Best in Show Magazine Europe • October 2021

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RES SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW GROUP 9

WHAT AN UNBELIEVABLE START!

LULA IS HANDLED BY JOVANA DANILOVIC AND CHRISTIAN RANGEL GROOMED BY NATASCHA KOLBE BRED BY SANDRA MIRO GRAU / ES OWNED AND SPOILT BY ERIKA AND DR. PAUL HEILMANN / D

THIS GIRL WENT INTO THE RING... FIRST TIME EVER, 19 MONTHS OLD, AND CAME BACK WITH 2 CHAMPION TITLES SHE IS NOW CH STAR PANGEA LET IT SNOW AT SPLIT/HR AND KOPER/SLO LULA WON 3 CACIB, 8 CAC, 4 BOB, WINNER SPLIT, GROUP 2.


LuLa


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WE ARE

Best in Show How exciting is to see schedules full of shows all around Europe?! Seems like everything is getting back to normal, or at least “new normal”. It was such a great feeling to be able to print magazine just before Split shows! It would like to thank to all clients for being supportive in times like this! Our team is still working hard to keep you entertained with interviews, interesting articles, beautiful photos and ads. In this edition you will be able to read interview with young but very talented and successful Handler - Kristina Savina; great man and person who always have smile on his face - judge and breeder Gabriel Valdez; Supreme BIS Junior Handler in Split - Balint Korozs; as well as Saluki and Afghan breeders. Tomasso Urciuolo did great job in Split as every year with beautiful candids that you can enjoy printed only in our magazine. I wish everyone successful World Show in Brno! Until next edition and Euro Dog Show in Budapest!

JOVANA DANILOVIC Chief Editor

LEE GROGAN Collaborator

BISCREATIVE.COM Art Department

JUSTYNA SKROBISZEWSKA & DJORDJE DANILOVIC Social Media



I N D E X INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSIONAL HANDLER

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KRISTINA SAVINA

RINGSIDE CLICK

IRKUTSK 40

INTERVIEW WITH JUDGE

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GABRIEL VALDEZ

MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND & SALUKIS

AFGHAN HOUND

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SALUKI



I N D E X INTERVIEW WITH AN ARTIST

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ROBIN PUNSALAN

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SPLIT 110

INTERVIEW WITH JUNIOR HANDLER

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TRAVEL TIPS

BRNO 134

KOROZS BALINT ANDRAS



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KRISTINA Savina Dear Kristina, thank you for taking the time to answer the following questions for Best in Show magazine. Please tell our readers how you got involved in dogs? Everything started when my aunt was searching for an Old English Sheepdog for herself, but she ended up getting a South Russian Shepherd dog. Obviously, she thought that the markings on the coat was the only difference between these two breeds and she wasn’t prepared to handle the temperament of the South Russian Sheepdog. My aunt moved from our house and the dog stayed with us. The breeder suggested that we try to take part in several dog shows. My mum took the dog to a handler, then we started showing, but our dog was consistently losing. One morning we were at a dog show and my mum said “If we loose again today it will be our last dog show”. That day the dog won Junior Best In show & Best In Show, at only 9 months old. That was a sign! Later on I started to learn and take part in junior handling competitions. The rest is history… 34

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“I like the most the fact that this job is not a routine, its something that i’m passionate about. Still really love traveling, meeting new people.”

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Who has been a positive influence or inspiration for you, as a handler and groomer? From an early age I was following many wonderful handlers on Facebook. One of them was Camilla Tell. I thought she had her own unique style and she is working with my favourite breeds, so she was always an inspiration. Now I can happily call her a good friend! Do you remember your first Best in Show win?

interested me as much as dog showing does. I decided to move 9000 km from home to continue my work in a more professional way. Apart from handling, I would like to have a business that would also involve the dog world. Personally, I admire that even at such a young age you showed great talent in grooming breeds that are not very easy at all. How important is it for you to groom the dogs that you are campaigning? Do you have your favorite breeds to groom?

I don’t think I already had one.

For me grooming is a passion. It is what I enjoy doing and I believe that because of it I’m able to have a special connection with the dogs I work with. Dog shows are beauty contests, as well as the quality of the dog itself, handling is also taken into consideration. Grooming especially long haired breeds has to be at the highest level.

What made you decide to become a professional handler? What career other than dogs would you pursue?

I believe that Poodles are the most difficult breed to groom, but they are still a favourite of mine to groom!

After spending years attending dog shows and finding my best friends there, I realized that I can’t imagine my life without them. Nothing

Would you say that you take a different approach when conditioning and training each dog? Please share with our readers some advice on conditioning

Yes, I was very young. Probably about 11 years old. I was handing my South Russian Sheepdog to Best in Show. What do you consider your greatest win so far?

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. INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSIONAL HANDLER .

a show dog. Besides the standard physical activity, I believe in simple daily activities. Such as walking dogs on a leash, spending time with them as you would with a pet and playing with toys. I do not believe in only spending time with them for grooming and training. A healthy mind is also very important. In grooming, every single dog is different, even with the same breed. Of course there are some general rules. I always use products specifically for the dog I work with. I believe that correct product choice and systematic bathing can change a lot. 
 Please name us 3 dogs of the past that you admire (not shown or owned by you).

I am not really superstitious. Well, maybe there’s one thing that I noticed. If the day started really bad, then it probably means that it will end well. No special habits, just stay focused and positive. Keep the dogs comfortable and happy, it will pay off! What part of your job do you like the most and what part the least? What I like most is the fact that this job is not a routine, it’s something that I am passionate about. I still really love the traveling and meeting new people. But really, the best part of our job is when you get an exciting dog. It really puts your heart

I would choose Afterglow The Big Tease, Xandali Isabeau of Boanne and Northgate’s As You Like It. Please name us 3 dogs that were the most important in your career so far. I have to mention Irish setter “Kody” Doble Dream Lovesett Pacific Foxtrot. He was such a show dog! I have many wonderful memories with him. Together we won the Junior handling competition at Eurasia, Group wins in Russia and Split and many Best In Show wins. For sure “Mr.Big” the Standard Poodle Da Maya Huffish Trademark was a big impact in my career. I learned how to hold a scissors because of him, he opened the door to the world of Poodles. It was an amazing journey showing this dog! Another dog who is still being shown is “Mica” the American Cocker Spaniel, Very Vigie L’Amour. I learned so much about grooming with this dog and I went through many mistakes. He’s the ultimate show dog, such a stable winner. I just love him! Are you superstitious? Do you have any special habits with your top dogs?

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. INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSIONAL HANDLER .

into working on it and the whole process then pays off. Having supportive people by your side is priceless. The part that I don’t like is negative energy from people, it can really spoil even your best days. Remembering our dinner in San Marino 2 years ago, I can’t forget all of the funny stories we shared. Please choose one to share with our readers. I will pick one that not many have heard before. It was back in February, earlier this year. Moscow saw a record snowfall, not seen since 1973. We had a dog show 120 km away from home. It was snowing like crazy all night. We woke up early in the morning to check if we had any chance to open the gates and if there was any road left to drive on. It was still dark but it was very obvious that the chances of entering the highway from

our street was very small. But, how can we miss a dog show, right? I was in contact with two of my friends who were supposed to attend this show as well. One of my friend’s car had gotten stuck in a snowdrift and the other friend just couldn’t even open the gate. My mom somehow managed to drive through this crazy snow to the highway, so we decided we will try to reach the show ground. The driving condition’s were very extreme and it took us 4 hours to reach the show. We also spent an hour trying to reach the parking as some of the cars in front of us got stuck. Finally, we made it to the show and prepared dogs for the ring. The Afghan Hound speciality started almost on time and everything went very smooth. Then we had the American Cocker Spaniel ring and Mica was all ready to go. When I came to the ring I realized it was a big mess. It was already the afternoon and the judge still had not arrived. None of the dogs from this judges ring had been shown yet. We had to wait, and nobody knew how long for or after what breed we would be judged. All we could do was have a cup of coffee and check the news on our phone, as the place where the show was held had no windows and we couldn’t see if the snow apocalypse outside had stopped or not. Finally, when the judge arrived, exhibitors greeted her with applause. This long and difficult day ended up with Best In Show for Mica ,the American Cocker. This is one of the reasons why I believe that sometimes if the day started not so good, it can end very well! Do you have a favorite show? Before the pandemic I would probably have answered differently. At the moment I’m really impressed with the organization of Russian International shows. It’s hard to name one, also Split and Nitra bring up great memories. Is there anything in life that you would like to do


. INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSIONAL HANDLER .

other than being involved with dogs? I really love photography. I wish I have more time for it. What advice would you give to young people who aspire to become professional handlers? First of all, be ready to work hard. I don’t believe that being a professional handler can be a hobby. It’s all or nothing. Always remember that the happiness and wellness of the dogs come first. Watch handlers that you like, and if you have a chance to get to know them don’t be shy! Accept your mistakes and move on.

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. RINGSIDE CLICK .

IRKUTSK INTERNATIONAL DOG SHOW IRKUTSK, RUSSIA JULY 17-18 th 2021 PHOTO CREDITS: OLESYA GAGARINA

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I N T E RV I E W W I T H J U D GE

GABRIEL Valdez by Lee Grogan

My first experience in the Dog World and dog shows was in Cuba in the beginning of the 80 ‘s . A short time later I understood that my life needed a radical change, due to the political and economic situation on the Island that couldn’t let my dreams come true. Being still very young, I traveled to Bogota - Colombia, in South America. It was in that beautiful country that I spent almost thirty years of my life getting involved in the Dog World and it’s shows. I also started working in the world of art and design, with great national and international designers. It was with Salvatore Ferragamo that Europe appeared in my life. I directed the Boutique in Bogotá and others in South America, it was here that I learned more about

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happened very fast, and with the help of some Cuban breeders I acquired my first dog with American pedigree. Back then I was traveling every weekend to dog shows with my Italian Greyhounds and somehow from that young boy that loved art, fashion and dance, I became a dog handler showing dogs in all of the seven groups! BREEDER’S LIFE Since the beginning my family was the greatest support! While still a child I received as a gift a couple of Italian Braccos who opened the doors to the world of dogs with pedigree. The first dog shown by me in a dog show was a female Rough Collie that was the beginning of the story of DaVinci’s.. The first dogs to finish a championship under the affix were Rough Collies. fashion and glamour in general. I have to say that to my trip to Colombia, I was able to bring with me my twelve dogs that had been my companions for years. Colombia was of great importance for my personal experience and it enriched me enormously. Also, it’s fantastic approach to the Canine Dog Shows opened many doors for me. During those years Colombia had the strongest and most prestigious influence in the Sport in Latin America. I have never up to this day seen such beautifully organized dog shows, full of details as the largest of all shows that took place at Bogotá’s yearly final Dog Show. Still in Cuba I have received as a present from a friend of mine a gorgeous Spanish Greyhound who would initiate my love, passion and devotion for Greyhounds. At the beginning in Bogotá, I worked a lot and lived in an apartment where I could only have one dog. I would say that was time when I totally fell in love with Italian Greyhounds. I had already been in touch with the breed since Cuba. Everything 50

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Besides Collies. the DaVinci’s name has some great champions from different breeds such as Toy Poodles, Whippets, Miniature and Standard Dachshundas well as Azawaks and Italian Greyhounds. I have also been the owner of other breeds such as Papillons, Japanese Chin, Greyhounds and Salukis. I had the privilege of being co-owner of the number One Fila Brasileiro in the history of the breed, with 57 Best in Shows. As I already mentioned, the history of art and fashion has been a part of my life since I was very young. Being fascinated by Italy and it’s history, as well as it’s art made me choose the name “DaVinci“. It is a symbol and brand of what I love the most. MENTORS & FRIENDS Through a whole life in this world called hobby or sport; many people have marked my life with moments of a great importance. I can’t forget the person that guided me and taught me about the life of dog shows and how to dedicate a lifetime to a very special breed. My always beloved friend BA in history of arts Zoila Portuondo, who was my


first mentor to whom I will always be grateful for guiding me through the right way of the dog world of breeding . When my path changed by travelling and living in Colombia I had the great privilege of meeting the unforgettable Max Magder from the famous kennel Lorricbrook. Max was and is still my greatest inspiration. He was the one to introduce me to one of the greatest people of the Sport such as Frank Sabella, with whom I have had a lovely friendship for years, Michelle Billings, Phyllis Wolfish, Peggy Newcome and many others that still inspire me in many ways. I thank Max for having taught me to see a dog as a whole, balance and function. I am fascinated with dogs temperament, that is of great importance. I wanted to find IG’S with excellent temperament and attitude for dog shows. Many years before nothing was as easy as it is now, we only had fax and very slow mail that made everything more difficult . I was very lucky by being very welcomed by conscientious and generous breeders in the breed in the United States.

