and USASA (United States Australian

Stay true to yourself and to your dogs. Do not bend to

Shepherd Association) specialties. All are great venues

what someone else is doing. Be a proud breeder and

to show or present your kennel.

never forget the foundation of this breed.

Who is the greatest Australian Shepherd you have ever

Surround yourself with people that have the same

had the pleasure of judging or seeing?

passion in their heart for this breed. The same beliefs

I have judged Australian Shepherds since May of 1993 as

and love, and you too can succeed.

an ASCA provisional, breeder and senior breeder judge.

What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of

I have been fortunate to have traveled as far away as

pedigreed dogs?

Germany and across the United States doing so. It has been a great adventure and is a major eye opener to the variations within this breed. There is no denying that the presentation of dogs across North America is high, do you feel that sometimes the grooming is taken too far?

Every owner, handler and breeder sets their own goals and dreams as it should be. I choose to obtain my dreams and goals by having my dogs chosen for their wins on their individual merit. I refuse to play political games for a win or ribbon, for in the end I get to take my dog home! I love them all,

As a breeder of four decades, I encourage the old and

win or lose. I see no gratification in buying wins in any

the new to read the standard while remembering the

venture of life.

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WITH

AJ Tavares

&MATT Mullin Please tell our readers how you got involved in the world of pedigreed dogs, the Australian Shepherd and dog shows.

LIMELITE AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD

I was fortunate enough to be born and raised on a small farm in Hawaii. Growing up I had every type of animal there was. Surrounding myself with and raising animals was my passion early on in life. My family and I did rodeo events for most of my life and into my late teens. Being around horse shows and rodeos, I always saw Australian Shepherds at these events and promised myself I would

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MEET T HE B REED · AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD

one day own one. At that time, the world-wide web was my ticket to in-depth research about the breed. Being quite isolated in Hawaii I was able to contact a breeder that relocated from the mainland to Hawaii. Her name was Kerry Kirtley of Windstar Australian Shepherds. She let me have my first Australian Shepherd and introduced me to all the events I could do with her. From there, the rest is history! Fast forward a couple of years, I decided that this was indeed my passion and one to which I would dedicate my life and decided a kennel name was in order. After sleepless nights and long days of letting my mind wander, I came up with ‘limelight’ and knew every bit of its meaning was what I wanted to represent myself and dogs. I decided to make the word a little more unique, so I changed the spelling to what we now go by—Limelite. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi was one I have truly always loved, even early on when deciding on my initial breed. But I decided to become established in aussies before taking on a secondary breed. Five years after my time in aussies I did my in-depth research into the breed and decided to take the plunge. My first Corgi came from the

endeavor into his much-desired love for Affenpinschers. We are now fortunate enough to have success in that breed with a best in show, reserve best in show and winner’s dog at the national specialty. Those Affens now carry our kennel prefix of Limelite as well.

late Diane Dickinson of Dwynella Corgis in New Zealand.

Where did you get your foundation Australian Shepherd

He would later become to be know as MBIS BISS Ch.

and what breeders (if any) do you work with today?

Dwynella Royale Footman—Regis. He and I were able to garner four all-breed best in show titles where he was ranked the #1 Pembroke dog the year, we campaigned him. I was able to breed multiple champions in the breed including our current mascot of Limelite, GCHB Limelite’s Myriad. My time in Corgis was one of the greatest rewards and has introduced me to so many wonderful friendships along the way. In 2012 my partner Matt Mullin decided to take a new

This is a tough question as I am not sure credit goes to any one breeder. I was fortunate enough to work with various breeders across the country to get me to where I am today. I am proud to say that my relationships with them still last to this day and I am fortunate to call them great friends who have become family. I truly feel we all still have things to learn, so being able to work with these breeders I admire, and respect is truly a gift and one for which I am incredibly thankful.

