Best in Show Magazine Europe • Summer 2021

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S TA R PA N G E A L E T I T S N O W

( C H A F T E R G L O W J O H N N Y H AT E S J A Z Z X C H O R I S H A Y E M AYA ) BREEDER: SANDRA MIRO GRAU / ES OWNER: ERIKA HEILMANN / DE H A N D L E D B Y: J O VA N A D A N I L O V I C


LuLa




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DOB 19.07.2019 Junior Champion of Slovakia, Croatia, Hungary Champion of Russia, Hungary, Slovenia Multi BIS Baby, Puppy, Junior, Group winner / placement HD - A/A , ED - 0/0 , Heart/ eyes -clear NHAT, CSAU Owned and handled by Voloshina Ekaterina & Thomas Wastiaux Freedom Field kennel

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Photo credit : Alexandra Morrison

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designed by Shadow Dog Design

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WE ARE

Best in Show Dear readers, it has been exactly one year since last Best in Show Magazine in Europe, but not only that - it has been a year of unknown, unexpected and unpredictable life, but yet it was a year of our lifes that hopefully thought us that little things matter. I can tell, that last year thought me was that living in the moment matter the most. Thinking about the future, doing plans seemed pointless because even in few hours things would change - cases would go up and not only borders would be closed but stores, gyms, salons, everything. Life would stop. The whole world would stop and we were on our own. No matter what you do in your life, do it with love and treat people around you with love and understanding, because you never know when will be the last time to see them. Do your best every day in doing what you love and be surrounded with people who make you a better person. Help and be loved. Stay safe.

JOVANA DANILOVIC Chief Editor

LEE GROGAN & CARLA IVANCIC Collaborators

BELTRAN ALONSO & BISCREATIVE.COM Art Department



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c o nt e nt INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSIONAL HANDLER

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JASON LYNN

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TOM MATHER 42 MEET THE BREED: SETTERS GORDON • ENGLISH • IRISH

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POLAND & RUSSIA 88 INTERVIEW WITH JUNIOR HANDLER

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JASON JASON Lynn Please tell our readers how you got involved in the world of pedigree dogs. I grew up in Kentucky, in a farming area, so I was always interested in animals but I got into the world of show dogs by accident. When I was 7 years old I saw the Westminster KC BIS on TV (won by the GSD ‘Manhattan’) and was mesmerised by the dogs, the handlers and the whole thing. From then I started to read every dog book and magazine I could find, made drawings of dogs and talked about dogs 24/7. I staged dog shows in my front yard with stuffed toys. My parents gave

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in and bought me a Rough Collie, Oscar, who I took to obedience classes, and later a Sheltie who I handled in Jr. Showmanship. What was the first show you attended and who was the first dog you handled, how did you do on the day? I don’t remember the first show I went to, maybe the Louisville KC, but I showed mostly in junior handling when I started out. The entry fees were reduced or free for junior showmanship classes, so that probably made my parents happy.


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Who were your mentors while learning the art of handling, and do you still have mentors to this day. I was lucky to have several good mentors in the sport who not only taught me about care and handling of dogs but also how to behave in a professional way. Dan Jones, Kyle Robinson, Michael Faulkner & David White had a big impact on my early years in dogs. As far as being a handler, my years working for Linda and Mike Pitts certainly made the biggest impression on me, in how to condition dogs and get the best out of them week after week. Being there ingrained a work ethic that has served me well to this day, even if I didn’t become a professional handler in the end. You are associated with presenting some of the most coat demanding breeds, do you have any particular favorite breeds you like conditioning and showing. My favourite is Standard Poodles, which came into my life after moving to England. They are the ultimate show dogs but their temperaments and how they carry themselves make them extra 32

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special. They are definitely high maintenance to keep in show condition, and you have to be committed to enjoying the whole process, but the highs in the ring make all of it worthwhile. What are some important points you feel people should focus on when conditioning a dog mentally for the ring. I think people can sometimes forget that a show dog needs to be a happy, well adjusted dog first and foremost. Grooming and hair and training should not come at the expense of exercise and experiencing a normal doggy life. I think some people micromanage their dogs to a degree that starts to have a negative impact on how the dogs behave and even move in the ring. As with most things, it’s all about balance. Please share with us some of the highlights of your handling career thus far. My first all breed BIS win handling the white Standard CH Afterglow The Big Tease (Donny) under the great British judge Derek Smith,


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considered a Poodle specialist here in the UK and one of our most respected judges, is a favourite memory. Mike normally showed Donny but he was judging abroad that weekend so I stood in. The career of CH Afterglow Maverick Sabre (Ricky) was beyond all of our expectations: Top Dog All Breeds, Eukanuba World Challenge BIS and ultimately Crufts BIS. Later I got to handle him for the last time at Westminster and he won BOV and 3rd in the group, showing his heart out. Three years after Ricky, the parti Cocker CH Afterglow Miami Ink surprised everybody in one of his first times out as a young champion by winning BIS at Crufts. Miami’s win made a unique record for the kennel of 2 BIS and 2 RBIS at Crufts in both of Afterglow’s main breeds. I’d also like to mention a very special opportunity I had a few years back to co-present a handling seminar in England with Frank Sabella. That whole experience and the time spent in Frank’s company was on a par with any win. I’m really grateful to have had that chance. What 3 dogs that you have handled, have been the most special. Ricky was the most wonderful dog to show. Not only a magnificent Poodle but he was the most steady and reliable dog in the ring. It was such a privilege to be his handler. Most recently the white Standard girl CH Afterglow Poppa Don’t Preach (Grace) was really fun to show and very dependable like Ricky, but in a glamorous, feminine white package. She won a BIS in the UK and at the Amsterdam Winner. Ricky’s sire CH Del Zarzoso Salvame from Afterglow (Dino) was a big black stallion, bred by the late Carlos Renau from Spain. Dino was always ‘’on’’ and never ran out of gas. I am happy that we were able to share his career with Carlos, as he was such a special and interesting man. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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Dino went to the USA and was shown to a great record by Amy Rutherford, and he retired as her housedog.

What breeder, of any breed, from any country would you like to handle dogs for, that you have not already handled for.

You can handle any 3 dogs in the history of pedigree dog showing (not handled by you previously.), what three dogs would you select?

Tom and Nioma Coen’s Macdega Shetland Sheepdogs, USA.

Three that come to me quickly are CH Redition Triple Play, the black & white parti Cocker….CH Smash JP Talk About, the white Toy Poodle from Japan….and at the last Westminster watching Afghans, the breed winner CH Agha Dhari’s Fifth Dimension of Sura looked so exciting that day. All 3 of these dogs gave me goosebumps when I saw them for the first time. Do you prefer to show at breed speciality, group speciality or all breed shows. Any show, any time, anywhere at this point. It’s been over a year! What is your favorite show to attend and why?, anywhere in the world. Favourite show to visit is Westminster...and probably my favourite to show dogs at is Crufts. Both because they bring together the best dogs and people from all over the world and they have a special atmosphere. The World Shows have a very similar vibe in that sense. You have handled dogs in many different countries, with huge success in each country. Where in the world is your favorite country to show dogs and why. Overall I really like showing in the UK because we have big breed entries for the most part and the shows are really well organised. I do appreciate how American shows try to accommodate the exhibitors in ways like easy access to bathing facilities and electricity, something I used to take for granted but now miss showing in England and Europe.