IG’S American Type with solid colors. I really think that what we have created during more than thirty years is a perfect combination of all types within the breed. We don’t have records of all the championships we have won, it is a very difficult sum after all these years in the breed. There have been numerous in many countries around the world. We finished the championships of six dogs bred by DaVinci’s, five of them owned by me. In 2006 Am .Ch Marchwind BelCanto Tia Maria, owned by Patricia Anders and me. She won the breed in Westminster Kennel Club exhibited by me, also she won many first groups in the USA. Many many BIS with several breeds specially Azawakhs, Whippets and Italian Greyhounds represent a big record in Latin America, but one of them has a special meaning for me as a breeder. Mult. BIS. Mult. Ch. DaVincis Gisela winning the Best in Show of SICALAM in 2009 with judge Mr. Ivan Sandoval from Colombia. Gisela also won the BIS in the yearly Dog Show in Colombia under the

When I started with the Italian Greyhounds I was a bit lost... I could identify clearly several types in the breed itself, not speaking only of colors. The base for Davinci’s was made by three important names: Mrs. Lilian Barber La Scala IGS, Mrs.Eva Partida Tekonevas and Mrs. Pat Anders Bel Canto; all in the United States. For many years I have bred and showed IG’S from American based genes, but with predominant solid colors. I can’t lie in this interview, I also showed particolors as I don’t criticize the inclusion of white in the standard in some canine organizations. I have to say, I invented a quite different type in the breed and continue doing so with our DaVinci’s. When you do something that gives excellent results you can find good critiques and not so good ones. It was said up to now that “DaVinci’s” are BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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mastery of judge Francesco Cochetti from Italy. Gisela also won BIS in the international Dog Show held in Bogotá under the first and unique Paul Stanton from Sweden. During my stay in Colombia, I exhibited and bred the best IG’S of the national Ranking for 13 years as well as the best in group ten. In my personal opinion, we breeders are the only ones responsible to modify the breeds having the standard as a guide and base. For this reason we can see differences between breeds of their original country and in other countries with great influence in the Cynophilia . IG’S are no different, in their countries of origin and others with great influence in the Cinophilia, IG’S are not an exception. In their country of origin breeders stand out with great influence in the breed such as DelBarone , Rampante Ragio de Luna and Sobers, who keep consequently the adequate type for European shows . The breed has had a considerable increase in the number of breeders throughout the world. Countries such as Russia and others from eastern Europe have increased in their entries in dog shows , now the breed is by far more popular than 20 years ago. In 2002 I was appointed as an all breed Judge. This is the beginning of a new stage in my life that has guided me to judge dog shows in the five continents, many Toy ,Hounds and sighthounds throughout the world and also World Dog Shows and many shows in the USA. I have been honored to have been chosen in 2019 to judge the famous Donauesching Festival in Germany where the greatest number of Sighthounds are in one show.

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M E E T the BR E E D


A F GH A N H OU N D AGHA DJARI’S ALOUANN BOXADEN OSHANAME

SA L U K I QIRMIZI YALAMEH


MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND

AGHA DJARI’S Afghan Hounds S T E FA N B OI E C K


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOIUND .

“Katwiga” (vdom) lines, but then I saw more and more dogs of the American type at shows, which absolutely fascinated me. I was so fascinated that in my 3rd litter an American stud dog was used. Almost all of my dogs go back to this C-litter. Which Afghan Hound breeder/breeders do you respect most, anywhere in the world. (past or present.)

Please tell our readers how you got involved in the world of pedigree dogs, the Afghan Hound and dog shows. (please mention your kennel name, it’s meaning and any other breeds you are involved with.)

I respect breeders the most who love their animals and do not regard them as objects. I respect breeders who keep the number of their animals small (I never had more than 7 dogs at a time), who keep and care for their old dogs. I detest breeders who suddenly give away old animals that have repeatedly provided for offspring when they are no longer able to do so. They then look

My first Afghan Hound was bought by my parents. It was in 1980 and I was 11 years old. I saw this breed in dog books, I had never seen one live before, and I was absolutely fascinated. We never had dogs before, always cats. It was a pretty bitch, but not suitable for shows. When we went to dog shows I fell in love with a dark-red bitch from Erika Rödde’s famous “Von Katwiga” kennel. In 1981 I got a bitch from this kennel. My kennel name “Agha Djari’s” was registered in 1987 (I was 19 years old at that time). Where did you get your foundation Afghan Hound’s and what breeders (if any) do you work with today. The Katwiga bitch described above then sparked my enthusiasm for shows. Of course, my parents always had to drive me at that time, so success was quite limited, but she still managed to complete her championship. Soon, the desire arose to have offspring from her and in 1987 the first litter was born from her, but only 1 bitch. The second litter followed in 1989, from which 1 male became a champion and even achieved a BIS, I was so proud. Both litters were from pure BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOIUND .

for a “good sofa place”. If I myself am not in a position to provide for this highly deserved sofa place, I should rethink my breeding practices. This is of course independent of the breed.

there must be a natural saddle, the rest should be secondary.

Who was your mentor in the breed when you started out and do you still have mentors today?

How have Afghan Hounds changed since you first started showing/breeding. This can be in quality and or presentation. Do you think the breed has changed for the better or worse?

Erika Rödde was certainly a mentor in my early years. She told me later, when I was already breeding and showing very successfully, that she was very disappointed when I chose the American lines and that I could have been her successor. At that point I was shocked and flattered at the same time, but I was speechless at first. I started to know very early what I wanted. The American type was quite frowned upon in Germany at the beginning of the 80s, especially because of the superiority of “Katwiga”, but I went my own way early on and didn’t have a mentor any more.

I think in all areas we tend to say “everything was better in the past”, including the dog world. Over the years, of course, you become more critical. In the beginning you think almost every dog is beautiful. Today, when I look at old pictures or videos, I see a lot of beautiful dogs, but also a lot of mediocre ones. I think because of the smaller and smaller population of our breed (breeding and show-numbers), it is of course more and more difficult to find outstanding specimens, but I think that the quality has not dramatically deteriorated in proportion.

As we know hair is the icing on a perfectly constructed cake, and Afghan Hounds are known for having beautiful long, flowing hair. Do you feel that patterned Afghans are overlooked because they cannot compete in the hair department or do you believe a good dog wins patterned or un-patterned?

From the outside of the ring looking in, there appears to be a great variation in type around the world in the Afghan Hound ring, would you agree? Is there a country in particular where you believe the quality of Afghan Hounds is especially strong?

At all-breed shows among non-breed specialists, pattern dogs certainly have a harder time. A deep saddle, possibly with bare pasterns, gives a different silhouette, looks narrower, many judges are used to hair masses, which of course can hide a lot. Breed specialists should recognize this, most of them do. I also find it worrying that dogs are often favoured because of the lack of hair. Sometimes dogs are described as “so raw and primitive”, which hardly look like Afghans, have extremely high set ears and round yellow eyes and whippet toplines. I hardly see the Afghan expression there. These remarks often come from breeders who breed dogs with hair masses at home, I always have to smile and think to myself why they don’t cross these dogs into their lines.... The hair that is there should be well groomed, 60

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I think America was the strongest country, years ago, of course, it’s also a huge country. Sadly, so many great breeders died, disappeared, changed their breed. For the moment, I’m not sure if there is a country which has the best ones. Certainly Russia has a high standard of grooming and presentation, but this is true for all breeds, but there is a lack of background knowledge, especially when I look at the many pictures where Afghans are posed like German Shepherds (this was also extreme in Australia, but here it has improved.) Hair and presentation above all, anatomy and gait seem secondary. An Afghan Hound is refereed to as the “King of Dogs”. What breed features/qualities make an Afghan Hound the King (or Queen) in your mind? Once upon a time it was the gait and the aura that


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOIUND .

defined an Afghan Hound as the “King Of Dogs”. Unfortunately, this unique gait is being lost more and more. If you look in the Irish Setter or Weimaraner ring today, you will often find dogs with better gaits than many Afghans. They simply lack the high class spring, many have hardly any stride, due to extremely steep and narrow fronts, the hindquarters, even if well angulated, are often stiff, there is a lack of flexibility. Another characteristic of Afghan Hounds are the prominent hipbones, which are also disappearing more and more. I want prominent hip bones in an athletic dog, not in a skeleton. The standard demands a straight topline, often you see very curved loins with round croup showing no hip bones at all. These croup’s also prevent the drive from the hindquarters. I always say that the fascinating thing about the Afghan is on one hand we have the glamour, combined with an original and often hardly tameable wildness.

What is your proudest achievement (so far) in the world of Afghan Hounds. The proudest achievement is, that all of our dogs are kept like pets in the house, we never gave old dogs away. At this moment in time, we have bred 172 individual champions worldwide, more than any other breeder anywhere. (with the FCI, you are not allowed to co-breed, so all of these dogs are born and raised in our home). I’m working on the 200th, I have bred 50 litters in 34 years (19872021), this makes 1.5 litters on average per year. All of this was done with never more than 7 dogs at the same time at home, alongside my studies, and then a normal “full time job” without any kennel-help. We also bred the top-SBIS winning Afghan Hound Male and Female in the USA of all times. Please mention some of your most successful dogs,

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owned or bred by you.(show ring, litter box and/or stud.) Multi BIS Ch.Agha Djari’s Reflection Of Xenos, “Reeva”, born 2005, she set several records, was the first European Afghan to win BOB at the American National, (also 5 Nationals in 5 European countries) as well as 2 consecutive World Champion titles (with a litter of 7 puppies in between). She had only 2 litters, one son was again World Winner, both Top Specialty Winning Afghans in the US mentioned above are Reeva grandchildren (and both also won National BIS in the US). Multi BIS Ch. Agha Djari’s Unplugged Version, “Colin” , also a World Winner, BIS at the FCI European Winner in Netherlands (8000 dogs), Champion in over 20 countries. A daughter of him also became a World Winner . Multi BIS Ch.Agha Djari’s Wilson Of Xenos, “Wilson” certainly not the perfect showdog, he was always a bit lazy, but I loved the look and the anatomy of this dog.

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Of the current dogs certainly Multi BIS Ch.Agha Djari’s Lonesome Cowboy, “Lucius”, now 6 years old, multiple All Breed BIS and title winner and a Champion in the UK. Unfortunately the last two years more or less we lost to Covid-19. He was Top Winning BIS Dog all breeds in Germany in 2019. There are so many dogs that meant/mean a lot to me, breeding-wise, character-wise, at shows, to name them all , would go beyond the scope. What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why. The USA National, still the place to be to maybe find a new stunning dog. Do you judge? (if not please comment if you would like to in the future.) Who is the greatest Afghan Hound you have ever had the pleasure of judging/ seeing? A: I started very late with judging (4 yrs ago, after 37 yrs in the breed) I have judged in Australia, USA, Norway, South Africa, France, Spain, Germany and by the time you read this in Hungary also.


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOIUND .

As many of the dogs I have judged are still being shown, I do not want to mention any names. I am in the process of training to judge the entire FCI group X (Greyhounds), at the moment I’m licensed for Irish Wolfhounds, Sloughi, Whippet as well as Basenji. Please name three Afghan Hounds that you wished you owned/bred. These can be any dogs in any point of history. I have to name 5 : Xandali Izabeau Of Boanne, Karakush Irresistable U, Blue Shah Of Grandeur, Applause Majic Show and Kyros von Katwiga. What do you wish all judges knew about the Afghan Hound before judging them? That Afghan Hounds are sight-hounds, hunters and athletes. They are not a huge toy breed that only needs coat! Look through all the hair, when you judge them, go not “over them , go “through them”!!! They need muscle, substance and strength, without being spongy or clumsy, or ribbed without muscle. Pay attention to the unique gait. Don’t be dazzled by long, swinging masses of hair, they don’t make the special gait. Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows? Please give reasons for your preference. In the past it was of course the specialties, but unfortunately the number of entries has gone down so dramatically that we have almost the same number of entries here at specialties as at all breed shows. Then it is of course more interesting to compete in the group/BIS competitions at all breeds shows. Of course there are still the few outstanding special shows, like Skokloster, Donaueschingen, which should be a must for every lover of the breed. There is no denying that the standard of presentation of dogs across North America is very high, do you feel that sometimes the grooming is taken too far?