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Who was your mentor in the breed when you started out

do take the time will be the ambassadors and the future

and do you still have mentors today?

of our breed. It is still truly dumbfounding that I can be

As I mentioned above, Kerry Kirtley is truly who got me involved and started in the breed. She let me tag along to national specialties and, between school, I was able to visit her and attend dog shows in California during the summer. Again, as I was living full-time in Hawaii, it was truly an experience that I will never forget. Being able to see all the dogs and meet the breeders I only stalked on the internet was truly the biggest learning experience possible. I took every ounce of what I saw, heard, and was taught, and soaked it all in like a sponge.

considered an individual by whom another will want to be mentored, but it is truly a humbling honor to be able to do so. I would like to say I have played a success in mentoring our dear friend Ashley McClure. Individuals such as her truly makes it a rewarding experience. She was gracious enough to have her kennel name named after a part of our own kennel. Ashley has now proven herself a great asset to our breed and now goes by the kennel prefix of Sublime. Another individual that we work with very closely and has such a brilliant future in our breed is Savannah Perry. She is currently our

Are you currently mentoring anyone in the breed, and

full-time assistant and truly has a bright and caring

if not do you have time to mentor a new person that is

future in our breed. It is such a rewarding experience

passionate about the Australian Shepherd?

when you can see people grow in the breed, they are

I am always willing and able to answer any questions that anyone may have. One of the biggest issues I feel

passionate about, garnering knowledge in the pursuit of the preservation of our breed.

with the newer enthusiast today is that there are ‘instant

How have Australian Shepherds changed since you first

experts’ in the breed and not everyone is willing to

started showing/breeding? This can be in quality and or

learn what they think they already know. But those that

presentation.

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MEET T HE B REED · AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD

It is commonplace in each breed for breeders to bemoan

1st. He was also the #1 Australian Shepherd all-systems

how there are very few quality stud dogs from which

in 2018.

to choose. I know I am guilty of this myself! It is always implied that there was so much more to choose from years or even decades prior, while the quality always

What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why?

remains in bitches. However, I truly feel that our breed

Hands down our national specialty! It is always my

has advanced in many ways for the better. No longer

most favorite week of the year, where we get to see old

are there very few high-quality stud dogs, rather a

friends, make new ones, and showcase to the fancy our

wider pool from which to choose. I feel like this is a

breeding program.

very debatable question especially for those longtime breeders, but in my opinion, I wholeheartedly feel that our breed has indeed advanced and is in a good place. What is your proudest achievement in the world of Australian Shepherd’s?

Do you judge? Who is the greatest Australian Shepherd you have ever had the pleasure of judging / or see? I am an ASCA breeder-judge. I recently had the honor of judging the Breeders’ Futurity at our 2021 national specialty. It was a wonderful assignment with many

I would say that hands-down my proudest achievement

quality dogs. While she was towards the beginning of

is winning the national specialty. It was more satisfying

my time in dogs, the most memorable aussie I have ever

knowing that it was with a dog I bred, owned, and

seen was the beautiful Ch. Bayshore Russian Roulette,

handled. Remarkably close seconds include going

Judy.

winners at our national specialties from bred-by, Westminster Kennel Club best of breed, and Royal Canin best of breed and bred-by herding group 1st. Who is your personal most successful dog?

Which Australian Shepherd breeder do you respect most, anywhere in the world? There are many that I greatly respect either from afar or still work directly with today, most of whom have

That would be our current special Cha Cha — MBIS

molded me into the breeder I am today in one way or

GCHS Limelite’s Cha Cha Cha. She and I hold the record

another; They would include Marge Stovall, Heather

as the top winning breeder-owner-handled Australian

Braddock, Betsy Atkinson, Yvette LeBlanc, Heather

Shepherd in the history of the breed. She currently has

Moyer, and Linda Wilson.

thirteen all-breed best in shows. She was winners bitch at our national specialty from bred-by, Royal Canin best of breed and bred-by herding group 2nd. Our second most successful would be her father Tango —MBISS MBIS

Please name three Australian Shepherd’s that you wished you owned/bred. These can be any dogs in any point of history.