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Is there an award/accolade you have not yet won that is on your list of goals? For several years we’ve been breeding Shelties, blending together US/UK/EU lines, and I would really love to breed a dog that can be made up here in the UK. And maybe another that I can take back to the American national and make a good impression there too. We have a half English/ American bitch who won a CC before lockdown, so maybe that first goal is already in sight. Do you currently judge? Is a career in judging pedigree dogs something you wold like to concentrate on? I’ve judged a lot at open show level in the UK, which has led to judging CAC shows abroad, including some big Poodle specialties in Sweden and Norway. In January 2019 I had the great honor to judge parti-color Cockers at the American Spaniel Club as part of AKC’s program whereby non-licensed judges can be granted appointments at national specialties if voted in by the membership. Judging the Cocker national at this stage of my dog career was a dream come true and is something I am very grateful for. I really don’t have judging aspirations beyond my main breeds for the time being. I’d like to get formally passed for Cockers and Poodles and see where it goes after that. You have bred many beautiful dogs in the breeds you are associated with, is there a breed you have not yet owned/bred that you would like to? Wire Fox Terriers are a breed that always interests me...


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Imagine a life where Jason Lynn never discovered dog showing (thankfully for our sport, you did!), what would Jason’s life look like today.

is that the dogs come first. Their care and welfare is priority and then we deal with what comes next.

I honestly can’t imagine what it would look like because I have had such tunnel vision about dogs since I was a kid. The dog world opened up a lot of doors for me professionally but also personally. It has enriched my life and I am thankful for finding it.

It’s time to select a new puppy/adult to campaign! Unfortunately, you can’t make it to select the dog. Luckily, three of your friends can go to make the decision for you .What three friends will go in your place to select your next hopeful.

What advice would you give to anyone interested in handling professionally, no matter their age. I think people tend to look at being a ‘’handler’’ from the top/down, i.e actually being in the ring, instead of the bottom/up. Sure it’s those moments in the ring that spark the imagination, but the reality is that if you want to be successful in the long-term you have to commit to the craft and daily grind of a life in dogs. The one thing that all of my mentors growing up instilled in me

I’ll choose a Handler, a Breeder and a Judge to make up my 3: Javier Gonzalez Mendikote, who has a focused eye for detail and quality in everything he does….Mike Gadsby, who is so good at spotting potential in dogs where many people don’t see it….and Andrew Brace who has judged everywhere in the world and has a passion and interest in all breeds. What are the must have’s in any handlers tack box? Hairspray, obviously.

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What do you wish you knew before you started a life with dogs and the pedigree dog show world. If I’d realised how all-consuming it would become, I might have been put off, but I guess when you are doing something you enjoy so much it’s too late by the time you realise those things. It definitely has a way of taking over your life and making time for other things along the way is something I wish I’d been more aware of in the beginning. Do you believe the Junior showmanship/handling classes are the best places for our young handlers to learn, is their anything you would change about these classes. The best place for young handlers to learn is by watching great handlers. For example, I think someone could learn so much about showing Standard Poodles just by watching Allison Alexander do her thing in the ring...where she puts her hands, how she adjusts the lead...there is so much to be gained just by watching handlers at work. And of course working for breeders and handlers to learn how to care for dogs, and by actually showing dogs in the ring whether that is Juniors or the breed ring. JH should be about preparing a new generation of exhibitors, 36

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but having good hands with a dog is not always something a judge can rate on a scorecard, and it seems like some junior handling instructors push methods which are more about looking for faults and missteps in technique rather than nurturing talent in young handlers. Have you any special dogs waiting to debut that have been growing the last year while there has been a lack of show’s? What rings should our readers look for you at in 2021? We’re all still skeptical if and when shows might actually resume in the UK. A few of our nice youngsters had their show coats clipped off in 2020. The white standard bitch ‘’Grace’’ had a litter prior to lockdown, so we have her yearold black daughter in full coat, just waiting for the chance to take her to a show somewhere. Afterglow Nocturnal...She might be one to watch. Another potential star from Afterglow is Mike and Tom’s apricot Toy Poodle puppy, called Agent Orange. In many years to come, how would you like people too remember you in the sport of pedigree dogs? As someone who was serious about their work and devoted to doing their best.





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I N T E RV I E W W I T H J U D GE

TOM

Mather

Tom Mather is no stranger to those in the world of pedigree dogs. He holds many positions in various clubs and organizations in the world of dogs, truly giving back to a world that has given him so much throughout the years. In 1999, Tom accepted an invitation from Miss Sybil Churchill to join the Crufts Committee and was honored to be elected Chairman of the Committee upon Gerald King’s retirement in 2018. Co-author with Pamela Cross Stern of ‘The Complete Japanese Chin’ (published in 1997), Tom is the honorary secretary of the United Kingdom Toy Dog Society and a Board member of the Kennel Club.

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her. Roby and District Alsatian Club ran classes locally and for the next few years, weekends were spent at training classes or at shows. The club ran open obedience and breed shows and that sparked my interest in dog showing. I started as an obedience competitor and then also became interested in the Confirmation classes. What breeds have you shown throughout the years.

TOM MATHER Please tell our readers how you got involved in the world of pedigree dogs. What was your first ever dog and what breed did you first show? When I was about 10 or 11 years old, my adult brother arrived home with a cross bred GSD. He had bought her in a pub on the Dock Road in Liverpool. She had a lovely temperament but was not very well schooled and a neighbour who was a police dog handler suggested that we (my sister Sara and I) should go to dog training classes with

My aunt lived opposite the Borman family (Sonic Cocker Spaniels) and in the late 1960’s Trevor Borman gave us a black and white Cocker dog. I showed him locally for a long time, sometimes successfully and sometimes not! I’ve owned Bichon Frisé, German Shepherds, a Pharaoh Hound, Lowchen and a Chihuahua. I showed the Sternroc Bouvier Des Flandres, Japanese Spitz, Rhodesian Ridgeback and Manchester Terriers. I was very fond of Pauline Block (Twinley) and showed her dogs (Pharaoh Hounds, Tibetan Spaniels and Chihuahuas) occasionally. What is you kennel name and please tell our how you decided on this name. Barklots - we lived in the middle of a city with lots of neighbours and it was the one thing we never wanted the dogs to do! You and your sister Sara were two of the very first Bichon Frise exhibitors in the UK, before the breed was ever grated championship status. How do you feel the breed has changed since you first started showing them? Type is now much more stable with fewer low legged, long backed dogs. You can still find lots of very pretty, well pigmented dogs and presentation of the breed is very uniform as the breed can boast so many talented groomers. The balanced, effortless easy movement with plenty of thrust from the rear is hard to find and it does surprise me that so many pet Bichons do not seem to have the friendly easygoing temperament that most of the show dogs have. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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I will forever associate you with my heart breed, the Japanese Chin. You are one of my idols in the breed (and world of dogs in general). Please share with our readers some of your proudest achievements in the breed. Thank you Lee, you are too kind! I can still remember the thrill of winning my first CC under the late Ellis Hulme, we subsequently became great friends and I had the greatest respect for him. I won Best in Show at the Japanese Chin Club Championship show twice, once with Lady Julie and then with Ch. Sternroc Fairly Folly and they were two great wins. In my early years in the breed I campaigned two red and whites to their titles, the home-bred Ch. Barklots Tiger Lily and then Ch Sternroc Airy Fairy - I think they were both made up in the same year and both were very pale lemon and whites. I was thrilled to win the group at Driffield (the show where I won my first CC) with Ch. Sternroc Fairly Frolic.