I think grooming in Russia is overrated, I think in the US everything is nowhere near as professional as it used to be. I always say nobody can do anything for their age, if you can’t walk properly anymore, you have to find a handler for your dogs. But you can do something for your dog’s condition and fitness. Our dogs walk with us every day for at least 1 hour , even though we have a big property. As everyone knows Afghans can get lazy quickly, they need active exercise. A weekly bath is also essential to be successful in the ring. The purpose of dog showing was (and should still be) to evaluate and “show off” breeding stock, do you think for some breeders/owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings? I can’t speak for other breeders, I don’t know what their goals are. For myself, I have remained true to my lines and goals for 37 years now. Almost all of my litters go back to my first litters. Unfortunately I was not so happy with outcrosses in the past. We now have the 7th SBIS Ch.Generation bitches at home. All lived and die here in our home. Of course, you want hard work to be recognized, and that happens in our sport through victories and rankings. Official rankings in this sense have never existed in Germany, I don’t know for what reason, I’m not sure if this one has any disadvantages... What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of pedigree dogs. The last two pandemic years were very hard for all of us, of course also for the dog world. I hope that we can all get back to normal, but maybe this has shown us all that there is no substitute for health, that it is still a hobby that it is meant to be enjoyable and something that most of us do in our spare time. I hope that it is once again primarily about the love for the dog, without wanting to detract from the professional work of the really good, loving handlers.

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MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND

ALOUANN Afghan Hounds LIZ & CLAIRE MILARD


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

breeder to add an A to it as when people read a directory (was the time before the internet.) you read the front and back but never the middle so we would always be seen. It worked great as A also stood for Afghans. Liz: We have been very lucky across our time to handle various breeds. For me, this led to my love for Lhasa Apsos. We have owned them since 1996 and bred one litter. I only have one living with us at a time but they are a perfect breed to live with the Afghan Hounds.

Please tell our readers how you got involved with the world of pedigree dogs, the Afghan Hound and dog shows. (please mention your kennel name, it’s meaning and any other breeds you are involved with.) LIZ: We had an old family friend who lived in Jersey in the Channel Island where we used to visit for holidays. They showed Afghan Hounds and had mated their bitch Khorinyas Rum Punch to the Crufts BIS Winner Ch Viscount Grant. The litter was due to whelp after we had left but to our delight, the puppies arrived early, our father became a midwife and this beautiful bitch came out who we named Velvet as she looked just like it.

Claire: Many years ago I was at a show in Belgium and I fell in love with the most beautiful red greyhound bitch, who at first I presumed was foreign but who in fact turned out to come from Rochdale UK from the famous Windspiel Greyhound Kennels, I said if you ever breed from her I would love a puppy, the rest is history. A year later I had the most beautiful blue brindle Greyhound male called Diego who went on to become UK, Belgium, International Champion Windspiel Northern Steel for Alouann. He won 14 CC’s many reserves and had huge success with multiple group placing’s with the pinnacle winning 2 UK championship groups at Southern Counties and Bournemouth where he went on to be awarded Reserve Best In Show. He was a multi

We asked our parents if we could have her and surprisingly, they said yes. Velvet arrived in the autumn of 1989 and started our passion, not just for Afghan Hounds but also for showing. As we both were young, Claire was 15 and I was 12, we were not only involved in breed showing but heavily involved in junior handling where we were able to travel the world and gain those core skills required to handle and present your dog to their best advantage. Claire: Our kennel name is Alouann, it is a combination of both our middle names Louise and Ann. We were then told by an old English Beagle BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

group winner in 4 countries. After Diego was ready to retire, I approached the Newsham’s again for a puppy from his sister and along came “Parker” SBIS UK, Netherlands, International Ch Windspiel Northern Scribe for Alouann WW’18. Parker had a hugely successful career winning 14CC’s in a short show career. The highlight was winning the World Winner title in the Netherlands at the world show, he too had many successful group placings both here and abroad, sadly I lost Parker earlier this year in a tragic accident while he was out running, life will never be the same and at this stage I’m not sure I will have any more Greyhound, but I hope in the future in some way Greyhounds will still be part of my life. Where did you get your foundation Afghan Hound and what breeders (if any) do you work with today? Liz: Our first Afghan was Elangeni Dancing Shadow bred by Pamela and Stuart Mottershaw. She became our foundation bitch for our kennel and won 1CC and 2RCC’s, one of which was at Crufts 1996 under breed specialist Angus Mcdonald.

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Claire: We got to know Birgit Ferguson of the famous Tahkira Afghans in Australia as Birgit had a litter by our Aladin, we found we hold highly all the same values for the breed and importance on health and temperament as well as how an Afghan should confirm to the standard. We were thrilled to be offered a grandson of Aladin by Birgit as she had 3 from the litter which she had run on that she thought would be perfect for the the UK. This was Benson SBIS BIS UK, LUX, Belgium, International, Netherlands, Champion Tahkira like it like that (imp Aust). Benson won 19 CC’s & 19 RCC’s in the UK, with his highlight winning Reserve Best In Show at Leeds Championship show 10 years to the day after his grandfather Aladin had won Best in show there. Benson was highly successful in the rings in Europe as well as the UK and has sired litters and has Champion offspring. Due to covid19 I decided to retire Benson earlier than planned though by this time he was 10 years of age, at the age of 9 he was the UK’s Top #1 Afghan Hound in 2019 proving our breed is one that should get better and better with age. He won many CC’s from the Veteran class. At the start of 2020 I was excited


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

at the opportunity again for us to work closely with Birgit when she offered us BIS Australian Ch Tahkira Affogato (imp Aust) he has only been to a handful of shows since they restarted and won the CC and Best in show at our parent club specialty a few weeks ago and is starting to make his mark in the breed. We are excited for him to mature and look forward to the future with him. Liz: For ease, Claire houses the males and I house the bitches. For the girls which we own, these are either bred by us or in the case of our current show bitch Calahorra Moonlite N Dreams of Tico at Alouann, she has an Alouann bred dam. In the case of breeding, we don’t work with only certain people but look at sires worldwide, research and deep dive into pedigrees, evaluate siblings and progeny and then choose the right dog for our bitch. I love spending many hours looking at pedigrees aswell as photos and videos. I have built up a vast knowledge of different lines which we use when evaluating males to breed from. Also, due to our handling involvement, we have been travelling over to shows in Europe and the USA from an early age so that enabled us to see a lot of the dogs in the flesh which pedigrees our line bred too. Who was your mentor in the breed when you started out and do you still have mentors today? Liz: Within the breed when we started we had mentors from old English breeders such as Carol Sturgeon Walkden (Alyshan) and Roy Wilson/ Ian Hodgson (Khonistan). Everyone should be constantly learning and improving. Our current mentor is Lynda Race (Kaskarak) who also co-owns our current Afghan Hound show team with us. Claire: On the presentation side, we were lucky to have mentors such as Mike Gadsby (Afterglow), Peter Frost (Dzum) and Louise and Jim Hickie (Gengala) to guide us on not only presentation of the dogs but handling too. A huge mentor to me not just in Afghan’s but steering my way through the show world has been Chris Amoo (Sade). Chris has always been so supportive to Liz and I since BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

we were teenagers and our breeding, which goes back to our foundation bitch Velvet who was by his Crufts BIS winner Ch Viscount Grant. Are you currently mentoring anyone in the breed, and if not do you have time to mentor a new person that is passionate about Afghan Hound? Claire: We have always encouraged new people into the breed, not just those who have bought a puppy from us. Afghans are a declining and aging breed in the UK with hardly any new or young people coming through. Lifestyle’s have changed and the Afghan can be perceived as too much work which is a myth that needs to change. In the UK, our judging program has also changed to include mentorship. Both Liz and I are part of that mentoring scheme and have mentored people as part of this initiative for new judges. I also along with Michael Coad (Pamploma) have run many handling and training classes which I really enjoy doing and encouraging not only new people in all breeds, but helping established owners and passing on handy tips and assistance to get the best from their dogs. Liz: I set up a Facebook group called “Afghan Hound Generation Next”, the reason I did this was to give people from every breed a platform to ask questions and learn about Afghan Hounds. Many groups have lots of advertising or people are afraid to ask questions, but I always ensure that the group is a friendly place, particularly to new people. No question is too basic or stupid, we all started somewhere. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross, and why? Liz: Linebreeding would be preferred, but for our last few litters we have outcrossed and bred based on phenotype than genotype.

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. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

There is such variation of types worldwide, we know what we want to achieve and if we can not do that line breeding then we will go out to get it.

that patterned Afghans are overlooked because they cannot compete in the hair department or do you believe a good dog wins patterned or un-patterned?

As such, even with outcrossing we have maintained our look and consistency of type across each litter.

Liz: We have just made up our cream patterned girl Ch Alouann Wishes N’Dreams, but this was not an easy process. We had to be very selective on judges, most of which had to be breed specialists as unfortunately the all rounders as a whole do not understand what patterning is.

How have Afghan Hounds changed since you first started showing/breeding? This can be in quality and or presentation. Claire: The ease of importing dogs has changed the look of the Afghan ring immensely, type varies enormously, and we sadly seem to be loosing balance, lots of dogs who are ‘low’ on leg or on the other end of the spectrum we are seeing ‘extreme’ become the ‘trend’ this is not correct. Presentation I would say overall hasn’t changed too much here in the UK Liz: I think the breed has changed massively since we first started. Unfortunately exaggeration has entered the breed and is becoming the norm. When we first started we were told that an Afghan Hound is all about balance. This is not the case in a lot of dogs worldwide. As we know hair is the icing on a perfectly constructed cake, and Afghan Hounds are known for having beautiful long, flowing hair. Do you feel

Claire: Education is key for judges to understand the different coat patterns. We have been told by many judges that within breed seminars patterning is not explained so they do not understand what it is and many are then presumed to just be out of coat. I have awarded a CC to a patterned Bitch who I just loved, she was so primitive and houndy. I wish more judges understood the history of our breed and appreciated both coat types equally. Liz: I have spoken to people worldwide with patterned dogs and they all say the same, that they can only show under certain breed specialists, as Claire says, judges’ education is the only way to do this. Ultimately, no dog should ever win on coat alone, be that full coated or patterned, it should be judged to the standard but then on the other hand, no


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at an Afghan Hound? Claire: Style of high order, they should command you to look at them, Carriage they should move like a sighthound not sadly like is seen more and more throwing there heads back over their shoulders (star gazers we call them.). They should move forward with purpose with that beautiful natural head carriage covering the ground with a light springy gait. I also look for the flow of their outline from the tip of their nose to the ring in their tail, no lumps bumps or breaks in outline. Li: For me, the most important qualities are balance, breed characteristics and that all important spring in the movement which is rarely seen today. Can you, in your own words describe your ideal Afghan Hound?

patterned dog should be put down due to its coat only. What is your proudest achievement in the world of Afghan Hounds? Claire: I am extremely proud of our Alouann bred dogs and I love watching owners win with them and sharing that excitement. In the ring for me my goosebump moments were wining Best in Show at Leeds championship show with Aladin but also when he won the Dog CC at Crufts under Paulo Dondina. I have never seen so many people around the ring anywhere in the world. It was such an international class of top dogs from all over Europe, the atmosphere was electric. Liz: For me, I am very proud of the litters we have bred and the success which they have achieved not only in the UK but across Europe and Australia. We have bred UK, International, Irish and Australia champions, with group winning and placing dogs at all breed championship shows and SBIS winners within the UK and Europe. 72

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Liz/Claire: An Afghan should be the king of dogs, have that arrogance where they look through you. It should be balanced all through, with a flowing outline, correct head and eye with those punishing jaws, good length of neck into well laid shoulders, balanced angulation front and rear, level topline, prominent hipbones, correct fallaway and tailset, demonstrating the smooth and springy movement with a style of high order. Who is your personal most successful dog (show ring, litter box or stud.)? Claire: Our most successful dogs in the ring have been Aladin UK, New Zealand Grand, Australian Grand Ch Rainbow Aladin of Jhanzi (imp) and Benson UK, Bel, NL, Lux, Int CH Tahkira Like it like that (imp) both held the sought after Top Dog positions here in the UK on multiple occasions and who between them won 33 CCs, 4 UK hound groups and a Reserve Best in show and Best in Show at UK Championship shows, they have both also proved themselves as producers siring multiple champions worldwide.


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

Liz: Our most successful dam to date is Alouann Moonlight N Roses. In her one and only litter she has produced 3 champion daughters: Ch Alouann Glitz N’Glamour Avec Algrahart who also won a UK group at Three Counties Ch Show, Ch Alouann Wishes N’Dreams who had a Group 2 at Maastricht International show in Holland and Australian Ch Alouann Red Hot N Sassy to Tico. In addition, there is: Alouann Mr High N’Mighty to Grenwood who has won 2cc’s, 3rcc’s and a Group 3 placing at Driffield Ch show, Alouann Diamonds N’Pearls with Purplequeen 1cc and 3rcc’s and Alouann Steal N’The show 4rcc’s. What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why? Liz: ine is Crufts, it is such a special show and will always remain ‘the world’s greatest dog show’. Claire: I agree with Liz that it would be Crufts, I have shown all over the world, but there is still something magic about Crufts.

as always to perfection by Michael Canalizzo who as a handler I have admire since a teenager. Australian Supreme Ch Khandu U got the look, Onyx I had the pleasure of judging him in Brisbane and awarding him Best in show, he is as close to the standard as you can get. UK Ch Tejas Conquistador, Riot she was just beautiful in and out of the ring, a total showgirl and I had the pleasure to know her in her home environment, she had the most stunning temperament and adored Mike Gadsby who worshiped her equally. To see them in the ring together was something special. Liz: This was very difficult to get down to three but I have chosen Aust Gr Ch & USA Ch Khandhu Amore Amalfi, AM CH Stormhill’s Who’s Zoomin Who and AM CAN CH Casbar Sugar-N-Spice. I though, also agree with Claire’s choices. Interestingly she awarded Oynx his first SBIS and I think I awarded his last SBIS in his career. Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows? Please give reasons for your preference.