GCHP Silverwood’s Kiss of Fire at Limelite. He won our

There is one dog that has been the most influential in

national specialty in 2019, best of breed at Westminster,

our pedigrees and successes, the incomparable BISS

Royal Canin best of breed and bred-by herding group

GCH CopperRidge Fire N Bayouland, Rowan. The second

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dog would have to be MBIS MBISS GCHP Harmony

an opinion, but I do not breed or own them, nor is that

Hills Money Talks, and lastly, MBIS BISS Ch. Bayshore

in my plans.

Russian Roulette. Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows? Please give reasons for your preference.

What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of pedigreed dogs? To see our breeding program improve in each generation

I would say our national always takes precedence.

and to stay true to my vision of how I interpret the

Specialties would be a close second, but our breed does

breed standard.

not have as many as others. There is no denying that the presentation of dogs across North America is high, do you feel that sometimes the grooming is taken too far? Sometimes. But for the most part in our breed, I would say no. Dogs at a show are meant to be show dogs, therefore they should look the part. My motto is that a beauty queen cannot win Miss America without a little glitz and glam! With that said, I feel you should present your dog to the fancy to your best ability and in your dog’s best light. The purpose of dog showing was (and should still be) to evaluate and show off breeding stock, do you think for some breeders/owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings? I feel that for some it is. But at the same time, those that have been successful and those whose successes are yet to come truly know the difference and persevere. This shows the difference between those who claim that this is their breed and those who truly breed the breed. What are your feelings on the Miniature American Shepherd? Do you own/breed them, and would you ever wish to? They are a breed of their own, so I do not have much of

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RINGSIDE CLICK

GRAYSLAKE Illinois

June 19th-20th, 2021

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The wonderful world of

Allison

Believing that you should always do what you love, Allison Foley became a professional handler in 1987. She has been presenting Canada’s (and the world’s) top dogs ever since. With more than 550 All-Breed Best in Shows, she was proud to have been highly awarded at such prestigious shows as Crufts, the World Dog Show, Westminster Kennel Club, and the AKC Invitational. She has also had top dog all breeds in Canada on three separate occasions. All three dogs are still record holders. In addition to her wins as an all-breed handler, Allison has spent more than thirty years perfecting the art of presenting one of the dog world’s most difficult breeds to master--the Poodle. Today, she is internationally recognized as one of the world’s most talented and experienced Poodle handlers. Allison has presented seminars on grooming Poodles all over the world. She is also the creative educational advisor and specialist for Chris Christensen Systems. Allison has proven that hard work, dedication, and passion can take you everywhere in this wonderful sport. In 2017, she launched Leading Edge Dog Show Academy, the world’s first online dog show training school. Her mission is to help mentor a new generation of dog show enthusiasts through innovative video-based grooming and handling lessons. LEDSA has won the award for best online education each year since it’s inception. Allison looks forward to working with enthusiastic students as they perfect their skills on the way to the winner’s circle.


The show must go on! Westminster Kennel Club 2021 by Allison Alexander

The iconic Westminster Kennel Club dog show is America’s second longest continuously running sporting event next to the prestigious Kentucky Derby. The Westminster Kennel Club dog show is scheduled in mid-winter during the chill of February in New York City with the judging of the breeds happening at Piers 92-93. The group judging and best in show takes place at the historic Madison Square Garden. In the fall of 2020, it seemed that the pandemic would not be over and indoor events would not be possible in February. If Westminster were to continue without a break in the tradition, they would have to adapt. History was about to change. The Westchester County Kennel Club held its dog show at the very historic Lyndhurst Estate. The grand Lyndhurst is a Gothic revival home in Tarrytown that sits on 67 acres which would make social distancing much easier than any location in New York City. If Westchester could make it work Westminster was going to add a page to their history book-the show must go on! The former temperature-controlled indoor competition would be at the mercy of mother nature and man and dog would have to adapt. Westminster in 2021 looked nothing like it had been before. The show was held in a field with eight outdoor rings covered with enormous tents. Large screen TVs were under the tents allowing viewing of many rings at once. Dogs were groomed beside personal vehicles in an adjacent field and most importantly for the first time in the 145-year history of Westminster the show was unbenched. Benched means that the dogs that are being shown are on display in specific