consistently successful with her dogs and bred many champions in a number of breeds. Dorothy was always kind and helpful to me and gave me lots of good advice and was the first person to really encourage me to start judging. There were a number of Gundog people locally who were very supportive when I first started showing my Cocker. Peggy Lanceley in Chins gave me my first Chin and she went on to win a large number of challenge certificates as well as being the dam of Tiger Lily. Peggy remained a firm friend right until her death. Pauline Block bred our first Bichon and she too was so knowledgeable and willing to share her experience. It goes without saying that both Ellis Hulme and Pamela Cross Stern were the two greatest mentors I had and I realise (and always did) how fortunate I was to know them both. I firmly believe that they were two of the best judges this country has produced.

Did you have any mentors when starting out in the dog show world?

You have had great success not only with your own dogs but handling the Sternroc’s also, please tell our readers how your great friendship with Pamela Cross Stern and Brian Conn formed.

As a child, even though I didn’t have Toys, I always attended the Merseyside Toydog Shows as they were held in a church hall fairly close to home. Dorothy Garlick was a regular local exhibitor with a big team of Chihuahuas. She was

I was judging Bichon Frisé at the Scottish Kennel Club Show in 1978 and from memory, Pamela had won BOB in Japanese Chin with Ch Sternroc Kiki. I got chatting to her and asked if she would ever sell me a puppy but the answer was no. Pamela

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took an interest in the Bichons and my friendship with Brian and Pam developed from there. Once I had campaigned my first Chin to her title, Pam and Brian asked me to show Airy Fairy, he came to me for a few week when he was about 11 months old and never went back home again except to be used at stud once or twice! Pamela’s judging career had really taken off and Brian didn’t enjoy handling so much, so most weekends in the summer I drove the 100 + miles down to Clows Top to bathe and collect dogs for the shows. It was never a commercial arrangement and I consider myself very fortunate to have had the opportunity to handle so many beautiful dogs. What was the greatest advice you have been given in your time in dogs? Do your own thing and keep very good judging records! Do you feel dog showing has changed since you first started showing? Yes, in the UK it has. In the 1960’s there were lots of thriving local canine societies and they would run evening Sanction and Limited Shows. There was a smaller number of bigger Open Shows and I also attended a very limited number of Championship Shows. I went to lots of shows on public transport and my parents were marvellous, acting as chauffeurs for us. Money was tight in those days and we used the prize money (which all shows paid then) to pay the entry fees for the next shows. I was fortunate to see so many famous dogs at relatively local shows and have the opportunity to talk to their owners. In the mid 70’s when I started to go to more of the Championship Show travel was often by coach and the journeys to and from the show would be spent chatting to other exhibitors and discussing their breeds. It was a great learning experience. The cost of showing and keeping dogs has escalated tremendously and it worries me that dedicated, talented young people will be deterred from joining our sport. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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What are some of your proudest win’s in the show ring? I think it was my first BIS win at the Japanese Chin Club Ch. Show under Mrs Ena Bassett. I had been told not to enter under her as she “only puts ups well known faces” but I ignored the advice and the rest is history. I had never spoken to Mrs Bassett until that day but we became firm friends and she proposed me for membership of the Kennel Club in the early 1990’s. In the 60’s I can remember showing at Liver Canine Society where Mrs Lola McDonald Daly was the judge and I won six (well filled) classes with Jake the Cocker and came home laden with silverware! My parents were impressed. When did you first begin judging? In the mid 1970’s. There were lots of matches and rally nights locally and then I judged my first Championship Show in 1978. I eventually became approved to judge all of the Toy breeds and then branched out into other groups. I’m now approved to judge approximately 70 breeds, five groups and Best in Show. What have been some of your most memorable judging assignments over the years?

The Toy Group at Crufts was a very special occasion. Best in show at UK Toydog Show (before I was a committee member!). My first CC appointment in Cockers at the Midland Counties Ch. Show stands out in my memory. Judging Best in Show at Manchester was important, it was one of the few Ch. show I regularly attended as a child and if you had told me that I would judge BIS there I don’t think I would have believed you. Do you have a favourite country you like judging in? I love Finland and have had many great experiences there. They are very dedicated and knowledgeable and the system they use is well suited to the number of dogs they have. Do you prefer judging at all breed shows or breed speciality shows? It’s always an honour to be invited to judge a breed speciality show but I can’t say I prefer one more than the other. Do you have a favorite breed you like to judge? Japanese Chins have a very special place in my heart though sometimes you do have to make compromises! Cocker’s are a joy to judge as it is a breed that still has some great breeders and you


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can usually find a depth of quality absent in other breeds. Is there a breed you find particularly intricate to judge? Pekingese and in fact any of the brachycephalic breeds are hard work but also give great pleasure. Could you please share with us some of your favorite dogs that you have judged over the years. The great Cocker Spaniel, Sarah Amos-Jones Sh. Ch. Veratey Vincenzo at Cassom immediately comes to mind. He was My Best Puppy at Darlington some years ago and I have also given him a CC and BOB. He was my group winner at Manchester and my Reserve BIS winner when I judged at Darlington. For type and temperament he is hard to beat and is the current breed CC record holder. David Guy’s Griffon Bruxellois, Ch. Donzeata Royal Vintage won his first CC under me as a puppy and it was obvious he would really make his mark on the breed. I judged BIS at Scottish Kennel Club a few years ago and Glen and Irene Robb’s Papillon Ch Gleniren Shootin Starmaker Sunshoo really caught my eye that day with his great type and deportment. What dog or dogs would you would like to have judged/handled but did not? The Hungarian Vizsla, Sh Ch Aust Ch Hungargunn Bear It’n Mind. The Lhasa Aspo, Ch Saxonsprings Fresno. The Cocker, Ch Quaine Chieftain and the Chihuahua (Smooth Coat), Ch Belmuriz Brevier. How do you find the grading system in Europe and would you like to see it introduced in the UK? It works well in most of Europe but writing a critique for every dog is very time consuming and would be impossible in the UK with the size of entries that we traditionally attract. In Scandinavia most of the exhibitors are

knowledgeable and accept with good grace their gradings and critiques - sometimes it is not quite the same elsewhere in the world! I’ve known the odd person to have a badly concealed temper tantrum when they have won the CC but not been declared BOB! In recent years we have seen the Champion class introduced at breed club shows in the UK, would you ever wish to see the class scheduled at all breed shows in the UK? No, I wouldn’t. The title of Champion in the UK is highly prized and I acknowledge that it must be difficult if you are being beaten by a particular dog who is on a real winning streak but those streaks don’t last for ever. Dogs are there to be beaten and I can remember the thrill of beating Ch. Sternroc Dikki for BOB when he was sitting on some 40 CCs. Do you have any advice for those wishing to began judging or those currently judging that wish to progress into other breeds/groups. A: Go to lots of breed club events and let people see that you are interested in their breed. Don’t just add them to you wish list because they are easy. Exhibitors deserve better than that. Keep good records of how many dog you have judged. In the UK it is somewhat difficult to break away from one group into an other. I was approved for every breed in the Toy Group before I was approved for another breed. Hopefully with the JEP (Judges Education Programme) that will change and people won’t be denigrated for wanting to judge extra breeds. We have some very talented young people in the UK and they are our future and the future of the sport - I hope they get the breaks they deserve. You give back greatly to the world of pedigree dogs and dogs in general. Your involvement with Crufts and UK Toy must take up a huge amount of time and you also work with dogs in your professional life.