Which Afghan Hound breeder do you respect most, anywhere in the world. (past or present) Liz: For me, it is Paul and Pauline Hewitt of Khandhu Afghans. Generation after generation they have consistently produced quality Afghan Hounds. Claire: Obviously I will say Birgit Ferguson at Tahkira due to our close relationship however there are many, many breeders in Australia I admire and I do believe this is what led me to exhibit and present how I do in the ring today. Please name three Afghan Hound’s that you wished you owned/bred. These can be any dogs in any point of history. Claire: Oh this was hard! Just 3 ! well that would be Ch Tryst of Granduer, we saw her in the flesh at Westminster and she was just electric, handled

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Liz: I don’t have any preference to be honest. Claire: Personally I prefer all breed, only purely as I have so many friends in other breeds, I love the day out catching up, I also enjoy watching the groups and learning about other breeds, it’s also the thrill of getting through to the ‘big rings’ and having space for the dogs to really move out and they love the atmosphere. There is also something special to a breed win at a specialty. The purpose of dog showing was (and should still be) to evaluate and “show off” breeding stock, do you think for some breeders/owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings? Liz: I think with the decline in breeders we are seeing in the UK that it is more about winning than breeding. We are seeing some younger handlers in the ring but unfortunately most of these will not own the breed themselves. We have also seen a large influx of imports lately as we don’t have the litters being born here. I do have serious concerns of what will happen to the breed in the UK in the future.

Claire: I think the issue moving forward as less and less people breed in the UK, people and newcomers are buying puppies overseas without research and this can be seen more and more as we see a lack of consistency in the rings. We all want to win but it’s the homework, knowledge and research behind that gets you to that point which counts. What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of pedigree dogs? Liz: My future goal is to continue to consistently breed quality Afghan Hounds. The same as any other UK breed specialist, I would love to judge my breed at Crufts one day. That has to be an ultimate in any judge’s career. Claire: Full agreement in Liz’s answer, I would love us both to judge Crufts. We have been extremely lucky to judge all over the world but that would be our ultimate aspiration. Also, to carry on with Afghans who confirm to the standard with that extra bit of magic and showmanship who have outstanding temperaments both at home and in the show ring and bring so much joy to our lives.



MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND

BOXADAN Afghan Hounds L O T T E JO RGE N S E N


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

Together with the Boxadan prefix, I took over three Afghan Hounds from Hanne, and started to show, to breed and to win! In 1976 I got my first World Winner, when Ch. Boxadan El Shaba won at the World Dog Show in Austria, and the rest of my life, I’m involved with dogs. Besides Afghan Hounds, I have showed and bred a few other breeds. These include American Cocker Spaniels, Whippet, Lhasa Apso, Poodles and Dachshund. Where did you get your foundation Afghan Hound and what breeders (if any) do you work with today?

Please tell our readers how you got involved with the world of pedigree dogs, the Afghan Hound and dog shows. (please mention your kennel name, it’s meaning and any other breeds you are involved with.) I have more or less had dogs since my childhood, but I got my first Afghan Hound in 1971. Some friends couldn’t have their Afghan anymore, and they asked if I would have him. His name was Davlen Croupade, and I took him to a dog show where he was awarded second in the class. I liked the show, but I wanted to win. I went to the lady that was winning and asked her to help me. The lady was Hanne Lassen, and she had the Boxadan Kennel. We became friends, and after some years she asked me if I would take over the kennel as she was more interested in horses. Boxadan Kennel was registered in Denmark on November 2 1965, when Hanne Lassen was breeding Boxers. As Denmark is called Danmark in Danish, the name became Boxadan, meaning BOXer from DANmark. In 1972 the Danish Afghan Hound Club was founded with Finn Lassen ( Hanne’s husband ) and my husband Ulf Jorgensen on the board.

When I started breeding, I saw the beautiful El Khyria Afghans in Sweden, so I approached Christina Jernberg, and she became my friend and mentor. I cannot mention one specific foundation dog, but the El Khyria lines was my foundation stock. I don’t work with any breeders today, as


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

I’m not breeding anymore, but along the way I have had a good co-operation with Iren Naarits, Oshanameh kennel in Estonia. Who was your mentor in the breed when you started out and do you still have mentors today? My mentor from the very beginning was Christina Jernberg from El Khyria Kennel in Sweden. She has a remarkable eye for breeding, not only Afghan Hounds but also Pekingese, Chow-Chow, Chickens and Guinea Pigs – you name it! She was my Afghan Hound mentor until I stopped breeding. I also had two other mentors, who I miss soo much today. Birgitha Runmarker from Sweden was my ‘Sighthound Mentor’ and Ole Staunskjaer from Denmark was my ‘All breed mentor’. Unfortunately, they both passed away far too soon. Are you currently mentoring anyone in the breed, and if not do you have time to mentor a new person that is passionate about Afghan Hound? I’m mentoring a few people in different aspects of the dogworld, and I’m happy to share my knowledge with anyone who deserves it. I don’t want to waste my time with new people who don’t want to listen, or who have a lot of ‘mentors’ with different opinions. Unfortunately, many new dog people don’t think they need a mentor – they know better themselves. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross, and why? I definitely prefer linebreeding, but it requires excellent quality in your breeding stock. The better dogs I had, the closer linebreeding I did. This way I could keep the type I liked and I knew what I would get. Also, the litters were very uniform. The old and very respected and well-known judge Hans Lehtinen said to me: “ Lotte, you can 78

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. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

breed your bitches to a goat, and still have nice Afghans”. Very often when people see a nice puppy, they first ask for the sire of the puppy. I ask first for the mother, which in my opinion is the most important of the parents. Sometimes you can need an outcross, which I also have done, but most of the time I never used the results from an outcross further on. How have Afghan Hounds changed since you first started showing/breeding? This can be in quality and or presentation. Hmmm, it’s a difficult question, as Afghan Hounds have changed differently in different parts of the world. In the USA they have changed a lot. In the UK they haven’t changed much, and in Germany half have changed a lot and the other half have not changed. I always preferred what is called the classic Scandinavian type, but you don’t see that much anymore.

I miss the old strong and experienced breeders, who were breeding their own line. I miss when you came to a dogshow and saw all the different Afghan Hounds, that you easily could see which Afghans were from which breeder. Today they all look very mixed, and it’s difficult to recognize their lineage. Of course, the grooming has improved in line with the developments in grooming products, and the presentation has become much more professional. Some handlers try to make the handling to a ‘performance’, and forget it’s the dog who has the lead role. What is your proudest achievement in the world of Afghan Hounds? That is hard to say, I think there has been so many proud moments for me. I was proud every time my mentors said I was doing fine. I was proud when my own breeding went Dog of the Year of All Breed in Denmark. I was proud every time I went back from a World Dog Show with a World Winner ( I have been at 10 World Dog Shows and have 11 World Winner titles with Afghans, and not junior- or veteran titles, and it was in the BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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1980’s, when you had 200 Afghans entered ), and when my Afghans were winning Best in Show, which has happened more than 200 times, both at Specialties and International All-Breed shows. I’m also proud when an Afghan Hound breeder is successful with my breeding, and proud when my males was the Stud Dog of the Year in the UK and in the USA. I was very proud, when I received the honorable ‘Golden Pin’ from the Danish Kennel Club for significant breeding, and when I was invited to judge Afghan Hounds at Cruft’s and at the World Dog Show and I’m proud, when the Best In Show Magazine asked me for an interview. What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at the Afghan Hound? I think the breed characteristics are very important in any breed. In Afghan Hounds, it is especially the expression and the movement, but also the coat and the tail. Especially the expression and attitude is essential for an Afghan Hound. The males have to look as if they are a King, and the females as a strong Queen. The movement does not have to be “showy”, but easy and powerful at the same time. However, it is also important for me that they have a strong underjaw. I hate when they look like a shark. Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Afghan Hound? The ideal Afghan Hound is described in the standard. All people can read the standard, but not all understand the standard. If more people could understand the standard, we would never have had the recent discussion about the “Panda Afghans”, which made it necessary to change the standard. Who is your personal most successful dog (show ring, litter box or stud.)? Please don’t ask me this. It’s as difficult to answer, as if you asked me who I loved most of 80

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my children or grandchildren. I love them all, and I feel that many of my dogs has been successful. Some in the show ring, some in the litter box and some as studdogs. Who is most successful out of Lady Gaga, Angela Merkel or Serena Williams ? The most successful dog is for me a dog who lives a long life and makes the owner happy. What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why? Of course, my favorite show is ‘Show of Winners’ in Denmark, which is organized by my husband Ulf since 1981. The atmosphere is outstanding, the dogs are all excellent and the exhibitors are friendly and happy. But besides that, in the past I loved the Skokloster Sighthound Show in Sweden, ( where I won Best in Show ) In the present, I love the Sighthound Show in Donaueschingen in Germany. Not to forget the wonderful Dog Show in Santa Barbara in California, where I have both showed and judged. Such a shame it’s so far away from Denmark. As I judge, I was pleasantly surprised to judge at an International Show in Katowice in Poland a few years ago. It was so well organized, and the show secretary Barbara Czaslawska, was one of the most friendly and effective secretaries I have ever met. Which Afghan Hound breeder do you respect most, anywhere in the world. (past or present) That’s my secret. The breeders I respect most, they know it – and the breeders I don’t respect, they know it probably too. Please name three Afghan Hound’s that you wished you owned/bred. These can be any dogs in any point of history. I wish I was the owner of Ch. Tryst of Grandeur. She was such a beautiful Afghan Hound, and then Michael Canalizo had to do what I told him to do, wouldn’t that be fun?


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

From the past, Ch. El Khyrias Hazztaffer was a ‘one in a million’ dog – that’s why I have been linebreeding on him – but he was a dog you should experience live. No photo or video of today does him justice. From the present, my BOB winner from Donaueschingen in 2019 Ch. Alaqadar Rigoletto “Riggs” is absolutely an awesome Afghan Hound. Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows? Please give reasons for your preference. I really don’t care, as there are pros and cons to both. As long as the judge is knowledgeable and experienced, which is hard to find today. At all breed shows you meet a lot of friends with other breeds, and at specialties you meet a lot of enemies with the same breed – and some friends too. The purpose of dog showing was (and should still be) to evaluate and “show off” breeding stock, do you

think for some breeders/owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings? Unfortunately, I find it’s only about ribbons and ranking – and a lot of party and showing themselves and their fashion clothes too. Today, it’s impossible to base your breeding from what you see in the showring and from who is winning. Some handlers are so good to hide the faults, that the dog is winning much more than deserved. Some judges appreciate the handling much more than the quality of the dog. What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of pedigree dogs? I’m too old for future goals. I feel that I was lucky to be a part of the Afghan Hound world in the “Golden age”, with big registration numbers all over the world.There was a great number of Afghans at the shows and excellent all over quality. My wish for the future will be, that the “Golden age” will return.




MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND

OSHANAMEH Afghan Hounds I R E N NA A RT I S


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

had a soft coat that was matted all over and I opened matts centimeter by centimeter every 5 days, while making sure he would not loose a single hair that did not need to fall off his coat. Of course, in these days grooming products were not nearly as good as they are today. He did not have a natural short coat, so I was trimming him with blisters on my fingers but I never gave up! I made every mistake possible. I took it as a lesson and learned from these mistakes.

Please tell our readers how you got involved with the world of pedigree dogs, the Afghan Hound and dog shows. (please mention your kennel name, it’s meaning and any other breeds you are involved with.)

Although it has always been and always will be Afghans, we have had several other breeds along the way at our home – Great Danes, Dandie Dinmont Terrier, Shih Tzu, Portuguese Podengos (medio) and Miniature Smooth Dachshunds. In addition to Afghan Hounds, we have bred a litter of Portuguese Podengo (medio) and a few litters of Miniature Smooth Dachshunds.