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T HE W O ND ERF UL WORLD OF ALLISON

areas. Visitors can look them up in a guide and visit

the most was the fact that there were no spectators

the breeds. Benching has always been an integral part

allowed for the groups and best in show. The New York

of Westminster, but due to the pandemic and the fact

City spectators are very dog savvy along with visiting

that it was an outdoor show they opted for the “show

dog enthusiasts from all over the world. While the lack

and go” option where you simply arrived closer to your

of spectators did make the groups a more intimate

ring time and you could leave once you were no longer

affair, the traditional roar of the crowd urging the dogs

required for judging.

on was decidedly absent. Dogs, being the wonderful

Other changes this year at Westminster included that you had to have a dog entered in the show if you were going to be admitted on the grounds. There were no spectators allowed. Exhibitors had to be either fully

creatures that they are, didn’t notice. All breeds still showed their hearts out and best in show was judged by the incomparable Pat Trotter. The show was just as special as the 144 that preceded it.

vaccinated or have had a Covid test within 72 hours

The Pekingese “Wasabi” handled by David Fitzpatrick

admittance. Westminster hired a company Reel Health

was chosen best in show. Reserve best in show was

that specialized in site control. Reel Health had an app

the Whippet “Bourbon” who perhaps had the dubious

that allowed users to upload the results of a negative

honor of being reserve best in show at Westminster two

COVID-19 test or vaccination card. Each morning the

years in a row. Wasabi got his name from a Canadian

user took an assessment on the app which would match

friend who was visiting David when Wasabi was young

your results with uploaded documents and give a green

and had yet to be named. The story goes that David

QR. Security would scan the code to allow participants

said, “I think this one has a lot of promise, what should

onto the grounds.

we name him?” The friend Kathy said, “Well, his

Once on the grounds you were given special armbands and if you had a green arm band that meant you were fully vaccinated you did not have to wear a mask. All others were required to wear a mask. The grounds were outfitted with billowing white tenting. All the tenting for the vendors, sponsors and the shows were gorgeous. There was a noted lack of international dog people at the show, but it did seem like a garden party. The weather was pleasant, although it did threaten to rain several times and a few raindrops did fall, but the dogs loved being outside and the atmosphere was refreshing. With all the changes this year, the one that stood out

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mother’s name is Sushi so obviously his name needs to be Wasabi”. Rewarded with top dog all breeds honors in the United States in 2020 and winning best in show at Westminster makes Wasabi a hot commodity in the show ring. In the end Pat Trotter came out to award best in show. Right before she presented the ribbon she said, “Not every pet can be a show dog, but I can assure you that every show dog is indeed a pet”. That comment rang true with the dog show community and the dog loving public at large because at the end of the day they are our beloved pets whether they win best in show at Westminster or win a blue ribbon-we love them all the same.


Online Handling, Training, and Grooming Classes for

A l l B re e d s & A l l S k i l l L e ve l s Let Allison Alexander and our other expert instructors be your guides to ultimate dog show success! Access our 100+ premium video courses through our

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I N T E RV I E W W I T H J U N IO R H A N D L E R

RYLEY Beckwith-Kirkland Ryley thank you for accepting our invitation and taking your time to do this interview with us. As a successful junior handler and handler, tell us a little bit about your introduction into the dog world? How and when did it all start for you? It started when I was very, very little. I don’t remember attending my first ever dog show. My mom is a professional handler and second-generation handler, so I was naturally brought into the sport. What was your opinion about dog shows early on? Did your opinion change along the way? I don’t actually remember the first one, but I do recall that I had the best time and went in with no cares in the world! I loved going to shows. Obviously, my opinion did change along the way considering the real side of the sport, but I still have a strong love for the dogs and the connection I get to have with them. Who was supporting you at the beginning of your journey? Who taught you the basics of handling, grooming, and taking care of dogs?