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could you please tell our readers about this great work.

Are there any breeds that you have not owned that you would like to?

I joined the Kennel Club in 1993 and Crufts Committee in 1999. I’ve been to every single Crufts Show since 1968 and wouldn’t miss it for the world. We meet as a Committee about 5 times a year and then obviously spend almost a week in Birmingham at the time of the show. I was due to judge the Utility Group at Crufts the year I became Chairman and was assured that it was fine for me to do so. I disagreed and asked to be released from the contract. UK Toy is quite different as it is just one day but it does require a lot of planning and effort from a very dedicated and enthusiastic Committee.

Lots! I’d love a Greyhound, a Standard Poodle (but I would need the groomer to come with it), a Whippet and there are a number of Toy breeds I could happily live with.

I had worked for a major clearing bank for over thirty year and took early retirement but 18 years ago I was recruited to work for the Cheshire and North Wales Guide Dogs Mobility Team. As an organisation our aim is to give all visually impaired people the right to as full a life as possible. Our guide dog service is just one of the ways we help them achieve independence and as you can guess it is tremendously rewarding. I am very lucky to go into an office (pre-Covid) that sometimes has 15 or 20 dogs in it and to work with a great bunch of people who really are trying to make a difference. 50

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Will we see you in the ring showing again one day? If you did show again what breed ring should we look for you in? It’s very unlikely but I’d love another Japanese Chin and maybe a Cocker Spaniel. Do you have any future goals you would like to achieve in the world of dogs? I judge breeds in all 7 groups and would love to be approved to judge both the Working and Pastoral Groups. To judge BIS at Crufts would be a childhood dream come true. Do you have any past times/hobbies. I swim 100 lengths every day and do try to walk and exercise at the gym. I love the theatre and reading and I listen to the radio a lot as it is something I can do whilst working at something else.



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Shiba

Kennel FCI registered since 2013

Arakon Visterija DoB 19.04.2019 Slovenian Junior Ch., Austrian Junior Ch., Bundesjugendsieger Austria 2020, Alpe-Adria Junior winner 2020

Akemi No Tama Go Tessaiga DoB 26.10.2018 3 x BOB 3 x BOS

BOB Arakon Visterija & BOS Akemi No Tama Go Tessaiga German Club of Nordic Breeds (DCNH) Specialty, 26.06.2021 BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE Judge: Klaus Strack

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Vulkan Heaven‘s Swords Choshihichirou DoB 05.03.2016

Muti-Champion (International Beauty Ch. FCI, DE Ch, SL Ch, CH Show Ch) Owner: Alexandra Schultz (DE) Co-owner: Larissa Kan-Vulpinari (DE)

Arakon Visterija with his handler Gaia Danesi (IT)

Vulkan Heaven‘s Swords Izanami DoB 20.11.2020, BOB Puppy Vulkan Heaven‘s Swords Larissa Kan-Vulpinari Freiherr-Vom-Stein-Straße 23 61118 Bad Vilbel Germany www.vulkan-shibas.de

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M E E T the BR E E D


G O R D ON S E T T E R

E NG L I SH S E T T E R

I R I SH R E D S E T T E R


MEET THE BREED: GORDON SETTER

AHentunen NNE G OA NG O K E N N E L


. MEET THE BREED: GORDON SETTER .

became the World Winner 2002 in Amsterdam. One of Scot’s daughters, Ludstar Kriter, became our first breeding bitch, the base for the Kennel Goango breeding. Our first litter was born in 2005. My mentors during these years have been Mrs. Esther Joseph (Kennel Triseter) and Mrs. Tiina Illukka (Kennel Caballus). What is the meaning behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? The Kennel name Goango is a combination of the names of my two heart breeds – The Gordon Setter and The Golden Retriever. I have bred 15 litters so far, and the 16th is on the way in few weeks. The first Goango Gordon’s were born in 2005. My breeding is quite small scaled. We usually have one litter per year. Every combination in each litter is carefully and thoroughly thought out.

ABOUT THE BREEDER Firstly, can you please share with our readers about your background in dogs. When and how did you start breeding Gordon Setters? How old were you and how did it all come about, did you have mentors in the breed?

Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? Triseter Ebonie Scot (imp. Australia), whose daughter Ludstar Kriter (imp. Italy) is the base for my kennel.

I have loved Golden Retrievers since 1988. With this breed I have only owned males, that other breeders have used for their breeding program’s. During this time I was a real fan for the dog shows, one of my Golden Retriever’s was the most winning show dog in the breed in 1994. I got to know the Gordon Setter better as a breed in the mid of 1990’s, when Mrs. Tiina Illukka (Kennel Caballus) imported one Gordon Setter bitch from Australia. This was Triseter Ebonie Nerissa and she ignited my passion for this breed into flames. In 2000 we imported together with Tiina a Gordon Setter male called Triseter Ebonie Scot, who BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program? Linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross, and why? Mostly I have done linebreeding’s and at some extent also I out-cross, to make sure that the breed is not declining too much. What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? Definitely the brightest achievement is by Goango Black I Want Go-Go. He won Show Dog of the Year 2018 in Spain. Other remarkable achievements are the Group Win for Goango Black Booms at the World Winner Show 2013 in Budapest. Winning a Group 2 placement for Goango Black Hakunamatata in The World Winner Show 2016 in Moscow, and also BIS-3 placement for our Breeders Group in The European Winner 2013 in Geneva are all special achievements. Dogs bred or owned by me have gained altogether 18 World Winner titles and numerous amounts of European Winner and various countries Winner titles, and championship titles. ABOUT THE BREED How do you interpret the breed standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the Gordon Setter should look like, or is there just one correct type? The breed is strongly divided into show type and hunting type. As an addition to this, there are the European, Australian and the American type in show lines. In my own breeding program I honor the origin of the breed by adding some style from the Australian or the American types without forgetting the typical healthy breed structure. What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at the Gordon Setter? I value the dog overall with beautiful color markings, well balanced movement and the 58

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. MEET THE BREED: GORDON SETTER .

carriage of the top line from the neck to the tip of the tail in movement, and the expression of course. Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? Light color in the eyes, this makes the gentle Gordon Setter expression fade. Narrow in front and high tail carriage are issues I pay close attention to. How has the breed changed over the years since you first began in the breed? Would you say that the breed has changed for the better or for worse? During the last 15 years the breed has developed into a slightly more stylish type, but the fear is that the breed will go too much over the top. We definitely have to remember, that from the breed’s origin that this is a hunting breed. They have to be durable in their structure.

forward, who carries itself with the tail following the top line is ideal for me. Please name 3 of your all time favourite winners that have been bred by you and 3 neither owned nor bred by you. I have already mentioned some of the greatest above, there are also others to mention. These are Goango Black Belle and his son Goango Balck I Want It All, Goango Black Full Of Life, Goango Black Hip-Hip-Hooray and Goango Black Jasmine. Others that are not owned nor bred by me are Triseter Ebonie Nirvana, Ludstar Frederick Frankenstein, Caballus Ebonie Adonis and his son Laurelhach The Pioneer. What advice would you give to a new person in the breed?

Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Gordon Setter?

Get familiar with the breed and try to have conversations and find information on the breed from several different breeders.

An overall well-balanced structure with a beautiful head and dark eyes. Straight top line. A dog that moves with a long and reaching step

All in all – This work would not be possible without the Excellent Goango Team consisting of the lovely dog owners .

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MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER

HSleegers ANS FA I R R AY K E N N E L


. MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER .

What breeds have you bred over the years? I have bred English, Irish and Gordon Setters and later also Rhodesian Ridgebacks because I was thinking I needed a new challenge!! When did you breed your first litter? I had my first litter in 1978. Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? My foundation two females would be Ch. Culstock Leighton Blaze and Franco’s CH Prairies Rossmoor Promise. All of my Fairray English Setters go back to those two beautiful and important females.

ABOUT THE BREEDER Firstly, can you please share some insight with our readers about your background in dogs. When and how did you start breeding English Setter’s? How old were you and how did it all come about. Did you have mentors in the breed? I bought my first English Setter when I was 17 years old! I saw a lovely picture from a kennel in Canada published in “ Our Dogs” . I wrote for two years in English to this lady and then I found out her husband was from The Netherlands too! Over the years, I have been working with several kennels, but I must say I was very independent and consider myself an autodidact. My best breeding partner was Franco Rubinato from Switzerland, although our ideal English Setter was very different, we bred from the same dogs and those dogs are still in all of my homebred dogs.

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program? Linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross, and why? in the beginning I have done close linebreeding, very successfully. Nowadays, I am opening my pedigrees a bit more. I wish to improve my flexibility, enlarge my gene pool and most importantly have a concept/a breeding plan for the next generations to come.

What is the meaning behind your kennel and your kennel name? My kennel name is Fairray and it is a fantasy name - a combination of words which reflect my dogs.

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. MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER .

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? To be recognized by people I admire as a quality breeder, breeding constant quality in every aspect with the focus on exterior and health. TOP breeders worldwide have cooperated with me for many years and lastly not the less important, I am very happy with the overall quality of my dogs today. I think I have better dogs than I had when I started, the type of “ Fairray” is recognizable and it is not extreme in any aspect, but always with beautiful expressions. The above, for me are my greatest achievements as a breeder, so far. ABOUT THE BREED How do you interpret the breed standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the English Setter should look like, or is there just one correct type? This is a VERY difficult question. I believe there is NO other breed with so many different

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interpretations of the standard and with so many different standards. YES you are reading it correctly. I have no issues that English Setters bred for field trials are looking and behaving totally different from “ the bench setters” , but if we speak about the standard we speak in the FCI part of the world about the FCI standard, which is not that different form the KC or AKC standard. In some Southern European countries , already starting in France, Spain, Italy etc etc another non official standard is widely promoted by the local clubs and unfortunately forced onto the national judges of the breed. What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at English Setter? I would say EXPRESSION, typical movement, structure (an English Setter is not a sight hound with long hair!). Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? Faults which I can’t tolerate in the breed is


. MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER .

definitely aggression, non-typical English Setter head, lack of ribs and fore chest. How has the breed changed over the years since you first began in the breed? Would you say that the breed has evolved for the better or for the worse? I think through years the breed has become more flashy, which actually I like a lot but sometimes it can be too much. Can you, in your own words describe an ideal English Setter? The standard says “a gentleman by nature”, which says it all. I would also add a loyal friend who will melt you if you look into his eyes. Please name 3 of your all time favourite winners that have been bred by you and 3 not bred by you. 3 all time favorite dogs bred by me would be: Ch. Fairray Charming Orange Camarque, maybe he was not my best home bred dog but he had this ego about himself that he was the King when he entered the ring. Second one would be Ch. Fairray Zanzibar “ Hope“ and third Ch. Fairray Sir Winston. 3 neither owned nor bred by me would be Ch. Windems Lotsa Dots, Ch. Stargaz’r ‘N Wingfield Time Will Tell and Ch. Wingfield ‘N Chebaco Here and Now. What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? Start slowly, go and have a look at the dogs in real life. Today with photo shopping they can even make a nice looking woman out of me lol. Seeing the dogs gives you all of the “in and outs” of his character, showmanship and EXPRESSION. Feel the dogs body, see the movement and EXPRESSION…

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. INTERVIEW WITH JUDGE .

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. INTERVIEW WITH JUDGE .

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MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER

BARBARA Gruzzi L AT I N L O V E R K E N N E L


. MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER .

ABOUT THE BREEDER Firstly, can you please share with our readers your background in dogs. When and how did you start breeding English Setter’s? How old were you and how did it all come about? Did you have mentors in the breed? My Family always had a “no animal” policy but, I was born with an immense passion for all animals and dogs in particular. Having never been able to have one in my home to share my daily life with, I dedicated myself to volunteering in shelters and taking care of strays. Over the years I managed to bring home a cat. He was a desperate case but lived with us for 18 years. Before I could have my first dog I had to wait until I lived alone, and that happened in the autumn of 1994. My first dog was a cross of a setter/pointer. I adopted him because the mice that lived in the local shelter ate his foot, and he would have been destined for euthanasia given the complications of infection and various other problems. I came to know the world of dog shows when I was around 25 years old ,thanks to my partner at the time who participated in it. The first breed I entered into this world with was the Samoyed. The first English Setter came into

my life by a “lucky” coincidence in 1997. I was immediately fascinated by their sweetness and their nature. They are full of energy and vitality, as well as being able to stay days next to you on the bed if you didn’t feel well. I started to buy books about the breed directly from England, at that time you were able to buy them on the internet. I studied the breed standard, diseases, history and everything that in theory should be done when you first become interested in a specific breed. Punctually, at every show we went to I went to look at the judgment of the setters. Something began to not be completely clear. What I saw in the ring was not exactly faithful to what I had read in the standard, both for morphology and character. I learned of a comment on the standard, obviously written by an Italian, Mr Solaro. It was a very detailed and interesting comment, which in Italy was considered as the one and only reference for the judgment in the expo, even international ones.


. MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER .

Although in some points it was very deviating from the FCI standard,it was difficult for me to conceive that a country other than that of origin of the breed could act in this way but, I quickly came to terms with it and acted accordingly. I decided to breed another “type” of English Setter in Italy.I continued to study further and in the end I made the decision to import the first progenitors from the USA. The type was not in all subjects, and in all kennels, what I was looking for but, in terms of health all subjects had been monitored for several years. They had been tested for hips, elbow dysplasia , deafness, thyroid, and deposited DNA. Each of these health screenings were very important for me. In 2000 the first one arrived from Set’r Ridge’s Kennel, and the story began. I was 27 years old, full of energy and there were projects to be carried out. It was all very clear in my mind. It was necessary to put it into practice and see if the results reflected the expectation. It has been a long journey, often uphill with small accidents along the way but, I have never regretted having undertaken it. I have to thank in particular two people who have been close to me on this path and who I can consider my mentors. M.A. Samuelson (Heathrow Kennel) a true stalwart of the breed in America, she bred the first DUAL ENGLISH SETTER! She has worked very hard to get the ES Club to approve and hold a National Field Trial. Another mentor is Dr.Ludovica Salamon ,a famous breeder of Gordon Setter and Irish Wolfhound. Dr Salamon is an international judge and esteemed veterinary specialized in reproduction. Both mentors are still my references for different types of doubts, comparisons, or a “healthy” chat. I believe that remaining a student is the secret of every teacher! What is the meaning behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? My Kennel name is Latin Lover. In the bibliography of the English Setter it is often described as a GENTLEMAN BY NATURE, for me he is a real Latin Lover because he made me fall in love with the 72

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. MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER .

breed. I bred my first litter in 2002 but, with no affix because in Italy at the time before granting you an affix you had to breed at least two litters, with different females and obtain results in the expo. Once achieved you could forward the request to the Enci and from here to the FCI before being able to obtain an affix. Mine arrived in 2004. My breeding philosophy has always been based on the well-being of my dogs in the first place, usually we have had one or at most two litters a year. Let’s say that we make a limited production but which fortunately has always guaranteed us high quality!

friend Marita Antila. After some failed attempts with my females I decided to have a daughter of Nick, As soon as Marita confirmed the pregnancy I booked a puppy. I already fell in love with her at 7 weeks and I chose her immediately. Ausa was not only a great ambassador for the breed but also an excellent producer. It was a great pity that she only had two litters. She has always been very busy on the show carpets, which she really loved and I would never “exploit” her in her old age, or in close heats. We enjoy her progeny and the legend lives on.

Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding?

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program. Line-breeding, in-breeding or out-crossing, and why?

To be honest I have imported many dogs from the USA and every single one was very important in a different way. I learned a lot from them ,in good and in bad ways. What I consider the absolute foundation of my breeding program was “Ausa”- Blue Baltic’s Surfin ‘Catalina. Born from the frozen semen of a wonderful male Heathrow Five O’Clock Shadow, Ausa was bred by my dear

I do not want to give a lesson in genetics because it is not my responsibility, so I will simply give my point of view . Luckily our breed is not among the rare ones and can count on a large number of breeders for this. I can say I am absolutely not a supporter of close forms of INBREEDING , involving mating’s between full brother and sister, mother and son or father and daughter. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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. MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER .

The health of individual dogs cannot be improved without improving the genetic health of the breed. The only way to improve the genetic health of the breed is to manage the health of the breed’s gene pool. The breed might look wonderful (because of selection for type), but it will suffer from the ill effects of genetic impoverishment . In-breeding depression, diseases caused by recessive alleles, increased risk for cancer, etc. Sincerely until now, I have not see in Europe a couple of relatives so “important” and proven producers about health to justify a similar close mating to take place, it is just BUSINESS !! Line-breeding is the kind of selection that I prefer, but you must know very well what you are doing because it is however a form of “Inbreeding”. The “common sense” of dog breeding should be that our primary goal is to produce healthy, long lived puppies. That includes all puppies in all litters. We would first and foremost mate only dogs that are themselves healthy, who come from a long line of relatives that are healthy and long-lived. From a long line of dogs that have not exhibited deleterious conditions, and we would want to be sure that there was a history of great temperaments and breed-appropriate abilities. We would make sure that all the dogs in our line can live and move without impediment, and are able to exhibit natural dog behavior. Once prioritized on those aspects, eliminate from breeding dogs with genetic or other screening results that indicate that they are likely to pass on detrimental traits. After the above, and only after that, we might make some selections on specific physical attributes. It wouldn’t be something to worry about if it’s known that the dogs in the line are all healthy and they’re all much better than the normal levels experienced within that breed, then a result of a 74

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line mating from such distant relatives is actually much more likely to result in a healthier dog. Out-cross is absolutely necessary in a good breeding program , sometimes you can be satisfied, sometimes not, but you can not avoid to do it if you are a conscious breeder! What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? Well , for me the greatest achievement as a breeder so far is not a specific champion title. Obviously, I’m very proud of all titles collected by my dogs around the world , but what I feel makes me more proud as breeder is that in some way I have contributed to the breed. The large number of champions produced by my stud dogs, even in other kennels and with different females, all of them with a well recognized STAMP and the same for many females of mine that are great foundation bitches makes me very proud. ABOUT THE BREED How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the English Setter should look like, or is there just one correct type? The standard should simply be applied and not interpreted. It is a basis to follow that should not be changed. Each individual breeder could by his choice give more emphasis to some areas, but the standard is what states the correct type and how they must be! Q: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at an English Setter? When I look at an English Setter I would like to see a dog that express elegance , substance and is able to bewitch you with the typical expression coming out from a chiseled head. It is not easy to achieve, but when it happens it is magic!


. MEET THE BREED: ENGLISH SETTER .

Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? I do not tolerate a head with no level plans, lacking a good stop or a bad expression. The lack of substance under tons of coat that is carefully groomed only to cover the lack of chest, with no sufficient rib cage resulting in open elbows and a bad top-line. Females should look feminine and males should not be coarse. I really do not tolerate over angulation on the rear. The front and rear must show a perfect balance, that together with a correct croupe should end carrying a tail at the correct level! How has the breed changed over the years since you first began in the breed? Would you say that the breed has evolved for the better or for the worse? I do not think that the breed has had BIG changes over the years. In Europe many “new” breeders are coming out over the years. Some of them are working in the right way and some are absolutely not. I think this is a kind of “sore” for all breeds, time will tell! For sure social network did not help. I find the old newsletters by the club or the annual book that I received by post from overseas much better, now just bittersweet memories! Can you, in your own words describe an ideal English Setter? My ideal English Setter should be moderate looking. Bigger is not better if the dog is loosing elegance! I need to see the ideal blend of strength, stamina, grace and style. Gaiting freely and smoothly with long forward reach, strong rear drive and with a firm top line and level tail carrying a proud head carriage! They should have a good length of silky, quality coat. A well chiseled head, with oval skull, well defined stop and a muzzle of good depth but absolutely not throaty and with a long muscular neck. The expression must be kind, intelligent and curious, with dark eyes, dark eyelid rims and fully pigmented. The temperament is absolutely friendly and affectionate, without fear or viciousness.

Please name 3 of your all time favourite winners that have been bred by you and 3 neither owned nor bred by you. I will nominated 3 that impressed me at the beginning of my research in USA when I was looking to import some interesting puppies: Dual CH Set’r Ridge’s Solid Gold , Ch Artizoe Color Of My Love and Heathrow Five O’Clock Shadow. It is not easy to name just 3 of my all time favourite winners bred by me because there are many. Each and every single owner and handler made gorgeous work with all of them and for this reason I will name 3 with a special personality. They are Ch Latin lover the Boss, Ch Latin Lover Micaela and Am Ch Latin Lover Night And Day.