I am second generation breeder, so I have been involved with the world of pedigree dogs for as long as I can remember. My Mother started breeding Afghan Hounds under the kennel prefix Oshanameh’s. I officially joined the kennel when I became 18 years old and now my daughter Alexandra is there with us. That makes us 3 generations of breeding Oshanameh’s Afghan Hounds. Our first Afghan was an import from Germany, Oshanameh El Gharib (from Christel Lemke, El Gharib kennel) and ever since that dog, all of our breeding has been carrying her name in front of their registered names. I was 11 when my mother got me my very first Afghan. His name was Bosse at home, Firesoul’s Australian Boss and he was all mine! Being young and full of energy and enthusiasm we did a lot of shows and travelled around. I got to learn the grooming and how to take care of the breed. Looking back, I am glad that he was far from an easy dog. He did not stand still for a second and made me work like crazy to get him stacked. He

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Where did you get your foundation Afghan Hound and what breeders (if any) do you work with today?

Who was your mentor in the breed when you started out and do you still have mentors today?

Our first female came from Germany and my mother used all connections to get her. That was deep in the Soviet times when borders were closed and no one was allowed to leave the country. My mother managed to get permission to travel abroad from behind the iron curtains. She was allowed to take only limited money with her and with every single penny she had with her, she bought… a dog. Haana produced 3 litters of puppies. One litter with an import male from France and for the second litter my mother pulled off another miracle and travelled all the way to Germany to mate her. Third litter was sired by Kirman Ishmin from Finland and this was the moment when our love for the Nordic lines was lit. Ever since then, that has been our direction.

I have been so fortunate to have several old breeders guide me through my journey in the dog world. I am forever grateful for Lotte Jorgensen, who has taught me so much. I remember my first trip to Lotte and Ulf’s home where I stayed for a couple of days. Lotte had big boxes of photos that I had the privilege to go through. Everyone who knows me, knows I have a terrible memory on names and numbers but I know her phone number and address along with zip code off by heart, and I have not sent her any packages or mail for at least 20 years.

Our current breeding program is based on two bitches, Boxadan I Better Ask Mom and Boxadan Know Me To Love Me that we got from Lotte Jorgensen, Boxadan kennel from Denmark. These two half sisters are in every pedigree that we have out there today. Ever since from the beginning, we never took an easy path or shortcuts in breeding. It was always all or nothing.

Another thing what I strongly believe in is to not only seek knowledge only within your own breed, but also have an open mind and listen to breeders from other breeds. I met Heli Sairola (Helisain Great Danes) from Finland when I got a Great Dane from her back in 1997. I loved her tips on raising large breed puppies into big and healthy dogs. I still use some of her instructions when feeding our litters during the first year of their life. The Afghan Standard is so general without much details. Everyone can read it, but to really know the breed, reading is not enough – earning the trust of a good breeder to get the inside information is worth a fortune! Are you currently mentoring anyone in the breed, and if not do you have time to mentor a new person that is passionate about Afghan Hound? I am trying my best to support my puppy buyers around the world. I have several very enthusiastic and hopefully future breeders amongst them. Learning is an ongoing process, while I still feel there is so much more left for me to learn, I do my best to share my experience and knowledge to those that are sincerely interested in it. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or


outcross, and why? We believe in and use quite strong line breeding. I am fortunate to have inherited the wonderful healthy quality lines from the breeders who no longer breed. Of course, every once in a while it is necessary to go out in the breeding, but after going out we always go back in. I know my lines and I have a pretty good idea what I am going to get from my combinations. They are healthy, long living and continue to be the same family type. We have also done quite a lot of frozen semen insemination’s. Some using very old semen. One of our recent litters was linebreeding using frozen semen from one of our foundation females’ litter brother. How have Afghan Hounds changed since you first started showing/breeding? This can be in quality and or presentation. What I miss from the past is the good old breeders who each bred for their own vision of type and stayed true to it through all of their breeding. You could look at a large class standing at a specialty, and you could easily tell who comes from what kennel without having to look into the catalogue. Unfortunately, this is not a quality we see much anymore. A lot of new breeders seek their

information from Google. They neither respect nor appreciate the knowledge of old breeders. Instead of “knowing it all” and “I Googled it”, new people should rather seek contact with those that preserved the bred for us to work with today. Most new people unfortunately do not have the possibility and privilege to see the high quality dogs from the past. Many have never seen a proper front, ground covering movement with that special spring, or know what a strong underjaw looks like. As I said previously, the Afghan Hound Standard is so general without many details. Everyone can read it, but to really know the breed reading is not enough. What is your proudest achievement in the world of Afghan Hounds? I would say that is my boy Tony – Oshanameh’s Mark My Words. He was shown a bit as a junior and did really well at shows as a youngster, winning several junior winner titles including European Junior Winner. Then he stayed home to mature and I kind of never really thought about taking him back out to shows. At the age of 5, I entered him in two show weekends in the beginning of a year to “get the last CAC he needs to finish some champion titles”. I am never nervous when showing my dogs, but with him on a leash I felt so insecure. He was BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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not me showing him but the other way around. Despite still in top condition, we decided to retire when he was on the very top, so Tony will not be shown any more. That’s another dog that has taught me a lot and boy it has been fun! What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at the Afghan Hound? Strong head that includes strong underjaw and small eyes, correct coat quality and patterning, flowing ground covering movement. Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Afghan Hound? An ideal Afghan Hound is the King Of All Dogs. The dog you will notice immediately. An ideal Afghan is strong and well built, balanced all over and moves on the ground as if he owns it. The small eyes with oriental expression should give you chills, not ever give you a feeling as if you are petting a companion dog. showing to perfection, despite not having ever done any kind of stacking for several years, he had not had a show leash on ever since his junior class days. He was stacking perfect and moved with the best attitude ever – tail up, head up. But… I knew I had absolutely zero control over him. That dog was doing everything only because he chose to do it and not because I was “showing” him. My hands were shaking when showing him at least for the next 10 shows, until I understood him fully. He was doing his stuff in the ring and I just tagged along in the ring. On that first weekend out, he went BIS 2 on Saturday and won the BIS on Sunday. He started the show year as number one at the Estonian Kennel Club Top Dog All Breeds list, and never, not once through the year he lost the number one position. It was always fun to enter the big ring with him after those first 10 shows. I think no one ever noticed that it was 88

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Who is your personal most successful dog (show ring, litter box or stud.)? For me breeding quality comes always first, that would be “Tweety”, Boxadan Know Me To Love Me. She produced two gorgeous litters and is present in every pedigree of Oshanameh’s Afghans. I loved the consistency of her offspring, and besides that, they all had wonderful coat quality. Most of her offspring never needed trimming and that has stayed so even in the following generations. Tweety’s puppies had natural short hair on face, saddle and tail and really needed no cleaning at all. What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why? I love specialties! Number one these days would be Donaueschingen Sighthound Festival. I have attended it both as a judge and as a participant, my trips have been wonderful! It’s so much more


. MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND .

than just a show, its meeting friends from all over the world and going into the ring is just a small part of it. I was so sad to hear this year’s show was canceled due to COVID and hope it will be arranged again in 2022. Which Afghan Hound breeder do you respect most, anywhere in the world. (past or present) I have to name two now. Lotte Jorgensen. Without her and her Boxadan kennel, we would not be where we are today and Oshanameh’s Afghans would not be the same. She has given us breeding material to work with that does not exist anywhere in the world these days. Second would be Christina Jernberg, El Khyrias kennel in Sweden who clearly had a vision and a goal in her breeding career. It is a loss for the breed that they do not breed any more these days. Please name three Afghan Hound’s that you wished you owned/bred. These can be any dogs in any point of history. Choice Wild West from Finland, Boxadan Alexis The Bitch from Denmark, Genesis Red Cloud from USA. I wish I could turn back time! Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows? Please give reasons for your preference. It really does not matter so much, as long as the company is good, there is strong competition and nice dogs in the ring. As a bonus, a breed specialist judging. The purpose of dog showing was (and should still be) to evaluate and “show off” breeding stock, do you think for some breeders/owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings? Oh yes, it has become so much more commercial unfortunately. It is especially obvious when judging as there is less and less breeders and owners showing the dogs and mostly handlers. I

think the best dog should win no matter who is on the other end of the leash. Breeders should take pride for their work. Being a successful show dog does not make one a valuable stud dog or brood bitch. Some of our best females in the litter box have not been out at shows perhaps more than once or a couple of times. What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of pedigree dogs? My own future goal and wish is to keep Oshanameh’s Afghans alive through the next generations. I am fortunate that my daughter Alexandra has continued our path and has become genuinely interested and involved in our breeding. My wishes for the sport of pedigree dogs in general is it to do more co-operation with other breeders and to be honest. Many breeds are getting problems that were not there before. We all have a goal to keep our breeds alive and for that to happen, we need healthy dogs and healthy lines in the gene pools.


MEET THE BREED: SALUKI

QIRMIZI Salukis N I C K L A S E I R K S S ON


. MEET THE BREED: SALUKI .

finer points of the breed. It was also on this trip that I first saw the smooth Saluki Ch Afking Baghdad’s Katulnas Khalif. He was a very impressive dog and to this day I can not think of one who has made a bigger impression on me. He is also the reason for me importing his grandson from Australia, Baghdad Globetrotter.

Please tell our readers how you got involved with the world of pedigree dogs, the Saluki and dog shows. We never had dogs in my family when I was growing up. It wasn’t until my older sister moved away from home and got her first dog that I even knew I liked dogs so much. This was back in 1978 and her dog was a Swedish Lapphund. We started taking this dog to shows and I remember that at his first show, an open show, he ended up as BIS-3. Open shows here can have 400-500 dogs or even more, so we thought this was fantastic. When he attended his second show he won the CAC (which you don’t win in every class in Sweden.), I was hooked. I started going to shows in the neighbouring cities just to look. I loved watching the different breeds and trying to learn. After a few years of looking at different breeds I started to take a liking to the Sighthound breeds. I got my first Saluki in 1985. I was still young and living with my mother and her husband, so I co owned the Saluki with my sister and it lived with her. I showed her and she finished her title quite easily, but was never a big winner. In 1987 I went on my first trip to California where I visited the Santa Barbara and Lompoc shows. That trip was so important to me from a learning point of view. To sit ringside with knowledgeable breeders and watch hundreds of Salukis day after day was very educational. I started to learn the the

He came to me in July 1990. By that time, Paula Bockman Chato and Ron Chato of Baghdad Salukis moved with their dogs from Canada, I think it was to Australia which is why I imported Globetrotter from Australia. I also imported two other Salukis from their kennel, one of them being the smooth Ch Baghdad Phantom. I have also imported several Salukis from the USA. I now breed Salukis under the Qirmizi prefix and I have since 1994 bred 19 litters. I became a judge in 2003 and I have judged in most European countries, Australia and the USA. I judge all breeds in FCI Group 10, along with Pharaoh Hounds, English Cockers, American Cockers and English Springer Spaniels.


. MEET THE BREED: SALUKI .

them and also from other breeders I got to know there. Elizabeth and Julian Guthrie of Elarabie Salukis among others. That year was so important to me and my education in Salukis and pure bred dogs in general. It was a very intense year with kennel chores every day and shows on the weekends. I had never known or seen such dedication to breeding and showing. There was such focus on that and it was totally new to me. I believe that year there with them was the equivalent to ten years at least if I had just stayed in Sweden, that is how much I learned.