My mom has always been my biggest supporter because she was the one here for the whole ride. She also taught me all the things I know. What do you like the most and what do you dislike about dog shows? I love the sport itself and getting to bond and hold that connection with the dogs and just be able to figure them all out. I dislike the lack of sportsmanship which I think we all do. Unfortunately, some people are very selfish and downgrade others for their accomplishments. How did you start competing in junior handling? Do you remember your first competition? I do partially remember my first junior’s competition. I showed my Australian Terrier and we moved up that weekend winning every day. Which one do you consider your greatest win as a junior

Which breed is your favorite to show and which one to

handler and why is that one so special to you?

have at home?

I will never forget making it to finals at Royal Canin! I

My favorite breed to show is my Treeing Walker

will mainly never forget this because there was so much

Coonhound and my favorite house dogs are English

clapping and so many people supporting me. I had to

Setters that give the best cuddles.

work so hard for it as my dog was being bad. It felt very deserving and I think that’s why it was truly the best.

Does it helps a lot to have a dog at home and to practice and bond before competing? How would you feel taking

What was the funniest situation that happened to you as

the dog at a show and going immediately into the ring

a handler?

with him?

I have a huge goofball of a dog so there is never a dull

Yes it helps to build that bond and in juniors we should

moment. I don’t really have any of these except that my

be seeing the bond between the junior and their dog. It

hound Bullet is an absolute goofball and crazy puppy, so

shows that they have put the work in and practice. I’ve

we’ve had plenty of times where he has jumped six feet

gone in with plenty of dogs I’ve never shown before in

in the air after a perfect free stack. You’ll never see him

the breed but not in juniors.

not being goofy.

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What do enjoy the most about dogs; training, grooming

There is a lot of responsibility involved in taking care of

and preparing dogs for shows, or showing them?

other peoples’ dogs, is it stressful for you or you just do

I definitely enjoying showing the most but I also love taking care of them and training. Showing is the most rewarding because it is the conclusion of everything that you have worked for and you feel so good about how far they have come.

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everything in the best way you can and feel calm? Everything is done in the best way and I am totally calm. You must be. Did you get a chance to be a show assistant or would you like to become one and who would you like to work with?


I NT ERVI EW W ITH JUNIOR HANDLER

I am an assistant for my mom and step dad June Beckwith and Zack Helmer. I’ve also assisted Stacey Hayes and Tracy Szaras who are both motherly figures. I’ve also assisted Sarah and Ariel Cukier.

of? Being a junior has made me realize it’s not all about what you accomplish—it’s about how others see you. It has shaped my perspective to see that you’ll never

Would you like to continue with this job or you have

accomplish your goals unless you applaud others for

other plans in life?

accomplishing theirs. My advice is do not get lost in

I will partially stay in the sport for sure but not full

everything else and develop good sportsmanship.

time. I plan on going to college and pursuing my other

What, in your opinion, makes the difference between the

dreams.

junior handling winner and the reserve?

You have been competing at many large shows and what

This is a very hard question because every judge likes

could you tell us about those experiences?

different styles. It depends on how competitive the two

Competing at big shows gives you the best feeling because the atmosphere is so intriguing and overwhelming but it’s a good feeling. Would you also like to attend any larger shows outside of the USA such as WDS, EDS, Crufts etc.? I would absolutely love to attend Crufts as showing in Europe is so much different than in the United States. How has Covid-19 influenced your life and activities? We basically continued normally since it is my parents

are and it could be very close or an easy win. I’m not the judge so I can’t speak on that. Besides showing dogs what else do you like to do in your free time? Always something with my dogs; practicing or going on hikes or taking them swimming. Would you like to become a breeder one day? If so, which breed would you choose as your own? I am. My main breed is Treeing Walker Coonhounds.

jobs just wearing masks.

What do you consider your greatest success in this sport?

What are the most important things when showing dogs,

Ending 2020 as the number one junior in the country

and how should a junior handler or handler behave at the

and staying consistent with my rankings. I’ve stayed

show and at home?

number one hound and in the top four in the country

The most important thing when showing is to always be aware of everything and have great sportsmanship and

through all of 2021 and making it to finals at Royal Canin.

your dog in good condition. Do you have any suggestions for younger people just entering the dog show world? What should they be aware

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