What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? We live in a historical moment where image has taken on an unhealthy importance. Unfortunately, over the years I have seen a general increase in focusing more on a beautiful photo. Too often the pictures are made up of filters and photo-shopped to completely modify the real dogs structure. Nowadays people buy a “photo” and think that is normal. This attitude will not bring anything positive to the serious breeding world. A real breeder will never waste hours and hours to do photo shoots where they appear dressed and just out from a make up artist, like for the wedding day, with freshly washed dogs groomed and photo shopped!!! I state that I love beautiful photos. I think it is right to capture the best in your dogs with a professional photographer,

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which I have always done and will continue to do. Now, too many have decided to focus solely on marketing, with many litter ads preceded by a bombing of photos of the future parents spreading them on all social network groups, not to mention Istagram. My warm advice to a new person in the breed is to build on their own knowledge by first reading the standard. There are many, many books on the breed, on movement and conformation. Watch dogs at a real dog show, meet breeders and TALK with them. When it is possible, visit personally with breeders at their kennels!! A good talk MUST be more appreciated than stock photos to draw attention, and for sure will be also very helpful! Thank you very much Jovana for this interview about my beloved breed .. it is always a pleasure to talk about a BIG PASSION !





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MEET THE BREED: IRISH SETTER

NO R M A Hamilton QUA I L MO O R K E N N E L


Firstly, can you please share with our readers about you background in dogs. When and how did you start breeding Irish Setter? How old were you and how did it all come about and did you have mentors in the breed? I came into the Irish Setter world in the late sixties, my husband and I had discussed getting a dog but hadn’t quite decided on the breed, he came home one day after being out with a friend and on the end of a lead was an Irish Setter puppy. Fortunately, he had chosen a very respected and knowledgeable kennel to get him from. “Rusty” was not a show dog, however, we became great friends with the breeder Ms Nantes Hinds who was a great mentor to me and so many others with her depth of knowledge which she shared with so many others coming into the breed. Her bloodlines are behind many of the top kennels of today. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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What is the meaning behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? My husband chose the name Quailmoor as our prefix. The original Irish were bred to find Quail on the “moors” of Ireland. What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? My greatest achievement, that’s a hard one, one however that stands out, I sent a puppy bitch to Juha Kares Quailmoor Nightlark. in 1993 That same year at 12 months of age she went Best in Show at The Helsinki International. She repeated that award in 1997 The World Show was held in Finland in 1998 , I flew to Helsinki and handled her to be World Winner.I was on such a high, the applause the papparatse, I was told we had beaten bitches from thirteen countries How has the breed changed over the years since you first began in the breed? Would you say that the breed has evolved for the better or for the worse? The breed has changed somewhat over the years and I believe for the better. I know my breeding certainly had.In those days we looked to England for our outcrosses, now we have America, Europe and Scandinavia, frozen semen too has played a big part. It is to be hoped that present custodians of the breed will be able to assess and utilize the imported bloodlines to the same advantage as our predecessors did in their time. Please name 3 of your all time favourite winners that have been bred by you and 3 neither owned nor bred by you. To choose three great ones, there have been so many, The Tirvelda’s, the Thenderins,


. INTERVIEW WITH JUDGE .

theCornevans, the Wendovers, and here in Australia we have the Taraglens the Eireannmada, the Pendorics, and more recently Fandango., T o get it down to three special ones, Cornavon Primose, a glorious bitch with a head to die for. Meadowlark Anticipation, I saw him shown by Elliott Weiss, a stallion of a dog. My third would be Charlton’s London Fog, I judged him at the Colorado Specialty,I loved him from the time he entered the ring, I just prayed I couldn’t fault him when I went over him and he didn’t let me down, I gave him Best in Show. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross, and why? What is “type’, the oxford dictionary says a category of things that share particular qualities or features. One hears of English type or American Type, I have never heard of Australian type. Rick

Beauchamp wrote a whole book on the subject. It’ something I can’t put into words, really I think the dictionary has said it all, I have line bred as much as I could and outcrossed when I felt something needed strengthening.,Line breeding I found gave me that particular “type”. What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? My advice to a newcomer, don’t rush in, I was lucky to find such an honest and intelligent breeder, read books, talk to more than one breeder, go to shows, look for temperament, don’t be captivated by a glamourous coat, see what is under it. The Irish Setter is the most handsome of dogs, their glorious coat. loving disposition, can we ever find words to praise them enough and explain to folk who have never had the pleasure of enjoying this glorious breed. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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. RINGSIDE CLICK .

Wieliczka Branch DATES June 5th-6th, 2021 • POLAND Photo Credits: Magdalena Dlugosz

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. I N T. ERRI V N IGE SWI DWE I TC H LIC J UK D. G E .

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. RINGSIDE CLICK .

MOSCOW Russia DATES April 4th, 2021

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LIZA PÓCS Dear Liza, thank you for accepting our invitation and for taking the time to do this interview with us. As many already know, you were a very successful junior handler and later on you continued your career as a professional handler. Please share a little bit about your beginning in the dog world? How and when did it all start for you? Thank you for the opportunity, it’s an honor for me. I have always attended dog shows since I was a child, but only as a visitor at that time. Later my mother took me into this world and officially I attended my very first junior handling competition when I was 10 years old.

photo by Boris Glukarev

What was your opinion about dog shows when you attended your first one? Has your opinion changed along the way? Who brought you into this world? As a young, enthusiastic dog lover it was wonderful to see handlers running with dogs in nice suits and enjoying and


loving what they were doing. Later on, it made me want to be one of them. My thoughts have changed throughout the years as I became one of them. As I mentioned before my mother was the one who brought me into this world and I cannot be more thankful to her for it. Who was supporting you at the beginning of your journey? Who taught you the basics of handling, grooming and taking care of dogs? It is not a surprise that my greatest supporter’s are my family of course, especially my mother. I learned the “first steps” from Attila Schlosser, and throughout the years as I got to know other handlers and breeders. I have gained a lot of knowledge about handling, grooming, breeding and taking care of dogs from them. How did you start competing in Junior Handling? Do you remember your first competition? Before I started to compete in junior handling I had some training with Attila Schlosser and my mom’s Bracco. Following the training we felt that I was ready to enter a dog show. I clearly remember my first junior handling competition. It happened with our Bracco Italiano. My first dog show was at the very first FHOVA winter Dog Show. I was competing for 3 days. Finally, on the 102

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third day I was placed first. I cannot tell you how happy I was. Although there are many, what do you consider your greatest win in Junior Handling and the breed ring? Please tell our readers why these ones are so special to you? I am very proud to have been a finalist at the World Dog Show in Leipzig from the daily finalist as a junior handler. I also wish to mention Crufts and EDs ’18 where I represented my country. I won the group at The World Dog show in Moscow in 2016 with the White Swiss Shepherd. At the time I was still a junior handler and I wasn’t even 16 years old. That moment was something I cannot describe by words. It was so difficult to believe. Standing there as a 15-year-old youngster with a young dog among professional handlers and famous dogs, and winning the group was simply incredible. What do you like most and what do you dislike about dog shows? I really like the atmosphere of dog shows, I am a perfectionist person and I really like to compete. I love the excitement and the adrenalin rush that it gives me. What I really do not like is the amount of hatred and greediness. We should share our love