Q: Where did you get your foundation Saluki and what breeders (if any) do you work with today? A: Around the same time, or some time before I imported Globetrotter, another breeder in Sweden imported two other Salukis from the same kennel in Australia. One of them was Globetrotter’s half sister Ch Baghdad Azahd Sahar. I was so lucky that this bitch after some time was given to me. She was an exquisite black fringed red of beautiful type. Very exotic. She was my foundation and I am hoping to continue my bitch line from her when I breed her look alike Ch Qirmizi Rivendelle next year. I can’t say that I work closely with any other breeder, but of course I have fellow breeders from different parts of the world with whom I discuss things and also very clever breeders of other breeds whom I respect a lot. There is a lot to learn from them too and talking to them can be a real eye opener at times. Who was your mentor in the breed when you started out? Do you still have mentors today? My first real mentors in the breed were Paula Bockman Chato and Ron Chato of Baghdad Salukis. I spent a whole year with them in Australia when I was young learning so much about the breed from 92

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Other very important people to me have been Ute Lennartz of Mata Salamata Salukis in Germany and Birgitha Runmarker of Azadi Salukis in Sweden. Birgitha is unfortunately no longer with us but I still have a lot of contact with Ute Lennartz. I am very happy that she has a young dog bred by me who is showing a lot of promise. I also have a few other people within and outside the breed I also talk to. Are you currently mentoring anyone in the breed, and if not do you have time to mentor a new person that is passionate about Salukis? I can’t say that I really mentor anyone at the moment or that I ever did. There are some younger/newer breeders and exhibitors asking questions and of course I am happy to answer them to the best of my knowledge. The same goes for some new judges in Scandinavia who I am happy to help if I can. I would be happy to be helpful to any breeder if I was asked. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross, and why? Without a doubt I have done more outcrosses and I have been very lucky with them. That does not mean that I prefer outcrosses. I would not hesitate to breed closer as long as the individual has the qualities I am looking for in a stud dog for my


. MEET THE BREED: SALUKI .

female. I could never breed to a dog only because of it’s pedigree. The dogs must also have certain traits that I look for. So far I have been able to find some of those qualities in individuals from other lines, but I certainly hope to connect the lines I have used sooner or later. That is my plan. Of course a dog I breed to must carry a certain look through it’s pedigree as well. I always find it very hard to find suitable stud dogs, but for the future I think I have a few very interesting options. Partially from my own breeding but also from recent Portuguese import Elamir Gypsy Power bred by Mario Cabral. Still, I will not be afraid to do more outcrosses as long as I feel that the look/type is what I like and that there are qualities to gain from it. I am also very happy to say that I have access to some very special dogs for the future, one of them being Baghdad Globetrotter whom I have semen stored from with very dear friends Elena and Mike Edwards of Shiraz Salukis in California. How have Salukis changed since you first started showing/breeding? I believe that the breed changes in cycles. It very much depends on what the dominating breeders at the moment are breeding and what styles of dogs they have.

from the side though? I wonder about that. I did not quite have the knowledge to see it as a beginner. I sure do see that there could be many better/more typical individuals around now though. But I guess as long as breeders don’t breed for movement or as long as they deny that their dogs have a problem, we will not see an improvement? Presentation is without a doubt much better than when I started. We never had handlers in Scandinavia, and we still don’t. There are however individuals doing a very good job presenting their dogs. Handlers in Europe have struggled for many years I think, but I do see many gifted young handlers now I must say. Handling is so much about knowing your dog’s flaws and virtues and knowing how to deal with them. A piece of advice for any handler is to attend an anatomy class or several. It will be very helpful to you. What is your proudest achievement in the world of Salukis? There has been quite a few moments to be proud of on their own. Qirmizi Ovation’s group win at Crufts or his BIS at Amsterdam winner....or when he was Dog of the Year in Sweden. Qirmizi Cartago’s many BIS wins including Stockholm international in 2003.

Since I started I notice an improvement in temperaments. They are more stable in temperaments without loosing the reserved attitude. Judges must know that it is ok for a Saluki to lean away and not enjoying them touching it as long as it can be done and they don’t show flight behaviour. Another area where the breed has improved is conformation and also front movement. I remember Hans Lehtinen telling me that it wasn’t unusual to see front movement resembling over cooked spaghetti, swirled around in front of you while a Saluki was moving towards you. We don’t see that often today. Have we lost the typical gait

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Qirmizi Global Temptress being Dog of the year in Denmark in 2011 or her brother, Qirmizi Global Challenger being top Hound in Australia 2008. Qirmizi Magnolia’s group win at WDS in Helsinki 2014 or Harley’s (Shiraz California Dreamin’) many BIS’s, among others at EDS in Celje 2010 or at WDS in Salzburg 2012 along with his Dog of the year awards in Sweden. I could mention many more, but I think having had top male or female in the breed, or both since 2000 with the exception of one year is a record I am proud of. And this in a country where the breed by many is considered strongest in the world. This was a lot of rambling of show merits but hey... this is for Best In Show magazine. ;-). What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Saluki? The general appearance is very important to me. Cracking the code for that will make you know what to look for in the breed. “The whole appearance of this breed should give an impression of grace and symmetry and of great speed and endurance coupled with strength and activity”. Grace means style, elegance and beauty among other things and that gives the breed class. Then they also need the power necessary to bring down whatever pray they were hunting in the particular area they were from. To give that hunters appearance they will need to be more than classy. They will also need to be a bit keen to display that athletic capability. A fierce, stylish hunter will not give the correct impression in the ring by looking tired and lazy. To be a little bit on their toes is also important for the correct general appearance. And then of course movement is very important to me, and I mean the movement that is described in the standard. The side movement, “Smooth, 94

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flowing and effortless. Light and lifting. Showing both reach and drive”. Many judges do prioritize what is typical but equally many need to pay attention to what is typical and base decisions on that rather than who is the soundest up and back. That does not make a breed. I sometimes read critiques online where a judge will comment on movement by saying “moves good both ways”. Then I know how they have looked at movement (coming and going) and they have paid zero attention to what is typical for the breed. In these days when so many judges and others are complaining that all breeds are developing into one common breed, it is very important that judges base decisions on what is typical for the breed rather than basic dog quality. With judging like that....no wonder all breeds turn into one. Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Saluki? I think I did pretty much in the previous question answered. They should fulfil that general appearance, have that typical movement and carriage that gives them class along with the impression of athletic capability. They should have a good combination of elegance and substance. Who is your personal most successful dog? As for a show dog that would without a doubt be Shiraz California Dreamin’ who was bred in California by close and very dear friends Elena & Mike Edwards and Valerie Nunes Atkinson. Harley was only shown around 60 times during his career in Sweden, but he still managed to be Dog of the year both in 2009 and 2011. He was also runner up in 2008 as a young dog. I took him to EDS in Celje, Slovenia in 2010 where he was BIS at both the Sighthound show and the European Winner show. He came out of retirement to win BIS at WDS in Salzburg 2012 and was shown again in Orlando the same year to be runner up at both the Eukanuba World Challenge and the AKC National.


In the litterbox I would say that Qirmizi Casablanca, her daughter Qirmizi Global Temptress and the next generations Qirmizi Magnolia. The G litter out of Casablanca by Shiraz Global Storm produced some lovely offspring and Qirmizi Global Temptress was one of them. She in her turn produced the M litter for Qirmizi where Qirmizi Magnolia was the most prominent winner. Magnolia herself was the dam of the P, Q and R litters. Qirmizi Global Temptress is also the dam of the singleton puppy in the O litter, Qirmizi Ovation. Ovation, or Rios, has been the most reliable producer as a stud dog. He has never been used at Qirmiz, yet, but he has produced some very high quality Salukis in the litters sired by him in Europe and Australia. Baghdad Globetrotter is behind many winners around and he was of course the sire of two favourite dogs of mine, Shiraz Global Storm and Shiraz California Dreamin. What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why? There are so many fantastic shows I love to visit.

In Scandinavia it is always a pleasure to visit the Helsinki shows in December each year, as is it to visit the Stockholm international which is held a week prior to the Helsinki ones. What wonderful reasons to visit the Nordic countries and see or compete with the best dogs we have up here. I have been to the Harvest Moon cluster in California probably a dozen times as either a visitor, exhibitor and even once as a judge. Wonderful shows where many breed clubs also have specialties. I will go again for any reason. I have never been to Westminster, but I would love to go one day of course. I will however always prefer Florida in December to New York in February. I love to visit the AKC National which for quite a few years has been held in Orlando. When going there I get to see the most winning dogs in the USA at the time and it is truly something else. That is probably my favourite show to visit. Or that whole week of shows. I will say that I love the answer Eugene Blake gave me when asking him the very same question. His answer was “I hope the next show I go to will be the best show I have been to”. He loves shows and can’t wait to see the next one.

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Which breeder do you respect most, anywhere in the world? There has been and still are so many good breeders around. Some which mainly bred before my time in the breed, and there is no way I can only mention one of all those clever breeders. From pictures and a few videos I have very much admired the look of many Salukis from the Jen Araby kennel. I never got to see them live but several have been very impressive in videos and photos. Some of the most prominent dogs from the Jen Araby kennels are also behind the Baghdad Salukis from where I imported some of my first Salukis. I have loved many of the Baghdads over the years and many had that Jen Araby look. I was fortunate enough to have two Salukis from them with that look. Globetrotter and his half sister Baghdad Azahd Sahar. I finally have that look myself now through my female Qirmizi Rivendelle. I consider her the best I have ever bred. Another breeder I have admired many individuals from is Joan Aaron and Joyce Thaddeo’s of Ariel Salukis. Even though I saw some on that first trip to Santa Barbara, I have mainly seen them on pictures and videos. I love their breed type. Very elegant and graceful. Actually....in 1998 I took Globetrotter to the Santa Barbara/Lompoc weekend and showed him to Joan Aaron who was judging one of the shows there. He was Best Of Winners under Joan and to do so well under a breeder I respect so much was very special to me. A breeder of today that I have the utmost respect for is Valerie Hamilton of Khiva Salukis in the US. She has been around for a long time too. She used two Ariel dogs to keep a certain look for her dogs that was beautiful. A few outcrosses changed the look of her dogs but she maintained the high quality. Please name three Salukis that you wished you owned/bred. These can be any dogs in any point of history. 96

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The first Saluki that always comes to mind is Ch Afking Baghdad’s Katulnas Khalif. He was the smooth grand sire of Baghdad Globetrotter. He had so many of the qualities I look for and I’m so glad I got to see him during my first visit to California in 1987. I will never forget watching him win BOB in a very large entry under Swedish sighthound specialist Göran Bodegård. Another dog I always come to think of is Ute Lennartz’s Ch Mata Salamata Jadaan Khan. I got to see him in 1997 when I bred a Globetrotter daughter to him to produce the C litter. He had a wonderful presence and was very dignified but also very friendly. A beautiful dog in so many ways and he produced outstanding movement for me in that litter. Perhaps I shouldn’t mention one I never saw, but I will anyway. A bitch I only saw in pictures and videos was Ch Ariel Sarih Rih of the Dunes. Breathtakingly beautiful of exquisite breed type bred by Joan Aaron and Joyce Thaddeo of Ariel Salukis. She only produced one litter but type and quality was amazing. Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows? Please give reasons for your preference. That depends so much on the show and the judges. Most specialties can not compare to the major all breed shows around. I admire judges who have achieved as breeders, regardless of their breed. To me they have proven that they have an eye for dogs and I enjoy showing to them. Their opinion is always interesting,as well as of course the opinion of the specialists who have achieved as breeders as well as exhibitors. Specialists do however have “hang ups” and they will at times struggle to look passed them regardless of how good the dog might be. Sometimes a specialist will therefore struggle to find the best overall picture. They just can’t forgive that detail they have such a problem with, even if the rest of the dog is outstanding. It is hard for me to say what I prefer. Again, it depends on the show and the judges.


. MEET THE BREED: SALUKI .

The purpose of dog showing was (and should still be) to evaluate and “show off” breeding stock, do you think for some breeders/owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings? To some it has of course. I mean we are many who enjoy the success,but it is not the main reason for breeding. In general, breeders of Salukis around the world breed for their love of the breed, and for trying to produce Salukis they find typical. Many breeders have a good feel for what they need to improve in their own dogs and they will work hard trying. They will not fall for the temptation of breeding to the most successful show dogs unless of course they feel that those dogs have the qualities they need to improve whatever flaws they might have in their own dogs. I have met breeders (of other breeds) though who can not mention their own dog’s name without first mentioning what the dog has won, and there are some of those around too of course. To some people this has always mattered more than to others. Champion titles are in some countries more or less thrown at the dogs, and I see people bragging about their dog’s wins and it sounds fantastic. I wish however that the titles were worth more than they are in some countries. In England you have to win best in your sex to get the CC. In other countries you might only need to win your class with an excellent grading to get the CAC. Talk about a difference in Ch titles value.

people, and I can and will trust in them. They are for sure the future and the passion they show for what we do gives me faith. With guidance they will keep fighting for the sport of pure bred dogs. Us, the people who love this will have to stay positive. Post positive information about pure breed dogs on social media. Post how so many things are good and successful within the many breeds. That most dogs actually are very healthy and that breeds are doing well. Because if we....the people who love this keep posting negatives about what we do, you can make sure that the opposition will pick up on it and we do not need them getting fuel to their cause of shutting us down or forbidding more breeds, as I understand some countries are trying to do. I hope we will work hard for our cause and that we will let people know that most breeds and individuals actually are doing very well.

What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of pedigree dogs? As far as for myself I hope to keep producing Salukis of a quality that I stand for and like. I will never be a big breeder but hope to breed when I feel I have the quality to do so. As for our sport, which is a lot more important, I hope we will not forget that what we are doing is for the dogs. I hope that the wins will never be more important than the dogs. I hope that breeders, exhibitors and judges realize the responsibility that comes with this that we love so much. I do see many young and very keen new dog

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MEET THE BREED: AFGHAN HOUND

YALAMEH Salukis BA R BA R A W E BE R & C H R I S T I N E S C H A D


. MEET THE BREED: SALUKI .

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross, and why? We figured out that line breeding is the best for our breeding, so we can keep our type in Saluki. How have Salukis changed since you first started showing/breeding?

Please tell our readers how you got involved with the world of pedigree dogs, the Saluki and dog shows. I guess you could say I was born with it, both of us grew up with pedigree dogs and finally in 1999 we established the Yalameh kennel. Where did you get your foundation Saluki and what breeders (if any) do you work with today? Our best foundation bitch was Baghdad MS Congeniality which I imported in 2001 from Australia. Our breeding lines are full of Baghdad Salukis, even today we try to keep this kennel in our lines/kennels. Who was your mentor in the breed when you started out? Do you still have mentors today? Our mentor was Mrs Ursula Knauber. Mrs Knauber had a Greyhound kennel by the name of “Happy Hunter’s”, unfortunately she died some years ago. She was a great sighthound person with fantastic knowledge about breeding and pedigrees. Are you currently mentoring anyone in the breed, and if not do you have time to mentor a new person that is passionate about Salukis? We have a lot of our puppy buyers we support in the showing and breeding, some are very enthusiastic and passionate about the breed.

They have changed a lot. Now you have more breeders and there is greater diversity. The quality is not much better today than when we started, a lot of Saluki have lost their oriental expressions. They have become heavier and some have lost their elegance. You can see a lot of heavy heads and bad pigmentation. Also, breeding has changed a lot today. You can breed


. MEET THE BREED: SALUKI .

with every male in the world through frozen semen, 20 years ago it was nearly unknown. On the World Wide Web today you see much more Salukis, the presentation has changed today as you have professional handlers.

Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Saluki?

What is your proudest achievement in the world of Salukis?

Who is your personal most successful dog?

Arif from Barbara‘s first litter became youth world winner 2002 in Amsterdam, our first big win. Phil winning Supreme Donaueschingen winner 2018 still gives me goosebumps. With our famous E litter breeding group, we won 4 times in a row in Donaueschingen. Eshendi winning Veteran World Winner in Budapest or Arif and Baghdad Ms Congeniality both winning veteran vice world winner in Bratislava are some of the other achievements we are so proud of. I love our veteran breeding group and progeny group wins most. What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at Saluki? I would say head, oriental expression and elegance. 104

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For us, the ideal Saluki is the “Jen Araby” Type. An ideal Saluki has to have a good character.

Most successful show dogs we had were Multi BIS Ch. Arif Yalameh,Multi BIS Ch. Yalameh Phil, Multi BIS Ch. Yalameh Eshendi, Multi Ch. Yalameh Enya Samira. Successful stud dogs for sure were Multi BIS Ch. Arif Yalam and Multi Ch. Elamir Sao Pedro. Litterbox wise Multi Ch. Baghdad Ms Congeniality and her offspring Multi Ch. Yalameh Chakira and Multi Ch. Yalameh LuLu Mumbai. What is your most favorite show to attend, anywhere in the world and why? It is definitely Donaueschingen. This show is one of the biggest sight hound events in Europe, here you see the most Saluki’s in one place. You also see many Saluki at the World Winner Show’s but these shows are so hectic. At Donaueschingen you can share your passion over 2 days with passionate Saluki lovers from all over Europe. It’s


. MEET THE BREED: SALUKI .

fun as we see a lot of our own breeding and the judges are specialists in this breed. Which breeder do you respect most, anywhere in the world?

We prefer to show at specialties, to enjoy it and have fun. All breed shows are often so hectic and the judges are often all breed judges.

I would say Baghdad Salukis and Mrs. Paula Bockman.

The purpose of dog showing was (and should still be) to evaluate and “show off” breeding stock, do you think for some breeders/owners it is becoming more about ribbons and rankings?

Please name three Salukis that you wished you owned/bred. These can be any dogs in any point of history.

Yes, unfortunately that has changed a lot over the last years. The purpose of breeding is showing your dogs.

Those would be Baghdad Globetrotter, Afking Baghdad’s Crimson Gazelle, Jan Araby Jurwadi Bey. My fourth one would be Baghdad Talk Of The Town.

What are your future goals/wishes in the sport of pedigree dogs?

Would you rather show at specialties or all breed shows? Please give reasons for your preference.

I hope we can attend them for a long time more, with successful and healthy Salukis.

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ROBIN PUNSALAN art

by Lee Grogan

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. ROBIN PUNSALAN ART .

That was a litter (Sugar x Hap) that included Ch. Sahiba’s Sudden Snow ‘Tinkerbelle’ (Dam of Ch. Camri Black and Tan Rebellion) and BIS Ch. Sahiba’s Battle Cry. Holding these new babies as they were brought into this world was the best classroom.

Thank you Robin for agreeing to this interview. You are one of the kindest, sweetest, insightful and talented people I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. Please share with our readers an insight into Robin Punsalan. How did you get involved with Afghan Hounds and the world of Pedigree dog showing? My mother, Carol Ness (Sahiba) got her first Afghan Hound puppy in 1967 while we were living in Northern California. ‘Pharaoh’ was a black mask red from Reigh Abram (Dureigh). Shortly after, was Ch. Sugar Plum Fairy from Betty Richards who would later be bred to ‘Hap’ Ch. Mecca’s Falstaff and on from there. By then, we had moved to Cleveland, Ohio. So I was fortunate to grow up in the era of the 70s, 80s of great representations of our breed, and great breeders. Many, besides our own captured me in my youth. When not at shows but leafing through publications, Our Afghans and The Afghan Hound Review. I was in junior handling but my most experience showing was in the breed ring with our dogs and handling for others. That was up until after high school as I had moved to NYC working in theater and dance. Often I’d come home to Ohio and attend a show handling for my mother.

Can you remember how you first got interested in art? A: My father was the artist. He was a professional oil painter, creative director in advertising and photographer. He shot cover ads for friends in The Afghan Hound Review. One including the 1978 cover of ‘Razzle’ Ch. Zuvenda Renegade of Esfahan for Karen Wagner. So, creativity was just natural to me. I was drawing Afghans everywhere, even in the Phone Book Yellow Pages (If that isn’t dating me, I don’t know what is.) while my mom was at the kitchen table on the phone for hours talking breeding options. How would you describe your style of art? I don’t know what my ‘style is and I experiment with many. It’s about expression and the heart and love to these dogs who surrounded me at home. So, it’s intuitive. I don’t think about the mechanics, and I’m not a trained artist as my profession was performance art. So the art is self

Can you please share some memories of your family Afghan Hounds. There are funny family memories with the dogs, as this is a family sport. One memory that I hold closest to my heart is when I was 8 years old getting ready for school. I walked downstairs and my Mother informed me that I didn’t have to go to school that day as I would help her whelp a litter. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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tables only to prefer sitting on the floor like I did as a child with my coloring book. Once I created a logo while sitting in bed watching ‘Crazy Rich Asians’. What is your favorite medium to work with and what have you worked with?

taught. In the beginning they were wispy and extreme.But painting an abstract artsy Afghan is separate from looking at a sound dog, good movement and correct structure. I prefer moving dogs, being a former professional performer and dancer. It’s sensitivity to balance, energy and line. Picasso, Pollock, Dali and others (cubism , abstract expressionism, surrealism etc) had to study a still life and paint the realism of an apple or loaf of bred before they created the ‘far out’ stuff they were known for by the masses. So I grew up as the daughter of a breeder, with classic books filled with illustrations of correct anatomy, structure. My mom drilled it into me. All those books of hers are still beside me on our bookshelves. A favorite is The Dog in Action : A Study of Anatomy and Locomotion as Applying to All Breeds by McDowell Lyon. Where and how do you like to work? At the easel in the studio. I’ve had many drafting 110

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Oils. In the beginning it was anything, then I fell in love with gouache. Many think some are watercolor, which I use on occasion. But I use black gouache, watered down then swift movement strokes and may apply splashes of color. So if I want a quick high energy sense of freedoms in movement (as with the portrait of ‘Wally’ (Ch. Thaon’s Wallstreet) in only black gouache) that’s my favorite medium for that effect. But since I started large oils, not just of dogs, but abstract florals... being in front of the canvas for hours over months is the most intoxicating result. The richness of the medium, the work involved ... nothing else compares. How do you name your paintings? Music is key while I’m painting. The energy and feel comes through the brush, how I’m feeling and then go from there. So many times just the line of a song will be that name as I was listening to the song at that time. Or it could be a sentence in beautiful prose I’ve read. It’s funny, because someone sent me a photo of a painting I did many years ago. I opened an email to read ‘Remember this? ‘Infatuation Junkie’ hangs in my home and I cherish it.’ It was a pretty black and silver bitch out of my head. Most my work is from my mind not a photo, I should add . I giggled as I remembered that I was listening to Alanis Morisette at the time. If it’s a portrait of someone’s actual dog, then it’s titled by the name of the dog. I am sure the time you spend on creating art differs. Do you find yourself coming back to a canvas


. ROBIN PUNSALAN ART .

after some time or are you committed to finishing something before starting on something new? Breaks are necessary and finding the balance. I have other commitments that bring me as much joy and part of who I am besides the art. First and foremost, I’m serving myself before others as it’s an intimate relationship with myself and what I create. We all need to do that and keep those healthy boundaries in place, whether it’s personal relationships or the relationship you have with your craft, your sport. From there we create the best work. With the oils, some take months so I rotate between pieces. While one may come out ‘boom, and we’re done’ some may take a year until I feel it’s finished. What other artists work do you admire. These can be from anywhere in the world or any point in history? So many and they change over the years. Off the top of my head ... Lautrec, Joe Eula and Kenneth Paul Block ( Fashion Illustration) Pollock, Rothko, O’Keeffe, Francis Bacon, Manet, Basquiat, Camille Claudel (sculpture), Louise Bourgeois, Deborah Turbeville and Sally Mann (Photography)

Besides Afghans, I’ve worked with Salukis, Ibizans Hounds, Azawakh, Poodles and Chinese Cresteds. I’m starting to do more Dachshund art now that they are my breed. I’d also love to do Scottish Deerhounds, Tibetan Mastiffs, Shiba Inus, Belgian Shepard Terv, Leonbergers, Borzoi (which has always been the toughest for me and irks me to no end as I’ve been in love with this breed since I was a child. What interests do you have outside of painting and the dog world? Figure skating and just began instructing. I’m working toward competing again as an adult skater. Just started sculpting which I love and studying it at the Cleveland Institute of Art. My first sculpture was an Afghan Hound bust which was chosen to be in a gallery exhibit. What is the best way for people to contact you and to see more of your art? Best way to contact me is email - RPunsalan77@ gmail.com ... To view the art, I have a business page on Facebook ‘Robin Punsalan Art’

Are you currently showing any dogs at the moment? Yes, I just returned to the ring after years away. Now in Dachshunds. We have two standard smooths who are litter mates. I’ve recently joined the Central Ohio Dachshund Club as a member. Do you judge and if not would you like to some day? Just recently I have given it more serious thought as I’ve been approached to do so. I’d like to, yes. Are you painting anything exciting at the moment? Yes! It’s a secret for now. (wink) Are there any particular dogs/ dog breeds you would like to paint in the future?

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4 Summer night shows

SPL I T 2021 by Tommaso Urciolo



SPLIT SUMMER SHOWS C R O A T I A

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. RINGSIDE CLICK .