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and worship of dogs. Our knowledge, our ideas and thoughts should be shared with each other too. Instead, we fight with each other and it’s not about the dogs anymore. It’s about people’s own agenda. How is Junior handling organized in your country? Are there many young handlers? Every year the Junior Handler Commission announces a competition for junior handlers. Competitors can enter based on their points collected throughout the year (minimum 15 points if I am correct). The solemn result is an advertisement and the award ceremony. Our representatives are picked from the older groups only. The 1st goes to Crufts, the 2nd represents at WDS and the 3rd at EDS. I see there are a lot of enthusiastic young dog lovers who are trying to do their best. In the last 2 years the number of them has grown a lot. It can be especially seen in the younger age group. I had the pleasure to judge twice in Hungary. The difference is huge in their knowledge and the approach towards dogs. I could clearly see that some of them were really enjoying what they were doing, for me this is a really important thing. In my opinion this is the result of our JH Club which organizes a lot of seminars and training for them – we are so grateful for this. What was a funny situation that has happened to you as a handler? As I am a clumsy person, a lot of funny things happen to me all of the time. Such as falling, losing things, suffering an injury on a dog walk. Literally anything can happen to me. Which breed is your favorite to show and which breed is your favorite to have at home? My favorites are terriers and pointing dogs, as I grew up with breeds like them. I especially love American Staffordshire Terriers and Pointers, they are my all-time favorite breeds. I have 104

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always loved to show them. Unfortunately, we don’t have any of them at home for now, “all is not lost that is delayed”.

worked together with. I learned a lot from him about American Staffordshire Terriers and about taking care of dogs at dog shows.

People usually have 2 opposite opinions, such as: “Junior handlers should prepare and compete with their own dogs” and “Junior handling is about trying new breeds and they shouldn’t compete with the same dog all of the time”. Which opinion do you agree more with, or is there truth in both of them?

Would you like to continue with this job or do you have other plans?

I agree with both opinions. Firstly they have to know how to handle their own dog. Getting along with the dog and knowing the breed on a high level is essential before handling other pets. On the other hand, it would be very useful to know other breeds and types of dogs. I always handled other dogs in junior handling, mostly because I am one of those whose own dog would work well with them. It’s also important to try other breeds, because you can find what breed fits perfectly and discover which breed or group you are good at. What do you like more: training, grooming and preparing dogs for shows, or do you enjoy showing them more? I like all of the above because none of them will work without the other. Seeing the development by training feels good and makes me proud. We cannot forget about the bond which can develop during training, this means a lot when in the showing. But showing them is really my kind of thing. Showing the dog to the crowd trained by yourself and even winning with them are the most valuable things that make me proud. Last but not least, seeing a happy owner is even more elevating. Did you have an opportunity to be a show assistant, or would you like to become one? If so, who would you like to work with? I have already had the opportunity to become an assistant of Norbert Tibay, whom I have recently 106

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Now I would say I would continue. I have a lot of plans to work out in this dog world. I hope I will be able to achieve at least half of them. But, we will see what the future holds. I won’t give up this part of my life for sure and I will always have dogs around me. I know you were competing at many big shows outside of your country, is the adrenaline and excitement bigger at the most important shows? How does it feel showing at WDS, EDS, Crufts etc.? Of course, I am high on adrenaline and excitement when I am at the most important shows. I always want to do my best and I still get nervous at big shows. Although, it gets better with age. Showing at WDS and EDS is not as big a deal as it was before. Obviously it has bigger stakes but they are also enjoyable. Showing at Crufts was amazing and exciting all at the same time. Is there any show you have never attended but you would love to in the future? I hope I will be lucky enough to show once in the US and other big countries. Shows like Crufts and almost all the WDS and EDS. I really want to visit the Westminster show once, even just as a spectator. How has Covid-19 influenced your life and activities? Did it change a lot or have you continued with life normally? Covid-19 had an influence on my life. At the very beginning I was quiet happy about it. I could rest and manage the things I was late with completing. I payed more attention to my recent Irish litter. After 2 months I could die to get my normal life


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back. No dog show, no time with friends and we could not even drink a cup of coffee somewhere. Covid-19 had an influence on the dogs too, the effects can be clearly seen on young dogs and puppies. Were there any special dogs for you along the way with whom you had a special bond and connection with? What made them so special? I am always trying to bond with my dogs. Once there was a dog, she was “THE AMSTAFF”. Her attitude and character was wild and sweet at the same time. Showing her was always a pleasure and an honor for me. I think these kind of bonds with dogs just happen, like love at first sight. It just happens, but when it happens it cannot be taken away. What are the most important things when showing dogs? And how in your opinion should a junior handler or handler behave, at a show and at home? For me it’s obviously the connection between the dog and the handler. It must be seen that they enjoy the show. I saw a lot of handlers and mostly JH who are so disrespectful with the judges and

treat the dogs as objects. They should be more delightful and grateful. Lot of JH’s act like they are stars in the ring and they are put into the spotlight. It shouldn’t be this way. A good handler cannot be seen beside the dogs, a good handler is invisible. The spotlight should be on the dogs at all time. Do you have any suggestions for younger kids just entering the dog show world? What should they be aware of? As I always say, enjoy what you are doing and treat the dog with respect. Besides showing dogs you also started breeding them. How did you choose your breed? Well, it happened accidentally. An old friend requested a breed and there was a woman who wanted to make a co-owership with her female. We got her contacts and then that female became my biggest partner in crime. She has been here for 5 years already. That’s how I have Irish Terriers at home - in a nutshell. Last year I had my first litter as a co-breeder and owner in the Breaks Your Heart kennel.

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Tell us a little bit about Irish terriers, and why them? This breed happened by the mere chance. When I had my first female I fell in love with them. They are the sweetest terriers I have ever seen. From your beginners point of view, how hard is it to breed dogs? How do you choose the “perfect” combination? What do you look for in a male when choosing him. Do you consider also his pedigree or do you just decide by the qualities and faults you see on him? In my opinion it’s not an easy thing to do. Find a “perfect” bitch which could be good enough to breed. I think the key in breeding is having great bitches, but I am a beginner in this field. Finding the “perfect” male is less hard than finding a great female. It is also important for me to have a nice pedigree and good qualities in the male. Was it challenging to combine school, shows and all the long trips? How did you manage everything? It is still challenging for me sometimes, but fortunately I could manage my studies and dog shows. I just have to find the golden balance.

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Sometimes, after a long weekend at a dog show I felt like I was unable to survive the upcoming days at school. After all of the balancing, I graduated with pretty good grades. Besides dog shows, you are also very good at sports, more precisely karate. How many years were you competing? I practiced karate for almost 10 years. Unfortunately, I had to give up professional sport because of my knee and my back. What do you consider your greatest success in sports? My greatest success was when I was placed 2nd at the European cup and I was also in the Hungarian National Team as the best from my weight group. I notice that you are very good and successful in everything you do. I wish you a lot of success in the future with everything you love. Keep up the good work. Best of luck Liza from the whole BIS team! Thank you for your time! Thank you for having me. I really enjoyed writing this interview.





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