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GALAKSI ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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BOTTOM SHAKER THE GREATEST PICTURE

BREED. AMERICAN COCKER SPANIEL

BREED. PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDEEN

BREED. OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG

OWNER. MICHAEL KRISTENSEN (DK)

OWNER. IVA RAIC (HR)

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BOTTOM SHAKER THE GREATEST PICTURE

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PLUMERIA’S SEVEN SEAS

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LOS CHATOS DEL NORTE SET FIRE TO THE RAIN

BREED. OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG

BREED. BEDLINGTON TERRIER

BREED. PUG

OWNER. JOZSEF KOROKNAI

OWNER. ALICE VARCHI (IT)

OWNER. JOSE LUIS SANTIAGO PIER

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MERRINDA SPEEDWAY TO MY HEART

BREED. STANDARD POODLE (BLACK)

BREED. WELSH TERRIER

BREED. BORDER COLLIE

OWNER. BARRIE DREWITT-BARLOW &

OWNER. FRIEDRICH-WILHELM

OWNER. LARA SEGHEZZI (IT)

JOSE TUCUPITA TERÁN (US)

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HELVÉCIA-VADÁSZ GYÖMBÉR

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BREED. HUNGARIAN VIZSLA

BREED. AUSTRALIAN TERRIER

BREED. PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDEEN

OWNER. VÁCZI DOROTTYA

OWNER. SAIJA REIMAN-WALLDÉN

OWNER. IVA RAIC (HR)

MARTINA GRANDQUIST (SE)

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SUPREME BABY & PUPPY BEST IN SHOW NAME. TAI FANZA EAST TO WEST BREED. LHASA APSO OWNER. KUDIRKIENE LAURYNA (LT)

SUPREME VETERAN BEST IN SHOW NAME. KONEK GORBUNOK OF SIBERIAN COUNTRY BREED. SIBERIAN HUSKY OWNER. LAURENE FLENGHI (FR)

SUPREME CROATIAN BREEDS BEST IN SHOW

NAME. RUNNING SPOT’S DANCING BOB BREED. DALMATIAN DOG OWNER. AGNES BIGLARNIA (SE)

SUPREME JUNIOR BEST IN SHOW NAME. ARIKO KOYU CATASTROPHUS BREED. JACK RUSSELL TERRIER OWNER. STEFANO SERAFINI (IT)

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BOTTOM SHAKER The Greatest Picture

supreme Best in Show





INTERVIEW WITH JUNIOR HANDLER

BALINT Korozs Andras Dear Balint, it is a pleasure to have an interview with such a young and successful Junior Handler. You were born into a dog family. Please tell us about your beginning and how your parents influenced you in becoming a Junior Handler. Thank you very much for inviting me to interview, I am very happy to. Indeed, I was born into this world thanks to my parents. I have been travelling the world with them since I was a child and have attended many major dog shows. It was my decision to begin entering junior handler competitions. Do you remember your first competition? My first competition, if I remember correctly, was at a show abroad. I entered with a Shetland Sheepdog and won the younger age group. I won and I was first in the overall competition as well. It is a very beautiful and defining memory for me.


grooming of our breeds includes regular bathing, which I also do at home on my own. What is the most important thing that attracts you to shows? It is important to me to show all dogs handled by me perfectly, even if it doesn’t always mean maximum results. I find it very inspiring that besides myself, our dogs enjoy the shows too and that attracts me to shows. Is the Kennel Club in your country involved in Junior Handling? Do they work with youngsters? In what way are they improving Juniors education? Who is your greatest inspiration when it comes to showing dogs? I follow the work of several professional handlers. My role models are handlers who, in addition to having big wins, appreciate smaller results and behave with dignity and respect, even if they do not win. Which win do you consider your greatest Junior Handling win so far? For me, the European Dog Show in Warsaw is memorable. At this show I managed to get to Sunday’s final out of more than 90 Junior Handlers entered. I must mention my recent achievement in Split where, as the only boy I managed to gain the title of Supreme Junior Handler during my 3 days of competing. How do you feel about grooming? Your parents have Wire Fox Terriers and Sheepdogs, it takes time to work with dogs like that and to prepare them at home and at the show. I consider myself very fortunate that through my parents I also have an insight into the show training of several long-haired breeds. I independently train some of our dogs not only for my competitions, but also for shows. The 130

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The Hungarian Kennel Club has its own Junior Handling Club. Training days and summer camps for junior handlers are organized. This is a very good team. The number of competitors in junior handling has been increasing in recent years. Do you have a funny memory of something that happened to you as a handler? My favorite Aussie embarrassed me at two consecutive European shows, in Warsaw and Wels. Even though I walked with him a lot before the judging (to relieve my own show stress as well) both times he did his number two in the ring. What is your favorite breed to show and what is your favorite breed to have at home? Fox terriers and Aussies are my favorite breeds. We also breed them, and I am happy to handle them. I really like their individuality and the temperament of these breeds. Are you considering being a breeder or judge one day? The thought that I would one day be a breeder and a judge and follow in the footsteps of my parents had already occurred to me.


People usually have 2 opposite opinions, such as: “Junior handlers should prepare and compete with their own dogs” and “Junior handling is about trying new breeds and they shouldn’t compete with the same dog all the time”. Which opinion do you agree more with, or is there truth in both opinions? I am active in both competition modes. I show my own dogs, but I also show my friends dogs frequently. I think both perceptions fit side by side in the world of competing. Have you had the opportunity to be a show assistant? If not, would you like to become one and who would you like to work with? I do not work as an assistant, but I have been working with my girlfriend, Csenge, at shows for a long time.

Would you like to continue with this job or do you have other plans? I am currently in high school, but my long-term plans include active participation in dog life. What do you like more: training, grooming and preparing dogs for shows, or do you enjoy more just showing them? All parts are very important, but we can see the results of our work at the show. Q: Is there any show you that have never attended but you would love to in the future? If the covid epidemic ends, I would be very happy to attend the Australian Shepherd National Speciality in the USA.


. INTERVIEW WITH JUNIOR HANDLER .

Were there any special dogs for you that you had a special bond and connection with? What made them so special? Several of my own dogs are an important part of my life. One of my favorites is an Australian Shepherd, Silver Dream Aussie’s Zoella. She was the first dog that I trained since she was a puppy. In 2019 she became Junior European Winner in huge competition in Warsaw with me handling. I already have my own breeding ideas for this dog. How do you make time for school and shows? Is it hard to organize everything? Are you a good student? This is a difficult question. As I am a good student, they allow me to be absent from time to time. I had to learn to prioritize and only be absent from school in the most important circumstances.

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What is the difference between the junior handling winner and the 2nd place? If I am in a strong competition, the 2nd place is also a great glory, but still winning is the real thing. ;) Is there any advice you would like to give to newcomers, not only those competing in Junior Handling but also to Junior Handling judges? I have experienced in recent years that there are fewer boy Junior Handling competitors. I would encourage boys to take part in the competition as well. My wish for Junior Handling judges is to be properly prepared for the judging assignment, and to help the development of our sport with their decisions. I think our most important task is to educate the next generation for the canine world.





TRAVEL tips

BR NO , C Z E C H R E PU BL IC WO R L D D O G SH OW SP E C I A L by Alexa Matelova



. TRAVEL TIPS: BRNO .

HOTELS.

BARCELÓ.

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT.

This 4 star hotel offers you a pleasant stay in luxurious rooms for very affordable prices. Polite staff are ready to help you 24/7. The fitness center is open the whole day, the hotel is situated about 1.5 km from the city center and is surrounded by greenery. The hotel restaurant Yard Lounge & Dining serves international cuisine alongside local specialties. The restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. A big benefit for dog show exhibitors is the price for a dog/night.. It’s only 200 CZK per night! OREA RESORT SANTON.

Located in the heart of the city on Silingrovo Square in a prestigious historical building. Guests can enjoy free access to a sauna, relax zone and a modern fitness center. The unique bedrooms provide a peaceful night’s rest. The á la carte Palazzo Restaurant serves a combination of Mediterranean and Czech cuisine. You can definitely enjoy an unforgettable stay in this 5 star hotel! Price for a dog per night is 35 euros. BEST WESTERN PREMIER HOTEL. The Best Western Premier Hotel is centrally situated right bellow Špilberk Castle in the city center. The two restaurants serve international as well as Czech-Moravian cuisine. It also offers fitness center and garage. Price for a dog per night is 600 CZK.

Situated in the recreational area of Brno Dam, 10 kilometers from the city center, the Orea Resort Santon offers rooms with a balcony overlooking the lake or the courtyard. It Includes a wellness center with a relaxation pool, a steam room, a Finnish sauna and aroma saunas. Price for a dog per night is 400 CZK.

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HOTEL VISTA. The non-smoking hotel Vista in Brno-Medlánky is a 10-minute ride from the city center. It offers modern rooms, free secured parking and Asianstyle wellness sauna. It’s only 15 minutes away from the Brno BVV fairgrounds.


. TRAVEL TIPS: BRNO .

RESTAURANTS.

MID-RANGE

CHEAP EATS

PEGAS.

GO BRNO.

If you want to enjoy the traditional Czech cuisine, you must visit restaurant Pegas. Their menu is full of yummy Czech food for affordable prices, and as a bonus they have their own brewery so you can enjoy delicious Czech beer! MONTE BU RESTAURANT.

Do you like Vietnamese classics such as Pho? Or perhaps a colorful bowl full of rice noodles with roasted beef Bun Bo Nam Bo? Experience Vietnamese culture with our favorite recipe’s. This restaurant is also a great choice for vegetarians and vegans, and is situated on Freedom Square. BISTRO BASTARDO. First Mexican bistro in Brno where you can try authentic tacos, quesadillas or burritos made by a chef who was born in Mexico-City! Bistro Bastardo is also situated on Freedom Square. POE POE.

Want Italian and American cuisine in one place?! This very cheap menu offers pizzas, Italian tomato soup, lasagna, hotdogs, fries, waffles, pancakes and smoothies! All made from the highest quality ingredients.

This is definitely a great place to enjoy steaks. Taste the best beef from Czech and foreign breeds, chosen specialties of American and South American cuisine and exclusive rums from all over the world. You can also order takeaway on their website monte-bu.cz MORI RESTAURANT.

Affordable Japanese restaurant that uses only fresh ingredients and high-quality material to ensure your experience there is memorable, delectable and enjoyable. Their specialty is sake salad, made with raw salmon, cucumber, wasabikko and Japanese mayonnaise. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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. TRAVEL TIPS: BRNO .

FINE DINING

VITTARIO.

THINGS TO DO

A modern dog-friendly restaurant with cozy terrace. Their food (Mediterranean cuisine) is all from fresh ingredients and very innovative! If you want to try their degustation menu, you have several to choose from. Prices are reasonable for such great quality food.

Need some time to relax after an exhausting show? Visit Maximus resort and their Infinit Maximus Wellness and Spa Center! Featuring a range of aquatic and wellness options including the Infinit thermal pools and ‘Sauna World’. Offering massages, swimming pool, hot tub, steam bath, Kneipp bath and an outdoor cooling pool all under one roof. (some available at a surcharge).

PAVILLON STEAK HOUSE.

VILLA TUGENDHAT.

This unique restaurant offers you an unforgettable culinary experience. They have a huge selection of steaks, burgers and fish, or you can enjoy a taste of everything and try their 7-course menu paired with wine from the Moravian region. ATELIER BISTRO & BAR.

An informal and friendly bistro and bar combined into one fun venue. They offer a frequently changing menu and provide tasty food from simple ingredients. The bar has a great selection of spirits, but can also prepare unforgettable cocktails especially for you. 140

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Visit this modernist landmark! It’s an outstanding example of international architectural style that flourished in 1920’s Europe. It’s designed by the architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and is the only example of modern architecture in the Czech Republic inscribed in the list of UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It’s open daily, except Monday from 10.00 to 18.00. To visit the interiors, it’s necessary to purchase a ticket in advance. VIDA! SCIENCE CENTER.

Near the Brno trade fair complex, playful explorers of all ages will find almost 200 interactive exhibits over an area of nearly 6200 square meters. It will provide a better understanding of the world around us! It’s open every day.


MORAVIAN KARST & CAVES. Famous for its cool air and stunning caverns, the Moravian Karst and Caves (Moravský kras) are a mustvisit when in Brno. Located 25 kilometers northeast of Brno, the Karst area covers some 100 square kilometers and contains more than 1,000. known caves and gorges. Five of which are open to the public for self-guided tours (trails are clearly marked, indicating their level of difficulty). For the truly adventurous, a number of less-traveled caverns can be visited with a qualified spelunker as a guide.

SIGHTSEEING Fun things to do in Brno include wandering around the many delightful public spaces, in particular the historic Zelný trh square,located in the oldest part of the city. Popular for its markets, cafes, restaurants, and boutique shops and galleries. Other notable public spaces that are pleasant to visit while away include the city’s largest park, Lužánky. The university’s arboretum and the area around the Brno Reservoir, which includes fun things to do such as swimming or skating is also a must see. Finally, historians will want to visit the grounds of the nearby Peace Memorial, located on the site of the Battle of Austerlitz, where a decisive confrontation between Napoleon and a combined Russian and Austrian army took place. Perched atop Petrov Hill in the very heart of Brno, the Cathedral of St. Peter and Paul is hard to miss. Considered to be one of the most important

Czech cultural monuments, this imposing Catholic cathedral remains one of the city’s most important attractions due to its splendid architecture. Highlights include the exquisite Baroque interior, as well as the 84-meter-tall twin towers that were added at the start of the 20th century (the main part of the building dates from the mid-1700s). Dating from the 13th century, Špilberk Castle (hrad Špilberk) was built on a commanding hill by Czech King Pøemysl Otakar II. It has served many roles over the years, including those of royal castle, fortress, and prison. Today, the castle is home to the Brno City Museum, established in 1904 and home to many excellent permanent (and frequent temporary) exhibitions. Permanent exhibits focus on the architectural history of the castle and its role as a prison, as well as the history of Brno. BEST IN SHOW MAGAZINE

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The Dog Breeders community has an appointment in Brazil! Get ready to the FCI’s World Dog Show 2022! #savethedate December 8-11, 2022 at Expo Center Norte, São Paulo.

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